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HISTORY NOTES (1), MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.

Journal by itellya

While looking for specific information, I often make a note of something else that may be of value, but looking for these asides can take hours, often without result. Such miscellaneous notes will be entered here (in alphabetical order) in future. Surnames of people mentioned within other articles will be in bold type for ease of location.

BALDRY.
John Baldry's obituary (in my journal THE SHIRE OF FLINDERS) mentions his involvement in the area from the 1860's. The first Flinders Road Board assessment of 8-6-1869 confirms this claim. John had 145 acres and buildings in the parish of Flinders. The assessment of 30-9-1899 shows that John still had this 145 acre property and William Baldry had 60 acres.

John Cairns, son of Alex Cairns (original Boneo pioneer with brothers Robert and David) married Emma Baldry.
(THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO by Peter Wilson.)

SWEETAPPLE.
I recall mentioning in another journal (WATSON AND STIRLING OF SORRENTO AND PORTSEA) that I had seen this surname mentioned while researching rates near Red Hill. Sweetapple had been running the Portsea hotel and I mentioned that I had considered a corny joke about the name (especially since Thomas Appleyard of Sorrento had land near Red Hill) but I reconsidered, not because it was corny (I never let that worry me) but because both seemed to be more likely graziers than orchardists.

Well, I found the assessment again, while looking for Shand.
In the assessment of 30-9-1899, William Henry Sweetapple was leasing 224 acres (58a and 59a Bittern) from Charles Kerr and 308 acres in the parish of Balnarring from Journeaux .
The Bittern land was at Melway 162 H 4-7 with a frontage to Balnarring Rd, a 58a frontage to Hunts Rd of 750 metres and a 59a frontage to Myers Rd of 366 metres. The Balnarring land was crown allotment 15 of 308 acres 1 rood and 34 perches, situated 1082 metres west along Myers Rd (Melway 161 K 8-9 to 162 B 8-9.) The subdivision of this land, with One Chain Rd providing access and settlers such as parliamentarian, James Fenton , and racing identity, Jack Hayes is detailed in THE GOLDEN PLAIN OF TUBBARUBBAREL.

NO RUGGED LANDSCAPE by Mary Karney.
VANSUYLEN P. 197. They built the first Balnarring store on the southern tip of the triangular piece of land.(I presume the south eastern tip of Warrawee, Melway 193 D5, is meant.) They built a kiln and made the district's first fired bricks. (This explains why the carpenter chose to hide the stolen watch between bricks.) Paul built Warrawee, later called the Tower Hotel, as an inn in 1860. Warrawee is the aboriginal term for "pleasant Place".The Vansuylens ran the post office 1868-81 (after which Johnson ran it in Dromana-Bittern Rd as described in the 1902 article about Bittern.) As well as liquor, the Vansuylens sold hardware.

TONKIN P. 196. Captain Tonkin died 12-7-1908. His son Bry (short for Bryan, also his father's name) married Mary Smith. The book contains information about the Smiths. The hill on Tonkin's grants (at about Melway 191 H8) was called Tonkin's Hill.

MORRIS P. 193.Morris (Robert, son in law of Edward Jones of Spring Farm and Penbank at Moorooduc)built Pembroke on Fook's selection in the 1900's and the house was still standing. (Robert had lived on Penbank on the south side of Tyabb Rd earlier, possibly where Penbank School is now located. Robert came from Pembroke in Wales and it is possible that Pembroke Rd in Somerville was named because the orchard that was later the Bullens' had been owned by his wife's sister, Mrs Unthank. SOURCES-David Shepherd, Trove, Murray Gomm.)

DOWNWARD P.193. Herb Downward's nickname was "Poley".

ALBERTO p.192 had KENT ORCHARD in 1899. Jack (Peter) SHAND and the HUNTLEY family ran the orchard from 1900 and lived in the house after "Hillside" was burnt down in about 1905.

