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My Hattabaugh Family

Journal by RogerG

Generation No. 3

4. RANGER JOHAN GEORGE3 HATTABAUGH (JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born November 10, 1761 in Germantown, Philadelphia Co., Pennsylvania, and died 1822 in Washington County, Indiana. He married MARY COINER Abt. 1789 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (Believed), daughter of MICHEAL KOINER and ANN DILLER. She was born Abt. 1762 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and died in Washington County, Indiana.

Notes for RANGER JOHAN GEORGE HATTABAUGH:




The following is quoted in full from the "Centennial History of Washington County, Indiana" Pages 505-6-7:

Monroe Township

At quite an early day the backbone of land extending north from Salem to the Muscatatuck river was called Walnut Ridge on account of the fine groves of black walnut trees that grew on these lands. Along the ridge, extending from the headwaters of the Blue River to the Muscatatuck, there was an old Indian trail that had, no doubt, been traveled over a great deal by red men, for it was easily traced from one end to the other. The first white men coming into this country, finding this trail, rightly concluded that there must be a fertile country lying to the north, and would have gone there, but for some seven or eight years after they first located in this county, the river was considered the "dead line", between the whites and the warring savages, and it was very hazardous for the pioneers to venture over into disputed territory. The Indians, who remained south of the Muscatatuck and White Rivers were friendly to the whites and never gave them any trouble. The depredations that were committed were by Indians who came across into the county from the north and west. Walnut Ridge, which is now in rather a dangerous place for scattered settlers, some of whom were killed by the Indians, and they frequently lost stock by thieving bands of these savages that roamed about through the county.
The first settlers to venture into the township were Aham Housh and Solomon Rink, in 1808. The first cabin built in the township was Housh's, which stood a few rods south of the Kossuth Store. Rink had a sort of pen made of poles on his land about a half mile south of where Plattsburg stands. In the spring of 1809 several others moved in including Jacob Hattabaugh, William Logan and Thomas Denney. In 1810, George Hattabaugh, Jacob Rink, Michael Rink, Dempsey Rice and many others came in. Shortly after landing here, Jacob Hattabaugh purchased Rink's right to the land he had squatted on. In those days, land sold at the land office for two dollars and fifty cents per acre on the installment plan. Hattabaugh had been to Jeffersonville to make a payment on his land and had paid out all but fifty dollars and had a certificate showing that to be the fact, but on his way home he lost his receipt. The word went round that this certificate was lost, when Adam Housh went to Jeffersonville and finished paying out on the land, getting a land warrant in his own name. This gave rise to a law suit which came off at Corydon, in which Hattabaugh was winner. Someone had found the certificate he had lost and left it at Royse's Lick with Doctor Lamb, which put in evidence with other facts in the case, won the suit for Hattabaugh.
The Hamiltons, Logans and Denneys settled about a mile and a half south of the present site of Kossuth. At the close of the War of 1812, the "ridge" was settled up more rapidly and two forts were built, one on the Logan farm and the Hattabaugh Fort near the place now called Plattsburg. The Hattabaugh Fort was probably the only regulation old time fort in the county. It consisted of a pen twenty feet square built of logs hewed square to a height of about eight feet, and on top of this there was another pen twenty six feet square projecting three feet on all sides beyond the walls of the bottom pen. There were port holes on all sides of both pens as well as in the floor extension of the upper pen to enable inmates to shoot straight down in case of an attack by Indians or an attempt to fire the fort. A stockade was built around this fort made of chestnut poles about ten feet long set two feet in the ground and touching each other. There were port holes arranged through this fence one about every six feet. This fort was on the east side of the road not far from a big spring that comes out of the hillside and remained there till sometime after 1830 when it rotted and tumbled down.


