<< Previous - Next >>

HENRY WILLIAM WILSON, BULLOCKY TO BUTCHER, MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.

Journal by itellya

This journal results from a request for information about Henry William Wilson. Hopefully I will be able to cut and paste much of it from previous work.

Street names in most parts of the Southern Peninsula honour the family of Henry William Wilson. Henry Wilson Dr and Thamer St in the Rosebud Industrial Estate recall Henry and his wife. Coutts St at Safety Beach recalls a Wilson presence on the Survey. Burdett St on the west side of Truemans Rd is on the Stenniken grant. Coutts Ct, Benjamin St, Godfrey St and Wilson Rd west of St Johns Wood Rd at Blairgowrie recall that the shopping centre sits on the old Wilson abbatoir site. When I started my research, I wondered if Wilsons Rd at Mornington was named after Henry William's family. I believe that both the road and the C.B.Wilson were named after Charlie Wilson, the train-driving President of Mornington Shire, the child of a female Wilson from "Tuerong" and a totally unrelated Wilson male from an equally old Schnapper Point family. (Joan Downward, Bonnie William website re Tuerong.)

Colin McLear's A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA gives much detail about the Wilson family on pages 43 to 47.Henry was the son of a London butcher and the licencee of the Beauvoir Arms Hotel, Kingsland Rd, London, in 1843. With his wife, Thamer, and four children, he left London on 22-1-1853 aboard the Emigrant, arriving at Port Phillip on 23 April. Their youngest daughter, Emily, died during the voyage.

He established an abbatoir at Sandridge(Port Melbourne) while living at Emerald Hill (South Melbourne.) He would have been living in a tent in Canvas Town as Emerald Hill was first known. Rents were extraordinarily high in Melbourne and most newcomers had to slum it at Canvas Town or Newtown (Fitzroy.) After a disease in his cattle on a run near Cranborne led to failure, he moved to Dromana in the early 1860's.

He had a bullock dray and four bullocks and initially lived in a slab hut on what was later to become Walter Gibson's No.10 paddock of 125 acres, then part of Jamieson's Special Survey. (Melway 160 K4 and bounded on the north by Wallaces Rd according to the subdivision map of Clarke's Estate.) The Stenniken land was a triangular block, the base of which was formed by the Nepean Highway and the sides of Moorooduc Highway and the upper reaches of Tassells Creek.( Roughly 151 D11, and sold as part of the Bruce Estate.) Henry took over as Dromana's butcher after the McLear brothers gave it up, but he first slaughtered on their "Maryfield" before buying the 45 acres that became the Dromana Aerial Landing Ground (P.27) from Mr Carrington and slaughtering there.
Henry was born in London in 1820 and died at Dromana on 17-12-1894.Thamer (Burdett!) was born in 1818 and died on 18-11-1894. (Both are buried at the Dromana Cemetery, their headstone easily read.) Their children were Henry John b. 1849, Godfrey Burdett 17-2-1850 to 21-1-1919, Thamer Burdett b.1846, Sarah b.1850, Emily 1852-3.

