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GEORGE ROBERT DAWS, A PIONEER OF DROMANA, VIC., AUST.

Journal by itellya

GEORGE ROBERT DAWS, A PIONEER OF DROMANA, VIC., AUST.
One of the pay to view scavengers let slip that G.R. died in 1899 so I was able to find his death notice.

DAWS.— On the 7th April, at Spencer-crescent,Camberwell. George Robert, dearly beloved husband of Elizabeth Daws. late of Kingston and Dromana, aged 71 years and 11 months. (P.5, The Age, 8-4-1899.)

DAWS. - On the 30th July, at her son's residence, George road, East Doncaster, Elizabeth, relict of the late G. R. Daws, loved mother of R. H.,Mrs. Stevens (Point Lonsdale), E., H.A**. , A.C*.(Privately interred.) (P.13, Argus, 1-8-1925.)

DAWS.—On the 30th July, at her son's residence, East Doncaster, Elizabeth, relict of the late G. R. Daws, dear grandma of F. W.*** (Brisbane),Ruby, and Harald Stevens. Passed peacefully away.
(P.11, Argus, 8-8-1925.


*Daws George Robert Daws married Elizabeth Smith Daws and they gave birth to Albert Charles Daws.(Daws George Robert Daws - Melbourne East - Ancient Faces www.ancientfaces.com › Daws Family › Daws Daws)

**George Robert Daws - Kingston - AncientFaces.com
www.ancientfaces.com › Daws Family › George Daws
This is a bio of George Robert Daws with George's genealogy and photos. ... George Robert Daws married Elizabeth Smith and they gave birth to Harry Arthur ...

** F.W. Daws was probably a son of Frank, who was obviously born at Kingston some time between 1867 and 1874.
Frank Daws-King, Victoria, Australia; date of birth-Unknown
Parents-George Robert Daws Smith Elizabeth Daws
(Frank Daws Birth Records
birth-records.mooseroots.com/d/b/Frank-Daws)


As I have accidentally lost my findings, it may be best to present this journal as a chronology.

1860.
When George Robert Daws moved to Kingston in 1867, he appears to have followed a relative to that place. William Allison who became a coach driver and then a Dromana blacksmith, and married widow, Catherine Wainwright, publican of the Arthurs Seat Hotel, in about 1887, may have been a descendant of Daws' business partner.

Allison & Daws District Road Board Kingston 22-Jun-60 3
(Creswick & Clunes Advertiser 1860 - Freepages - Ancestry.com
freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/…/…/.../CCA60A.htm)

1866.
There is no known connection between this George Robert Dawes and the one mentioned in 1867 unless there was a Deep Creek at Bullarook*. The digitisation has not been corrected in order to illustrate why this result was not found with a George Robert or G.R.Daws search but a George Daws search.
A publican's license, for a house at Subaatopol Hiil, Bullarook, was granted to George Ilobert Dawes, (P.1, The Ballarat Star, 24-10-1866.)

*POSTSCRIPT. There is a Deep Creek Road at Werona and a map search revealed that the Kingston-Werona road ran parallel to an unnamed creek which may have been Deep Creek. However there is no need to prove that the above hotel was the Deep Creek hotel because the Mr Boyd (owner of the hotel) who opposed the transfer of the licence in 1867 was probably W.Boyd of Bullarook and the Boyd family presence at Bullarook continued with M.Boyd of Bullarook gaining a soldier settlement farm in 1919. (BOYD, BULLAROOK search on trove.)

Most mentions of W.Boyd were in connection with the agricultural show.
"The Smeaton, Spring Hill and Bullarook agricultural society (dating from 1859) ran one of Victoria's most successful annual shows."

