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MALDON, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA'S FIRST NOTABLE TOWN.

Journal by itellya

THE CARETAKERS!
Maldon Museum and Archives Association | Caring for the ...
maldonmuseum.com.au/

ABOUT US.
Maldon Museum and Archives holds a wonderful collection of artefacts and historical information from the Maldon District
The Maldon ‘collection’, comprising old objects and records from the local area, was initially brought together by the Maldon Progress Association in 1966. The collection is now under the custodianship of Maldon Museum & Archives Association Inc., a member-based volunteer-run organisation established in 1992 to bring together the previously separate museum and family history groups.

The collection continues to grow, and our members and volunteers work hard to research, document, preserve and present it in a way which helps visitors to understand the past, reflect on the present and look to the future. Our Association is very grateful for the commitment and huge contribution of time and expertise given by our many volunteers and supporters, and for the financial assistance received for special projects from various funding bodies over the years.

The district settlements covered by the collection include Baringhup, Bradford, Eaglehawk, Gowar, Maldon, Muckleford, Neereman, Nuggetty, Pollard, Ravenswood South, Sandy Creek, Shelbourne, Tarrangower, Walmer, Woodbrook (Chinaman’s Creek), and parts of Eddington and Welshman’s Reef. Also from 1947 to 1956, the construction settlement for Cairn Curran Reservoir was located at Baringhup.


THE TOWN AND AREA.
MALDON was most likely named after Maldon in Essex,the name having been in existence since Saxon times. The town was declared and named in early 1854.

GOVERNMENT GAZETTE.
A new Township is declared at Mount Tarrangower, situate 11 miles N. W. of Castlemaine,to be called Maldon, which will be a place for holding Courts of Petty Sessions.
Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 - 1856) Monday 13 February 1854 p 4 Article

A sales notice in mid 1854 alerted me to the fact that land in the parish of Maldon was to be offered for sale and in order to find out about land divisions rather than church parishes, I knew I needed to use County in the trove search term. Also aware that Maldon would be well beyond the county of Bourke, I tried PARISH OF MALDON,COUNTY and it worked. There is a township and a parish map. Have a look!

Township of Maldon, Parish of Maldon, County of Talbot ...
digital.slv.vic.gov.au/dtl_publish/compleximages/50/2442854.html

This township site was ignored and settlement sprang up at the junction of tracks leading elsewhere. See the Sydney Morning Herald article in italics under HISTORIC BUILDINGS,



Maldon, Victoria
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Maldon
Victoria
Maldon, view from hill.JPG
View of Maldon from the south west, 2009
Maldon is located in Shire of Mount Alexander MaldonMaldon
Coordinates 36°59′30″S 144°4′0″ECoordinates: 36°59′30″S 144°4′0″E
Population 1,601 (2006 census)[citation needed]
Established 1853
Postcode(s) 3463
Elevation 320.0 m (1,050 ft)
Location
136 km (85 mi) from Melbourne
38 km (24 mi) from Bendigo
20 km (12 mi) from Castlemaine
LGA(s) Shire of Mount Alexander
State electorate(s) Bendigo West
Federal Division(s) Bendigo
Mean max temp Mean min temp Annual rainfall
19.6 °C
67 °F 7.5 °C
46 °F 598.9 mm
23.6 in
Maldon is a town in Victoria, Australia, in the Shire of Mount Alexander local government area. It has been designated "Australia's first notable town" and is notable for its 19th-century appearance, maintained since gold-rush days. At the 2006 census, Maldon had a population of 1,601.[1]


History
The district where Maldon now stands was first discovered by white Europeans in 1836, during Major Thomas Mitchell's famous Victorian expedition. It was settled soon afterwards by pastoralists, and two sheep runs were established in the area, at the foot of Mount Tarrangower. In December 1853, gold was discovered at Cairn Curran (the name given to one of the sheep runs), and Maldon became a part of the Victorian Gold Rush.

The goldfield, which was named "Tarrangower Fields" after Mount Tarrangower, immediately attracted an immense number of men eager to make their fortunes at the diggings. Just one month after gold was first discovered, the Chief Commissioner for Goldfields reported 3000 miners had arrived at the diggings. A month after that, a journalist for The Argus reported that the road from Castlemaine to Maldon was lined with the shops of people hoping to make a living of their own from the miners:

The road follows up the course of Long Gully, where the diggings were first opened, for a couple of miles, and is lined on either side by an almost continuous row of stores, refreshment tents, eating houses, doctors' tents, apothecaries' shops, and, in fact, shops of every description.[2]

The same report noted that the goldfield's population had already grown to 18,000, though only about 1000 had taken out mining licences.


Maldon in 1904, seen from the south-west
In 1856 the Victorian government arranged for the settlement to become a town, which was named Maldon. The post office had opened on 14 March 1854.[3]

In 1861, a government census declared the town's population to be 3341, servicing an additional 5,000-6,000 miners at the diggings. At that time it was the eighth-largest town in Victoria, and remained so for the next decade. However, as miners were forced to dig deeper to obtain usable specimens, or as mines ran dry completely, the population began to decline. By 1891, Maldon was reduced to 1,600 inhabitants. Mining of small claims continued through the 20th century, together with sluicing of gullies and tailings. In the 1980s, several new ventures commenced, including an open cut at Union Hill.