The Hattabaugh Family
The Hattabaughs were a very prominent family in the development of the county. Jacob was born in Dover, Delaware, in 1780. His father, Warwick, served with honor through the revolution. When eighteen years of age, Jacob Hattabaugh went to Kentucky. While there, he worked at the tanning business and made trips to New Orleans on flatboats. At that time, the Spanish controlled that city, and all the money the traders received for their products was in Spanish dollars. These boatmen usually returned home afoot, having a pack horse to carry their money and provisions. Upon one occasion, Hattabaugh's party was attacked by highwaymen when only a day out from New Orleans. In the assault, the pack animals became frightened and broke away, but went back to the city whither the party returned and found everything safe. It was the custom of the land pirates to allow all boats to proceed quietly down the river with their produce, but laid for the boatmen upon their return. As a means of self protection, several boat crews would join together for mutual protection on the return trip, all well armed. The roads were nothing but paths through the forests and canebrakes. The parties Hattabaugh returned home with, at different times were attacked at several points, but they always put up a strong defense and never lost anything.
This was the days when the celebrated Harpes roamed at will, robbing and murdering boatmen right and left when the latter were not able to protect themselves. There were two gangs of the Harpes, one headed by "Big" Harpe and the other by "Little" Harpe. They became so bold and dangerous that large rewards were offered of their capture. Big Harpe was finally run down near Bowling Green, Kentucky, and his head was cut off and placed in the forks of a tree by the roadside, and for many years the highway was designated the Harpshead Road. In 1807, Hattabaugh made a trip all alone over into the northwest territory. He journeyed over the old Vincennes Trail and went on as far west as the American Bottom, opposite St. Louis, but returned to what is now Washington County, and concluded the latter was the most desirable place in which to locate. He stopped in Louisville for more than a year, and while there was offered four acres of land, in what is now the business part of the city, for his horse which he refused, not dreaming what such an investment would have yielded him in years to come. In the spring of 1809, he located in this county, as related, where the remainder of his days were spent. In 1812, Jacob married the widow Spears who was the daughter of William Logan. He had met her upon one occasion when he had stopped over night with the Logans on his way to the frontier settlements when he was on his way back to Kentucky for provisions. He said then, he would marry that woman if he could get her.
Jacob Hattabaugh, believed Cousin of George, was one of the "Rangers" during the Indian troubles of 1812-15, and was one of the party that pursued the Indians after the Pigeon Roost Massacre. Upon one occasion the Indians stole all his horses, some six head, and made way with them, excepting one that was blind, which he found across the river. He sunk the first tan yard in the township, if not in the county, in 1811, on the place where he settled. In 1824, he purchased the farm southeast of, and in sight of Salem on the Martinsburg Road, off Guthrie Bullet, where he erected a brick house and lived for many years.
When the rebel John Morgan and his army came through Salem, in 1863, Hattabaugh was crippling around on the streets having had a leg broken some years before. When a squad of soldiers accosted him and asked him if he was a Democrat or Abolitionist, he wiped his eyes and responded loudly, "Sirs, I am a Democrat!" They told him he could do as he was bid or be shot, at the same time cocking their pistols and pointing them at his breast. Shoot and be damned he cried, you can't cheat me out of much time anyhow. At this reply, they passed on swearing the while that he was the contrariest and gamiest old man they ever saw. The old man then went around and had an interview with General Morgan at his room in the hotel, and thought him a fine looking fellow. [In the revised history, it stated that he told General Morgan that he would be lucky to get out of Indiana alive! Roger G. Spurgeon 12/29/02]
George Hattabaugh came to the township in the spring of 1810, locating on the piece of land just south of what is now Plattsburg. He had nine children, two sets of twins, all born in the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia. He too, was one of the "Rangers", and always ready to join in the pursuit of thieving, murdering Indians. The Hattabaughs were all powerful men and great fighters. They were not particularly quarrelsome, but at all musters and elections they were always present, and stepped around with a chip on their shoulders and whoever dared to knock it off had trouble right there.
Thomas Denney, who located on the west side of the road, nearly opposite the Logan place, married a daughter of George Hattabaugh. His son Joseph was one of the stoutest men in the county during his day. A perfect lamb when not imposed upon, but a lion in his fury. Upon one occasion, during the Civil War, he was on the cars bound for a Democratic state convention at Indianapolis. There was a squad of soldiers on the train going home on furlough and they concluded they would have some fun out of the "Old Butternut", as they called him. Denney stood their slurs and abuse as long as he could when he arose and went for the whole bunch, which after a short set-to, retreated into another coach with bloody noses and battered faces. When asked what the trouble was the soldiers said they had made a mistake and tackled a hurricane, instead of a "Butternut".