Why would George Robert Daws want to move to Kingston about seven months later?
Firstly "It is on the main road between Ballarat and Castlemaine" not on the south end of Black Swamp** Road which leads only to Bullarook. Secondly Kingston was probably the food bowl for the diggings near Ballarat. Thirdly, fortunes fluctuated on the diggings; when all the alluvial gold had been found, many diggers moved on to a new strike and even after mechanised mining (such as the William Tell at Bullarook) started, success was not immediate, and hampered by flooding etc. The only secure income was derived by carters (who certainly earned their money)and those who satisfied the diggers' hunger and thirst.

"Kingston is a rural township 7 km north-east of Creswick and 100 km north-west of Melbourne.

Kingston was beyond the alluvial gold mining in the Creswick district during the 1850s-60s, and just to the east of the deep lead mining which started with the Spring Hill lead in the 1870s. It was like Smeaton, providing agricultural land for cereals and grazing. A flourmill was built in Kingston in the early 1860s. A school was opened in the mechanics' institute at about the same time. (In nearby Spring Hill an Anglican school was opened in 1857.) Kingston was also the administrative centre of Creswick Shire until about 1948, 14 years after Creswick borough had been united with the shire.

Kingston was fortunately situated, with good agricultural land which suffered little disturbance from mining except to its west. The railway line from Creswick to Daylesford, via Kingston, opened in 1887 and ran until 1976." (Quotes from:
Kingston Township | Victorian Places
www.victorianplaces.com.au/kingston-township)

**Incidentally the name of Bullarook is almost certainly an aboriginal description of a swamp near a hill. As pointed out above, Bullarook is at the end of Black Swamp Rd. Tootgarook, named because of a swamp, means the growling of frogs and Bulla, according to I.W.Symonds in his "Bulla Bulla", means hill.



But the following shows that the Bullarook publican was definitely the Dromana pioneer unless the Advertiser's journalist was only guessing that the proud father was the former Bullarook publican.
DAWS Mrs George Birth of Son 12-Apr-67 On the 8th instatn, at her residence, Kingston, the wife of George Daws, of a son, both doing well.
Creswick & Clunes newspaperBirth Death and Marriage extractions ...
freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~po…/…/BDM1866.htm

The journalist was right! When 9 month old Emma died at Kingston she was buried at the New Creswick Cemetery. There was a definite Smith presence at Bullarook so George Robert Daws may have become acquainted with Elizabeth there. Emma was not necessarily their daughter. (See 1860.)
Daws Emma 9 mths residence-Kingston
(New Cemetery - Creswick Cemetery
www.creswickcemetery.com.au/list-of-burials/new-cemetery…)

Bullarook is not on the main road to Ballarat (or anywhere) so why would there be a hotel there in 1866?
Bullarook - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullarook
Bullarook is a locality in the Central Highlands in Victoria, near Ballarat. Bullarook was home to the William Tell Quartz Mining Co., a gold mining company which ...


1867.
The application of George Robert Dawes, for a transfer of the publican's license from the Deep Creek hotel to the Beehive hotel, Kingston, .was opposed by Mr Burton on behalf of Mr Boyd, the owner of the house at Deep Creek, and postponed till Friday next, (P.4, The Ballarat Star, 15-5-1867.)

A removal of licence from Deep Creek to the Beehive hotel, Kingston, was granted to George Robert Daws. (P.4, The Ballarat Star, 18-5-1867.)

Deep Creek would seem to have been near Bullarook. I originally thought that Kingston was in the area near the current bayside City of Kingston but it was near Ballarat.
"Kingston is a small town in rural Shire of Hepburn in Victoria, Australia. Kingston is located about 15 km from Creswick, just off the Midland Highway and is about 20 km from Daylesford. Kingston's post code is 3364.
Kingston was once a thriving gold mining town during the Victorian Gold Rush and became the administrative centre of the Creswick Shire. Kingston Post Office opened on 11 October 1858.[1] "(Wikipedia.)


