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Daniel Wedeman

Journal by wfrounds

Original Wedeman settler in this country.

FROM "HISTORY OF THE LACKAWANNA VALLEY"

Daniel Waderman, of Hamburg, Germany, was the second settler . While
visiting London in 1775, he was seized by a British press-gang, and forced into
unwilling service. He was present at the battle of Bunker Hill, followed the
fortunes of the British until 1779, when he was taken prisoner on the Mohawk.
Taking the oath of allegiance, he enlisted in the American service, and, by his
faithful deportment as a soldier during the remainder of the war, proved
himself an unquestioned patriot. Under the shadows of the bluff, deepened by
the foliage extending down to the edge of the Lackawanna, this scarred veteran,
in 1790, brought forth his cabin. The house of Daniel Silkman now occupies its
site. For a period of twenty-one years Mr. Waderman lived here in comparative
thrift and contentment, acquiring, by frugality, means to purchase wilder lands
farther up the valley, where he died in 1835.

FROM "CITY OF SCRANTON" page 138

The story of the founding of the Wedeman family in America reveals an
unusual, to say the least, method of immigration, and one that one might well
wish to avoid. Daniel Wedeman, a store-keeper and a single man, of Hamburg,
Germany, had made a trip to London to purchase a stock of goods to replenish
his depleted supply, when he was seized by British soldiers, compelled to don
an English uniform, and was pressed into the service of that country. He was
placed on a transport bound for America, where the war for independence was
passing through its birth throes, preparatory to the long, grueling struggle
that levied such a heavy toll of lives. Enraged because of the high-handed
treatment to which he had been subjected, he deserted the British ranks and
joined the Colonial forces, entering into the conflict with the double
incentive to aid a cause which he believed righteous and to avenge his own
abuse. He fought through-out the entire war, and after receiving an honorable
discharge from the service he decided to remain in the land to which his fate
had led him, and he purchased 400 acres of land near Providence, being the
second white settler in the Lackawanna Valley. He erected a log cabin on the
site until recently occupied by Daniel Silkman's home. He married and among
his children was Peter.
Peter Wedeman was born in Providence, now North Scranton,
Pennsylvania, and there followed his father's occupation. He married and was
the father of the following children: Daniel, Thomas, John, Henry, Martin
Peter, Cyrus, Ensign, Herman.
Martin Peter Wedeman was born where the borough of Mayfield now stands.
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Some salient dates in the life of Daniel Wedeman (or Waderman),
1775 - Forced into service for British in America.
19 Sep 1777 - Wounded in the battle of Stillwater.
13 Oct 1777 - Captured by the Americans.
1790 - Settled in Providence Corners, PA which is now Scranton,
Lackawanna Co, PA. The following is copied from "The Wedeman Family
History" as compiled by Wade E. Taylor, great great great grandson of
Daniel Wedeman. This document is in the form of handwritten notes
currently (March 1993) in the possession of Susan Linda Crocker.
The following is from History of Luzerne, Lackawanna and Wyoming
Counties 1786-1880:
Page 383= "Daniel Waderman of Hamburg, Germany was the second
settler on Village Site. He had been seized by a press gang in London
in 1775 and compelled to serve with the forces of the English until
1779 when he was captured by the Americans and served with them until
the close of the war with great credit. He erected a crude cabin in
1790 on the site since occupied by the residence of Daniel Silkman.
21 years later removed further up the Valley where he died in 1835."
From the "History of Lackawanna - Wyoming Counties" 1786, page
383: "Providence was formerly a township 5 miles square, formed in
1770 and named from Providence R.I. The first whites to locate there
were Timothy Keyes, Andrew Hickman and Solomon Hocksey in 1771. They
erected a cabin where Taylorville now is. In 1788 Enoch Holmes
erected the first house on the site of Providence Village near what
is now Oak and Main Streets. Daniel Wademan of Hamburg settled there
in 1790, also Conrad Lutz, John Gifford, Constant Searles, John House,
Jacob Lutz, Benjamin Pedrick, Solomon Bates and the Athertons."
I [Wade E. Taylor] have an old newspaper clipping dated Sept. 26,
1940. Commemorating the 100th anniversary of Scranton. The location
of Daniel's cabin is shown on a map of Scranton and Providence as it
was prior to 1840. An inset map of Providence Corners is included.
The large map shows location of Lackawanna River and Roaring Brook and
also the existing roads. Also the location of many other old time
settlers.
[SLC: This newspaper clipping is present in the Wade Taylor notes
and it is from the Scranton Tribune of Thursday, September 26, 1940.
The Tribune was recently purchased by the Scranton Times.]
From "History of Luzerne, Lackawanna and Wyoming Counties, 1786",
The following is recorded in the above history.
"Greenfield Township was formed from Abington in January, 1816.
It embraced about 20 square miles and had 821 inhabitants in 1880, two
less than in 1870. Pioneer settlers came here as early as 1804 and
1805. At this time Greenfield was an undeveloped wilderness and no
mansions better than a double log house. The nearest grist mill 30
miles away was Slocum Hollow, now Scranton. Scott Township was formed
from Greenfield in 1846 and named in honor of Hon. David Scott, one of
the associate Justices of Luzerne, Co. It had 1132 inhabitants in 1870
and 1263 in 1880."
Several variations of spelling the name have been used in various
records. One record states that the original German spelling was
Weidemann. Most of the decendents of Daniel have spelled it Wedeman.
A few have spelled it Wademan or Waderman.
Daniel Wedeman, born in Hamburg, State of Hesse, Germany in 1756
or 1757, (according to a record left by his great grand daughter, Emma
Anne, daughter of Ebenezer Wedeman), and I [Wade E. Taylor] believe
her record should be used. This is corroborated in Hollisters History
of the Lackawanna Valley published about 1857 in which he states that
Daniel Wedeman was captured by the British in 1775. Emma Anne's
record states he was captured at age 19. Deduct 19 from 1775 and we
have 1756 which is probably the correct year of his birth. Applicants
to the D.A.R. have shown the date as 1758 and 1762. The official
record is 1762. He died in Carbondale, PA in 1835. There is no
record of his burial place but it may be at Providence, PA as he lived
there a long time. His second wife Hannah may also be buried there.
Have been unable to find any record of her birth or death or burial
place.
Daniel was born of wealthy parents, which is evidently true, as
the writer [Wade E. Taylor] distinctly remembers hearing the fact
mentioned between my grand parents, my mother and Aunts and Uncles at
family gatherings that there was a large sum of money in the estate in
Germany and they frequently talked about sending someone to Germany to
make claim for Daniel's share, but as far as I know they never did.
Daniel was well educated and could speak read and write seven
languages. It seems that his parents were bankers and the Colonies had
asked for a loan and because of his knowledge of the English language
he was sent at the age of 19, (1775), to America to ascertain the
advisability of the loan. Enroute his ship was borded by the British
and he was taken prisoner, forced into unwilling service and sent to
America where he was forced to serve under General Burgoyne as Aide de
Camp to the General. He was present at the battle of Stillwater, Sept.
19, 1777, and was wounded in the hip. Burgoyne retreated to Saratoga
but attacked again on October 7th and was defeated. He surrendered on
Oct. 13, 1777, his entire army of nearly 6000 men.
After his release Daniel joined the Continental Army under
Captain Tenbrock, Col. Schaicks regiment, New York Militia and served
in many battles.
The D.A.R. record shows that his Revolutionary service was Mohawk
Valley Militia 1779 to the end of the war (1781). Records indicate
that he served with great credit.
He was the second settler in the Lackawanna Valley near
Providence Corners, now a part of Scranton. His cabin was built at
Providence in 1790 and he and his family lived there for 21 years,
then purchased lands further up the valley. (The first settler was
Enoch Holmes (1788). (Holister).

