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Info on Irish & Scottish Clans

Journal by edmondsallan

Aherne
The Dal gCais were the great clan of Thomond, or North Munster, an area more especially associated with County Clare (excluding the Burren and Corcomroe on the northwest corner) and adjacent parts of Tipperary and Limerick. They were the axe-wielding footsoldiers who formed the core of the army that defeated the Vikings in 1014, one of the most significant dates in Gaelic history. The chief families of this tribe were above all the OBriens, but also OAhernes.

The Aherne Family
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Barrett
Barrett crestBarrett is a well known Irish clan which includes various septs including MacPadine, MacWattin, MacEvilly (Mac an Mhileadha), and MacAndrew. There are two Barrett clans in Ireland which are believed to be completely unrelated. The most common are the Munster Barretts of Co. Cork who are Norman in origin. The other is the Barrett clan of Connacht, most numerous in the Mayo-Galway mountain region. This clan is Gaelic in origin although they came to Ireland with the Norman invasion at the end of the twelfth century. They were hired mercinaries from Wales. To this day the Barretts and the Barrys of Connacht are known as "the Welshmen of Tirawley". The similarity of the names of the two Barrett clans is purely coincedental. The Barretts of Cork derived their name from the Norman-French "Barratt" while the Barretts of Connacht derived their name from the gaelic name "Bairad" which means quarrelsome or warlike . In fact, many daughters and sons of the clan, living in Connacht, are still called Bairad (or mac Bairad, as the case may be). In any case, both Barrett clans were fully assimilated into Irish culture and married into many old Irish families, they are said to have become "more irish than the Irish themselves". You will find many Barretts/Bairads in Irish history serving the Irish nation such as Col. John Barrett who raised a regiment of infantry for King James' army in Ireland, afterwards he and his clan suffered a wrath of genocide and land confiscations dealt by the Williamite armies in 1691. There was Rocard Bairad "The poet of Erris", a prominent United Irishman; to name a few.
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Barry
Barry crestThe first bearer of the surname to arrive in Ireland was Robert de Barri one of the original band of Norman Knights who landed at Bannow in Co. Wexford in May 1169 and the brother of Giraldus Combrensis historian of the invasion. The name comes from the earlier association of the family with the island of Barry seven miles southwest of Cardiff in Wales. From the start the family were prominent in the settlement of east Cork and were soon absorbed into the native culture forming sub septs on Gaelic lines the most important being Barry Mor, Barry Og and Barry Roe. The names of two of these are perpetuated in the names of the Cork baronies of Barrymore and Barryroe and many other Cork place names are linked to the family: Kilbarry, Rathbarry and Buttevant (from the family motto Boutez en avant) to mention only three. The surname is now numerous in Ireland but still inextricably associated with Co.Cork.
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Boyle
BoyleBoyle or O'Boyle is now one of the fifty most common surnames in Ireland. In Irish the name is O'Baoghill thought to be connected to the Irish geall meaning pledge. In the Middle Ages the family were powerful, sharing control of the entire northwest of the island with the O'Donnells and the O'Dohertys and the strongest association of the family is still with Co. Donelgal where Boyl is the third most numerous name in the country. The majority of those bearing the name are of Gaelic origin but many Irish Boyles have separate Norman origins. In Ulster a significant number are descended from the Scottish Norman family of de Boyville whose name comes from the town Beauville in Normandy. The most famous Irish family of the surname were the Boyles, Earls of Cork and Shannon, descended from Richard Boyle who arrived in Ireland from Kent in 1588.

Family Boyle
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Brady
Brady crestThe surname derives from the Irish MacBradnigh coming possibly from bradach meaning 'thieving' or 'dishonest'. The name remains very numerous in Co. Cavan their original homeland with large numbers also to be found in the adjoining country of Monaghan. Their power was centered on an area a few miles east of Cavan, from where they held jurisdiction over a large territory within the old Gaelic kingdom of Breifne. There have been many notable poets, clergyman and soldiers of the name including Thomas Brady (1752-1827), a field marshal in the Austrian army, the satirical Gaelic poet Rev . Philip MacBrady, as well as three MacBrady, Bishops of Kilmore and one MacBrady Bishop of Ardagh. The pre-Reformation Cavan Crozier originally belonging to one of these MacBradys is now to be found in the National Museum in Dublin.