Maldon proved to be one of Victoria's richest quartz-mining centres, though with poorer alluvial results than others such as Castlemaine or Ballarat. Quartz mining extended southward through Sandy Creek to Newstead, along to Mia Mia and Muckleford, eastward to Fentimen’s and Smith’s Reefs, and even to the apex of Mount Tarrangower. In all, over seventy reefs were proven to contain gold deposits. Maldon was undoubtedly a poor man’s diggings, with many excellent yields from very small claims.

The Maldon Vintage Machinery Museum houses stationary engines, farming implements, mining exhibits, fire pumps, and objects with links to Thompsons Foundry, Castlemaine.[4]

Modern times

Historic streetscape at Maldon
Today, Maldon's population is more or less stable at around 1,000 people. The town has changed very little since mining operations ceased, though a former bank at the junction of High and Main Streets has been supplanted by a service station. The town was declared a "notable town" in 1966 by the National Trust of Victoria, who explained that:

The township displays overall historical and architectural importance, particularly in its gold town buildings. The significance lies in the variety of building styles, and the area of mining is of interest with one mine still open to the public. Maldon boasts that it is largely unchanged since the 1850s, and has attracted considerable interest from tourists for its 19th-century atmosphere.

Maldon is now sustained by its appeal as a retreat and retirement venue for artists and writers, as well as tourist trade. The town holds several annual fairs, including a Winter Fair, Easter Fair, Art Show, and Folk Festival. Notable landmarks include Beehive Chimney, Mount Tarrangower and fire tower, Lake Cairn Curran, and the railway station. Maldon has its own newspaper, the Tarrangower Times, which was first published in 1858 and is the oldest continuously published newspaper in Victoria. The Maldon Museum and Archives Association operates a district museum and family-history centre in the former Maldon Shire Hall, and a vintage machinery museum.

The minimum-security female prison HM Prison Tarrengower is located to the near north of the township in the locality of Nuggety.

Sport

The memorial park at Maldon
The town has an Australian Rules football team competing in the Maryborough Castlemaine District Football League.

Golfers play at the course of the Maldon Golf Club on Golf Links Road.[5]

Events
The town has an annual Easter Fair which includes events such as billy-cart racing, dancing in the street, the Great Aussie Scone Bake, a cemetery walk and the lighting of the Mount Tarrangower tower.[6] The Maldon Folk Festival has been held annually since 1974. (31 October to 3 November in 2008).[7]

In popular culture
Much of the 2007 film Romulus, My Father, set in the 1950s and starring Eric Bana, was shot on location in Maldon.[8] Romulus, My Father went on to win the Australian Film Institute award for Best Film.

Notable residents
Bill Woodfull, former Australian cricket team captain, born in Maldon on 27 August 1897
Joseph Jenkins, the Welsh Swagman, maintained Maldon's gutters and drains for one pound per week from 1885–1894
Henry Handel Richardson, the Australian author, spent some of her childhood in Maldon when her mother was postmistress there, and wrote about the town in her memoir, Myself When Young
Frank Arthur Nankivell, artist.

PEOPLE.
Plenty of town can boast famous residents but how many of these were named after the town?
William Maldon Woodfull - Australian Dictionary of Biography
adb.anu.edu.au/biography/woodfull-william-maldon-9174


Henry Handel Richardson in Maldon Book Sales

Henry Handel Richardson in Maldon. Henry Handel Richardson in Maldon is an illustrated booklet that details the young Richardson's life in the Victorian gold mining town. She arrived in Maldon as Ethel Richardson in 1880 at the age of 10 with her mother and sister, after the traumatic decline and death of their husband and father, Walter Lindesay Richardson. HHR later wrote that Maldon nourished the imagination of the future writer.

The booklet was winner of the 'Best Walk/Tour' prize in the Victorian Community History Awards 2011, sponsored by the Royal Historical Society of Victoria and the Public Records Office of Victoria.

The authors, Peter Cuffley, Helen McBurney, Janey Runci and Geoff Palmer, assisted by the Maldon community, have produced a well-illustrated and carefully researched booklet that contains three walks; the first, which has a clear map, describes 16 buildings that would have been familiar to the Richardsons; the second, focuses on significant cemetery graves from the 1880's period; and the last, records places fictionalised in Richardson's The Getting of Wisdom.
(Henry Handel Richardson in Maldon Book Sales - The ...
www.henryhandelrichardsonsociety.org.au/book_sales.html)


SOME HISTORIC BUILDINGS.
This amazing article supplies terrific information that I may never have found through trove. The most staggering fact is that the township of Maldon is not built on the township of Maldon site declared in 1854 which explains the absence of the grid layout so typical of declared townships. It also directs readers on a guided walk around the historic town. Some information (such as Maldon's version of Sovereign Hill and the hill climb)may be out of date.

Maldon - Victoria - Australia - Travel - smh.com.au
www.smh.com.au/news/Victoria/Maldon/2005/.../1108500206685.html

Maldon
Extraordinary historic town which looks as though time has stood still.
In 1966 Maldon became the first Victorian town to be classified by the National Trust. This honour reflects an appreciation of its remarkably well-preserved historic streetscape with its European trees, wide verandahs, flagstone paving, old-fashioned shop fronts, quaint cottages with attractive gardens, and its many stone buildings erected in the heyday of the goldmining era.