1874 -1876.
In the last Finders Road District assessment of 13-6-1874, G.R.Daws was rated on a two roomed house on 322 acres in the parish of Balnarring that he was leasing from the Crown. Because ratepayers were listed in geographical order, it is almost certain that George was leasing crown allotments 90 and 91 Balnarring, fronting Shoreham Rd south of Oceanview Avenue, consisting of 322 acres 0 roods 19 perches, and granted to J.&J. Bayne on 4-7-1879.
1875. The Flinders and Kangerong Road Districts had merged to form the Flinders and Kangerong Shire. In its first assessment of 2-10-1875, George was rated on the same property although it was wrongly called 323 acres.
1876.George was joined by Edward Daws who may have been a brother. George was now rated on 34 acres and a building with a high net annual value of 35 pounds; this assessment being repeated in 1877. Edward was rated on 12 acres and 95 acres, Flinders and Kangerong and in 1877 just the 12 acres.

Alexander Haldan was operating Dromana's first post office by 1858. When he died, Walter Gibson gained appointment as postmaster and built a new post office (just west of Nelson Rudduck's Jetty Store which was on the west corner of Pier St.) SEE APPENDIX.RE POST OFFICE. Thus Mary Haldan's old post office became a mere store, as it remained during George Robert Daws' tenure. There was stern opposition to Gibson's site for the new post office and Mary unsuccessfully offered the old P.O. free to the government. She later moved to "Belmont" in Carlton, where her daughter was married. See my journal:
ALEXANDER HALDAN,PIONEER OF DROMANA,VIC., AUST. (& JAMES AND ...
www.familytreecircles.com/alexander-haldan-pioneer-of-droma…

IN the SUPREME COURT of the COLONY of VICTORIA :
Probate Jurisdiction.-In the Will of ALEXANDER HALDAN, late of Dromana, in the Colony of Victoria, Storekeeper, Deceased.-Notice is hereby given, that after the expiration of fourteen days from the publication hereof application will be made to the Supreme Court of the colony of Victoria, in Its Probate Jurisdiction, that PROBATE of the LAST WILL and TESTAMENT of the said Alexander Haldan, deceased, may be granted to Margaret Balmanno Haldan, of Dromana aforesaid, the widow and sole executrix named in and appointed by the said
will.
Dated this first day of December, 1876.
JOHN HOPKINS, 8 Market-buildings, ColIins
Street west, Melbourne, proctor for the executrix.
(P.3, Argus, 1-12-1876.)

TO SEASIDE VISITORS.-Mrs Haldan has pleasure in intimating the continuance of her BOARDING ESTABLISHMENT, Dromana-villa, Dromana,where every comfort and attention are offered to her patrons upon strictly moderate charges.(P.8, Argus, 18-12-1876.)

CHECK HOW LONG EDWARD STAYED.
Edward was assessed on 13 acres Kangerong (N.A V. 10 pounds) in 1877 and in 1878, no mention of George, nor Edward could be found. Typical! In 1879, both reappeared with Edward's 13 acres proving to be 12 acres Kangerong and one allotment west of McCulloch St in the township, the N.A.V. now being 14 pounds. In 1880, the township allotment was forgotten but in his last assessment, Edward's property still had the same value.


1877.
No assessment of Charles Barnett on his 36 acre triangular grant.
George's occupation was given as miner, as was Edward's. George was still rated on 34 acres, which I believe was still Charles Barnett's triangle west of today's Jetty Rd. It still, and till 1887, had a N.A.V. of 35 pounds.
Margaret B.Haldan, whose occupation was given as private lodging, was rated on one allotment and building, Dromana, the former post office, now Dromana Villa, which had a net annual value of 50 pounds.


