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MARITIME HEROES, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA - ROLLS OF HONOUR.

Journal by itellya

Surnames: ALICIA BALL GRIEVES MCLAREN MILLAR MURRAY QUIST SINGLETON
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by itellya Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2014-06-02 04:27:51

Itellya is researching local history on the Mornington Peninsula and is willing to help family historians with information about the area between Somerville and Blairgowrie. He has extensive information about Henry Gomm of Somerville, Joseph Porta (Victoria's first bellows manufacturer) and Captain Adams of Rosebud.

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by Morgan2409 on 2014-06-02 05:54:30

10th August 1898, The Caulfield & Elsternwick Leader p.3

A STRUGGLE FOR LIFE.
_o_
Peter Toy, the old cockle man, of Rickett's Point, was out fishing on Wednesday, when a gale sprang up from the north-west, which prevented his landing, although he was only a short distance from the point. Being unable to use his sail, he took to the oars, and fought bravely from 11 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. to keep his frail flat- bottomed boat to the land. His wife was on the cliff watching him, and when the wind suddenly chopped to to the west, and caused a great com- motion on the bay, she thought " old Toy " was capsized, and she went to Mrs Finlay's to report the matter. Mrs Finlay telephoned to the police, who at once went to the rescue. Con- stable Creed soon found the boat just below Watkin's boathouse, Mordialloc, Toy having started for home. Old Peter informs us that he has lived at Beaumaris for the past 22 years, and never before has he had such a hard fight for his life. The gale came straight off the shore, and every sinew in his body was exerted to save him- self being carried out to sea. He was very exhausted when the westerly squall came upon him, but the old boat rode well, and he had no trouble in reaching Mordialloc, where several willing hands helped him to land. We have had the extremes of heat and cold this week. The hot winds of Monday have done very much damage to the gardens, vegetables being burnt up, and fruit burnt on the trees

12th November 1936, The Argus p.15
FISHERMAN'S ORDEAL
Rescue by Lifeboat
QUEENSCLIFF, Wednesday.-When he arrived at Queenscliff to-day, Salvatore Pompei, aged 45 years, fisherman, of Mordialloc, described the ordeal which he experienced in a storm on Monday night,and yesterday before being rescued off Point Danger, Torquay, last night by the Queenscliff lifeboat. Pompei left Westernport on Monday afternoon at 4.30 p.m. in his 30ft. launch for Mordialloc. At 11 p.m. he reached the Rip, but the tide swung his boat from its course. When morning came, he found that he was near Torquay. His petrol supply was almost exhausted, and the lifeboat came on the scene just in time.
He was taken abroad the lifeboat, and his boat was taken in tow. The Fisher-
men's Club at Queenscliff has provided him with sufficient petrol to take him to
Mordialloc when the weather is favourable

by Morgan2409 on 2014-06-02 06:07:17

6th January 1922, Frankston & Somerville Standard p.5
A trying experience befell two young men at Frankston on Sunday night. A young returned soldier named "Snowy" Downer, who lost a leg whilst on active service, and his companion, George Mor- ris, left Frankston about 5.30 p.m. on Sunday night in Mr. R. E. Fairnie's motor boat, wearing only their coats over their bathing costumes. After they had cruised around for a time, the engine failed, and the boat commenced to drift out to sea. A heavy sea waa running, and Senior Constable Bray, of the Frankston police, telephone to Wil- liamstown, Mordialloc, Mornington and other points around the bayside, as it was feared the boat had capsized. Mr E. K. McComb, who has a total of'some 29 rescues to his credit, also set out, accompanicd by Brigadier-General Grimwade, and Mr. Guy Madden, in search of the missing men. They as- certained that Downer and Morris had been picked up by the steamer, Armargh, at 6.30 a.m. on Monday, about 11 miles out, and were conveyed to Port Mel- bourne. Although they had been drift- ing for nearly 12 hours, they were little the worse for the experience, except for a severe drenching and the fact that the they had been without food. It was when off Frankston that Captain Vint, of the Armagh direct from London, ob- served that the motor boat was in diffi- culties, and that the occupants were making signals of distress. He heaved to and took the men and mootor boat aboard his vessel. Downer and Mor- ris returned to Frankston on Monday afternoon when they were heartily con- gratulated on their escape from a watery grave.

by itellya on 2015-01-12 18:42:24

BEFORE THE FORMATION OF RESCUE ORGANISATIONS,COUNTLESS LIVES WERE SAVED BY FISHERMEN.
HERE'S ANOTHER RESCUE BY E.McCOMB (SEE PREVIOUS COMMENT. AND TO THINK THAT McCOMBE STREET NEAR ROSEBUD PLAZA DISRESPECTS THIS PIONEERING FRANKSTON FAMILY!

An accident occurred during the holidays to two young men while out boating, which might easily have resulted in a fatality. In appears that a sudden gust of wind came and tookthem unawares, and the boat capsized. They both succeeded in keeping them-
selves afloat by clinging to the over- turned boat. Accompanied by A Greggs and
G. Hesselman, E. K. McComb was returning from fishing and observed the accident. He lost no time in covering the distance, (about a mile and a half) between his boat and the drowning men, and arrived in time to take one of them into his boat before he was quite exhausted. In the meantime his companion in disaster had elected to reach the shore by swimming, a distance of about 200 yds, which he succeeded in doing and after a rest neither of them were the worse for their narrow escape. (P.2,Mornington Standard,16-1-1915.)

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