Godfrey married Maria Stenniken (b. 6-1-1855, d. 1-9-1927) in 1878. Their children were Henry William Burdett Coutts (1879-1956), Benjamin Godfrey John Ralph (1891?-1953) and Samuel James Stenniken (1886-1949.)
(They must have had other children, surely. LIME LAND LEISURE has more Wilson genealogy.
I should have found the Wilson family connections before I typed the above.
WILSON-BURDETT
Henry William Wilson married Thamer Burdett.
This marriage took place in England. Henry was the son of a London butcher. In 1843, Henry was running the Beauvoir Arms Hotel in in Kingsland Rd, London. Henry, Thamer and their four children left London on 22-1-1853 aboard the Emigrant and after a remarkably fast voyage, which obviously stopped them getting into the doldrums (in both ways), they reached Port Phillip on 23 April. (Dreamtime of Dromana page 43.) This source and Lime Land Leisure contain much business and genealogical detail about Henrys descendants.
It is possible that some of Thamers family came with them and any Burdett family historian should inspect the Emigrant passenger list for that voyage. Henry established an abbatoir at Sandridge (Port Melbourne) and lived in Emerald Hill, where it is possible that he came into contact with Isaac White and Captain Henry Everest Adams, pioneers of Rosebud, and that Captain Adams gave Henry Wilson an idea.
It is likely that Thamer was related, however distantly, to Sir Francis Burdett and his daughter, Angela Burdett. Sir Francis, a Baronet, had married Sophia, daughter of Thomas Coutts, a wealthy banker who founded Coutts and Co.
Now if Henry had chatted to Captain Adams, the old sea dog would have bragged about being the son of Lord Vivian (which led to the name of his vineyard, Vivyan, with spelling altered in case his real father had an agent in Singapore- and given names of many in the Adams line). Wilson would have thought, Well, my wife is related to the wealthiest woman in England and one of the greatest social reformers and philanthropists in the world; why not flaunt that fact? He was speaking of Angela, the first Baroness Burdett- Coutts and that is possibly how the Wilsons and Stennikens used Coutts as a given name and Coutts St in Safety Beach got its name. See Historic Origins of Street names entry and the sources named above. (Details about Angela Burdett -Coutts from Wikipedia.)
The Burdett Quarry, on 101 hectares at 160 Potts Rd, Langwarrin, was probably established by relatives of Thamer. Burdett St in Frankstons The Pines Estate would have been named after the quarry family, which must have been in the area fairly early (since they shared this honour with the pioneering Brunnings family of Somerville); if it had been one of the many subdivision of Wilson land there would have been another street named Thamer, Wilson, Godfrey, Benjamin etc nearby. See next entry re Coutts.

WILSON-McDOWELL
Benjamin Godfrey John Ralph Wilson (son of Godfrey Burdett Wilson and grandson of Henry William and Thamer) married Dorothy McDowell. Bens first given name came from his maternal grandfather Ben Stenniken. His brothers had Henry, William, Samuel, James, Burdett, Coutts and Stenniken as given names.
Allotment 17, Wannaeue, on the west side of Jetty Rd, which extended to Spray St and Eastbourne Rd, was subdivided in the 1870s by the Woolcotts of Melbourne. George and Susan Peatey purchased 2 acres on which they grew vegetables, which they sold along with poultry, eggs etc. Their cottage burnt down in 1912 by which time their son had established a similar business on the east side of Peateys Creek (Murray-Anderson Rd) on a Rosebud Village (foreshore) block. Another early purchaser from the Woolcotts was the Education Department but that block was not as big as the present school site.
By 1900 the only other blocks sold were owned by George Chapman from Dromana (4), Charles James (3 acres), Marshall (William? 7 acres), postmaster John Roberts whose daughter established the Post Office Store, now a caf of that name (4 and house) and Furmbisher (2.5 acres). The commercial bank now owned 84 acres of Woolcotts land. As crown allotment 17 consisted of 129.5 acres, Mrs Phillips and Frederick Taylor probably had three more blocks too.
By 1910, Henry Bucher had 4 lots, Annie Eliza Cairns 4, Rosebud Ted Cairns 6, Alf Hanson (of Alpine Chalet in Tucks Rd ) 6, blacksmith, Hy Geo Chapman 2, the Coburns of Springbank 4, Fallow 1, Maconochie 4, Back Road Bob Cairns 2 near state school, Marshall (Moonee Ponds R.E.Agent) 7, Susan Peatey 2, Mrs J.Spensley 4 and Vale , probably the politician after whom Vale St in Mornington was named had the 84 acres forfeited by Woolcott.
By 1920, Mrs Mary Butler had a house on lot 49 and her rate notice was to be sent to Mrs McDowell of Rosebud. Robert McDowell had lots 77, 79 and part of lot 75 and buildings. These were across McDowell St from the Presbyterian Church, which became the site of Woolworths. Ernest Rudducks store was being run by L.C.Leech. Houses had been built by the Cairns family, Mrs Helena Salina Mitchell of Essendon, and Joseph Maconochie of Richmond. One house had disappeared and Alf and John Peatey were assessed on the block only.
McDowell Street changed little for years. The McDowells neighbours were Don Miller and his caravan park opposite the school, Rosebud Ted opposite Pattersons Garage, then Ivy Patterson, Harry Nichols and the SEC on the Rosebud Avenue Ave corner.
SOURCES: A Dreamtime of Dromana by Colin McLear, Kangerong and Flinders rate records, Wannaeue parish map, Pine Trees and Box Thorns by Rosalind Peatey, The Cairns Family of Boneo by Peter Wilson, On the Road to Rosebud by Peter Wilson, Map of early Rosebud incorporated in Early Rosebud by Ray Gibb.

