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Captain JAMES HENRY - 7th Dragoon Guards

Journal by ngairedith

the Obituary of Captain James Henry (1859-1933)
Evening Post 17 January 1933 - ADVENTUROUS CAREER
... The death of Captain James Henry, for the past 19 years Inspector of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, removes from public life a well-known figure.
The late Captain Henry was born in Ireland 74 years ago. He ran away from home when a lad, and, after becoming an apprenctice in the jewellery trade, enlisted in the 7th Dragoon Guards. With that regiment he served for 30 years, taking part in campaigns in Egypt and India. As Regimental-Sergeant-major, Captain Henry went to the South African campaign. During that period his Corps of Mounted Police, and Captain Henry's time with his regiment having run out, he was offered a commission with the new force and so became lieutenant in the police, which subsequently merged into the South African Constabulary. He rose to be captain and was placed in charge of the Hoopstad district, in what was then the Orange Free State. When the South African war ended, Captain Henry, who had been mentioned in dispatches, was presented with a very cleverly illuminated address signed by all the leading residents, regretting his departure and commending the tact and courtesy in which he had always carried out his duties as officer commanding the district.

For some time Captain Henry was engaged in farming in what was formerly the Orange Free State, but in 1910 he and his family came to New Zealand. For a time he farmed in the Eketahuna district, but nineteen years ago came to Wellington to take up the duties of Inspector for the Society of Cruelty to Animals, for which duties he was peculiarly qualified.

Captain Henry leaves a widow, four sons, and four daughters.
The sons are Messrs C. R., William and Phillip Henry of Miramar, and Lieutenant J. N. Henry, who represents the Defence Forces at Hawera.
The daughters are Mesdames D. O'Donoghue of Mahoenui, W. M. Walker of South Africa, D. Ginnane of Mangatainoka and Miss Henry of Miramar.
The funeral took place to-day


It says he had 8 children (possibly whilst in South Africa)
I only have 4 at this time
I also do not have his wife's maiden name
can you help ?

1887 - 1977 Helen Theresa Henry
- Helen married Daniel O'DONOGHUE in 1921

1889 - ? Frances Beatrice Henry
- Frances married William Morely Percy WALKER in NZ 1910
- may have lived in South Africa

1891 - 1957 James Norman Henry
- James married Kathleen MORGAN in 1919

1896 - 1975 Mary Agnes 'Molly' Henry
- Molly married David Paul GINNANE in 1920
Evening Post 24 July 1920
... The wedding took place at St Patrick's Church, Kilbirnie, recently, of Miss Mary Agnes Henry, third daughter of Captain and Mrs J. Henry, of Miramar, to Mr David Ginnane, youngest son of Mr and Mrs J. Ginnanne - Newman. The Rev Father Connelly officiated. The bride was given away by her father. She wore a French grey costume, and hat to match, and carried a shower bouquet of freesias and maiden-hair ferm. Miss K. Henry was bridesmaid and Mr P. Henry best man. The bridegroom's present to the bride was a fox fur and to the bridesmaids a gold bangle. The presents were numerous, including a Doulton salad bowl and set of stainless carvers, given by the Miramar Sports Club
- David was a son of John GINNANE & Winifred ROCHE

the children missing (as per his obituary)
sons:
C. R. Henry
- tentative: Charles Robert (1885-1965)
William Henry
Phillip Henry
- tentative: Philip (1885-1955)
daughter:
Miss Henry
HIS WIFE was:
Sarah Theresa ? ()
Evening Post 13 October 1941 At her residence, 49 Park Road, Miramar, on October 13, 1941, Sarah Theresa. relict of the late Captain James Henry; aged 82 years. R.I.P.


