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CAMPBELLS CREEK, BETWEEN CASTLEMAINE AND FRANKLINFORD, VIC., AUST.

Journal by itellya

On Saturday I had a lovely meal at the Five Flags Hotel in Campbells Creek after my ma-in-law's ashes had been buried at the cemetery. As I drove through Campbells Creek every school day in 1965-6, I have fond memories apart from the time I copped a broken half window in my old FX going up the hill to the Maine.

There wouldn't have been a FRANKLINFORD REPORTER without the assistance of Ron Champion, H.T. at the C.C. school who kindly let me run off copies on his duplicator. On hot days,I didn't care that the water in the swimming pool had been pumped out of the creek by the fire brigade.

The owner of the Five Flags Hotel was very busy but kindly spared a few moments for a chat.The hotel was established in 1854 with the bar near the car park being the original section.

There are some great photos of the "Creek's" heritage items, details of Ray Bradfield's history etc. available on trove. I also found a picture of the Five Flags Hotel.The reason I started this journal is that the history in wikipedia was as pathetic re Campbells Creek as for most other places. Fancy saying that Campbells Creek was named after a creek! Dur! How did the creek get its name?

Excerpt from my INVERNESS HOTEL AND FRANKLINFORD journal.

STATIONS - Bough Yards

The establishment of the Aboriginal Station not only displaced the Jumcra* run, but took a good portion of Mollison's Bough Yards run. Now effectively separated from the Coliban run by Holecombe and the Protectorate Mollison possibly found Bough Yards an imposition.

In 1840 Alex Kennedy (1801 - 1877) had arrived in the Guildford area. He was related to William Campbell. William Campbell and Donald Cameron had arrived on the "Wm Metcalfe" from Invernesshire in late 1838.

Kennedy and his wife Margaret, and five children arrived aboard the "S Boyne" in January 1839. The Kennedys made their way to Clunes where Donald Cameron had set up his run. Kennedy had selected a run near Newstead whist on route to Clunes. By the time he returned, Norman Simson had established the Charlotte Plains run on the site.

Fortunately, William Campbell had purchased the lease for Bough Yards which was adjacent to his run, Strathloddon. Campbell gave Kennedy the remains of the Bough Yards run and the Kennedys established a homestead on the Loddon River. The homestead was named Bowyards.

The Strathloddon run homestead was near Yapeen. The township of Campbell's creek was named after William Campbell.


SOME SNIPPETS. (From The Argus unless otherwise stated.)
Richard Hills, a storekeeper of Campbells Creek, had become insolvent. (P.6, 18-1-1859.)

On the 25th ult., at Campbell's Creek, Mount Alexander, by the Rev. J. Chene, Isabella Will, eldest daughter of William F. Preshaw, Esq., surgeon, to Mr.John Graham, of Belfast, Ireland.(P.4,3-6-1853.) Dr Preshaw was one of Castlemaine's most prominent citizens.

MARRIED.
On the 15th inst., by special license, at the residence of Mrs. McLaughlin, Campbell's Creek, by the Rev. James Low, Mr. Robert Moorhead, store-keeper, to Anne, only surviving daughter of the late James McLaughlln, Esq., Kingston, Ireland.(P.4, 20-11-1854.)

DIED. On the 23rd ult., after a short illness, of rheumatic gout, Mr. Thos. Wightman, of the John o'Groat Hotel,Campbell's Creek, Castlemaine, aged 43 years. (P.4,5-3-1857.)

DIED. On the 26th ult., at his residence, Campbell's Creek, Castlemaine, Mr. William Frederick Wheeler, youngest son of the late Daniel Wheeler, Esq., of Chelmsford,Essex, England, aged twenty-six years.
(P.4, 4-14-1857.)

N.B. AS I HAVEN'T BEEN STUDYING THE AREA'S HISTORY FOR 25 YEARS,I AM PLAYING IT SAFE BY INCLUDING ITEMS ABOUT CAMPBELLS CREEK,CASTLEMAINE, BECAUSE I WOULD NOT KNOW WHETHER THE PIONEERS WERE IN CASTLEMAINE OR THE TOWNSHIP. I'M TREATING CAMPBELLS CREEK AS I WOULD ROSEBUD, DROMANA, WHERE THE LATTER IS GIVEN AS A CLUE TO THE LOCATION OF THE FORMER. WHEELER'S LOCATION WAS PROBABLY ON WHEELERS HILL IN CASTLEMAINE BUT I THOUGHT THE ABOVE MIGHT BE OF INTEREST.