WILSON-RUDDUCK
Samuel James Stenniken (son of Godfrey Wilson and Maria, nee Stenniken) married Ruby Bery Rudduck, daughter of Nelson Rudduck and Jane Sophia, nee Chapman.
After Nelson died in 1935, Sam and Ruby moved into Piawola, the fine double storey house next to the Uniting Church in Dromana that Nelson built in 1894. The connection between the families goes back to the arrival in Dromana of Nelson and Jane from Dandenong in 1871 or early 1872. By 1867 Henry William Wilson had given up his occupation as a bullocky to become a butcher, grazing and slaughtering on 45 acres that was known as the Dromana Aerial Landing Ground by 1927*, and selling his meat from a shop whose location is described in two different ways by Colin McLear. (Main St or McCulloch St?) Henry retired in 1877 at 57 and Godfrey took charge of the company, expanding into Sorrento and building a brick shop and home** in Gibson St, Dromana. (*New abbatoirs had been established at Melway 167 F2, and operated until 1955, where Coutts Crt, Godfrey St, Benjamin Pde and Wilson Rd now stand. **Godfrey named the home Beauvoir after a hotel that his father had run in London in 1843.)
Sam was born in 1886 and died in 1949. On his fathers death in 1919, Sam and his brother, Ben, took over the Dromana portion of the empire Godfrey had built up and also expanded their retail into McCrae and Rosebud where older brother Henry had built shops. They relocated their shop to Main St in 1934.


Henry's son, Godfrey, married Ben Stenniken's daughter, so a bit of information about this other pioneering peninsula family will not go astray. The following comes from the FAMILY CONNECTIONS entry in my PENINSULA DICTIONARY HISTORY.
STENNIKEN-SHERLOCK
Benjamin (1815-1897) married Mary Ann, daughter of Samuel Sherlock.
Mary Ann was the sister of the Sam Sherlock who was much involved in the southern peninsula as a lad and later became a pioneer of the area north of the Osborne Township which the locals called Green Island. This name is perpetuated by Green Island AvE(145 E6). Ben and Mary Ann (and Mary Jane, probably their daughter) were buried at Rye Cemetery; their details are on the cemetery microfiche at Rosebud Library.
Sam Sherlock worked for the Barkers at Boneo and at The Briars for Balcombe. After his marriage, he carried the mail on horseback from Rye and Hastings to Cheltenham.
( Osborne Primary School Centenary 1873-1973 by Leslie Moorhead.)
Perhaps it was en route to Cheltenham that he spotted the Green Island land. According to LIME LAND LEISURE, Sam Sherlock was a co-grantee of the Stenniken land (at 14) but it was probably Mary Anns father.


STENNIKEN-PRINCE
Benjamin Henry, son of Jack and grandson of Benjamin Jnr, married Dorothy, daughter of Harry Prince. Ray Cairns told me that Harry Prince bought some of his fathers land near Maroolaba and that it came into Bens ownership after the death of Harry Prince.
(See TALKING HISTORY WITH RAY CAIRNS by Ray Gibb.)
Ray Cairns father, Hill Harry, inherited Maroolaba from his father, the original Robert Cairns, who settled in Boneo in 1852. Robert Cairns and the Pattersons moved to Fingal, near Pattersons Rd at about the same time in the 1870s. Rather than repeat information contained in the PATTERSON-STENNIKEN entry, I will simply state that Maroolaba (part of which was bought by Harry Prince) was 260 metres from Mary Jane Stennikens grant. The Prince family could have earlier lived near Truemans Rd, but, if not, Fingal provides an explanation as to how the two families connected.