In Seoharie County NY in 1792, Daniel married Hannah De Wolfe
daughter of Moses De Wolfe and Sarah Sharpe birth and death dates
unknown. This from records left by Emma Anne Wedeman, daughter of
Ebenezer Wedeman. [SLC: Notes later in Wade Taylor's record indicate
that the parentage of Hannah is confused since there were two Moses De
Wolfes and between them they had three wives. Sarah Sharpe is
probably not the mother of Hannah but rather Anna Mc Arthur. The
Moses who married Sarah Sharpe was probably Hannah's brother. Birth
and death dates for the various De Wolfe's are also obtained from
these later notes.] Hannah was a direct descendent of Balthassar and
Alice De Wolfe of France. [...] The settlers called the De Wolfs
"Dolph" the name by which many decendents are known today.
Grace Wedeman thinks Daniel married again after the death of
Hannah but no proof available.
The following have joined [the D.A.R] on the record of Danial
Wademan.
Mrs. Estella Wedeman Williams - No. 81841 Daughter of Miles
Wedeman
Mrs. Libbie Wedeman Stanlick - No. 89818 Wife of Samuel
Stanlick, Greenfield.
Minnie Wedeman Von Storch - No. 89819 Wife of Elisha G. Von
Storch
Mrs. Grace Wedeman Matthews - No. 322749 Daughter of Charles A.
Wedeman.
The D.A.R. application of Estella Williams indicates that Daniel
served in New York Line, Capt. Charles Grahams Co., Col. Van
Cortlandts Reg.

