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The barque ATALANTA to South Australia 1866

Journal by janilye

The Atalanta, Captain John Ballingall, sailed from Plymouth on the 23rd January with emigrants for Adelaide. The names and nationalities of the passengers we give below:

English.
Edward, Anne, Henry, Emily, and Anne Allchurch,
John Arney, Joseph Bailey, Jonathan, Ann, Josiah,
and Stephen Baldwin, Richard Bate, Jeremiah Barron,
Peter, Mary, William J., Jane, Peter, and Mary Bawden,
Charles Bawden, George Bolts, William and Eliza Bonson,
Benjamin, Maria, Mary and James Chick, John Coomb,
Andrew, Ann and Andrew Cooper, Charles, Martha and Helena Courtis,
John Craggy John, Christina, Elizabeth, Arthur, Niel,
Christina, and Mary Curnow, Mary Curnow,
James J., George, Bichard and William Curnow,
Fanny Davis, John and Alice Davy, James, Amanda,
Francis, Thomas, John, and Albert Daymond, Samuel,
Ellen, and Ellen Dennis, William Devine, William and
Elizabeth Diderah, Robert Duddleston, John and
Emma Forseath, Thomas Foster, John, Elizabeth, and
Fred Fowkes, Joseph Freeth, John Fry, John Gill,
William Gray, Henry, Sarah, and Thomas Green, John, Mary,
Mary, John, and Charles Hawke, Henry and Maria Heath,
Elizabeth Helliger, Eliza Henwood, William House,
Catherine and Catherine Hunter, William and
Amelia Jasper, George and Gilbert Jerden, Robert
Johnston, John Jose, Hugh, Elizabeth, James, and
Mary J. Kearns, W. Lake, Joseph Lester, Hannah
Lovell, James and Henry Loveridge, James Lownds,
Eliza Mallett, Tom Marsan, Nicholas, Mary, Thomas,
Mary and Edward May, Thomas, Harriett, Mary,
and Atalanta McCormack, William Mills, Robert
Mitchell, John, Mary, and Anne Mutton; Iltyd
Nicholas, Henry and Bichard Painter, Bichard Parkyn,
Sam. Pigeon, Chadwell Pearce, John Poor, John,
Rebecca Mary, and Edward Potter, Joseph and Eliza
beth Richards, John Richens, John, Martha, John,
James, and Phillip Roberts, James Rule, James Rogers,
Henry Rowe Ellen Sawyer, John Shaw, Philip Snigs,
Mary Skewes, Joseph and Ann Townsend, Walter Tre-
harne, Joseph Treloar, James, Harriet, Thomas, Mary,
and Fanny Trevaill, Charles, Elizabeth, and Maria
Tucker, James and William Turnbull, Edward and
Emma Tippond, James Walker, Thomas Watkins,
Francis and Anne Weller, William, Frank, Emma,
Florence, and Elizabeth Weller, Ann, Winnifred, and
Kate Weller, Elizabeth Welsh, Charles White, William
and Adam Whitehall, William and Elizabeth White
hall, Mary Whitehall.
Scotch.
James Abel, John Allan, James Anderson,
William Anderson, Christina Ballantine, John Banner-
man, Donald and Ann Bremer, James Bradshaw, Sam,
Margaret, Janet. John, and Maria Black, Jessie Calder,
Alexander Cameron, William Cameron, Catherine
Carey, John Chalmers, John Chesser, Alexander Chis-
holm, David Christie, Adam Clark, Thomas Copland,
John Cormack, Ann Cormack, David Cormack, James,
Elizabeth, William, Mary, Louisa, and Sam Cormack,
Thomas, Craigill, John Chricton, John, Jane, Jane,
John, and Eliza Deany, Thomas Duff, John Duncan,
David Duncan, David Ferrier, William, Elspet, and
Peter Foreman, John Forsyth, Alexander Fraser, John,
Ann, and Jessie Fraser, Simon, Mary, James, John
and Elizabeth Fraser, John Gillies, John Grant,
Isabella, John, Ann, Lodovick,James, Margaret, Eliza-
beth, and Fred. Grant, Bernard, Catherine, and Ann
Grogan, John and Mary Innis, John Inverarity,
George Jenkins, David, Rebecca, James, and Mary
Johnston, James, Jane, and Isabella Knight, Catherine
Mecnee, John and Christiana Marton, Edward, Mary,
Janet, and James Mason, Archibald McCallister, John,
and Jane McCann, Duncan and Margaret McCorquidale
Alexander, Eliza, Eliza, and Alexander McDonald,
Daniel and Welter McFarlane, Daniel and Mary
Mcintosh, Alexander McKenzie, John McKay, John,
Barbara, and Kenditfeva McLennon, Isabella and Mar
garet McNaughton, David McQueen, John, Ann, and
Elspet Murdoch, John Munro, William Nicol, Thomas
Oswald, Mary Pearson John, Isabella, Isabella and
and Helen Riddell. John Robertson, James Ross, Wil
liam, Catherine, and Alexander Ross, Mary A. Shaw,
William and Isabella Simpson, W. and E. Smith, James
Smith, John Smith, James Strachan, James Stirling;
Andrew, William, and Peter Sutherland, Thomas
Thompson, Eliza Troup; Duncan Urquhart, George
Walker, Alexander Wann, George Watt, Alexander,
Mary, and Alexander Watt.
Irish
Margarett Barrett, James Boucher, Bridget
Brady, Hannah Bridle, James Burns, Elizabeth
Caverby, Wm. Cleary, Honora Cotter, Timothy Dane
ter, Johannah Davidson, Margaret Drisbane, Bridget
Dunne, Boger Dwyer, John, Mary, James, John, and
Margaret Dwyer, Mary Egan, Bridget.Faby, John Fitz-
gerald, Julia Flaherty, Ellen Flanagan, Mary Goomane,
Francis Harrison, Margaret Henessy, Ellen Hoolam,
Mary Hogan, Mary, Johanna and Margaret Kelly,
John, Margaret, John, and Michael Kelly, Mary A
Kenny, Annie Keumane, Catherine Kenny, Mary and
Margaret Kettleby, George and Elizabeth Kidd, Julia
Madigan, John Mahoney, Anne McDermott, James,
Norah, John, and Annie Madigan, Mary McNamara,
Mary McDermott, Ellen Melvin, Patrick Noher, Ellen
O'Brien, John O'Brien, Bridget Quirke, James Rearden,
Francis Schoales, Owen, Isabella, Terence, and
Frederick Shannon, Mary Sheehan, Mary Walsh.
Summary.
Adults —
English, 136 ; Scotch, ; 114 ; Irish, 58—total, 308.
Children between 1 and 12 —
English, 39; Scotch, 27; Irish, 6—total, 72.
Infants —
English, 6; Scotch, 5; Irish, 1—total, 12.
Grand totals—English, 181; Scotch, 146 ; Irish, 65. Equal
to 244 statue adults.
The following are the names of the children who died on the voyage:
Atalanta McCormack, Maria Tucker, Frances Grant,
James Mason, Thomas Green, and two infants.
Source:
The Adelaide Express (SA : 1863 - 1866)
Friday 16 March 1866
Page 3
transcription, janilye 2014
The Ships List

