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FRANKLINFORD 1, VIC., AUST. (S.S. 257 AND THE PARKER FAMILY.)

Journal by itellya

If I had not taught at Franklinford S.S. 257 in 1965 and 1966 I would not be writing this journal. Happy memories of my time there were revived when I was writing the Inverness Hotel journal (in regard to Ken Sier knowing his customers by the sound of their footsteps.) Just about every lunchtime in the colder months there would be a full-scale footy match. The six boys would be divided as equally as possible into two teams and never did I have to mention fairness in regard to competition. There was fierce competition between opponents of equal maturity but the little ones were always allowed to get their kick. This spirit of fairness was a tribute to their parents' example of how to treat others. As the participants relaxed at the end of the match, I'd snatch a few minutes for a bite and to do some correction. If anyone entered the building, I'd know exactly whom it was before seeing him.

A COPY AND PASTE FROM AN EMAIL TO BILL O'DONNELL.

Last night I was researching Alexander Kennedy who lived at Bowyard Station on the Loddon and was related to William Campbell after whom Campbells Creek was named. Alexander was the father of Henry, the first licensee of the Inverness Hotel, which was a stone's throw north of the end of the north-south runway at Melbourne Airport. I added a bit of detail about my time at Franklinford in my journal about the Inverness Hotel, written under the user name of itellya on FAMILY TREE CIRCLES on the internet. I just remembered the name of the other family that contributed to the enrolment of 6 boys in 1966; it was Allen. I think they moved into 800 Hepburn-Newstead Rd (which might have been called Jim Crow Rd) just in time to prevent closure of the school.
I stumbled across your website when I googled Franklinford Reporter. This was the name of the school newsletter that I started while there. I still have a copy of one issue somewhere and if you're interested, I could launch a search for it.
It contained some news but it was mainly a showcase for the children's writing about things like the joint excursion to Melbourne with the Fryerstown and Faraday schools. Franklinford did not have a duplicator so Ron Champion of the Campbells Creek school let me use theirs. I've attached an image of my final issue.
The Whitlocks moved to Maldon but I would love to know if the Morrisons and Glenns are still around. I've read some of Edgar Morrison's history. Max Glenn talked me into playing cricket for Guildford and used to drive half the team to away games in his beautiful yank tank.
I just remembered another family at the school, the Robertsons.
Well done Eleanor Marney! I don't know whether she's into historical novels but if she is, she might be interested in the Franklinford Murder detailed in The Star (Ballarat) of 17-10-1862, page 2, accessed through trove.
I hope all the residents in your area appreciate its rich history and have read Edgar Morrison's books. At the start of the above article, I was puzzled about why William Bumstead would be running a store at Franklinford.I imagined Franklinford as I knew it in the 1960's. The reason was explained when I came across the articles about the many gold mines.
I've found my copy of the Franklinford Reporter and attached the front page. Page 2 listed those who volunteered to water the garden during the holidays: Sharon and Karen Doolan, Mrs Eric Satori and John Morrison. Then followed some writing by the pupils.
THE ZOO. Last week we went to Melbourne. In the morning we went to the school for blind children. After dinner we travelled on a bus to the zoo. At the zoo you must not put your fingers in cages. We saw lions and tigers and funny monkeys. Cameron Morrison.
THE SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND. The blind school is situated in Burwood. Vast lawns surround the buildings and provide lots of playing room for the blind children. Pupils stay in expensive and well-kept living quarters. Some teachers are blind too. John Morrison ( who also wrote about their games, the pool, braille, and the importance of craft.)
Another story described the author's dad driving all the boys to Castlemaine where they met me, so it was probably written by Stephen Glenn and described the Royal Melbourne hospital as a large, cream brick building located on the corner near the Melbourne University.(The title and author must have been written too high on the master sheet for page 3.)
THE ZOO. An eagle soars/ And a lion roars./A monkey swings/And a lyre bird sings.
We all start to giggle/ When the snakes wriggle./It would take four days/ For a really good gaze. John Robertson.
Tony (Allen?) traced "Merry Christmas" very precisely and Stuart Glenn wrote his name and drew a Christmas tree.

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Much of the school's revenue came from the pine plantation near the school. We were in the Dayleford district for sports and used to have regular visits to the Daylesford school (one of the first in the state to have its own pool) for lessons in swimming and other special subjects. Another way the educational opportunities were broadened was the 3F alliance. The Franklinford Boys' College, as we jokingly called it, enjoyed shared excursions with Fryerstown and Faraday.
In the old days the children used to ride horses to school but the traffic problems described in the Yandoit, Franklinford and Clydesdale Chronicle of 2012 had started by my time there and the old paddock had waist-high grass. Ken Ginifer, a teacher at Winter's Flat, brought some calves down to munch the grass but when it was time for them to leave, they led us a merry dance through the forest of elm suckers. The old school was a school camp for a while but is now a hall for the community.