(TRUSTEE, DAVEY'S GULLY)
I accidentally lost information when transferring the post I'd started on the HISTORY OF DROMANA TO PORTSEA Facebook page and DELETED!. Changing tacks every quarter of an hour, I'd fluked finding a trove article on a pay to view ancestry site that listed trustees whose appointments had been notified in the government gazette. At that time, I suspected that George was associated with Castlemaine and I think I was doing a GEORGE ROBERT DAWS, CASTLEMAINE google search. After "Castlemaine:" were listed some trustees who, no doubt, were appointed as trustees of some public property at Dromana. HAVE NO DOUBT THAT THE SOURCE IS THERE; I JUST CAN'T FIND IT AGAIN.
The trustees were, from memory: Walter Gibbon (Gibson), Peter Pidoto, George Robert Daws, Robert Caldwell, Daniel Nicholson and Charles Barnett. The others were all respected members of the community and the fact that in about four years George had been placed on a similar pedestal says a lot about him.
Walter Gibson built a Presbyterian Manse at his own expense, Peter played a prominent part in Dromana's trade with Melbourne, Robert Caldwell played a prominent part in Dromana getting a pier and Caldwell Rd is named after him, Daniel Nicholson was one of Dromana's two pre 1861 schoolteachers and became the registrar, Charles Barnett* was the grantee of the triangular 36 acre block west of Jetty Rd that I believe was George's 34 acres.
(*See the second item in the appendix.)

George nearly didn't survive in order to enjoy the respect he had earned.

A serious accident happened on Friday night last to the Schnapper Point coach on a decline leading into Davis' (sic) Gully* beyond Frankston. The brake unfortunately broke, and at the bottom of the decline two of the passengers were thrown off, but escaped with a few bruises. The horses then .ran up the incline on the other side, and the driver, known as "Dick," was next thrown off, and received some fractures of the ribs.
The greatest sufferer was Mr. Dawes (sic), of Dromana, who was thrown down the side of the gully, receiving some very severe fractures of the ribs, which impede the action of the lungs. The horses were brought to a stand-still by Mr. John Everard, who had occupied a seat beside the driver, and managed to keep his place. (P.2, South Bourke and Mornington Journal, 22-8-1877.)

* The Davey pre-emptive right of the Davey Kannanuke Run was between Old Mornington Rd and Port Phillip Bay, extending from the said gully (bottom left corner of Melway 101 J8) to Boundary (now Canadian Bay) Road. As the present highway did not exist, the coach would travel to Dromana via Old Mornington Rd, Mt Eliza Way- Wooralla Rd, and the three chain road (Moorooduc Rd.)

I learn that Mr. Dawes, of Dromana, who was so seriously injured in the frightful coach accident that occurred near Frankston eight days ago, is still lying in a precarious condition, very little hopes being entertained of his recovering.(Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918) Monday 27 August 1877 p 2 Article)


1879.
George and Edward were still called miners. George still had the 34 acres (net annual value 35 pounds) but now had one allotment and building, Dromana, with the incredibly high N.A.V. of 50 pounds. This was the former post office.

DROMANA -Comfort and Economy -Dromana Villa is now ready for visitors.
G R Daws, proprietor, (late Mrs Haldan) (P.8, Argus, 30-1-1879.)

1880.
The 34 acre block and the old post office were combined in one assessment (net annual value 85 pounds.)

1881-1886
George's details were unchanged except that he was now a yoeman. In 1882 and 1883 he was a carpenter.

1887.
DAWS George Robert was now a boarding house keeper. He was rated only on 30 acres with a net annual value of 65 pounds. How could the rate collector describe him as a boarding house keeper without thinking it necessary to include the house he was keeping in the property description?
This was George Robert Daws' last assessment.

##################################################################
The Daws family which occupied "Carnarvon" many decades after the death of George Robert Daws, was not descended from G.R.Daws. This family was descended from Charles Pearson Daws, who may have been one of G.R.'s brothers.

COPY COMMENTS UNDER THE FLEMING STORE PHOTO ON THE DROMANA TO PORTSEA FACEBOOK PAGE.
ME.The Flemings lived on the west corner of Foote St and discovered ink wells from Alexander Haldan's post office, established by 1858 and used by the Haldans as a guest house called Dromana Villa when Walter Gibson established the new granite P.O. just west of Rudduck's store in about 1876. The Flemings lived in "Carnarvon" (photo, P.54, A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.) It has been extended but one of the stone walls remains under the carport, as the current owners kindly showed me.

