377 people have looked at my Posting below but have not had one single comment or reply. I'm wondering if I have posted it incorrectly or can any reader not get on to discuss any links. Can you help in any way? Thank you CLANBOB :: FamilyTreeCircles.com Genealogy
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377 people have looked at my Posting below but have not had one single comment or reply. I'm wondering if I have posted it incorrectly or can any reader not get on to discuss any links. Can you help in any way? Thank you CLANBOB

Question by CLANBOB

HAY FAMILIES OF BELOW.
Journal by CLANBOB Owner Edit Favorite
Doing research on my Paternal line of Williams and Roberts Hay back to about 1800 to present covering East Dunbartonshire, Clydebank, Anderston, Hutchesontown, Calton, Bridgeton.
Wives' maiden names, Miller,Lees, McCulloch, Galbraith, Clark, Kiltie and have lots of Certificates etc on them,
but having a problem with William Hay and Agnes Miller parents of Agnes Hay b. 1796 and William Hay b. 1805 both born Canniesburn East Dunbartonshire

Also have a lot of info on Adam Carter Hay born 1861 in Anderston died 1936 in Glasgow and was Managing Director of R & J Dick's Balata Works in Bridgeton Glasgow.
Wives' surnames Henderson, Todd, Campbell.
Surnames: CAMPBELL GALBRAITH GILLON HAY HENDERSON LEE. LEWIS MILLER TODD
Viewed: 377 times Owner Edit
by CLANBOB Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2018-09-22 09:28:35
CLANBOB has been a Family Tree Circles member since Aug 2016.

Viewed: 232 times
by CLANBOB Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2018-11-27 04:14:37

CLANBOB has been a Family Tree Circles member since Aug 2016.

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Answers

by charlie19 on 2018-11-27 20:07:17

These notations may assist you - Chas '

Hay Surname Definition:
A considerable number of OHG. words were introduced into Gallo-Roman speech between the eighth and tenth centuries. Among the words then introduced was haga, which we find in the Capitularies of Charles the Bald (823—877) spelled haia, the modern French hale, a hedge.

Read More About This Surname

Hay Surname Distribution
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Leaflet | Population data © Forebears
World
Nations
2014
By incidence
Fullscreen
2014
1901
1881
1880
Place Incidence Frequency Rank in Area
Cambodia 31,772 1:487 120
United States 23,577 1:15,322 1,914
Australia 8,980 1:2,647 350
England 8,631 1:6,442 916
Myanmar 7,680 1:6,763 238
Scotland 7,482 1:716 92
Canada 6,521 1:5,643 824
Pakistan 5,807 1:30,039 1,496
France 3,744 1:17,764 1,950
New Zealand 3,057 1:1,481 175
SHOW ALL NATIONS
Hay Surname Meaning
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Descriptive Writing introductory reference
A considerable number of OHG. words were introduced into Gallo-Roman speech between the eighth and tenth centuries. Among the words then introduced was haga, which we find in the Capitularies of Charles the Bald (823—877) spelled haia, the modern French hale, a hedge. By the middle of the eleventh century or earlier the word had entered into the name of a place in the arrondissement of Coutance-La Have du Puits, and so gave name to a family de la Haye. The first of the name in Scotland was probably William de Haya who obtained the lands of Herrol (Errol) in Gowrie from William the Lion c. 1178—82 (SCM., II, p. 303), and is in record as witnessing charters by Malcolm IV after 1160 and others by William the Lion c. 1170—1200 (REM., 5; LAC., p. 1; and elsewhere). In one of the charters of Malcolm he is styled pincerna or cup-bearer to the king. Another William de Haia, a churchman, clerk to Gilbert, earl of Strathern, is in record c. 1206—11 (LIM., XXV; RAA., I, 86). David de Haya was vicecomes of Forfar c. 1200—14 (RAA., I, 64). Thomas de Haya made a gift to the Hospital of Soltre c. 1202—38 (Soltre, p. 15). John de Haye witnessed a confirmation charter by Alexander II dated at Muschelbracht, 1228 (RMP., p. 215), and with Thomas de Haya witnessed a charter of the earldom of Levenax to Maldouen in the same year (Levenax, p. 2). Edmund de la Haye and Thomas de la Haye of Perthshire and Huwe de la Haye of Fife rendered homage, 1296 (Bain, II, p. 204). Thomas de Hay, lord of Lochorwirt, was a charter witness c. 1300—20 (Hay, p. 6). Of William Hay, Constable, slain at Dupplin, 1332, Boece tells us that his race would nave been extinguished had not his wife been pregnant, "an old fable often repeated in our histories" says Lord Hailes (Annals, II, p. 187). Hugo dictus Haiy held land in Ayr before 1320 (RMS., I, 43), and Thomas de Hay was one of the hostages for ransom of King David II, 1363 (Bain, IV, 81).