STENNIKEN-WILSON
Maria, daughter of Benjamin Stenniken Snr married Godfrey Burdett, son of Henry William Wilson. Benjamin Stenniken was based in Truemans Rd but also leased land on the western portion of Jamiesons Special Survey near Pickings Lane, near Henry William Wilson's abode. Family members could have resided there to manage the property for Ben. Maria probably resided there in the summer. Big Clarke had bought the survey and the northern part was given to Bruce, his son-in-law. (Colin McLears version is more likely than Hollinsheds.) Maria used to work at Bruces house during the season.
One more piece of information is contained in the final verse of one of my first pieces, a poem called ALONG THE BACK TRACK, which can be found in my CANTERBURY TALES and describes an imagined trip made by drapery hawker, Charles Graves, and young Godfrey Wilson in about 1860. They have traveled from The Willow (Safety Beach area) to the corner of Weeroona and Browns Rds, Godfrey having been reassured by Graves that the smoke came from kilns, not a bushfire.
As they turned back to Kangerong,
A well-known man came riding strong,
With five year old Maria, running late.
Godfrey married Maria in 1878.


STENNIKEN-CLEMENGER (See PATTERSON- STENNIKEN.)
Jack Stenniken married Lily Clemenger.
By 1910, Mary Ann Stenniken (most likely the owner of the Fingal land) was living in Dromana and assessed on crown allotment 6 of section 17. This block with frontages to McCulloch St and Heales St and halfway between the school corner and the freeway was leased from Patterson. Ralph Patterson had probably just leased it to her (because of the position of Mary Anns assessment). His wifes entry is next and her property (1 lot and buildings, McCulloch St) was probably next door. As lot 6 had no buildings, it is likely that Mary Ann was staying with Ralph and her daughter, Rachel. Ralph Godfrey Patterson (whose second given name recalls the marriage of 1878 in the previous entry) was leasing 287 acres (lots 18 and 19) from Clarke on the Survey and was probably Rachels husband and Mary Anns son in law. His move to Dromana probably followed the sale of his Fingal grant to one of the Cairns family. (His 244 acres may have been the bulk of the 260 acres that Harry Cairns sold to Harry Prince.)
Robert Adams sold crown allotment 19 of Wannaeue (between Parkmore Rd and Adams Ave) to William Tetley in about April 1889. Subdivision plan 3513 shows that the Clemengers bought lots 1-5 of section B, fronting Parkmore and Rosemore Rds. Albert Holloway built Parkmore in 1896, probably on lots 1-5 of section A, fronting Pt Nepean Rd. The Clemengers bought this historic house in 1908, after it was occupied for some time by Mr and Mrs Fair. The Clemengers introduced tented accommodation. Jack Stenniken was born in 1893 and died in 1970.
(Adams Corner and Rosebud Flower of the Peninsula by Ray Gibb.)
Jack might have met Lily at a dance at the Mechanics Institute dances at Dromana, Rosebud or Rye or perhaps at the Boneo hall on the CFA site. Another possibility is that he worked for Ralph on the Survey or met Lily on the way from Truemans Rd to visit Mary Ann Stenniken in Dromana.

BITS AND PIECES.
"A Dreamtime of Dromana" discusses members of the Wilson family on pages 43-7, 53, 65, 72, 80, 81?, 101, 114, 121, 132, 140, 144, 156, 162, 165 and 177. I would love to give these details now but I am halfway through the journals about the WHITES and THE RED HILL. However I find page 132 interesting because it tends to confirm my theory that George Wilson of the Flinders area might have been related to Henry William Wilson. Whoever made the index has stated that Sarah Wilson and her sons, George and Robert, settlers on Jamieson's Survey in 1855 signed the letter supporting Quinan's school. Sarah was obviously a widow and it is possible that Henry and Thamer's daughter was named after her. In 1900, George Wilson was assessed on 216 acres at Flinders and George Wilson Jnr on 96 acres at Flinders and 48 acres, Balnarring (the latter being at Melway 255 J1.)