MAIRSP.192. Dave Mairs was shire president in 1882. His children included Dave (David T., the crack shot who married a Huntley girl), Minnie, Ethel and Vi.

BUCKLEY p. 191. Louise HUNTLEY married David Buckley. Hillside was leased to Joseph McILROY in September, 1892 (as mentioned in an extract from Joseph's diary in Sheila Skidmore's THE RED HILL)at a rent of 108 pounds p.a.

STANLEYP.195. E.Stanley arrived in 1861. His sons Bob, Joe and Bill were given the task of minding some cattle. They stuck to their task so well that J.BUCKLEY led a search party of 20 men to find them. The boys were returned home from the Mt Martha area by Teddy Quinn . This story is told in full in THE MEN WHO BLAZED THE TRACK. Bob Stanley married a Byrne girl and their children were Vincent, born 11-5-1896, and Vera.

(The Quinns and the Whites, ancestors of Shirley Bourne, the female drover, were pioneers of the parish of Moorooduc, the Quinns living on the north west corner of Tyabb and Three Chain (Moorooduc) Rd and the Whites at the east end of White's Rd, which was renamed Range Rd during W.W.2 when soldiers marched along it to the rifle range on the other side of the White/Bourne property.)

SHAND P.195. Old Mr Shand who had the sawmill at Red Hill (Main Ridge)died on 18-7-1901. Hw was a Methodist lay preacher.His sons, Alex and John (Peter) were close friends of the Oswins.Peter married Mary Huntley on 28-7-1900. He was a clever man who could do anything from mending clocks to suturing wounds.

GOTTLIEBSON P.190. The western extension of Myers Rd was called Gottliebson's Lane. (See FRITSCH.)

FRITSCHP.190. Came from Germany in 1850 and lived at Nhill, Nunawading and Cranbourne before moving to the peninsula. August, an architect designed many of the early Melbourne buildings. Charles and Andrew settled(and received grants) in Kangerong. The children (of which?) included Emily, Lily, Charlotte, and Edward (Teddy.) Two of the girls married Gottliebson brothers and Teddy married Louise WARNECKE. The Warnecke family was from Hanover but had migrated to England. They came to Australia in 1855 and tried the Ballarat and Dunolly diggings. They came to Balnarring in 1908 and built "Fairview" on lots 19 and 20, originally Rogers'. (Melway 162 F-H 12 south to 192 F-H 2,top half. They must have added Reidy's grant to the west, judging by the very German Tannenbaum Ave.)

OSWIN P.190.Willie Oswin was called Grampas by the family.P.1.Mary Oswin, sister of John, married Lawrence WADESON (who with John Holmes was granted the 208 acres on the north and west side of Red Hill Rd between Vines of Red Hill, inclusive, and the south boundary of the Kangerong Nature Conservation Reserve.The southern 104 acres became the Huntleys' Hillside Orchard; John Huntley Snr may have had a lease from the Crown for the whole 208 acres before rate records started.)
John Oswin was known as DADAS according to a caption under a photo of John -page number not recorded.