The town's genuinely historic feel is quite overwhelming, arising out of its architectural harmony, an extensive restoration program that has avoided tackiness and frippery, strict and divisive controls on building alterations, an absence of grandiosity and the tendency of the shops to reinforce the antiquity of their exteriors with interiors that also bespeak a lost time.

For these reasons Maldon has become a very popular tourist destination, particularly during the Easter Fair. Hence, many of the buildings have been converted into specialist stores designed to appeal to the visitor. Some locals scornfully regard the tourist orientation as the 'commodification of heritage'. At any rate, Maldon is located 138 km north-west of Melbourne via A HREF="VICCastlemaine.shtml">Castlemaine, which is 19 km to the south-east, and 359 metres above sea-level.

Prior to the arrival of the first squatters in 1840 the area was occupied by the Wemba-Wemba people and an Aboriginal station operated near Mt Tarrangower from 1841-1849. However, the town really began when John Mechosk, a German prospector who had already struck gold at A HREF="VICDunolly.shtml">Dunolly, A HREF="VICMaryborough.shtml">Maryborough and Kingower, discovered gold at the foot of Mt Tarrangower in 1853, thereby initiating a rush of some 20 000 diggers who initially devoted themselves to alluvial mining. By the end of 1854 the tide had receded to some 2000 prospectors and a township of sorts had developed around a narrow road.

The settlement was initially known as Tarrangower. A townsite was surveyed in 1854 but the location was rejected and ignored by locals. Consequently the de facto township established by the diggers was surveyed in 1856 (which explains the irregular street patterns which evolved organically as routes between the diggings). It was renamed after Maldon in Essex, England.

In 1856 Nuggetty Reef was uncovered to the north of town and companies entered the picture, supplying the capital to unearth the gold-bearing quartz reefs which proved to be among the richest in the country. In the 1860s Maldon rivalled Bendigo for returns but, by 1870, the gold had begun to dwindle. In the subsequent years mines began to close and the population declined. The last operating mine was the North British which closed up shop in 1926, although the Union Mine was reopened in 1987 to reprocess the tailings.

It is this absence of growth after the late 19th century which has facilitated the preservation of the town's historic features.

Noted novelist Henry Handel Richardson (nee Ethel Richardson) spent a portion of her childhood at Maldon.

The Maldon Camp Draft is held in February and the Maldon Easter Fair in April. In late October and early November, a folk festival is held at Butts Reserve (along the road to Mt Tarrangower) and the Mt Tarrangower Hillclimb (a motor sport event) is held in late October. The Spring Festival occurs in August.

Things to see:
Tourist Information
The Maldon Visitor Centre is located adjacent the shire offices in High St. It is open weekdays from 9.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m daily. Be sure to pick up the brochures which outline walks of the town, tel: (03) 5475 2569.

Historic Buildings - High St (South)
The information centre has two free pamphlets identifying the town's historic buildings. One covers the main commercial district (Main and High Sts) and the other roams more widely.

Start at the southern end of town where the Castlemaine Rd meets up with High St. Head north along High St. The second house on the left is Lauriston House which was built in 1866 for local mining magnate R.D. Oswald. With its Malmsbury bluestone and elaborate timber verandah fretwork it was regarded as the town's finest building at the time of its construction.

At High and Fountain is the Kangaroo Hotel (1866) which, with its timber lattice and iron lacework, was once a staging post for Cobb & Co coaches. Head south along High St passing, on the right-hand side of the road, the former Commercial Hotel (1867), Argyle House (1866), the former Carriers Arms Hotel (1857), the former Bank of NSW (1858), the enormous Robert Cox Motors (built c.1858 as a four-shop complex), the motorcyclists' (formerly the Freemasons' Hall built c.1863 with a 1908 facade) and a former flour mill (1873).

Cross the road and return northwards to the former Royal Hotel which was built as a concert hall in 1857 and extended in 1862 when it became the hotel. In 1975 it was used as a setting in the film 'Break of Day'. All that was required was to cover the streets in dirt and Maldon furnished a plausible 19th-century setting. It is now a restaurant.

Historic Buildings - Main St
The Grand Hotel (1888) marks the start of Main St. It features some elaborate arches, pilasters and balusters. To the right, as you head north-east, are the former McFarlane's Drapery, built c.1867 (the face of McFarlane's brother, the Secretary to the Treasury, once graced the Australian pound note), Cookies Collections (built c.1870 as a hairdressing salon), Goldsmith's Building (1897), Berryman's Bootshop (1895) on the site of an 1857 bowling alley, the former Albion Hotel (1866), Dabb's Produce Store (c.1870), a former butcher's (c.1858), Swann's Buildings (1866) and the grand two-storey facade of the Maldon Hotel (1909) with its delicate verandah lacework and slender cast-iron posts. The hotel extension was originally the stables. Cornflowers was built c.1860 and was later used as the Bank of Victoria. Wearne's Building (c.1895) is currently a residence (note the old kerosene sign on the wall) and Franklin's Building (c.1870), at Main and Phoenix, started as a shoe warehouse.