Andrew Davis After Grahame and Rosemary Daws left (the store near the site of the Arthurs Sest Hotel-itellya) around 1976 the next owners were the McIntosh family and then it was Andy Griffith. After the milk bar Grahame and Rosemary lived up the road in Codrington St (at Albey Brasser the concreters old house). Mum and Dad moved from Codrington St to McCrae in 1995 and they're still there today. Rod Daws Sue Stone

ME. Rod Daws. How nice to find another descendant of one of our pioneers (whose surname has been written countless times as DAWES in ratebooks, newspapers and, thus, in Colin McLear's history.) If Andrew had not posted the comment and mentioned Rod, I would never have twigged. I promise to spell it correctly in future. George Robert DAWS retained the Haldans' name of Dromana Villa for the house. I wonder who called it Carnarvon, the Flemings? Did you ever hear of George's brush with death in 1877?

Deborah Hiskins R__ G___ The Dawes (pretty sure with an "e") had the store after the Fleming's were not from Dromana. M;y parents Margaret (jnr) and Mike Fleming had the shop for 2 years and my grandparents Margaret (snr)and Arthur owned Carnarvon. After the shop was sold we moved into Carnarvon. Dad dug up several clay ink wells and broken clay pipes in the garden here. The original Carnarvon was originally purchased by my great grandparents Howard and Gertie SALTER in the 1920's as well as the next house in the street. Howard named the house but not sure where the name came from.(Margaret Fleming Snr was their daughter)

Margaret Fleming Deb, actually I spelt Daws with an e, but now I remember it didn't! Also regarding Carnarvon, several of the granite walls are still standing in the house, even though it's been renovated. This granite came from Dromana quarry and when the old house was pulled down, Mike (Fleming), remembers all the roof slate being dumped down the well at the rear of the house!

Andrew Davis I can confirm its Daws with no "e" and we are not descendants of George Robert Daws. Dads side of the family dating back to 1874 descended from Charles Pearson Daws of Llanelly* in Central Vic.

(*Postscript. This name was associated with Robert Smith of Bullarook who was NOT the father of Elizabeth Smith, who became George Robert Daws' wife, but may have been related to her. I can't remember whether Llanelly was the name of Robert's farm or birthplace.)

ME. Andrew Davis. Charles Pearson Daws might have been a brother of George Robert Dawes. The father of C.P. Daws was named George and the given name Robert was bestowed on one of C.P.'s descendants. Bertie Charles, a son of George Robert and Elizabeth Daws, may have been named after Charles Pearson Daws.(Bertie Charles Daws Dromana, Victoria, Australia
Birth date -Unknown, Parents-George Robert Daws Smith Elizabeth Daws)

Unfortunately George Robert's siblings are not mentioned in his death notice.
(My comment included George's death notice, see start of journal, and the following genealogy.)