-------
Baron Von Mueller the famed botanist who,if I remember correctly, designed the Castlemaine Botanical Gardens, organised the planting of trees at the Campbell Creek Reserve.
(CAMPBELL'S CREEK.
Mount. Alexander Mail (Vic. : 1914 - 1917) Tuesday 2 February 1915 p 2 Article.)
EDITS WON'T SUBMIT.

March 2014.
WELSH-ANNEAR.-On the 31st January, 1919, at
"Redbank," Rusden street, Elsternwick, John
Alexander Welsh (late A.I.F.), eldest son of
Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Welsh, Elwood, to Henrietta,
daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Annear,
"Five Flags," Campbell's Creek.
(P.11,Argus,8-3-1919.)

by itellya Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2013-10-21 09:17:00

Itellya is researching local history on the Mornington Peninsula and is willing to help family historians with information about the area between Somerville and Blairgowrie. He has extensive information about Henry Gomm of Somerville, Joseph Porta (Victoria's first bellows manufacturer) and Captain Adams of Rosebud.

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Comments

by itellya on 2013-10-21 11:10:33

??William Haverson,who'd been running a hay and oats business at Campbells Creek (which may have been in the Western District where a creek of that name fed the Avoca River, according to a description of Runs)had become insolvent after arriving from Adelaide with 25 pounds and was now working for 3 pounds per week.(P.6,23/2/1858.)
It seemed that Haverson was near Ballarat because most of the limited results involved The Star,but William Haverson bought a small farm near Castlemaine. Colonial News. VICTORIA.
The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Saturday 8 July 1854 p 4 Article.

by itellya on 2013-10-21 21:31:37

NAME CONFUSION.
It's nice to have your conclusions confirmed by an oldtimer. William Campbell and the other Campbells Creek have been mentioned within the journal and comment 1.

I'll never understand the internet. When I started "some snippets" my trove search was limited to The Argus, and when I resumed,I forgot the s in Campbells and to limit the search. What luck!

RESULT 1.
Campbell's Creek
Dear Sir: Campbell's Creek, near Castlemaine, is always associated with Sarah Campbell, grand daughter of Robbie Burns. The fact that Mrs. Campbell is buried at
Campbell's Creek Cemetery does not mean that the creek was named after her. It was so named because William Campbell first settled there. He was a well-known pioneer, and later M.L.C., and was granted licence No. 70 for 25,000 acres of holding in 1840. The Campbells of the Burns connection came to the State during the gold rush, and Campbell's Creek was known as such for many years prior to that period.
ARTHUR H. BRADFIELD (Ascotvale).
( The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 30 September 1950 Supplement: The Argus Week-End Magazine p 2 Article.)

RESULT 18.
A most confusing state of affairs exists owing to the name of this township being Campbell's Creek, and the railway station being designated Campbell. Letters are often misdirected or taken to another Campbell's Creek, near Stawell, while there are many instances of railway passengers erring through ignorance, and carried
through the place, although on the look-out for Campbell's Creek.
(DISTRICT CORRESPONDENCE CAMPBELL'S CREEK.
Castlemaine Mail (Vic. : 1917 - 1918) Tuesday 24 December 1918 p 4 Article.)

by itellya on 2013-10-21 21:31:38

NAME CONFUSION.
It's nice to have your conclusions confirmed by an oldtimer. William Campbell and the other Campbells Creek have been mentioned within the journal and comment 1.

I'll never understand the internet. When I started "some snippets" my trove search was limited to The Argus, and when I resumed,I forgot the s in Campbells and to limit the search. What luck!

RESULT 1.
Campbell's Creek
Dear Sir: Campbell's Creek, near Castlemaine, is always associated with Sarah Campbell, grand daughter of Robbie Burns. The fact that Mrs. Campbell is buried at
Campbell's Creek Cemetery does not mean that the creek was named after her. It was so named because William Campbell first settled there. He was a well-known pioneer, and later M.L.C., and was granted licence No. 70 for 25,000 acres of holding in 1840. The Campbells of the Burns connection came to the State during the gold rush, and Campbell's Creek was known as such for many years prior to that period.
ARTHUR H. BRADFIELD (Ascotvale).
( The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 30 September 1950 Supplement: The Argus Week-End Magazine p 2 Article.)