Diagonally opposite, at Main and Templeton, is a fruit shop which dates from 1866 (note the fence and the sign). Just along Templeton St is Maldon Old Grain Store Antique Market (1864).

Return to Main St and head south, passing, on the right, the quaint old bakery (c.1895) with an 1854 wood-fired Scotch oven, Calder's (1866), originally an ironmongery, Maldon Pharmacy (c.1860), Wade's Building (c.1880), the former Dabb & Co. Store with its ornate door (built in 1859 and now the Maldon Supermarket), and the service station, which is housed in an old ironmongery and a former smithy (both 1858).

Historic Buildings - High St (Middle)
Turn the corner, heading north back along High St. On the right-hand side are Wade's House (c.1865), now a residence, and, at the Francis St corner, Calder House (c.1885), a distinguished residence which is now a restaurant and bed-and-breakfast.

On the other side of High St is the old post office (1870) which, from 1880-86, was the childhood home of noted Australian novelist Henry Handel Richardson. Her mother was the postmistress. Richardson's autobiography Myself When Young (1950) recounts her time in Maldon with great affection.

Walk along Francis St. To the left are the croquet club (1890) and the museum.

Museum and Courthouse
The Maldon Historical Museum, at the corner of High St and Fountain St, has mining photographs and equipment, domestic memorabilia, and archives. It is located in a mellow-toned brick building erected in 1858 as a Market Place. However, this venture was unsuccessful and it became the shire offices in 1865. The hammerbeam arches were added to correct the buckling walls in 1871. It is open weekdays from 1.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. and from 1.30 p.m. to 5.00 p.m on public holidays and weekends.

Behind the museum is the old fire station (1870) and on the other side of the adjacent football oval is the former courthouse (1861).

Historical Buildings - High St (North)
Return to the post office and head north-west along High St. To the left is Robinson's House, a Gothic Revival structure dating from 1866. Over the road, at 50 High St, is the unusual brickwork of Thomas Vivian's House (1862). It sits in the shadow of Holy Trinity Anglican Church (1862-89), a Gothic Revival ragstone structure with exceptional stained-glass windows and an intricately trussed roof. At 54 High St is Tressider's Cottage, a miner's cottage dating back to 1859 which is now a bed-and-breakfast. A little further along is Dr Lisle's House (1857) and over the road is the primary school (1874).

At Hospital and High is Dr Hardy's House (1857) and adjacent is School Cottage (1860) originally a school. Further along High St and on the other side of the road is the arched entranceway of one of the town's grander homes, 'Glendonald', built in 1870 as 'Ethandune'. Continue north past a range of late 19th-century residences to the Adair St corner where there is an Italianate villa with impressive plasterwork.

Historical Buildings - Adair St
At Adair and Chapel is the hospital, built as a one-storey Classical Revival structure in 1860. Patients were allegedly given subterranean water from Eaglehawk Mine as it was believed to have medicinal properties. Just along Chapel St is St Brigid's Catholic Church (1891).

Return to the High and Adair St intersection. On the north-eastern corner is Rule's House (1897). The brick-and-timber house adjacent dates from 1875. At the south-western corner of Adair and Templeton is a corner store and residence (1880s).

Historical Buildings - Templeton St
Heading south on Templeton, to the right, are Brook's residence (1890) with its fine iron lacework, and a typical timber house from the 1880s. Over the road is Chapman's House which was started at some point prior to 1863. The large house on its southern side dates from 1870.

At the south-eastern corner of Templeton and Camp Sts is the former Holy Trinity Parsonage (1863). The original church was to the rear. Just to the south is Lovell's Cottage, a timber house dating from 1860.

Historical Buildings - Church St
Walk along Camp St to the Church St corner where you will find one of the town's highlights - the former Anglican Penny School where the children once paid a penny a day for their schooling. It was largely rebuilt in 1862 after a storm destroyed part of the original 1856 structure, although the tower and entrance porches remain from that earlier day. The architecture is unusual and eclectic. Over the road is the Welsh Congregational Church (1863 with a transept added in 1901).

Walk south along Church St past the Presbyterian manse (1859) to the Presbyterian Church (1905) at the Edward St corner.

Historical Buildings Concluded
At the north-eastern corner of Edwards and Templeton is the Baptist Church (1896). On the south-eastern corner is Brook's Store (1864).

Across Templeton St, at the Francis St corner, is the former Welsh Baptist Church (1865). On its western side is the former temperance hall (1873) and behind that is one of the town's oldest surviving structures, the former Edwards crushing plant.

Maldon Historic Reserve
The Maldon Historic Reserve constitutes about 2500 ha of public land and forest around Maldon. It was created to preserve the area's goldmining relics, including old shafts, abandoned equipment, mullock and tailing heaps, tunnels, dams, tracks, kilns, cyanide vats, stone walls and the goldmining dredge beside the road to Bendigo, 3 km from the town centre. Some are outlined below.

The box and ironbark forests are regrowth projects as the original woodlands were destroyed by goldmining and farming activities. Bushwalking, forest drives, wildflowers and fossicking can all be enjoyed at Smith's Reef which is signposted to the left off the Castlemaine Rd about 4 km from town.