SULLIVAN.
Extract from my PENINSULA DICTIONARY HISTORY.
SULLIVAN
Refer to the ample information about this family in THOSE COURAGEOUS HARDY WOMEN and Patricia Applefords RYE PRIMARY SCHOOL Pages 7,27-8,31,33-6,40-2,54,68,117-121,125,134, 137,139,141-4,151,159.
Also see the FAMILY CONNECTIONS entry.
Dennis Sullivan, or perhaps one of his sons, produced an object of amazement to the rapidly expanding settlement on the Yarra. I quote from Robin Annears excellent Bearbrass:Imagining Early Melbourne.
A twenty one inch (53cm) long cucumber sounds fairly unremarkable to us who are accustomed to gangly cucumbers of the continental variety; but one such specimen created a sensation when exhibited at the Bearbrass market in 1842 by a gardener named Sullivan from Merri Creek. It was, marvelled the Patriot the next day, raised without a particle of manure.
Another Peninsula pioneer was having similar success in the growing of vegetables. Melbournes first postmaster, Ben Baxter, who had ceased that occupation, grew a turnip that was two feet in circumference. As the price of vegetables was astronomical at this time, Dennis and Ben were probably able to build up enough capital to launch their pioneering enterprises. It seems that another peninsular pioneer was involved in growing vegetables in Melbourne even earlier. In 1836, two men were charged with stealing onions from the garden of publican, George Smith. If it had not been for the money that George Smith made from selling his grog and probably vegetables as well, Owen Cains daughter, Sarah Ann might have died at the tender age of four. Lost for several days soon after the Cain family arrived on the peninsula, the near-dead girl was taken to George Smiths Wooloowoolooboolook homestead where Georges wife nursed her back to health. Thanks for the pre- peninsula details, Robin!
Another history of the early years of the Port Phillip District reveals more about the Sullivans before their move to The Heads. It is entitled MEN AND WOMEN OF PORT PHILLIP and ironically written by Martin Sullivan. While Dennis was growing vegetables at Merri Creek, his wife Honora was probably working as a domestic servant for one of the respectable inhabitants of Newtown (Fitzroy). Newtown and The Brickfields (South Melbourne) were outside the limits of Melbourne and working class immigrants could squat to reduce costs. Unfortunately the brickfields settlement was the resort of a drunken, bloodthirsty, thieving crew according to Garryowen and Newtown was little better. A writer to the Port Phillip Herald might have been referring to Honoras employer when he sympathized with the respectable portion of the inhabitants who had to suffer the debauchery and immorality of the place.
Honora was probably happy with her employer and no doubt he was happy with her work. Honora was one of Elizabeth McMeekins COURAGEOUS HARDY WOMEN and was about 50 at this time while Dennis was six years older. Perhaps shrewd was another adjective that Elizabeth might have employed to describe Honora.
She had agreed to serve for three months at the rate of 17 pounds per annum, but she failed to arrive for work, later informing her employer that she had another situation and could get higher wages. She was brought before the Court of Petty Sessions on 27-10-1840 for having contravened the Masters and Servants Act. A female could be jailed for three months and forfeit wages for many offences including absenting herself from the service of the person to whom she shall be so engaged. But that was before a new act was published on 20-10-1840, one week before her court appearance.
This Act forbade the imprisonment of any female servant for any offence committed under the Act. It also became harsher to prevent the type of job swapping that Honora had committed, with servants liable to a three month gaol term and masters liable to a fine of between 5 and 20 pounds for employing somebody already engaged. Was Honora the first to find the loophole in the new act?