ANOTHER OBITUARY
Auckland Star 6 February 1933 - THE CAVALRYMAN
... There was a touch of unconscious swagger in his walk, the gait that goes with jingling spurs and sword clanking in its scabbard, the bearing of the old trooper. That powerfully framed, big shouldered, drooping moustached figure, over six feet, striding along a Wellington street, always suggested, or rather proclaimed, the veteran mounted man.
No foot-slogging soldier could ever achieve the commanding cavalier-like poise of the long-trained Dragoon Guardsman. There went a man who was a perfect product of the Regulars of the Victorian days, who knew more about the soldiering business than any general knew, for he was an old regimental sergeant-major of the old red-coat army. Thirty years as a trooper and a non-com. of the Forces had made of this Kilkenny lad a soldier of the type that Kipling delighted to write about. He had helped to chase Arabi Pasha over the sands of Egypt and he knew India from end to end in the days of Lord Roberts. He knew horses and he knew men. Thousands of recruits had passed through his hands, he had shepherded scores of raw young subalterns through the beginning of their military careers. His troop, his squadron, his regiment, he schooled them all. He lived the army life of "Soldiers Three"; Ortheris and Mulvaney and their like were his comrades and his problems.
For that old cavalryman, Captain James Henry, who died a few days ago in Wellington, one felt the admiration that is the due of a fine man physically and mentally, an example to the young generation in discipline and in the value of long-sustained training to a desired end.

Captain Henry received his commission in the South African War in a mounted constabulary claimed him for the best part of his life. A champion swordsman, a first-rate rifle shot, he was unexcelled in his regiment. When he gained his captaincy and had a local command in South Africa he showed that his long regular army service had not disqualified him for the task of dealing tactfully with a hostile people.
In Wellington he did duty for nearly twenty years as inspector for the S.P.C.A., and his care for dumb animals and his efforts to prevent and punish cases of cruelty were what were to have been expected from one who all his life loved horses and taught their handling.
A good soldier and a chivalrous and humane citizen


photo
Plot 2, Section ROM CATH at Karori, Wellington

GRAVE of Captain James Henry

Surnames: GINNANE HENRY MORGAN ODONOGHUE ROCHE WALKER
Viewed: 699 times
by ngairedith Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2013-01-09 16:27:56

PECK of TAITA

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Comments

by traceyjames78 on 2013-06-17 02:36:32

Hi there! James Henry was my great great grandfather. My grandmother was Kathleen O'Donoghue. I have some letters from the Walker family in South Africa that have a bit of info about the Henry children. I'll have to dig it out and see if any of it can help you!

Tracey James

by traceyjames78 on 2013-06-17 02:37:01

Hi there! James Henry was my great great grandfather. My grandmother was Kathleen O'Donoghue. I have some letters from the Walker family in South Africa that have a bit of info about the Henry children. I'll have to dig it out and see if any of it can help you!

Tracey James

by traceyjames78 on 2013-06-17 02:37:39

Hi there! James Henry was my great great grandfather. My grandmother was Kathleen O'Donoghue. I have some letters from the Walker family in South Africa that have a bit of info about the Henry children. I'll have to dig it out and see if any of it can help you!

Tracey James

by traceyjames78 on 2013-06-17 03:08:22

Sorry for multiple posts! Sarah Theresa Purcell is the name you are after. I have her death certificate. Died in Wellington october 1941 at the age of 82. Her parents first names are not listed but father's occupation is a farmer. She was born in Kilkenny, married in dublin. There are no names of children, only ages at the time of her death. 4 boys 57, 51, 48 and 46. 4 girls 56, 54, 44, and 41. I'll read through the south african letters and see what I can find about the children you have asked after.

by traceyjames78 on 2013-06-17 03:27:16

4 of the children were born in Mhow, India, including Helen and Frances, known as Fanny, and 4 were born in the UK. I have a lovely photo of Sarah with all if the children from about 1900. The information I have is not as good as I'd hoped, mainly discusses descendents of Fanny and Percy Walker. Let me know if you are interested and I'll scan the photos and letters I have. Always keen to share our history and make new connections.

Tracey

by traceyjames78 on 2013-06-17 03:59:00

4 of the children were born in Mhow, India, including Helen and Frances, known as Fanny, and 4 were born in the UK. I have a lovely photo of Sarah with all if the children from about 1900. The information I have is not as good as I'd hoped, mainly discusses descendents of Fanny and Percy Walker. Let me know if you are interested and I'll scan the photos and letters I have. Always keen to share our history and make new connections.

Tracey

by traceyjames78 on 2013-07-05 17:32:58

Murray Ginnane has some useful information including a copy of the Newman School 1948 reunion booklet. It lists 4 Henry children attending but has only mentioned to me Philip, Mary (Molly) and Kathleen. Murray has said that the youngest 4 were born in Norfolk, England.

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