Beehive Chimney
The 30-metre Beehive Chimney (1862) is located just off the road, near the intersection of Main St and Church St. The Beehive reef was discovered by Cornish miners who named it after a swarm of bees which were, at that moment, settled on a nearby post. There is a picnic area adjacent.

North British Mine
Turn off High St into Parkins Reef Rd which heads south-west. 2 km from town, to the left, is the site where the North British Mine operated until 1926. A walking track leads past numerous ruins including two large stamper batteries and some kilns. There is much to see but some remnants may go unnoticed or unappreciated by the untrained eye so be sure to obtain a guiding pamphlet from the information centre. The forest just to the south contains some old puddling machines and mining holes from the gold days.

Carman's Tunnel
Just past the North British, to the right, is the access point to Carman's Tunnel, a 570-metre goldmining tunnel which was excavated, largely with pneumatic drills, between 1882 and 1884. Despite the extraordinary effort, returns were minimal. For a small fee you can go on an informative, candle-lit, half-hour walk through the dry, clean, spacious, level and easily accessible tunnel from 1.30 p.m. to 4.00 p.m. on weekends, public and school holidays, tel: (03) 5475 2667.

Steam Railway
The town's handsome railway station in Hornsby St was built in 1884 . Two steam trains serve as a static display while another two operational steam trains are used for 45-minute return trips into the Muckleford Forest (a diesel locomotive is used on days of total fire ban). Trips are made on Sundays and public holidays at 11.30 a..m, 1.00 p.m. and 2.30 p.m. and on Wednesdays and Saturdays in school holidays (same departure times). Trains also run every day from December 27 to mid-Januray and from Good Friday to Easter Monday. Ring (03) 5475 2966 for recorded information concerning train times, or call the general office on (03) 54751451.

Nuggetty Ranges Winery
4 km north-west of Maldon, on the Maldon-Sherbourne Road (also known as Bradford Road), is Nuggetty Ranges Winery. Established in 1994, it is a small family-owned winery which produces cabernet sauvignon, semillon and an award-winning shiraz. The cellar door is open daily from 10.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m., tel: (03) 5475 1347.

Yabby Farm
Next to the Nuggetty Ranges Winery, in the Maldon-Sherbourne Road, is the Maldon Yabby and Fish Farm which offers a personalised farm tour, yabbie catching, barbecue and picnic facilities and sales. It is only open to the public in the Christmas school holidays, tel: (03) 5475 1086.

Anzac Hill
One of the best vantage points in town is from atop Anzac Hill which furnishes views of the Grampians, Mount Franklin and Mount Macedon in the distance. You can walk or drive to the summit along Fountain St although it is unsealed, difficult and much further (2.4 km up a steep hill) than most guides will admit. At the top there is a picnic area and a walking track which heads west along a 4WD track to the summit of Mt Tarrangower. If you're looking for an easier option there is an excellent view of the town from the Turkish cannon which is less than a third of the way up the hill.

Mt Tarrangower and Butts Reserve
Mount Tarrangower (570m) is located 2 km west of town via Franklin St. This was the centre of the gold diggings in the 1850s and it was here that the richest quartz reefs were located. Today there is a very good lookout tower (which is illuminated at Eastertime), fine picnic areas and walking tracks to Anzac Hill and Fountain St.

Just off Franklin St, at the base of the hill, is Butts Reserve where there are picnic and barbecue facilities and where a folk festival is held each year in early November. In late October it is also the starting point for a motor race to the top of the hill.

Reservoir
Cairn Curran Reservoir, 12 km south-west via Newstead Rd, is a large and scenic lake which offers good opportunities for water sports, swimming, picnicking and relaxing. There is a sailing club near the spillway.

Porcupine Township
Porcupine Township is an award-winning recreation of an early 1850s gold town located in rugged bushland on the site of the original Porcupine diggings where the first gold discovery between Castlemaine and Bendigo was made. The buildings associated with the original settlement have entirely disappeared but slab, shingle and mud-brick buildings have been relocated from other goldfields and derelict townsites. These include a two-storey barn, an hotel, an undertaker's, miner's huts, a blacksmith's, a general store, a carriage repository, a doctor's surgery and a bowling alley.

You can go for a ride in a Gold Escort, pan for gold, feed the emus or take a trip on the Little Toot train which does a circuit through the original diggings. There are actors in period costume, a resident artisan working in pioneer style, a licensed restaurant, a motel and self-contained cottages. The 'village' is located 2.5 km from the post office at the corner of the Maldon-Bendigo Rd and Allans Rd, tel: (03) 5475 1000.

Cemetery
Maldon's pioneer cemetery (1857) contains the graves of over 200 Chinese goldminers from the early days of the town. There is a Chinese oven where incense was burned for ceremonial purposes, Chinese headstones, a caretaker's cottage (1866) and a rotunda (1900). Jonquils grow in profusion in springtime. To get there follow the Maryborough Rd for 3.8 km then turn right at the women's prison.