August 30, 1905 Salem "Democrat" :

"SOUTH PRECINCT MONROE TOWNSHIP., by Wm. Barnett:

The south precinct of Monroe township, was first settled by white people in about the year of 1808 or 1809. The Hattabaugh family were the first to arrive,, then the Logan and Ellison families. The Hattabaughs settled on section eight, built a cabin, and; soon after the Indians commenced their warfare, when George and Samuel Hattabough with the assistance of others erected a fort which was named "Hattabaugh". This fort was on high ground and about 75 yards from a spring of lasting water, which was in plain view of the fort. This land is now owned by Robert Dorsey. In passing and returning from the fort to the spring, the whites soon discovered that their lives were in great danger by the Indians lying in wait and firing upon them and in consequence they dug a ditch between the fort and spring so as to pass along said ditch without being seen and thus avoid being fired upon by the savages.
About 300 yards south west of where the old Hattabough fort stood, there is yet standing a house which was built in 1813, by George Hattabaugh. It is now occupied as a residence by John Ryan, a large two story log house and which is yet in a fair state of preservation..."

Notes for MARY COINER:
From, "A Historical Sketch of Michael Keinadt and Margaret Diller" by the Michael Koiner Memorial Association, page 61:

"2. (Second Generation.) Mary, the daughter of Michael Keinadt and Margaret Diller, his wife, was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, about 1762. She Married George Hedabaugh from Pennsylvania. The latter had been to Virginia and visited Casper Koiner before the removal of the Koiner family to Virginia. It is not clear whether they were married in Pennsylvania or Virginia; but the probabilities favor the belief that they were married before the removal, 1789, and that a part of their children were born in Pennsylvania. The family church record, in Virginia, shows the birth of their son Samuel, on September 17, 1800; also the birth of daughters, Marinda and Elizabeth,--(twins), on December 17, 1802. Tradition reports a large family of sons, and a removal of the family to Powel's Valley, South West Virginia, or to the Western States."

More About JOHAN HATTABAUGH and MARY COINER:
Marriage: Abt. 1789, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (Believed)

Children of JOHAN HATTABAUGH and MARY COINER are:
5. i. JUDGE JACOB JOSEPH4 HATTABAUGH, b. October 21, 1793, Augusta County, Virginia; d. February 04, 1864, Washington County, Indiana.
6. ii. MARY HATTABAUGH, b. Abt. 1780, Pennsylvania; d. February 19, 1875, Washington County, Indiana.
7. iii. GEORGE JR. HATTABAUGH, b. 1792, Virginia; d. December 1837, Washington County, Indiana.
iv. PHILLIP HATTABAUGH, b. 1791; m. JANE ENGLAND.
8. v. MICHAEL HATTABAUGH, b. 1791; d. Abt. 1826.
9. vi. MARTIN HATTABAUGH, b. 1797, Virginia; d. 1872, Washington County, Indiana.
vii. SAMUEL HATTABAUGH, b. 1801; m. (1) ANN CLAY?; m. (2) JANE MCCLARY, November 26, 1828, Washington County, Indiana.

More About SAMUEL HATTABAUGH and JANE MCCLARY:
Marriage: November 26, 1828, Washington County, Indiana

viii. MARGARET HATTABAUGH, b. 1802; m. WILLIAM HAGEN.
ix. ELIZABETH HATTABAUGH, b. December 17, 1802, Virginia; m. ISAAC DENNEY, August 29, 1826, Washington County, Indiana.

More About ISAAC DENNEY and ELIZABETH HATTABAUGH:
Marriage: August 29, 1826, Washington County, Indiana


Generation No. 4

5. JUDGE JACOB JOSEPH4 HATTABAUGH (JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born October 21, 1793 in Augusta County, Virginia, and died February 04, 1864 in Washington County, Indiana. He married ANNA FRANCIS JUDIA. She was born September 05, 1803, and died November 03, 1872 in Washington County, Indiana.

Notes for JUDGE JACOB JOSEPH HATTABAUGH:
In the "History of Washington County Indiana, 1804" pages 719-20, Jacob Hattabaugh was named as a Justice of the Peace in 1821 and again in 1840. "A well known carpenter of the early days of Washington County, Indiana."