THE FOLLOWING IS A COPY, CUT, AND PASTE FROM THE JOURNAL ABOUT THE INVERNESS HOTEL.
I WAS THE TEACHER AT THIS SCHOOL IN 1965 AND 1966 AND DURING THAT TIME A CAIRN HONOURING THE PROTECTOR, EDWARD STONE PARKER, WAS ERECTED AT THE JUNCTION NEARBY.(THIS CAIRN IS SHOWN IN THE FRANKLINFORD WIKIPEDIA ENTRY.)
THERE WERE ONLY SIX PUPILS AT THE TIME, ALL BOYS FROM THE MORRISON,ROBERTSON, ALLEN AND GLENN FAMILIES, FRANK WHITLOCK HAVING MOVED HIS CARMEN GHIA AND FAMILY TO MALDON WHERE I TAUGHT PHILLIP AGAIN IN 1967. THE SCHOOL'S NUMBER WAS 257 AND A MONTHLY HIGHLIGHT FOR ALL RESIDENTS WAS "THE FRANKLINFORD REPORTER", PRODUCED WITH THE HELP OF RON CHAMPION, HEADTEACHER AT CAMPBELLS CREEK PRIMARY; THERE WOULD BE AN OUTCRY IF IT WAS PRINTED A DAY LATE.
THE NAMES OF MT FRANKLIN AND FRANKLINFORD HONOUR SIR JOHN FRANKLIN, GOVERNOR OF TASMANIA AND ARCTIC EXPLORER; THE FORD WOULD HAVE BEEN ON JIM CROW CREEK.

A photo of the pupils in front of the school is shown on the Rigetti family website. This family was one of many from Ticono, the Italian speaking part of Switzerland, which settled in Yandoit in the mid 19th century.
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EDWARD STONE PARKER.
There will surely be biographies available, so I will not go too much into his life story. Edward, William Thomas and the other aboriginal protectors were Methodist missionaries according to a source I have glanced at in passing.I will focus on Edward's obituary and details of his family's continued presence at Franklinford. For convenience of location, all Parker biography and genealogy are here rather than in the chronology.

11-12-1838 page 2 (Sydney Gazette and N.S.W. Advertiser.) Edward Stone Parker was appointed a magistrate.

30-11-1847 page 2 (Melbourne Argus.) Edward Stone Parker junior died at the aboriginal station, River Loddon, of heart disease on the 23rd at the age of 18.

S. 3-8-1863 page 3. Edward Stone Parker was to be the Hon. Secretary of the Board for the Protection of Aborigines.
A.23-4-1864 page 4. In a complaint about statistics not being provided to the press, it was pointed out that Mr Joseph Parker of Franklinford had for some time been collecting agricultural statistics for the County of Talbot. This would probably have involved much travel and missing the joy of spending time with his first-born son, Francis Ware.
A. 13-9-1864 page 1. Francis Ware, the only son of Joseph and Amelia Parker, died on 26 August aged 10 months.
Do you know what is remarkable about this death notice? It shows a special attitude that must have been passed down by Edward Stone Parker and his wife to their children, concerning EQUALITY.I have no doubt that William Thomas and Edward considered aborigines as being equal, in God's eyes, to the greatest white men, but this concerns women and family notices. Let me give examples of typical birth and death notices of the time.
BIRTHS. BLOGGS. The wife of William Bloggs of a son.
DEATHS. BLOGGS. The wife of William Bloggs at his residence on----. Notice what's missing? A married woman and her possessions were regarded as "belonging" to her husband and the only time a woman's name (with her own given name) would appear in a rate book was when she was a spinster or a widow. Joseph seems to have had the opinion that a woman should not have to cease being treated as an individual just because she was married.

S. 13-10-1864 page 1s. Edwaed was appointed a trustee of the gazetted Franklinford cemetery along with John William Wyett, Charles Menzies and Richard Molloy.