FAMILY CONNECTIONS. (A lot of speculation but you never know.)
SULLIVAN-ONEIL
John, son of Dennis and Honora, married Hannah ONeil. I offer two speculative suggestions about how they met.
1.John, like many Peninsula pioneers, might have tried his luck at Bendigo or Ballarat. On the way to either, he would have passed through Keilor where Brees bridge of 1854 enabled a more direct route than the older ones through Maribyrnong (Raleighs Punt) and Bulla. William ONeill owned Horseshoe Bend and like Basket Davey Milburn, Victorias first official irrigator, he probably sold his produce at the roadside.
It is likely that the Sullivans already knew ONeil. They may even have arrived at the five year old settlement on the same ship. ONeil, one of Melbournes early policemen, might have brought Honora before the court of Petty sessions for an offence against the Masters and Servants act on 27-11-1842. Like all citizens of Melbourne, he would have marveled at the gigantic cucumber grown by the Sullivans near Merri Creek in 1843 before they moved to The Heads. Most workers squatted in rough shelters at The Brickfields (South Melbourne) or Newtown (Fitzroy) as they could not afford to buy or rent on the surveyed town, and the Sullivans were probably near Newtown. (See sources and more detail in the SULLIVAN entry.)
The baptism of three Sullivan children at St Augustines Keilor between mid 1854 and early 1862 lends weight to my theory that John might have gone to the goldfields with some cousins who came out later for that purpose; one of the children was named Timothy. Their parents were working in the area, one at Jacksons Creek (perhaps for the Reddans) and another at Keilor Plains (almost certainly for Taylor, Robertson or Big Clarke). That peninsula pioneers would seek employment at thriving Keilor after an unsuccessful stint at the diggings, is shown by the presence of Edwin Daly Tassell (probably the son of Edwin Louis Tassell a pioneer of the Safety Beach area) whose daughter was christened at the temporary St Augustines in 1858.
2.A map on page 6 of Leila Shaws THE WAY WE WERE shows that J. Sullivan and J.ONeill were pioneers of the Somerville area. Their grants were, respectively, at Melway 149 J3 and 148 J6. Somerville became the home of plant nurseries and orchards with those of the Brunnings family (which started this business in St Kilda) gaining international fame. These facts lead me to the following fantasy.
Trudging dejectedly back from the diggings, the emaciated John Sullivan hears a familiar voice calling his name. William ONeil offers him a job after hearing of Johns woes. While tending ONeils apricot orchard, John meets Hannah. They and a relative, whose name is rendered with a double L by some official, move to Somerville to continue their orcharding occupation. (Apricots were the main crop of Keilor and Peter Anderson kept growing them at Horseshoe Bend after the Spaniards such as Borrell and Vert switched the emphasis to growing cauliflowers and tomatoes.)
Whether J.Sullivan was our John is not yet known, but if so, he would not have been the only Southern Peninsula identity to receive grants in the area; Henry Gomm, guardian of the Rosebud jetty bought allotment 48 at 148 E8.
See THOSE COURAGEOUS HARDY WOMEN regarding the fate of John and Hannahs children. This probably explains the Clark-Clark marriage!

SULLIVAN-GRACE
Patrick, son of Dennis married Ellen, daughter of William Grace. Ellens father was an early grantee of 249 acres fronting the west end of Boundary Rd at Dromana and bounded by Caldwell Rd, Pindara Rd and the eastern end of streets such as Beverley St and Cloud St. On his farm Gracefield he planted vineyards and orchards. Patrick named his hotel at Rye after the farm, which is recalled by Gracefield Ave at 159 H9.
During the late1860s, Williams vineyards were wiped out by a disease that spread through most wine-growing areas. It is likely that he leased the farm to the Counsells. He probably bought allotment 6 of section 3 in the township of Rye at about this time. The half acre block ran from the Esplanade (a name given for Pt Nepean Rd in Dromana, Rosebud and Rye townships) to Nelson St and was just a little nearer to Dundas St than Napier St. As can be seen in Melway 168 F4, this is almost the exact location of the Rye Hotel, which was built on the site of Patricks Gracefield Hotel in 1927 by the Hunts.
It is possible that the two families had met before William moved his family to Rye. While most of the Sullivan grants were near the south end of Weeroona Rd (and used to extract limestone for the kiln there, which was managed by Antonio Albress after Patricks death), Catherine Sullivan was granted allotments 15 a and b Wannaeue (152 acres) fronting the north side of Browns Rd and extending east from the Kinwendy Rd corner 767 metres (halfway) to the Purves Rd corner. Catherine was one of earliest landowners in Wannaeue, receiving her grant on 31-10-1858. No doubt she was self sufficient but if she needed to buy anything Dromana was the destination. It already had Holdens store near the Carrigg St corner and Richard Watkins Dromana Hotel and possibly the Arthurs Seat hotel near Foote St and soon the McLears would open their butchers shop.
To get there in the 1860s, she would climb Purves Rd and then take Bryans Cutting down through the town common, just west of the Gracefield boundary. No doubt she would drop in for a cuppa and a chat with Williams wife.
The naming of Grace St in Rye could be given a dual justification; it could be named after William Grace or it might honour Grace Sullivan, a much- loved teacher who tragically died young, apparently from the Spanish Flu.

