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BONEO AND FINGAL IN 1902, MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST. (Cairns,Crichton, Russell, Williams, Patterson etc.)

Journal by itellya

Round Flinders and Kangerong, BY VIATOR. "Blow winds and crack your cheeks," but whether the wind cracked its cheeks or not it certainly did blow on Tuesday, 17th inst., when I started on my ride round. Starting from Dromana and on through Rosebud to Boneo (the proper name of which, by the way, is Boniyong), I found all crops looking very well indeed. At present the only crops showing are oats for hay, and with a fair season there should be a good return. Messrs Cain and the Cairns family--or I should rather say- clan and Crighton, have areas varying from 10 to 50 acres under hay, and the last-named has a considerable area under barley for his cows. About 30 acres of the old house paddock of the Barker's estate are under crop so that the purchasers have not lost much time in commencing operations- The blocks sold are all fenced with wire and netting and there is really good feed on the uncultivated portions. The chief business at Boneo, at present, is the milk. Messrs Crighton, with about 40 cows; Cairns and Russell, 20 cows; Williams, 20 cows; McGillvray, the same, besides Messrs Purves, Cairns and others at Green Hills, make up the greater portion of the cream suppliers to the butter factory at Mornington, and were it not for Boneo, I hear, the factory might have to shut down for want of cream. How is it that the Shoreham people do not produce more milk? I They seem to have every advantage-land that will will grow any kind of crop, ro? or otherwise-and yet they seem to make no provision for winter f g. There must be a .... woeful lack of energy on the part of the young men in that part. To return to our matter, the idea seems to have got abroad that all the Barkers' Estate is sold. This is not so. There are about 500 acres at Boneo unsold and 1500 acres about the homestead and a good part of this is really first class land, quite equal to that on which onions are now being grown, concerning which more later on: ' After passing Boneo, we come to Cairns'- in fact, to several Cairns' and Pattersons'-all of whom have con- siderable areas under crop, and, as in the other cases,all looking well. All things considered, crops looking well, good feed and milk a good price, the prospects for Boneo this season are extremely good. The only drop of bitterness in the cup that I heard of was the ravages of the bot-fly, Mr A. Cairns, senr., having lost a valuable draught mare from this cause. Mr Sherlock was called in, but what the result of his investigations are I have not heard. So much for Boneo . (To be continued.)
(P.2, Mornington Standard, 28-6-1902.)

A BIT EXTRA.
John Cain was the son of Owen Cain who established Tyrone, between Rye and Canterbury Jetty Rd where streets are named after family members (Michael)and maiden names of wives (Murray, Neville). Hill Harry Cairns married the daughter of Michael Cain and his wife (nee Neville.) John Cain owned two crown allotments in Boneo Rd which included the high school site and the historic limestone house just south of Bunnings, in which John's unmarried daughters lived. John also had land fronting Main Creek Rd so he would have passed through Boneo quite often. In earlier days he was the correspondent for the Board of Advice, which looked after the welfare of all the schools within the Kangerong Road District. It is no wonder that Hill Harry became acquainted with a Cain girl.

Donald McGillvray had the land between Little Scotland and the Rosebud Country Club site in 1900.

Edward Williams had land on the north and south side of Browns Rd just east of Truemans Rd. He had a butchers shop in Sorrento but the competition from the H.W.Wilson& Sons must have been too strong and he moved to Eastbourne before 1900 and was looking after the grantee, Sidney Smith Crispo, one of the Peninsula's greatest characters when he died.

THREE YEARS LATER.
The 1902 article mentioned that all the blocks sold on Barkers' were wire netted. The state governmment provided wire netting loans to shire councils so that farmers could protect their farms and the nation. Once a farm was enclosed, the threat within was trapped and could be eliminated. Ten percent of the loan could be repaid each year by the shire but if the farmers didn't pay their ten percent the shire would be short of money for road maintenance. John Cain hadn't been paying his. Firstly, in case you don't know what the threat was:
The rabbit-proof fence was built to protect Western Australian crops and pasture lands from the destructive scourge of the rabbit. Introduced to Australia in Victoria in the 1850s, the pest rapidly spread across eastern Australia. By 1896 it had been found as far west as Eucla and 200 kilometres further west at Twilight Cove, near Esperance. The fence represents a unique, if inadequate, response to an overwhelming environmental problem.

Construction of the Number 1 Rabbit Proof Fence began in 1901. It stretched 1834 kilometres from the south coast to the northwest coast, along a line north of Burracoppon, 230 kilometres east of Perth. Unfortunately by 1902 rabbits had already been found west of the fence line. The Number 2 Rabbit Proof Fence was built in 1905 in order to stem their advance. Stretching 1166 kilometres from Point Ann on the south coast through Cunderdin, 150 kilometres east of Perth, the new fence joined the original fence line at Gum Creek in the Murchison area.

WIRE NETTING.
A meeting had been called at Dromana to deal with the council accepting a 200 pound payment by John Cain when he should have paid more. This humorous extract from the meeting report contains a dig at Boneo, detail about some of its pioneers such as Harry Cairns (most likely Hill Harry, who was Michael Cain's son-in-law) and finishes with another dig about Sidney Smith Crispo's Australian Capital City, Federanium.

A report was going about from that famous town of Boneo, from one of the petitioners' own party, that they intended suing each councillor for the recovery of interest. Mr Anderson: Kindly give the name, as the statement is not correct. Cr Clark: Very well, it was James Patterson. Mr Anderson denied that he had spoken to him on the subject. Cr Clark said it was also asserted that the council had suppressed portion of the terms of the settlement. This was at down right lie. (Applause.) He defied any man to prove such a statement. Everything that had been done in private went through the council's books, and was read to the public. Mr Harry Cairns, another Boneo representative, had criticised the council in the Standard for dealing with the subject in committee. Mr Cairns was not an authority upon municipal matters,-in fact he was not aware that he was an authority upon anything. (Laughter.) When a question of law was involved, he considered the council was quite justified in going into committee. (Applause.) He was not siding with John Cain in the matter-it was a scandal that the money should have been owing -but had the council gone to law the first man they would have had to prosecute would have been Robert Anderson. He thought there would have been more trouble to get the-200 pounds out of " Bob " Anderson than there would out of " Jack" Cain. (Laughter.) Mr Anderson : I'm not " Bob " to you. (Renewed laughter.) The Chairman requested Cr Clark to avoid personalities. Cr Clark said there was no more show of getting any interest from John Cain, as there was of Boneo getting the Federal capital. (Laughter.) (P.5, Mornington Standard, 1-7-1905.)

FEDERATION. WHAT OUGHT TO BE.
Mornington Standard (Vic. : 1889 - 1908) Thursday 5 May 1898 Edition: MORNING. p 2 Article
... 'Federanium.' The streets a mile and two miles long. S: 8. CRISPO ...

BONEO.
Mornington Standard (Vic. : 1889 - 1908) Thursday 17 May 1894 Edition: MORNING. p 2 Article
... sugar beet and sugar making. The 'meeting was convened by Mr. S. S. Crispo of Eastbourne, Rosebud, who ... that the meeting considers it advisable to cultivate sugar beet for the purpose of sugar making, seeing that the land about Boneo district is suitable. The motion was carried and Mr. Crispo then read ... 863 words

by itellya Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2013-06-04 02:47:15

Itellya is researching local history on the Mornington Peninsula and is willing to help family historians with information about the area between Somerville and Blairgowrie. He has extensive information about Henry Gomm of Somerville, Joseph Porta (Victoria's first bellows manufacturer) and Captain Adams of Rosebud.

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