ANZAC DAY-THIS POEM SAYS IT ALL! :: FamilyTreeCircles.com Genealogy
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ANZAC DAY-THIS POEM SAYS IT ALL!

Journal by itellya

Surnames: BROWN STUART
Viewed: 624 times
by itellya Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2014-05-13 00:11:51

Itellya is researching local history on the Mornington Peninsula and is willing to help family historians with information about the area between Somerville and Blairgowrie. He has extensive information about Henry Gomm of Somerville, Joseph Porta (Victoria's first bellows manufacturer) and Captain Adams of Rosebud.

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Comments

by itellya on 2015-03-14 23:16:39

LEST WE FORGET.

by Morgan2409 on 2015-03-14 23:51:34

THE SPIRIT OF ANZAC
The following is the prize essay at the Cheltenham school on the above subject, written by Hilda Brown,aged 13:-
The spirit which was displayed by the Australian and New Zealanders at the landing of Gallipoli, is now being shown in France and on the other battle-fronts.
What was it that prompted these men to leave comfort and safety and go forth to face the unknown? Was it to gain honor and praise? No, it was not for this, but for the purpose of defending the rights of humanity, and keeping nations free, from the
tyrant's rule.
Those men who fell at Gallipoli were "the flower of Australia's manhood," They needed no recruiting meeting to tell them what their duty was, for the spirit of patriotism was kindled in their hearts, and to answering the Motherland's bugle-call, they went to the front and joined the ranks of the men who made the supreme sacrifice in order to buy liberty for their country with their own precious life-blood.
These boys did not fear death for they knew that the death that was before them was an honorable one.
They did not mind sacrificing their happiness and leaving their loved ones, for they knew that if they did not act in this way, the enemy would soon be making short work of their homes in their own happy, sunny country.
The spirit of their long-dead ancestors was stirring up their hearts and recalling memories of the deeds of those brave men and women who went to a strange land to face an unknown future, and so unheeding the call of the slacker, to stay behind
end enjoy life, they enlisted and became soldiers of the King.
Moorabbin News 18th May 1918 p.4

Hilda Brown went on to become a School Teacher. Hilda Eveline brown died at Sorrento in 1942, aged 38 years. She was the the daughter of John Brown and Amelia Jane Pearce. She was buried with her parents at Cheltenham Memorial Park

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