MacBrady is very common in Cavan today with large numbers also in the adjoining Co. Monaghan. There are also a number of Brady families in East Clare but these originated from the "O'Grady" family who changed their name to the more English sounding Brady at the time of Henry VIII.

In the 18th century three MacBradys distinguished themselves as Gaelic poets. They were Fiachra MacBrady , Rev. Philip MacBrady (d. 1719) and Phelim Brady, usually referred to as "bold Phelim Brady the bard of Armagh".

Gilbert MacBrady was Bishop of Ardagh from 1396 to 1400 and there were three MacBrady bishops of Kilmore in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

Andrew MacBrady in 1454 as bishop of Kilmore provided a cathedral church for the diocese. The pre-reformation Cavan crozier belonging to one of the MacBradys is now in the National Museum in Dublin.

Thomas Brady (1752-1827), son of a Cootehill farmer, became a field marshal in the Austrian army.

William Maziare Brady (1825-1894) was the author of "Episcopal Succession in England, Scotland, and Ireland".

Anthony Nicholas Brady (1843-1913) was an Irish-American who made a fortune in railroads and electric lighting companies in Albany and Brooklyn. His empire included the Municipal Gas Co. of Albany and New York Edison Co. and other power companies in Brooklyn, Memphis and Chicago. He was on the board of directors of Westinghouse Electric, American Tobacco, U.S. Rubber and 30 other corporations. On his death in 1913 he left an estate of 100 million dollars.

His son Nicholas married Genevieve Garvan, sister of the famous detective Francis P. Garvan. The couple devoted much of their time and money to the Catholic Church. They were friends and sponsors of Francis J. Spellman who became Archbishop of New York and Cardinal. Mrs. Brady received the title "Dame of Malta" in 1927 and became known as the Duchess Brady.

Clan Donald connection: Only those from Islay & Kintyre and must originally been O'Brolachain. About 37% of all Brady's are Scots. Brady's not of Clan Donald may be from Dundee, Dunblane, Berwick or Edinburgh.

The Brady Heritage Assocation
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Brennan
Brennan crestThis is one of the most frequent surnames in Ireland. It derives from the two Irish originals O'Braonain and Mac Branain . The Mac Brandin were chiefs of a large territory in the east of the present Co.Roscommon and the majority of the Brennans of north Connacht, counties Mayo, Sligo and Roscommon descend from them. O'Braonain originated in at least four distinct areas: Kilkenny, East Galway, Westmeath and Kerry. Of these the most powerful were the O'Braonain of Kilkenny, chiefs of Idough in the north of the country. After they lost their land to the English, many of them became notorious as leaders of the outlaw bands. A separate family, the O'Branain, are the ancestors of many Brennans of counties Fermanagh and Monaghan where the name was also anglicised as Brannan and Branny.
The Brennan Clan came into existence over a thousand years ago when Braonan, the son of Cearbhall, Viking King of Dublin, settled in the area of north Kilkenny, then known as Idough. Until the coming of the Normans in the 12th century the Brennans were the most powerful clan in the area, having defeated all local opposition.

In the 17th century the Brennan lands were granted to Christopher Wandesforde and the Brennans lost all legal rights to their land.

Since then Brennans have left Ireland and settled every corner of the world. In 1990 the first Clan Gathering was in Castlecomer where hundreds of the descendants of those Brennans came back to the land their forefathers.