RESULT 18.
A most confusing state of affairs exists owing to the name of this township being Campbell's Creek, and the railway station being designated Campbell. Letters are often misdirected or taken to another Campbell's Creek, near Stawell, while there are many instances of railway passengers erring through ignorance, and carried
through the place, although on the look-out for Campbell's Creek.
(DISTRICT CORRESPONDENCE CAMPBELL'S CREEK.
Castlemaine Mail (Vic. : 1917 - 1918) Tuesday 24 December 1918 p 4 Article.)

by itellya on 2013-10-21 23:31:47

Sorry about the twin comments above.

It appears that the hill down from Castlemaine,where a Yandoit resident nearly ate his pipe because of his horse's faultless obedience, was known as Oddfellows' Hill.
(CAMPBELL'S CREEK.
Mount. Alexander Mail (Vic. : 1914 - 1917) Friday 16 March 1917 p 2 Article.)

Many residents of Campbell's Creek, such as Charles Holden and Tom Hayes, found employment at Thompson's foundry and the woollen mill at Castlemaine, bringing home pay packets and, sometimes,injuries.
(Mount. Alexander Mail (Vic. : 1914 - 1917) Monday 6 July 1914 p 2 Article.)

But not Paul Dalton Annear who attended Mr Richardson's old Grammar School and became a Bachelor of Law at the age of 24.
(CAMPBELL'S CREEK.
Mount. Alexander Mail (Vic. : 1914 - 1917) Monday 6 April 1914 p 2 Article.)

by itellya on 2013-10-21 23:39:50

Where is/was the fire station?

by itellya on 2013-10-22 02:44:15

THIS WOULD NOT SUBMIT IN THE JOURNAL; POSSIBLY THE RAIN!

Finding reports of Delmenicos playing footy for Campbells Creek circa 1915 and that Guildford had a team captained by a great grandfather or great uncle of Kevin, (whom I was privileged to watch playing at Camp Reserve as I ran the boundary, before he went to Teddy Whitten's mob), I wanted to see how long the two towns' teams had existed. I entered CAMPBELL'S CREEK, CASTLEMAINE (the latter to eliminate the other Campbell's Creeks)and found the following.

Charles McKnight may have been squatting at Campbell's Creek before or alongside William Campbell (and his relative Alexander Kennedy who built the Inverness Hotel at the original Oaklands Junction which was a stone's throw north of the north end of the north-south runway at Melbourne Airport.) Charles came to the colony in 1841 and was on his station at Campbell's Creek from 1842 until early 1844,when he moved to Dunmore Station where he died. (THE DEATH OF MR. C. H. MACKNIGHT. (FROM THE WARRNAMBOOL STANDARD.)
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 13 March 1873 p 6 Article.)

by itellya on 2013-10-22 03:13:09

Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918) Monday 4 September 1876 Supplement: Supplement to The Bendigo Advertiser p 2 Family Notices
... Robert Nicholson, of Camp bell's Creek, Castlemaine, to Annie Gubbins, of Campbell's Creek Castlemaine, eldest daughter of the late Mr. K. B. Tydd, of Melbourne.

Chinese Camp Destroyed by Fire,
One of the largest conflagrations that has ever occurred in the Castlemaine district swept away the Chinese camp at Campbell's Creek, this morning, within the space of half-an-hour. A fortunate circumstance was that the wind blew from the north west ; had it been otherwise, the old-established Five Flags Hotel, kept by Mr. Hans Appel, Mr. Jennings's general store, and a range of shops extending to the main Fryers Road, would have disappeared with the camp. It was between 12 and 1 o'clock a.m. that the fire was first discovered by Mr. Appel and Mr. Tolstrup. Mr. Appel was in the act of closing his premises, when, startled by the baying of his Newfoundland watch dog, he raised a blind in the roar, and saw the tongues of flame shooting upwards. The Chinese camp, being built almost exclusively of wood, went before the devouring element like chaff before the wind. The direction of the wind is indicated
today clearly enough by the seered and blackened ground, the grass having been most extensively fired by the sparks. Three or four houses remain out of the thirty or forty which constituted a little Canton. It is understood that not one of the buildings in the Campbell's Creek camp was insured. Castlemaine Representative,
Jan. 20
(The Newcastle Chronicle (NSW : 1866 - 1876) Tuesday 26 January 1875 p 2 Article.)

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