FROM:Giles Daniel, Charles Pearson Daws, Fernanda Dennis, John Dennis ...
www.reocities.com/mepnab/d/d61.html
Daws
Charles Pearson Daws was present at the Eureka Stockade Revolt, appears to have been aged 17 years 9 months. His presence is reported by at least 3 books about the event.
Jane Geary wed to Dec 1842 to Thomas Pollen in Lambeth which spans the boundaries of the counties of Greater London, London and Surrey
Thomas Pollen came and was joined Jul 1857 via the Essex by Jane 34 with Jane 11 and Henry 7
Charles Pearson Dawes 07 Jan 1837 - 5 May 1919 aged 82, son of Mary Pearson and George Dawes born at Greasley, Nottingham, England, (detail from IGI submitted entry) wed 13 Dec 1863 #3328 to Jane Dorothy Pollen 1845 - 9 July 1928 aged 83, and lived at Inglewood, Tarnagulla
7 Children 1. George Pearson Daws 1864 - 11 Oct 1950 aged 84 - original birth record 1864 #15785
2. Jane Daws 1866 #8805
3. Mary Jane Daws 1867 #15518
4. Charles Henry Daws 1869 #16181
5. Thomas Pollen Daws 1874 #19654
6. Elizabeth Ann Daws 1877 #5655
1. George Pearson Daws 1864 #21484 - 1950 born and died in Inglewood, wed 1896 to Emily Theresa Keefe 1872 - 1856 children born in Tarnagulla
8 Children 1. Ada Etta Daws 1897 - 1951 wed 1929 to William Stanley Notman
2. Thomas Ashley Daws 1898 - 1972 wed 1924 to Thelma Minnie Taylor
3. Vera Jane Daws 1899 - 1983 wed 1918 to Stanley James Murrowood
4. Ivy May Daws 1901 - 1955 wed 1919 to Clifford Henry Pollard
5. Mary Evelyn Daws 1904 - 1975 wed 1927 to Walter Robert Arnfield
6. Florence Elizabeth Daws born 1906 #22630 wed 1932 to Lionel Percy Stevenson at Llanelly, Vic, Aust
7. George Henry Daws 1908 - 1969 was born in Parkville, Vic, Australia.
8. Linda Elsie Daws born 1910 #15173 wed 1929 to John Edgar Davies
7. George Henry Daws born 1908 at Tarnagulla (Reg No. 23128/1908 Births) and died at Parkville (Reg No. 23830/1969 Deaths). Married Florence Bloodworth in 1939 (Reg No. 9804/1939 Marriages)

APPENDIX.
From my HERITAGE WALK, DROMANA journal.
THE POST OFFICE.
As stated previously,the Township was west of McCulloch St (to Burrell Rd, which despite the virtual cliff was supposed to connect the Esplanade and the north-south section of Latrobe Pde.) East of McCulloch St were crown allotments 1-8 of section 1 Kangerong.
In A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, Colin McLear stated that the original post office was in a granite building named Carnarvon,situated on the corner of Foote St and Latrobe Pde.
"In the 19th century prospecting days about Dromana miners could sell their findings to Dawes who ran a store on the corner of Foote St. and Latrobe Parade in the first Carnarvon which stood there then. On the counter stood his gold scales in what was the first Dromana Post Office. (P.54 with photo.)

Despite the majority of permanent residents being tenants on the survey in the mid 1850's when the township site was decided, the centre of population was probably farther west with many timber getters working on Arthurs Seat. The zig-zagging Tower Rd, which was used as a boundary between the township's suburban allotments, may have been created by bullock drivers bringing timber to the coast by the shortest possible route. Codrington St, which divides township streets to the west running at right angles to the coast and those such as Verdon St, which don't, may have been a continuation of this track.

Another early track may have been between McLear Rd near the summit and Caldwell Rd, which formed the boundary between suburban allotments and William Grace's "Gracefield",granted in 1857. This track would have continued along McCulloch St,the eastern boundary of the township.

Despite the township being proclaimed in 1861, the suburban blocks of mostly 2 roods (half an acre) were being sold in about 1858. Richard Watkins, who is stated wrongly as establishing the Dromana Hotel in 1857 (actually 1862 not counting the slate roof) was in 1858 running Scurfield's hotel as well as selling Arthurs Seat timber (in competition with another firm.)

Proclamation of the township meant that the Crown would provide a school and a post office. Shortly afterwards, Robert Quinan and Daniel Nicholson were scrambling to have their private schools chosen as the Common School. Interestingly, many of those who signed the 9-3-1861 petition (P.132 A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA) were Survey residents. The private school near Wallaces Rd on the Survey had apparently closed after the death of the teacher's wife. With the school also west of McCulloch St, Survey children could pick up the mail on their way home from school, so the location of the post office was not a great problem.