SULLIVAN-KENYON
Timothy (known as Ted), son of Dennis married a Kenyon girl.
She was almost certainly the daughter of Richard Kenyon and his wife, who was Robert Rowleys mother. (See THOSE COURAGEOUS HARDY WOMEN.) Timothy was probably about 20 when the Sullivans arrived at the Heads in late 1843 and started limeburning alongside the Kenyons who might have arrived in 1939 to produce lime for John Pascoe Fawkner. I believe that they married a few years later, went to the goldfields with Timothys brother John and spent some time market gardening near Keilor where a child was born. That might be why nobody remembered the name of Timothys wife. (See SULLIVAN ONEIL.)

SULLIVAN-ONEIL
John, son of Dennis and Honora, married Hannah ONeil. I offer two speculative suggestions about how they met.
1.John, like many Peninsula pioneers, might have tried his luck at Bendigo or Ballarat. On the way to either, he would have passed through Keilor where Brees bridge of 1854 enabled a more direct route than the older ones through Maribyrnong (Raleighs Punt) and Bulla. William ONeill owned Horseshoe Bend and like Basket Davey Milburn, Victorias first official irrigator, he probably sold his produce at the roadside.
It is likely that the Sullivans already knew ONeil. They may even have arrived at the five year old settlement on the same ship. ONeil, one of Melbournes early policemen, might have brought Honora before the court of Petty sessions for an offence against the Masters and Servants act on 27-11-1842. Like all citizens of Melbourne, he would have marveled at the gigantic cucumber grown by the Sullivans near Merri Creek in 1843 before they moved to The Heads.
The baptism of three Sullivan children at St Augustines Keilor between mid 1854 and early 1862 lends weight to my theory that John might have gone to the goldfields with some cousins who came out later for that purpose; one of the children was named Timothy. Their parents were working in the area, one at Jacksons Creek (perhaps for the Reddans) and another at Keilor Plains (almost certainly for Taylor, Robertson or Big Clarke). That peninsula pioneers would seek employment at thriving Keilor after an unsuccessful stint at the diggings, is shown by the presence of Edwin Daly Tassell (probably the son of Edwin Louis Tassell a pioneer of the Safety Beach area) whose daughter was christened at the temporary St Augustines in 1858.
2.A map on page 6 of Leila Shaws THE WAY WE WERE shows that J. Sullivan and J.ONeill were pioneers of the Somerville area. Their grants were, respectively, at Melway 149 J3 and 148 J6. Somerville became the home of plant nurseries and orchards with those of the Brunnings family (which started this business in St Kilda) gaining international fame. These facts lead me to the following fantasy.
Trudging dejectedly back from the diggings, the emaciated John Sullivan hears a familiar voice calling his name. William ONeil offers him a job after hearing of Johns woes. While tending ONeils apricot orchard, John meets Hannah. They and a relative, whose name is rendered with a double L by some official, move to Somerville to continue their orcharding occupation. (Apricots were the main crop of Keilor and Peter Anderson kept growing them at Horseshoe Bend after the Spaniards such as Borrell and Vert switched the emphasis to growing cauliflowers and tomatoes.)

See THOSE COURAGEOUS HARDY WOMEN regarding the fate of John and Hannahs children. This probably explains the Clark-Clark marriage!