A. 1-5-1865 page 4. Edward Stone Parker Esq., J.P., had died at his residence, Mt Franklin, aged 63, after a long and painful illness borne with Christian fortitude.
A. 1-5-1865 page 6. Early on Thursday, Mr Edward Stone Parker J.P. of Mt Franklin died of a dropsical affection, resulting from disease of the heart and rheumatic fever. Mr Parker was 62 years of age and one of the oldest residents of the colony. He appears to have landed in Sydney so far back as 1838, whence he came to Victoria as protector of the aborigines. After various changes of residence, Mr Parker finally settled down on a station, remarkable for its beauty and fertility, at the foot of Mt Franklin. Here he lived up to the time of his death, for nearly a quarter of a century. He was a member of the old nominee (Legislative ) Council, and took an active part in obtaining the severance of Victoria from New South Wales. Mr Parker was also a candidate at the last general election for the representation of the Creswick district. In politics he was a liberal conservative. As an efficient and influential local preacher, he was widely known in the Wesleyan Methodist Church, and his loss will be a serious one for the denomination. It is said that among the manuscripts he has left behind are several relating to the remoter history of the colony, including many interesting traditions of the aborigines that are worth preserving.

South Bourke Standard 23-11-1866 page 3. Joseph Parker was secretary of the Glenlyon, Franklinford and Daylesford Agricultural Society.

LAUNCESTON EXAMINER. 2-12-1869 page 3. Mr Joseph Parker of Franklinford is the fortunate competitor for the Town Clerkship of the Borough of Guildford. He is contracted to perform the duties of clerk, assessor, collector of dog tax and rates, inspector of thistles and nuisances, revenue officer and surveyor for 70 pounds per annum. (This is repeated in the snippets at the end of the journal. As I intend to break this journal into parts so all surnames can be listed, I have pasted it to here so that it appears in the first part, including the Parkers.)

A.28-6-1892 page 1. Frederick Octavius , the eighth son of the late Edward Stone Parker Esq. of Mt Franklin, died at Clunes aged 38.

9-10-1893 page 3 (Portland Guardian.)Thomas Wilkinson, the first Chairman of the Brunswick Municipal Council 36 years earlier, had died. He and Edward Stone Parker had purchased a considerable amount of land in Brunswick on which the Wesleyan chapel and school stood.

29-9-1914 page 2 (Bairnsdale Advertiser and Tambo and Omeo Chronicle.)The death of James Williamson was announced. He had arrived in 1851 and spent several years as manager of the Union Bank at Ballarat. In 1860 he married Emma Mary, daughter of Edward Stone Parker, Mt Franklin, Daylesford, the first protector of the blacks in Victoria.

A. 21-6-1916 page 1. George Alfred, late incumbent of Christ Church Daylesford, youngest son of the late Edward Stone Parker and Hannah Ewardes Parker, Mt Franklin Estate, died aged 57. Interred at Mt Franklin on the 21st (i.e. that day.) I think he died in Bendigo but I forgot to record this. (See 23-6-1939.)

A.28-5-1918 page 4.Mr Joseph Parker who died at Castlemaine on Sunday at the age of 87 years was the only surviving son of Edward Stone Parker of Mt Franklin, protector of aborigines, and arrived in Victoria with his parents in 1838. He was therefore a colonist of 80 years standing. He had a clear recollection of Governor Latrobe, Sir John Franklin and other notabilities who were his father's guests in early days. (More details such as Joseph refusing an offer of land in Collins St at 5 pounds per acre.)

A. 23-6-1939 page 10. Charles George Bright Parker, vicar of All Saints, St Kilda, son of Rev. G.A. and E.S.Parker ( her own initials!), Bright, Daylesford and Bendigo, beloved husband of K.H.Parker, grandson of the late Edward Stone Parker of Mt Franklin Estate, Franklinford had died and his ashes were interred at Franklinford on the 21st June.
MY APOLOGIES ABOUT FAILING TO RECORD SOME DETAILS BUT AT LEAST YOU KNOW WHERE TO FIND THEM.


WILLIAM CAMPBELL'S HEAD STATION.
Alexander Kennedy who was related to William Campbell, is discussed in the journal about the Inverness Hotel near Bulla. It is likely that his Bowyard Station homestead was located near the Head Station of Campbell's Run.
I never thought that I would be able to tellya where William Campbell's head station was, but I can. I discovered it when I was trying to verify the location of Dean's Hotel at Bulla. I came across a map that had been produced for the chief commissioner of goldfields by G.Charing Cross (1852-3) and was called PLAN OF THE AURIFEROUS REGION OF MT. ALEXANDER. It shows the station in a slight horseshoe on the west bank of the already-named Campbells Creek not far north of the famous Guildford plateau. The Jim Crow Ranges to the south are also named on the map.

by itellya Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2012-03-02 00:03:57

Itellya is researching local history on the Mornington Peninsula and is willing to help family historians with information about the area between Somerville and Blairgowrie. He has extensive information about Henry Gomm of Somerville, Joseph Porta (Victoria's first bellows manufacturer) and Captain Adams of Rosebud.

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