Anyone can be a Genealogist !!! :: FamilyTreeCircles.com Genealogy
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Anyone can be a Genealogist !!!

Journal by janilye

Anyone can be a genealogist!

These days it seems, to call yourself a genealogist, all you have to do is learn to spell 'genealogist', or find an old photo of your grandfather when you moved the fridge.

If you're thinking of hiring a 'genealogist' note that Certification and accreditation are not a requirement for genealogists who wish to accept clients.

Of course certification or accreditation does help you to know that these individuals have had their competence as genealogical researchers thoroughly tested by their peers and not just any individual who knows how to find the Mormons Family Search on the internet. Which is the first online site we all find during our first steps into trying to find where the rellies all hailed from.

Professional Genealogist: - This title generally applies to any genealogist with knowledge and experience of proper genealogical research methods and techniques, and who supports and upholds high standards in the field of genealogy. People who call themselves professional genealogists are usually either certified or very experienced, but this is not always the case. Anyone can use the title "professional," so be sure to inquire about their education, experience, and references.

Do you think that the genealogical profession is one that you will enjoy? Follow these simple steps to see if you have the necessary skill, experience, and expertise to offer your services to others on a fee basis.

Below I've added some tips by Kimberly Powell for those thinking they may be able to earn a bit of extra change in the field of genealogy.

How To Become a Professional Genealogist

By Kimberly Powell, source- About.com Guide

HERE'S HOW::

1. Read and follow the code of ethics of the Association of Professional Genealogists and the Board for Certification of Genealogists.

2.Consider your experience. A genealogist must be familiar with the various types of genealogical records available and know where to access them, as well as know how to analyze and interpret evidence. If you are unsure about your qualifications, enlist the services of a professional genealogist to critique your work and offer guidance.

3. Consider your writing skills. You must be knowledgeable of the proper format for source citations and have good grammar and writing skills in order to communicate your findings to clients. Practice your writing constantly. Once you have it polished, submit an article or case study for possible publication in a local genealogical society newsletter/journal or other genealogical publication.

4. Join the Association of Professional Genealogists. This society exists not only for practicing genealogists, but also for people who desire to further their skills.

5. Educate yourself by taking genealogy classes, attending seminars and workshops, and reading genealogical magazines, journals, and books. No matter how much you know, there is always more to learn.

6. Volunteer with a local genealogical society, library or group. This will keep you in touch with a network of fellow genealogists, and help to further develop your skills. If you have the time, start or join a transcribing or indexing project for additional practice at reading genealogical documents.

7. Make a list of your goals as a professional genealogist. Think about what types of research interests you, the access you have to necessary resources and the profitability of doing research as a business. What do you want to do? Professional genealogists don't all do client research - some are authors, editors, teachers, heir searchers, bookstore owners, adoption specialists and other related fields.

8. Develop your business skills. You cannot run a successful business without knowing about accounting, taxes, advertising, licenses, billing and time management.

9. Get a copy of Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers, and Librarians. This book by Elizabeth Shown Mills is the bible for genealogy professionals and those who want to become professional. It offers advice and instruction on everything from abstracting to setting up a business.

10. Consider applying for certification or accreditation. The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) grants certification in research, as well as in two teaching categories, and the International Commission for the Accreditation of Professional Genealogists offers accreditation in specific geographical areas. Even if you decide not to become certified or accredited, the guidelines offered by these testing programs will help you objectively evaluate your genealogical skills.

If you are in Australia,The Society of Australian Genealogists has a formal course and examination, resulting in a Diploma in Family Historical Studies (Dip. F.H.S.).


Tips:
1.Practice your research skills every chance you get. Visit courthouses, libraries, archives, etc. and explore the records. Get as much experience as you can before working for others.

2.Don't stop researching your own family history. It is most likely the reason you fell in love with genealogy in the first place and will continue to provide inspiration and enjoyment.



Kimberly Powell is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, the National Genealogical Society, the International Society of Family History Writers and Editors, and several local genealogical societies. She has been writing about genealogy for About.com since 2000, and her work has also appeared in several genealogy magazines.

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by janilye Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2011-04-21 18:22:43

janilye - 7th generation, Convict stock. Born in New South Wales now living in Victoria, carrying, with pride 'The Birthstain'.

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Comments

by 1bobbylee on 2011-04-22 17:47:09

Food for thought Jan. What is and would be important for me is to make a lengthy search, when contemplating the services of a professional genealogist. A fair fee to a professional is to be expected. One of my main criteria for hiring a practitioner is not just the fee. But, really how does he express his dependability. If he is speaking to me directly or over the phone, I will be observing how well he speaks. (Speaking Skills.) If he is writing me by mail or by E-Mail, I will notice his correctness in spelling, grammar, compositon, sentence structure (Writing Skills.) If he displays himself poorly in these areas, I will seek services elsewhere. Almost entirely a client is passionate about finding a part of himself in his or her ancestral past. They want the best and will pay the fee if convinced their lengthy search has finally paid off.
They want to be "sold the steak" and "not the sizzle"

by janilye on 2011-04-23 00:43:50

Now I know why I'm not a genealogist. Too much sizzle

by 1bobbylee on 2011-04-26 20:00:09

You write sizzlin journals with the steaks.

by janilye on 2011-04-28 11:39:49

Thanks!

by lisabelle on 2011-04-28 17:26:58

Thank you Jan.I always enjoy reading your Journals.

by janilye on 2011-05-11 18:19:39

SIMILAR Mr.ED? Indeed, I would say the links are exactly the same.

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