The Brennans of Idough
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Browne
BrowneThis is one of the most common surnames in the British Isles and is among the forty commonest in Ireland. It can be derived as a nickname, from the Old English Brun referring to hair, complexion or clothes or from the Norman name Le Brun similarly meaning 'the brown'. In the three southern provinces of Munster, Leinster and Connacht where the name is usually spelt with the final 'e', it is almost invariably of Norman or English origin and was borne by some of the most important of Norman-Irish and Anglo-Irish families, notably the Earls of Kenmare in Kerry and Lord Oranmore and Browne and the Earls of Altamont in Connacht. In Ulster where it is more often plain 'Brown' the surname can be Anglicization of the Scots Gaelic Mac a'Bhruithin ('son of the judge') or Mac Gille Dhuinn ('son of the brown boy').
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Browne
BrowneThis is one of the most common surnames in the British Isles and is among the forty commonest in Ireland. It can be derived as a nickname, from the Old English Brun referring to hair, complexion or clothes or from the Norman name Le Brun similarly meaning 'the brown'. In the three southern provinces of Munster, Leinster and Connacht where the name is usually spelt with the final 'e', it is almost invariably of Norman or English origin and was borne by some of the most important of Norman-Irish and Anglo-Irish families, notably the Earls of Kenmare in Kerry and Lord Oranmore and Browne and the Earls of Altamont in Connacht. In Ulster where it is more often plain 'Brown' the surname can be Anglicization of the Scots Gaelic Mac a'Bhruithin ('son of the judge') or Mac Gille Dhuinn ('son of the brown boy').
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Browne
BrowneThis is one of the most common surnames in the British Isles and is among the forty commonest in Ireland. It can be derived as a nickname, from the Old English Brun referring to hair, complexion or clothes or from the Norman name Le Brun similarly meaning 'the brown'. In the three southern provinces of Munster, Leinster and Connacht where the name is usually spelt with the final 'e', it is almost invariably of Norman or English origin and was borne by some of the most important of Norman-Irish and Anglo-Irish families, notably the Earls of Kenmare in Kerry and Lord Oranmore and Browne and the Earls of Altamont in Connacht. In Ulster where it is more often plain 'Brown' the surname can be Anglicization of the Scots Gaelic Mac a'Bhruithin ('son of the judge') or Mac Gille Dhuinn ('son of the brown boy').
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Burke
BurkeBurke, along with its variants Bourke and de Burgh, is the most common Irish name of Norman origin; over 20,000 Irish people bear the surname The first person of the name to arrive on Ireland was William Fitzadelm de Burgo, a Norman knight from Burgh in Suffock who took part in the invasion of 1171 and succeeded Strongbow as Chief Governor. He received the earldom of Ulster, and was granted territory in Connacht. His descendants adopted Gaelic law and customs more completely the any of the other Norman invaders and quickly became one of the most important families in the country. According to legend the arms of the family originated during the Crusades when King Richard dipped his finger in the blood of a Saracen slain by one of the de Burghs drew a cross on the Saracen's golden shield and presented it to the victor.
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Burke
BurkeBurke, along with its variants Bourke and de Burgh, is the most common Irish name of Norman origin; over 20,000 Irish people bear the surname The first person of the name to arrive on Ireland was William Fitzadelm de Burgo, a Norman knight from Burgh in Suffock who took part in the invasion of 1171 and succeeded Strongbow as Chief Governor. He received the earldom of Ulster, and was granted territory in Connacht. His descendants adopted Gaelic law and customs more completely the any of the other Norman invaders and quickly became one of the most important families in the country. According to legend the arms of the family originated during the Crusades when King Richard dipped his finger in the blood of a Saracen slain by one of the de Burghs drew a cross on the Saracen's golden shield and presented it to the victor.
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Butler
ButlerThe surname Butler is Norman in origin, and once meant 'wine steward'. The name was then extended to denote the chief servant of a household and amongst the nobility a high ranking officer concerned only nominally with the supply of wine. In Ireland the most prominent Butler family is descended from Theobald Fitzwalter who was created Chief Butler of Ireland by Henry II. His descendants became the Earls and later the Dukes of Ormond. Up to the end of the seventeenth century the Butlers were one of the most powerful Anglo-Norman dynasties sharing effective control of Ireland with their great rivals the Fitzgeralds.

The Butler Society
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Byrne
ByrneByrn or O'Byrne together with its variants Be(i)rne and Byrnes is one of the ten most frequent surnames in Ireland today. In the original Irish the name is O'Broin from the personal name Bran meaning Raven. It is traced back to King Bran of Leinster who ruled in the eleventh century. As a result of the Norman invasion the O'Byrnes were driven from their original homeland in Co. Kildare into the south Co.Wicklow in the early thirteenth century. There they grew in importance over the years retaining control of the territory until the early seventeenth despite repeated attempts by the English authorities to dislodge them. Even today the vast majority of the Irish who bear the name originate in Wicklow or the surrounding counties.
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Till we meet again - Regards- edmondsallan

Surnames: CLANS
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by edmondsallan Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2011-08-16 15:32:05

edmondsallan , from auckland .nz , has been a Family Tree Circles member since Aug 2010. is researching the following names: CLAYTON, EDMONDS.

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