Is it possible that Henry William had a brother named George who came out with him, went to the Survey very soon and then died, leaving his widow and children on farmland that needed to be cleared before it could help to pay the rates? And that Henry, at Sandridge, having seen the enormous amount of sleepers needed to build the railway to that place at the end of 1854, moved into the "hut, Survey", on which he was assessed in 1863, to support her? (There is no mention of Sarah, George and Robert in that assessment although they signed the document in March 1861.

By 1900, the ratebook revealed that Henry Willam (the son) had 1 lot and building, Dromana and 5 acres leased from Thompson. Godfrey Burdett had 144 acres and 2 lots, Dromana. The 144 acre block was the holding paddock/abbatoir that was called the Dromana Aerial Landing Ground by 1927 when Spencer Jackson was flogging the Panoramic and Foreshore Estates with the aid of his "history of beautiful Dromana" which the Dromana Historical Society has for sale. As I did not transcribe the rates in the parish of Nepean, I do not know the details of the family's property in Blairgowrie and Sorrento, but I am prepared to research this if requested in comments. A Catherine Eleanor Wilson had 3 lots and a building in Dromana but I have no idea whether she was related to the Henry or Sarah Wilsons.

In 1910, Mrs G.G.Wilson had 60 acres of the Cairns' brothers'320 acre "Little Scotland' at the north east corner of Boneo and Browns Rd but I don't know if she was related to H.W.Wilson, although Colin McLear mentions that they had land at Boneo. Godfrey Burdett Wilson, butcher, had: shop, house and land, McCulloch St, 1-3 of 4, 4 of 13, 11,2 of section 2; 40 acres 2,3 of 1 Kangerong, 100 acres and slaughteryards, Kangerong probably in Shergolds Lane ; 255 acres (lots 22 and 23 Clarke's.) His wife had house and land, Heales St, Ben had 150 acres Kangerong, Henry(living in Sorrento and running that branch of the empire) had 100 acres, Kangerong, and Sam, living in Dromana, had 180 acres Kangerong.

As the land designated as Kangerong was not granted to the Wilsons, it would take months of research to specify its location. Dromana Township was west of McCulloch St. Section 14 was bounded by the Esplanade, Verdon, Hodgkinson and Heales Sts with lots 1-3 near the beach, section 13 was across Verdon St, lot 2 section 2 was at the east corner of Latrobe Pde and McArthur St and I can only presume that 11 meant section 11, bounded by Codrington, Ligar and Verdon Sts with lots 10, 11 and 12, fronting Palmerstone Ave, granted to G.B.Wilson.

Lots 22 and 23 Clarke's is a pushover and the rate collector was amazingly accurate with the acreage! Lot 22 was 127 acres and 19 perches. Lot 23 was 127 acres 2 roods and 37 perches, giving a total of 254 acres,3 roods and 16 perches, only .15 of an acre out! The Wilson's were involved with the subdivision of the Safety Beach area and must have been involved with the land near Coutts St (160 D2) where the female drover thought Jagger's dairy was located. Lot 23 and 22 were between Pickings Rd and the south side of the Martha Cove Waterway with Victoria St the western boundary and the bend in Island Drive indicating the north east corner of lot 22. The western two thirds of the canals are in lot 23.
Even though he was living in Sorrento, Henry William Wilson Junior was still involved in the social fabric of Dromana. He was the Secretary of the Dromana Sports and was a handicapper for the athletic and wood chopping events. (Mornington Standard, 21-3-1901, p.26.) The Mornington Peninsula souvenir in The Argus of 7-6-1954 has and advertisement for the long established butchering business which features photos of the main players. This is just a sample of the information about the family that is available on trove.
HOPE THIS HELPS.

by itellya Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2012-08-05 12:08:13

Itellya is researching local history on the Mornington Peninsula and is willing to help family historians with information about the area between Somerville and Blairgowrie. He has extensive information about Henry Gomm of Somerville, Joseph Porta (Victoria's first bellows manufacturer) and Captain Adams of Rosebud.

Do you know someone who can help? Share this:

Comments

Register or Sign in to comment on this journal.