Sold Price for 1 Cnr Camp & Church Street Maldon Vic 3463
www.realestate.com.au/property-house-vic-maldon-116578799
(PHOTO)

1 Cnr Camp & Church Street Maldon

“Welsh Congregational Church” 1863/1901

This charming church, where services were conducted in Welsh until 1893, has been servicing the community for over 120 years.
In continuous community use since 1863, this historic church forms part of the rich history of Maldon. A delightful building constructed of locally sourced materials including rich red brick and wonderful old timbers, it is in good condition and sited on approximately 1011sqm.
Superbly positioned on an elevated corner block and overlooking the historical township, this is a wonderful opportunity offering the astute buyer many lifestyle options.
- Classified by the National Trust at Local Level Significance (B4034)
- Included in the Mount Alexander Heritage Study (stage 2)


Sold Price for 11 Church Street Maldon Vic 3463
www.realestate.com.au/property-house-vic-maldon-116578543
(PHOTO)
11 Church Street Maldon
Penny School 1856/1862

The Maldon former Church of England Denominational School No.413, today known as the Penny School, is of historical importance for its association with the early provision of education to the burgeoning population in the Central Victorian Goldfields.
The building is one of a small number of early substantial buildings which are integral to the history of the Maldon Township. This charming building is in good condition and constructed of locally sourced materials including stone, brick and timber.
Since the Penny School's custodianship by the National Trust of Australia (Victoria) in 1983, it has been used by the community in a multitude of ways.
For the last 12 years the Penny School has operated as a commercial venue hosting functions including weddings, art exhibitions, community events and projects.
It has kitchen and bathroom facilities, heating and cooling.
Located on approximately 4349m2, on an elevated corner site overlooking the township, this is a rare opportunity to secure something very special for a commercial venture, Bed & Breakfast, weekend retreat or permanent living.
- Classified by the National Trust at State Level Significance (B2035)
- Classified by Heritage Victoria on the Victorian Heritage Register (H1382)
- Included on the Mount Alexander Heritage Overlay (H071)(PHOTO)

Maldon - Anglican Diocese of Bendigo
www.bendigoanglican.org.au/parishes/maldon.html








JANILYE,ONE OF THE FAMILY TREE CIRCLES STALWARTS, HAS DONE MUCH RESEARCH ON MALDON. (See also COMMENTS.)

The lone but not alone grave of Elizabeth ANSET Maldon, Victoria ...
www.familytreecircles.com/i-know-this-lone-grave-has-been-photograph...

Search results for '' - Digitised newspapers and more - Trove
192.102.239.158/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Maldon&q&s=20
THE BOILER EXPLOSION AT MALDON. ... (1843-1914), Joseph Thomas Bawden; Text last corrected on 17 December 2013 by janilye ... MALDON. The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 23 June 1897 p 9 Article: Abstract: ..

SOME PERSONAL MEMORIES OF MALDON.
In 1967, I ran from Landseer St, Castlemaine to Maldon to attend the Easter Show while my future wife's family drove and discovered on a very hot day that the shade provided by roadside trees was not as great as I had imagined. At the Show a little girl's eye was pecked out by a magpie.

Before teaching at Maldon in 1967, I had taught at Franklinford,Phillip Whitlock being one of my pupils. His dad moved the family from Mt Franklin to Maldon during that time and I taught Phillip again at Maldon.

Steven Burchell was a great kid and I believe he became a talented stilt walker. The Burchell family had been in the area for a considerable time,apparently coming from near Talbot by 1900.
Private W. Burchell who has been home on final leave prior to going to the front, was entertained by the residents of Baringhup, and Tarrangower and presented with a pocket wallet and wristlet watch, for which
he suitably returned thanks. (Mount. Alexander Mail (Vic. : 1914 - 1917) Monday 1 November 1915 p 4 Article)

Steven's father seems to have been Reg and his mother Joyce,a Castlemaine girl.
(Annual Report 2007 - Maldon Hospital
www.maldhosp.vic.gov.au/reports/annualReport2007.pdf)


A MINI CHRONOLOGY.
Many references are to mines, gold escorts etc.which will not be included here. My emphasis here is on early residents (whose family folklore makes vague reference to "the diggings"*) and noteworthy events.
*As the surnames list has limited capacity,priority will be given to surnames of those pioneers whose descendants are unlikely to know of a connection with Maldon. Those descendants who know of a connection are likely to read the journal anyway.



GENERAL POST OFFICE -The following notice was issued at the Post office yesterday -Maldon (Tarrengower) -On and after the 6th inst., and till further notice a weekly mail for Maldon will be closed at this office every Thursday at 5 :30 p.m. , and the return mail will arrive every Saturday, at 12 noon -Fryers Creek etc.
(P.5,Argus, 8-4-1854.)
N.B. Any reference to Maldon before 1854 will be to Maldon in Essex, Maldon's Punt (apparently on the Murray near Albury, hence Tarrengower in brackets in the notice to prevent confusion) or the Maldon Plate in horse racing. Fryers Creek was sometimes rendered as Friars Creek in early days by those not aware of Mr Fryer.