— The Surnames of Scotland (1946) by George Fraser Black (1866-1948)
Or De la Haye. Richard, surnamed Turstin Halduc, the first known ancestor of this family, was probably a younger son of Turstin de Bastembourg, ancestor of the Bertrams (see Mitford), as might be inferred from several reasons. He in 1056 with Eudo his son founded Essay Abbey, Normandy, endowing it with vast and princely possessions (Gall. Christ. xi. 224 instr.). Eudo accompanied the Conqueror. He is mentioned by Wace as the ‘Sire de la Haie,’ and in 1086 was a great baron in England (Domesd.). His d. and heir m. Geoffry de Mandeville, Earl of Essex, Seneschal of Normandy in her right (Dugd. Bar. 110). Eudo had a brother Ralph, Dapifer or Seneschal to Robert Earl of Mortaine. In 1086 Ralph Dapifer held in capite in Lincoln, and from the Earl of Mortaine and Earl Alan in Northants (Domesd.). He accompanied Duke Robert to Palestine, 1096 (Des Bois). In 1105 Robert de Ilaia his son as heir confirmed the charter of Turstin Halduc and Eudo (Gall. Christ. xi. 227, Instr.); and 1105 as Robert de Haia, ‘son of Ralph the Seneschal of the E. of Mortaine’ and nephew of Hudo (Eudo) Dapifer, granted Boxgrove to Essay Abbey (Ib. 233). The confirmation charter of Henry I., 1126, recites the gifts of Turstin, Eudo, and the confirmation by Robert de Haia and his sons Richard and Ralph (Ib. 234), also the grants of Richard de Haia in Britville, Normandy (Ib. 235). Robert had issue, 1, Richard de la Haye, whose barony in Lincoln was of twenty fees, 1165, and who left coheiresses; 2, Ralph, who held a Norman barony 1165; 3, William. The latter held fiefs in Hereford, Devon, and Worcester, 1165, and held the office of Pincerna or Butler of Scotland (Douglas). From his eldest son descended the Earls of Errol, and from his younger the Marquises of Tweeddale. Many other branches of De la Hay existed in England and Scotland.

— The Norman People (1874)
Anglo-Saxon haeg, French haie, a hedge, and that which it encloses-a field or park. The map of Normandy shows many localities called La Haie, and from one of these, doubtless, came, in early Norman times, if not actually at the Conquest, the family once eminent in England and still so in Scotland. The name was written De Haia and De la Hay. King Henry I. gave to Robert de Haia the lordship of Halnaker, co. Sussex, and so early as the close of the XII. cent. William de H. passed into Scotland and held the office of pincerna regis or king's butler, temp. William the Lion. From his two sons descend Hay, marquis of Tweeddale, and Hay, earl of Errol, hereditary lord high constable of Scotland. These are well-ascertained facts, but tradition assigns a different origin both to name and family. It asserts that in 980 a yeoman called John de Luz and his two sons by their prowess reinvigorated the army of Kenneth III., when they were on the point of succumbing to the Danes. They took the yokes from the oxen with which they were ploughing, and so belaboured the invaders as to drive them from the field, amidst shouts of Say! Say! The king in reward for these services gave the yeoman as much land as a falcon could fly round (the lands of Loncarty near Fife), and in memory of the event the family adopted a falcon for their crest, two husbandmen with ox-yokes for their supporters, and Hay for their surname.

