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Keeping the Kids Safe (Australia)

Journal by janilye

This isn't genealogy but a little bit about our interesting history.

My aunt told me, owning an air-raid bag and doing the drills was a marvellous adventure which lasted about a week then it became a chore and many bags were left at home or on the bus.
Nah, children haven't changed

World War Two was a difficult time for children. Some children didn't see their father for long periods of time and others would never see their father again. Many children were evacuated from England to Australia or from cities to country towns. Some pets had to be put down because of the lack of food due to rationing. School children contributed to the war effort by collecting rubber, paper and saucepans. Our empty toothpaste tubes were taken to school for scrap metal collections. There were also strict rules about wasting paper.
Many teachers left their jobs to join up. The return to school at the beginning of 1942 was delayed by two weeks while trenches were being dug in all the school grounds. Pupils were taught the procedures for moving into the trenches. Air-raid drills were performed regularly and children had to take their own air-raid bag to school containing all the items they needed for emergency.
The photo below shows children at a Sydney kindergarten practicing their air-raid drill. The headgear was designed to muffle the sound of explosions, protect their teeth and prevent them from biting their tongues.

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by janilye Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2011-03-19 01:24:05

janilye - 7th generation, Convict stock. Born in New South Wales now living in Victoria, carrying, with pride 'The Birthstain'.

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Comments

by edmondsallan on 2011-03-19 14:42:27

what a pleasure to read Jan - thank you for letting us peruse it
-Regards

by Sarajane on 2011-03-19 20:41:15

I loved reading this-Thank you Jan.

My mother told me that during the war, in 1942 my father worked night
shift at Pt Kembla and her neighbour, the local baker and a warden always told her that if there was an air-raid, she was to come with them and they would shelter in the bread oven.

Hopefully it would not have been in use at the time!

by edmondsallan on 2011-03-19 23:47:21

I still have my survival kit issued in NZ at the beginning of the war 11 -up in the cupboard . Perhaps a descendant one day will say " what the blazes is that "

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