DEPUTY REGISTRARS. - The Government Gazette announces the appointment of the following gentlemen to the office of Deputy-Registrar:-Mr George L. Hutchinson, at Hepburn; .....Henry Nathaniel L. S. Kentish, at Maldon ; etc.
(Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 - 1856) Saturday 22 April 1854 p 4 Article)

1854.
If Mr Thomas Waters, of Harton, Bedfordshire, will forward the whereabouts of William Howard Birt, (whom he promises to take care of), to Mr. John Howard, Maldon Post Office, Tarrengower Diggings,he will oblige.
(P.2, Argus,31-5-1854.)
There must have been some desperation because the advertisement was inserted numerous times in different forms. This must have been another of Mrs John Howard's brothers.
PETER HOWARD BIRT, who came out on the ship Calabar, Captain Moodie, will oblige his sister by writing to her, at Maldon Post Office, Tarrengower. (P.2, Argus,29-5-1854.)

DIED. On the 13th instant, at Maldon, Tarrengower diggings, from the accidental discharge of a fowling-piece,
Mr. Humphrey Jones Evans, late of Llambdr, North Wales.(P.4, Argus, 19-6-1854.)

INSOLVENTS.William Henry Ritchie, storekeeper, of Maldon, near Castlemaine. The causes of insolvency are stated as depreciation in value of goods and pressure of creditors. Amount of debts, £2099/6/1 ; assets £932/9/8.
(P.5,The Age,5-12-1854.)

Two peninsula pioneers held the office of postmaster at Melbourne,Ben Baxter before he established Carrup Carrup (at Baxter) and Alexander McCrae after an unsuccessful short tenure on the Arthurs Seat Run. It was the latter who received a letter signed by numerous residents of Maryborough griping about their poor service. The present Maryborough residents could hardly complain about their absolutely beautiful railway station.

......4. That the inhabitants of Maldon and of Avoca (at neither of which places does the population, during the summer season, approximate within about one-fifth of that of Maryborough)enjoy the advantage of postal communication with Melbourne and Castlemaine twice a week.etc. (P.5.Argus, 21-12-1854.)


GOLF COURSES.
I only played at Maldon once, with my wife's uncle Roy Portwine of Castlemaine. Roy hit a beautiful drive right down the middle of a fairway and despite a lengthy search, we never found the ball. Maldon,like Castlemaine,had its fair share of magpies* and its likely that one rescued its "baby" or the ball went down a burrow.
*At Castlemaine's course some very clever maggies had set up home in some gums overlooking about three fairways and would swoop you just as you commenced your downswing. And they knew when you were foxing! When running around Maldon's footy ground I did plenty of backwards running although I was playing footy,not umpiring, at the time. It was essential to keep an eye on the maggies nesting in the south west forward pocket. The little girl who had her eye pecked at the Easter Show at the ground was indelibly etched into my memory.

30603 Maldon Golf Club Bendigo District 6 holes in virgin bush club called Tarrengower Golf Club
Club records

NAME DISTRICT LOCATION REFERENCE
30603 Maldon Golf Club Bendigo District Original 1913 Relocated to site owned by Dabb and Co in North
Maldon. ? holes Club records

30603 Maldon Golf Club Bendigo District 1st change. Extended to 9 holes and land purchased in 1924 and
1935. In 1939 additional land purchased and course extended to 18 holes. Club records.
(GSA Vic-Country courses-by District 17.2.10for Website use ...
www.golf.org.au/site/_content/document/00015081-source.pdf)

Legend: Maldon is also the birthplace of Walter Travis, "the most successful amateur golfer in the U.S. during the early 1900s, a noted golf journalist and publisher, an innovator in all aspects of golf, a teacher, and a respected golf course architect." - See Wikipedia - Walter Travis.
( Maldon Golf Club - 1 - Golfer
victoria.golfer.com.au/directory/maldon-golf-club-victoria/1488)

by itellya Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2015-04-28 07:54:25

Itellya is researching local history on the Mornington Peninsula and is willing to help family historians with information about the area between Somerville and Blairgowrie. He has extensive information about Henry Gomm of Somerville, Joseph Porta (Victoria's first bellows manufacturer) and Captain Adams of Rosebud.

Do you know someone who can help? Share this:

Comments

by janilye on 2015-04-28 10:36:44

Indika something else worth seeing in Maldon.

by janilye on 2015-04-29 04:30:32
by Crawford on 2015-05-02 04:21:40

John Ramsay MLA for Meldon. He is my 4x gt grandfather.

