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HANSARD, Albert William life in New Zealand

Journal by vagabond2

Would like to find out about AW's two wives in NZ. Jane Jennings gave birth to two boys then died in a carriage accident shortly after AW marries Fanny Maria Jennings (20 years younger) but all I have is a marriage certificate for this...she did not go to Japan with him in 1860

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by vagabond2 Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2013-11-08 17:53:58

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by ngairedith on 2013-11-08 18:43:09

hello vagabond2,
just to give your readers some dates:
Albert William Hansard, Estate and Commission Agent of Auckland:
* married Jane JENNINGS on 12 Oct 1850
they had:
1852 - Albert Francis Hansard
1855 - Arthur Charles Hansard
Daily Southern Cross, 3 April 1857 - DEATH On the 1-2 instant, at Evenwood, Grafton Road (Auckland), Jane, the beloved wife of Albert William Hansard
* he married Fanny Maria STEELE on 7 Nov 1857

New Zealand Herald, 1 August 1866
Mr Albert William Hansard, some years back of this city, and who left here for Japan, has, we now learn, died, on the 5th of May last, of scarlet fever, while on a visit to England. Mr Hansard left many creditors in Auckland, and these will be not a little pleasantly surprised to learn that by his will, Mr Hansard has made the whole of his property (with the exception of that in Japan) said to be considerable, subject to those debts. Mr Thoms Russell, now in London, and who may be expected in Auckland in about a month, and Mr Brookfield, solicitor, are the trustees under the will

Observer, 2 November 1895
The real active promoter of the early building societies in Auckland was a notable citizen, Albert William Hansard, otherwise better known as the "Dying Schnapper," from his woe-begone visage. He ultimately went to "where the woodbine twineth" - to wit, China - leaving the shareholders of some of his societies lamenting, and feeling that they had built their houses, so to speak, "upon the sand". When the Dying Schnapper years afterwards came to draw nigh unto death, while on a visit to London, Tom Russell heard of his condition and sent to see him. Tom was not then a big B.N.Z. or Load and Mercantile man. He was a green and unsophisticated youth, and consumed with a desire to save the building society shareholders. He pleaded with Albert William to make restitution, to settle his accounts before he passed in his checks, and the final balance was struck. There is nothing like giving good advice to another fellow - it goes round. The Dying Schnapper thought there was something in the suggestion, especially as he was getting white about the gills. A shipment of tea consigned to Hansard had just arrived in London, and Tom empowered to sell the shipment and refund the shareholder their money. And this was really done in due course

by vagabond2 on 2013-11-08 21:05:57

thank you, I wasn't sure how to put the information I did have. You have included information here which is fascinating for me to read about AW. I do now that according to other probate records he left 2,000 £ to his daughter Mary Elizabeth, along with a letter asking for her apologies for his mistake with Fanny (I read this once but have lost my citation). I wonder what happened to her.

by ngairedith on 2013-11-09 03:01:15

I believe it possible that daughter Mary Elizabeth was born in 1844 (and also a brother Robert in 1847) in Darlington, England, a daughter of Alfred's FIRST wife, Elizabeth (nee Percival), making Jane 2nd & Fanny 3rd wives!

children with Alfred & Fanny appear to have been:
1859 - 1945 Roger Walter Hansard (born ?, died Christchurch NZ)
1861 - Josephine Mary Hansard (born ?, died NZ)
1862 - 1939 George Albert/Alfred Hansard (born London, died NZ)

Also possible (but you may already know this) that Albert's brother, Charles John Hansard (1828-1920) died in New Zealand

a lot more research needed to verify, & build on, all this of course, but fascinating as usual ...

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