South Australian Weekly Chronicle Saturday 21 April 1866 Page 3
ARRIVAL OF THE ATALANTA, WITH 394 GOVERNMENT EMIGRANTS.

There are very few vessels arriving in the Gulf which cause more interest than immigrant ships. For a period
some slow craft were engaged ; but of late much better passages have resulted, and the AtaLanta has accomplished tier's in 81 days, against every disadvantage of foul winds and a long continuation of calms on the
Line. The vessel is American built, of 930 tons, commanded by Captain Ballingall, a gentleman who has
before visited Port Adelaide in the Omega. In the Surgeon-Superintendent a familar face was recognized
in Dr. Sanger, late of the Morning Star. This system of electing gentlemen of experience evidently works
well, for it almost invariably produces a degree of co-operation highly necessary in promoting the well
being of the persons on board. With regard to the sick list, the cases entered on the hospital record are
by no means important ; some few children and persons in delicate health being the principal patients
treated, and even those cases were partly attributable to inclement weather experienced while
in the depot at Plymouth. The mortality on board, was one less than the increase by births, the former being young children and infants
— two of the latter and one of the former having succumbed to the damp cold weather experienced while
running down the easting in the Southern latitudes.
The general appearance of the people was prepossessing in the extreme, indeed, rather more so than some batches
of importations ; and it is extremely pleasant to add the Surgeon's testimony to a course of good conduct
during the voyage. The only disagreement was some fracas between the feminine portion of the population,
which, however, ended in nothing. Dr. Sanger's experience of the distiller is much to the credit of the
machine, which has produced an ample supply of water.
In the tropics the usual allowance was increased, and proved a valuable assistance in preserving good health.
Of the recently introduced ventilating trunkways. his
opinion is decidedly opposite, and he remorselessly condemns the whole affair as calculated only to monopolise valuable space without corresponding good result. In reviewing the figures in the official lists it is evident the mechanical trades are well represented. There is a most singular collection of designations, some of which must be rather altered before finding occupation here, but as they are all hard working people there is room and to spare for the lot. Perhaps the domestic servants may tend in a measure to relieve the demand for that class.
There are 94 laborers, 51 domestic servants, 2 housekeepers, 1 dressmaker, 2 porters, 1 draper, 3 gardeners,
7 carpenters, 1 printer, 1 papermaker, 1 widow, 1 policeman, 14 ploughmen, 6 miners, 5 blacksmiths, 2 tailors,
2 bricklayers, 5 shepherds, 2 masons, 2 grooms, 2 painters, 8 bootmakers, 2 butchers, 1 sawyer, 1 quarryman, 1 coachbuilder, 1 saddler, 2 wheelwrights, 1 fitter, 1 waiter, 1 platelayer, 3 cooks.

Surnames: NONE
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on 2016-12-27 09:53:22

janilye - 7th generation, Convict stock. Born in New South Wales now living in Victoria, carrying, with pride 'The Birthstain'.

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