On page 138, Colin McLear wrote:
From its original premises,the post office moved into another granite building of the same period,this time in the main shopping centre. These premises were owned by Walter Gibson and also incorporated brick from the Glenholme (sic) clay pits. In later years these offices were replaced by a used car yard.

I have been trying since I started this journal to find the second article about the removal/argument re the post office first seen years ago. It was found by accident when I was trying to find out whether Pattersons Lane had been renamed Wallaces Rd after a Wallace family. The first article was found when I unsuccessfully searched for a request from Water Gibson to the Flinders and Kangerong to have the township boundary altered to take in the area near the pier. (Perhaps that was in 1885 when Peter Pidoto's parents-in-law died? No!*)

The Postmaster-General was waited upon on Friday by Mrs.(Alex.)Haldan, accompanied by Mr. Fergusson, M.L.A., the object being to draw his attention to the inconvenience caused to the residents of Dromana by the removal of the post and telegraph office from that place to some distance outside Dromana. Mrs. Haldan represented that her husband had held the office of postmaster in Dromana for many years till the office was removed,and if it were now re-transferred to Dromana she was willing to supply a building for the purpose free of cost to the department. Mr. Cuthbert replied that if it was the wish of the residents generally that the office should be re-transferred,he would take the matter into consideration.

Mr.Gibson, the lessor of the post-office building, afterwards waited upon the Postmaster-General, and represented that he was one of the guarantors to the department in regard to the post-office at Dromana, and he desired that they might not be called upon to pay the deficiency of L.105 in the revenue. In support of his request he quoted several precedents, and Mr. Cuthbert promised to take the matter into consideration.Telegraph.
(South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic. : 1872 - 1920) Wednesday 5 June 1878 p 2 Article)

DROMANA.
A strenuous effort is being made by one section of the community to have the post and telegraphic office removed to a site remote from the general traffic. The advocates of this movement argue that the post and tele-
graph office should be in the township, which is certainly right in the abstract, but the township of Dromana is anomalously situated, the jetty and principal places of business being some distances beyond its boundary.
The jetty, however, is naturally the convergent point, from all the traffic of the district. The other section of the inhabitants, therefore, argue that the post office is in the right place, being in close proximity to the centre of trade and feel that the proposed removal, if carried out, would, be injurious to the interests of the district at large. The Postmaster General has been interviewed by both sides, and a petition has been got
up for presentation by the removalists. The result remains to be seen.
(South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic. : 1872 - 1920) Wednesday 12 June 1878 p 3 Article)

*PROOF OF THE SAYING:"YOU MAKE YOUR OWN LUCK."
If I had not decided to write a journal about Alex Haldan and hadn't suspected that Cr. George M.Henderson was a relative of Alexander's wife, I would never have discovered the article about Walter Gibson,actually George McLear, wanting to extend the township boundary toward the pier. I knew all the right key words apart from the petitioner's name, and was sure that the article was from 1878 but there was not one result on trove.

A petition was presented by Councillor McLear; praying that the boundary of the present township of Dromana might be so extended as to include the jetty and other places of business. The petition was signed by a number of owners of land in the township, and also by nearly all the owners of land sought to be incorporated*. Notice of motion was given for the consideration of the matter at the next meeting of the Council.
(P.3, South Bourke and Mornington Journal, 3-7-1878.)

(*Land east of McCulloch St, in section 1, Kangerong, whose owners wanted incorporated or included in the township.)

CHARLES BARNETT. (See separate journal.)

Surnames: DAWS
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by itellya Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2016-06-17 10:57:14

Itellya is researching local history on the Mornington Peninsula and is willing to help family historians with information about the area between Somerville and Blairgowrie. He has extensive information about Henry Gomm of Somerville, Joseph Porta (Victoria's first bellows manufacturer) and Captain Adams of Rosebud.

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