— Patronymica Britannica, written: 1838-1860 by Mark Antony Lower
A hedge, an inclosure, to inclose, fence in, a protection, a place of safety. In Dutch, Haag; Saxon, Hege; German, Heck; Danish, Hekkee; Swedish, Hagn; French, Haie; Welsh, Cae; Gaelic, Ca; Cornish-British, Hoy.

"In the reign of Kenneth III. (says Douglass), about 980, the Danes having invaded Scotland, were encountered by that king, near Loncarty, in Perthshire. The Scots at first gave way, and fled through a narrow pass, where they were stopped by a countryman of great strength and courage, and his two sons, with no other weapons than the yokes of their plows. Upbraiding the fugitives for their cowardice, he succeeded in rallying them; the battle was renewed, and the Danes totally discomfited. It is said, that after the victory was obtained, the old man, lying on the ground wounded and fatigued, cried 'Say, Say, which word became the surname of his posterity. The king, as a reward for that signal service, gave him as much land in the Carse of Gowrie as a falcon should fly over before it settled; and a falcon being accordingly let off, flew over an extent of ground six miles in length, afterward called Errol, and lighted on a stone still called Falconstone or Hawkstone."

— An Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names (1857) by William Arthur
In the reign of Kenneth II, about 980, the Danes having invaded Scotland, were encountered by that king near Loncarty in Perthshire; the Scots at first gave way and fled through a narrow pass where they were stopped by a countryman of great strength and courage, and his two sons, with no other weapons than the yokes of their ploughs, upbraiding the fugitives for their cowardice, he succeeded in rallying them, and the battle being renewed, the Danes were defeated. After the victory was obtained, the old man lying on the ground, wounded and fatigued, cried "Hay, hay," which word became the surname of his posterity, and the king, as a reward for his signal service, gave him as much land in the Carse of Gowrie, as a falcon should fly over before it settled, and a falcon being accordingly let off, flew over an extent of ground six miles in length, afterwards called Errol, and lighted on a stone, still called Falcon stone; the king also assigned three shields or escutcheons for the arms of the family, to intimate that the father and his two sons had been the three fortunate shields of Scotland.

— The Origin and Signification of Scottish Surnames (1862) by Clifford Stanley Sims (1839-1896)
This surname is derived from a geographical locality. 'at the hay,' i.e. the haw or hedge, an enclosure; compare Hayward or Haward, a hedge-ward; v. Haig and Hawe. The popular form in the North of England was Haig, Haigh, and Hague.

'But right so as these holtes, and these haves, That have in winter dead been and dry.': Chaucer.

Eborard de de Heys. Norfolk, 1273. Hundred Rolls.

John del Heys, Norfolk, ibid.

Nicholas de la Hay, Lincolnshire, ibid.

Robert in the Hay, Close Roll, 18 Richard II.

Ricardus del Haye, 1379: Poll Tax of Yorkshire.

Petrus del Hay, 1379: ibid.

Cecilia de la Hay, Somerset, Edward III: Kirby's Quest.

William atte Haye. Placitorum in domo capitulari Westmonasteriensi.

— A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames, written: 1872-

by charlie19 on 2018-11-27 20:26:56

Here is some listings from my research to assist you - i think this is a different result ( re spouse ) in the descendantcy - + very possible -Chas'

father -William Hay -1792 -1852 Dumbarton , Scotland
mother -Anne McNicol -1793 - 1886 - Renfrewshire , Scotland

G Father - John Hay -b - 1756 - ? -Dumbarton
G Mother - Agnes Calder -b-1759 - " " ( children _ 6 boys + 7 girls

GGF _Robert Hay -1720 -? - Dumbarton
GGM - Margaret Nisbet -1726-? Lanarkshire , Scotland -( 3 boys + 4 girls )

GGGF - John Hay -1684 - ? - Dumbarton -
GGGM -Jean Kirkwood -1688-? " " -( 5 boys - + 2 girls )

by CLANBOB on 2018-11-27 22:26:36

Thank you Charlie for that encyclopaedic reply. I will research further from what you have supplied and the fact that you alone out of 378 'viewers' of my Post has relied is odd in itself. Maybe you have opened some link I was unaware of.
Thank you
Bob.

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