SULLIVAN-GRACE
Patrick, son of Dennis married Ellen, daughter of William Grace. Ellens father was an early grantee of 249 acres fronting the west end of Boundary Rd at Dromana and bounded by Caldwell Rd, Pindara Rd and the eastern end of streets such as Beverley St and Cloud St. On his farm Gracefield he planted vineyards and orchards. Patrick named his hotel at Rye after the farm, which is recalled by Gracefield Ave at 159 H9.
During the late1860s, Williams vineyards were wiped out by a disease that spread through most wine-growing areas. It is likely that he leased the farm to the Counsells. He probably bought allotment 6 of section 3 in the township of Rye at about this time. The half acre block ran from the Esplanade (a name given for Pt Nepean Rd in Dromana, Rosebud and Rye townships) to Nelson St and was just a little nearer to Dundas St than Napier St. As can be seen in Melway 168 F4, this is almost the exact location of the Rye Hotel, which was built on the site of Patricks Gracefield Hotel in 1927 by the Hunts.
It is possible that the two families had met before William moved his family to Rye. While most of the Sullivan grants were near the south end of Weeroona Rd (and used to extract limestone for the kiln there, which was managed by Antonio Albress after Patricks death), Catherine Sullivan was granted allotments 15 a and b Wannaeue (152 acres) fronting the north side of Browns Rd and extending east from the Kinwendy Rd corner 767 metres (halfway) to the Purves Rd corner. Catherine was one of earliest landowners in Wannaeue, receiving her grant on 31-10-1858. No doubt she was self sufficient but if she needed to buy anything Dromana was the destination. It already had Holdens store near the Carrigg St corner and Richard Watkins Dromana Hotel and possibly the Arthurs Seat hotel near Foote St and soon the McLears would open their butchers shop.
To get there in the 1860s, she would climb Purves Rd and then take Bryans Cutting down through the town common, just west of the Gracefield boundary. No doubt she would drop in for a cuppa and a chat with Williams wife.
The naming of Grace St in Rye could be given a dual justification; it could be named after William Grace or it might honour Grace Sullivan, a much- loved teacher who tragically died young, apparently from the Spanish Flu.


The Quarantine Station.
When the gold rush started, captains would have been tempted to fit in more passengers and neglect checks. In crowded conditions, it only needed one carrier to infect numerous other passengers, and with the arrival of the first fever ship in 1852, a quarantine station was set up very quickly on the site occupied by the Sullivans since 1843. Dennis Sullivan was compensated for his house and was allowed to take away lime that he had quarried. His son, Patrick, moved the family to the Rye area.

The Sullivan grants.
Wannaeue.
35, 173 acres, P.Sullivan, Melway 168 H-J11-12, 251H-J1,adjoining The Dunes.
33A, 148 acres, P.Sullivan, 251 J 2-3, K3. DO THE REST.

Nepean.
Nepean Land.
Patrick Sullivan's lime kiln is apparently well preserved on The Dunes golf course. Patrick was granted crown allotments 22 (159 acres), 27 (120.8 acres)and 28 (almost 37 acres) which included all of the land occupied by The Dunes and extended south to the National Park at St Andrews Beach; the boundaries of 28 were the Ocean Park, Sandy Rd and the western end of Iona St. DO THE REST.

DAWES
I learn that Mr. Dawes, of Dromana, who was so seriously injured in the frightful coach accident that occurred near Frankston eight days ago, is still lying in a precarious condition, very little hopes being entertained of his re covering. "Dick," the driver of the vehicle, who was also a good deal knocked about,but who escaped with less dangerous injuries, how ever, is in a fair way to convalescence. It is rumored in the neighborhood that in any case an action will be brought against the proprietors of the coach either by the principal sufferer or his friends, as there can be very little doubt that the accident was brought about by the weakness of the brake. Mr. Evarard's coolness and presence of mind in keeping his seat on the box and pulling up the horses in time to save the lives and limbs of the other passengers, who, like himself, stuck to the coach through the whole of its perilous career, have called forth great admiration, and should fairly entitle him to a free pass on Messrs. Robertson and Co.'s stages for the rest of his life.
(P.2, Bendigo Advertiser, 27-8-1877.) Also see MORNINGTON PENINSULA HISTORY NOTES (2)re SCURFIELD.

by itellya Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2012-11-04 19:54:07

Itellya is researching local history on the Mornington Peninsula and is willing to help family historians with information about the area between Somerville and Blairgowrie. He has extensive information about Henry Gomm of Somerville, Joseph Porta (Victoria's first bellows manufacturer) and Captain Adams of Rosebud.