DEATH OF MR. RAMSAY, M.L.A.
We regret to announce the death of Mr. John Ramsay,the member for Maldon in the Legislative Assembly. The deceased entered public life as a representative for Maldon in the third Parliament of Victoria, which assembled, on the 30th August, 1861. He had previously contested the constituency with Mr Geo. Harker in 1859, and with Mr Martley the following year, consequent upon the resignation of the former, and in both instances was defeated by very narrow majorities. A second attempt of Mr. Martley as a member of the O'Shanassy Administration to enter Parliament for Maldon, resulted in his defeat by a majority of 411 votes. Mr. Ramsay continued to sit in the Assembly as representative for the district until his death, which took place at Echuca, on Saturday forenoon. He had been ailing for some time, and was constrained to absent himself from his legislative duties much to his regret. Though suffering from bodily injuries, accidentally received on the gold-fields, his mind was full of energy, and ever active in the defence of the miners, by whom he was held in great esteem. There was a high-souled principle pervading the man, which rendered him proof to all the wiles and snares which were set for him in the belief that his pecuniary necessities were great. "Honest John" became a proverb, and afforded an occasional butt for the ridicule of his opponents, who failed to detach him from his allegiance to the principles of the party which returned him to Parliament. His antipathy to the squatters was well known. His "platform," to use a transatlantic phrase, was a reform of the Upper House, payment of members, free selection and deferred payments, abolition of the gold export duty the right of mining on private property, and the development and encouragement of native industry. As a member of the Land Convention, he was instrumental in keeping alive that agitation which culminated in the Land Act of 1862 ; and to his energy in some measure the country is indebted for the improvements in the land system of this colony, embodied in the Amending Land Act of 1865. During the six years (within a month or two) he sat in Parliament, he was rarely absent when questions of public importance were under discussion. He voted in favour of the occupation licenses, which Mr Duffy considered "a dangerous example of lawlessness." He supported the Heales Government against the want of confidence motion brought forward by Mr O'Shanassy. He was one of those who declared
with Mr Service that, "rather than do as the Attorney-General (Mr Ireland) had done, rather than stand up like the bold beggar, as that hon. member had done, he would live on bread and water for the remainder of his life." But the House, by a majority, held that Mr Ireland had a legal right to his pension, which he afterwards obtained through the instrumentality of the Supreme Court. He supported Mr Brooke's motion in favour of throwing open the pastoral runs for sale or license ; he opposed the Duffy Land Bill in the belief that the proposal to give the squatters such a tenure as the bill proposed was equivalent almost to giving them the land in perpetuity, and because it did not give free selection. He supported the abolition of the gold duty, asserting that "so far as the matter of rent was concerned, the miner's right was more equivalent for the advantages gained, as compared with the squatters — the squatters' rent being 2d per acre, whilst the miner had to pay £1 for one - eighth of an acre." The Common Schools Bill, the Municipalities and the Local Government Bills met with his cordial approval. To come to more recent events, his support of the Government was throughout of the most consistent character. The constitutional question arising out of the tack and tariff, found in him one of the earnest defenders of the privileges of the Assembly, and in a speech of more than ordinary vigor he opposed the motion of Dr. Greeves, which sought to make the Assembly a mere tool in the hands of the Upper House. His parliamentary conduct met with the approbation of his constituents, and he had the singular honor of being returned unopposed at the general election - his most virulent opponents considering it hopeless to contest the seat. As an advocate of the miners he was considered an authority in the House, and deference was paid to his views, which were marked by great common
sense, and had a very practical bearing. His knowledge of mining pursuits justified his election to the office of Chairman of the Castlemaine Mining Board, and he was returned as the representative of the district to the Board of Agriculture, and was one of its most prominent members. In short, his life was one of ceaseless activity. In such esteem was he hold, that amidst the whirlpool of party strife, when the reputation of public men was torn to tatters, he was singularly free from even a suspicion of being actuated in his parliamentary career by base or personal motives, and his death occurred under circumstances which add lustre to his reputation, and reflect honor upon his memory. He had gone to Echuca to sojourn with his son-in-law, in the belief that a change of air would benefit him ; but he unfortunately caught a cold, which brought about a fatal result. His last request was that he should be buried in Melbourne, and in accordance with his wish the body was forwarded by train, and reached the Spencer-street station on Sunday evening at nine p.m. Mr Daly, the undertaker, was in attendance with a hearse, and the removal of the remains was witnessed by the hon. Mr Macgregor, M.L.A., Mr F.L. Smyth, M.L.A., Mr McKean, M.L.A., Mr Farrell, M.L.A., Mr Frazer, M.L.A., Mr Finley and other gentlemen, who accompanied the body to the residence of the bereaved family. The remains of the late Mr John Ramsay, M.L.A., were consigned to their last resting place on Monday 27th ult. The funeral cortege, left the residence of the family of the deceased, Napier-street, Collingwood, shortly after three o'clock, for St. Andrew's Church. Following the hearse were three mourning coaches, containing the relatives of the deceased and the pall bearers, and a long line of private carriages closed the mournful procession. On reaching St. Andrew's Church, the coffin was removed from the hearse and laid in front of the pulpit, which was draped in black. After a hymn had been sung, the pastor of the
church, the Rev. Angus McGregor, dwelt with much feeling upon the loss the church had suffered in the death of one who had long sat under his ministration, and who, as a trustee of the church, had always taken a lively interest in its progress and welfare. Some passages from Scripture were then read, when prayer was offered up and the body being removed to the hearse, the procession was again formed and proceeded to the Melbourne Cemetery. The pall-bearers were the hon. the Chief Secretary, the. hon. the Minister of Railways and Roads, the hon. the Minister of Lands, the hon. the Minister of Mines, and the hon. the Minister of Justice, Messrs Burtt, Watkins, Kyte; and McCaw, M.L.A.'s, and one of the relatives of the deceased. The prayer at the grave was offered by the Rev. Mr McDonald, and after the last tribute of respect had been paid to the deceased by the numerous persons present, the grave was closed. Among the gentlemen present were Messrs Reeves, Jones, Farrell, Davies, J.T. Smith, F.L. Smyth, Longmore, Casey, Frazer, McKean, and Edwards, M.L.A.'s. The deceased was a native of Glasgow, and aged 56 years.

The Australian News for Home Readers (Vic. : 1864 - 1867) Thursday 20 June 1867 p 3 Article

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