DANIEL WEDEMAN AND HIS CHILDREN
Daniel Wedeman was born in Hamburg, Germany in December 1754. He was impressed as a soldier of King George III who was also known as Duke of Hanover, Germany. In 1775 he came to Boston as a servant to a British officer and later took part in Burgoyne's invasion of New York State from Canada. He was in Captain Tomae's Company, Major Von Barner's Regiment of the New Brunswick Army under the command of Major General Friedrich Adolphus Riedsel. He was listed in the military records as being five feet, one inch in height, a protestant, and a shoemaker. Daniel was captured by the Americans and the Stockbridge Indians while on a foraging expedition for provisions. (Pension R11268).

Apparently he remained in the Albany area and was enlisted in March 1779 by Captain Timbrook at Claverack, New York, in the New York Continental Line. He served in the Company of Captain Vaughn in the Second Regiment of Colonel Van Cortland. He was stationed at Fort West Point for three years and took part in the storming of Stoney Point under General Anthony Wayne on 16 July 1779. He was wounded in the face by a spent bullet in the skirmish at Hoboken. This was probably the raid on Bull's Ferry by General Wayne in July 1780.
On 11 April 1779 Daniel Married, at Claverack Reform Church, Salome Sitzer (Clav. Ref. #103). She appears to have died between 1787 and 1892. Daniel married Hannah Dolph for his second wife. She was the daughter of Charles and Elizabeth (Macy) Dolph (research of Carol Maginnis).
In 1797 Daniel moved to Providence, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, where his father-in-law Charles Do;ph had settled in 1792. During the move to Providence, Daniel stayed at the Wyllis Inn at Blooming Grove, Northampton County (now Pike County), Pennsylvania, where he left a box of papers. He discovered that the papers were missing when he arrived at Providence and sent his son, Peter, back to Blooming Grove for the box. When Peter returned with the box, Daniel found that some of the papers were missing, including his discharge from the army (Pension R11268).
He purchased some 400 acres of land near Providence in Lackawanna Valley. "He erected a log cabin on the site until recently occupied by Daniel Silkman's home" (Portrait and Biographical Record of Lackawanna).

Daniel appears on the census of 1800 for Luzerne County, PA., Providence Township.

History of Luzerne, Lackawanna and Wyoming Counties 1786-1880 page 383


Daniel Waderman of Hamburg, Germany was the second settler on Village Site. He had been seized by a press gang in London in 1775 and compelled to serve with the forces of the English until 1779 when he was captured by the Americans and served with them until the close of the war with great credit. He erected a crude cabin in 1790 on the site since occupied by the residence of Daniel Silkman. 21 years later removed further up the Valley where he died in 1835. Providence was formerly a township 5 miles square, formed in 1770 and named from Providence R.I. The first whites to locate there were Timothy Keyes, Andrew Hickman and Solomon Hocksey in 1771. They errected a cabin where Taylorville now is. In 1788 Enoch Holmes errected the first house on the site of Providence Village near what is now Oak and Main Streets. Daniel Wademan of Hamburg settled there in 1790, also Conrad Lutz, John Gifford, Constant Searles, John House, Jacob Lutz, Benjamin Pedrick, Solomon Bates and the Athertons."

History of Luzerne, Lackawanna and Wyoming Counties 1786-1880 page 383



It appears that Daniel's parents were bankers and the Colonies had asked for a loan. Because of his knowledge of the English language, he was sent to America in 1775 to assess whether the loan should be granted. His ship was seized by the British and he was taken prisoner. He was forced into service and sent to America to serve under General Burgoyne as Aide de Camp to the General. He was wounded in the hip at the battle of Stillwater, Sept. 19, 1777. Burgoyne retreated to Saratoga but attacked again on October 7th and was defeated. Burgoyne surrendered on Oct. 13, 1777. After his release, Daniel joined the Continental Army under Captain Tenbrock, Col. Schaicks regiment, New York Militia and served in many battles. The D.A.R. record shows that his Revolutionary service was Mohawk Valley Militia 1779 to the end of the war (1781). Records indicate that he served with great credit.



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From the 8 May 1812 edition of the GLEANER & LUZERNE ADVERTISER.

Lost A Pocket Book on the road between Calvin CONES and my house in Providence. A generous reward will be given to any person who will return it with the contents. Daniel WEDEMAN, Providence

Surnames: WEDEMAN
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on 2013-08-27 15:32:11

Walt Rounds

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