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Comments

by janilye on 2012-11-04 23:27:22

Hello itellya, I'm struggling with poor quality data;
What have you got on Snapper Point?
I'm trying to trace 3 people from the ASHTON family who lived and died there;
Hannah Frances ASHTON 1813-1881. never married buried at Mooraduc Cemetery
Michael ASHTON 1789-1872 buried Mornington
Dorothea STAMP nee ASHTON 1804-1895 buried Mornington
Father was John ASHTON mother Sarah nee Frost
also where is Rydal Mount, Mornington and
do you know where Mooraduc Cemetery is/was?

by janilye on 2012-11-04 23:38:25

I think that's supposed to be Moorooduc Cemetery! (still can't find it)

by tonkin on 2012-11-05 00:59:52

Moorooduc Cemetery was changed to Mornington Cemetery.
Not sure when.

by janilye on 2012-11-05 01:58:56

Thanks tonkin doesn't matter when just as long as I have the right one.

by janilye on 2012-11-08 22:37:44

* pokes itellya with a stick,
ASHTON? (anything?)
and do you have Dreamtime of Dromana handy? save me a trip.

by itellya on 2012-11-10 06:13:13

I have A Dreamtime of Dromana.
Mornington Cemetery was called Moorooduc Cemetery because it is in the parish of Moorooduc which goes north from Ellerina (Bruce, Foxey's Hangout) Rd to Eramosa-Canadian Bay Rd (originally known as Boundary Rd.) Craigie Rd was originally known as Cemetery Rd.
Val Wilson of the Mornington Historical Society might be able to help you with information about the Ashtons and Rydal Mount. In my Moorooduc research, I deliberately steered clear of Mornington except for the Downward property Redwood and its heritage listed redgums.
Sorry I was so slow; been working 25 hours a day on Flinders Shire presidents.

by janilye on 2012-11-10 07:04:13

Shire Presidents always demand that extra hour!
Thanks for your reply. Would you have a look at Dreamtime of Dromana and see if there is a photograph of Joe Peters (from Cape Verde) a member 'abbeyg' needs to know, was a he coloured.
I have a copy but it is at Maldon and I'm not going up there till late next week.
Thanks for the tip re- Ashton, will contact Val.

by itellya on 2012-11-11 17:59:25

There's no photo of Joe "the black fiddler" Peters in A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA unless he and Miss Busher were in the photo of the grand ball of 1928, in which case the world's most powerful magnifying glass would be required. I'm going to the library now to see if the photo might be in Isobel Moresby or Rosalind Peatey's books.

by janilye on 2012-11-11 18:54:33

Indeed! A magnifying glass wouldn't suffice. The original Joe Peters from Cape Verde was dead many years before the grand ball in May 1928.

by itellya on 2012-11-11 20:45:20

I checked ROSEBUD: FLOWER OF THE PENINSULA and PINE TREES AND BOXTHORNS. There were no photos of Joe Peter's. Unwilling to put the bone down again, I turned through all the pages of A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA again. Again finding no photos of the "band" I was looking for, I borrowed a magnifying glass from NASA and had a close look at the grand ball photo again.

Wearing a hat at the front of the photo, and sporting a very bushy beard, is a very dark man, who could well be the black fiddler's son. He might also have been a descendant of one of the many Cape Verde Islanders settled between Sorrento and Rosebud such as Antonio Albress, Emmanuel De Santos, and Joseph Silva (called Silver in the rates) or maybe Antonio Bosina, who the locals at Rosebud thought was an Austrian!There is a good chance that he was Joe Peter's son.
I will send photocopies of the whole assemblage and a close up of that portion of the photo to abbeyg.

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