More About JUDGE JACOB JOSEPH HATTABAUGH:
Burial: Plattsberg Cemetery

Notes for ANNA FRANCIS JUDIA:
Judy may have come from Tschudi. A Samuel Tschudi (now spelled Judi, Judy) from Switzerland m. Maria 1732

More About ANNA FRANCIS JUDIA:
Burial: Plattsberg Cemetery

Children of JACOB HATTABAUGH and ANNA JUDIA are:
10. i. GEORGE WILLIAM5 HATTABAUGH, b. November 30, 1823, Washington County, Indiana; d. December 09, 1898, Washington County, Indiana.
ii. JULIA ANN HATTABAUGH, b. October 19, 1830, Washington County, Indiana; m. WILLIAM GRACE, January 05, 1854, Washington County, Indiana.

More About WILLIAM GRACE and JULIA HATTABAUGH:
Marriage: January 05, 1854, Washington County, Indiana

iii. ISSAC HATTABAUGH, b. 1833.
11. iv. JACOB JOHN HATTABAUGH, b. August 07, 1844, Washington County, Indiana; d. May 10, 1918.
v. MARTHA ANN HATTABAUGH, b. February 12, 1848, Washington County, Indiana; d. March 20, 1917, Washington, Arkansas; m. WILLIAM DILLINO?, January 08, 1867.

More About WILLIAM DILLINO? and MARTHA HATTABAUGH:
Marriage: January 08, 1867

6. MARY4 HATTABAUGH (JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born Abt. 1780 in Pennsylvania, and died February 19, 1875 in Washington County, Indiana. She married CAPTAIN/JUDGE THOMAS DENNEY, son of JAMES DENNY and UNKNOWN. He was born Abt. 1775 in Virginia, and died March 13, 1843 in Washington County, Indiana.

Notes for CAPTAIN/JUDGE THOMAS DENNEY:
From the History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington County, Indiana, 1884, Page 904:
"Joseph Denny, a native of Virginia, was born April 9, 1808, the second of nine children in the family of Thomas and Mary (Hattabaugh) Denny, the latter a native of Pennsylvania and the former of Virginia. During 1809 they came to Washington County, Indiana and settled in Monroe Township where they spent the remainder of their lives..."

From the Centennial History of Washington County Indiana, Pages 511-12: MONROE TOWNSHIP:

"The first post office was called, "Walnut Ridge", and the first postmaster was Thomas Denny... Among the earliest teachers are... and Joseph Denney. Mr. Joseph Denney probably taught more terms of school in this township than any other one man."

From the "History of Washington County, Indiana 1804 page 719, Thomas Denny was listed as a Justice of the Peace in 1816 and 1821.

Joseph Denny stated the following, quoted from page 643 of the "Centennial History of Washington County Indiana".

"Joseph Denny spoke as follows: "My father located on Walnut ridge in 1810. There were nine or ten families in that settlement and they built a fort near where Plattsberg now stands. I'll never forget the night after the Pigeon Roost Massacre. Word reached us that the redskins would attack the Hattabaugh Fort next. The women and children were all bundled up and taken down into the knobs where there were no Indian trails and would not likely be found. The men gathered at the fort and made all necessary preparations to give the savages a warm reception. There were fifteen men and boys stationed in the fort armed and ready to fight. Strict guard was maintained through the night, but no Indians came. They had crossed the Muscatatuck up east and soon were out of reach of their pursuers.
I was too young to handle a gun and was sent away with the women folks. We made beds as best we could out of leaves and trash, but the women slept very little, expecting every minute to hear the crack of rifles and the war whoop of the Indians as they stormed the fort. Next morning they came for us and we all went to our respective homes, but we had to keep about half the men in the settlement scouting about and doing guard duty while the rest tended the crops. That season we lost some horses by thieving bands of Indians. One of our horses that would not stand hitched, came back soon after he had been stolen with some paw-paw bark around his neck, which the Indians had attempted to tie him up with. Those were the times that made me always hate the Indian and I have never had any sympathy for them since."

"The Alarm and Pursuit" Pages 525-6:

"The news of the killing spread very rapidly through the settlements and where forts were within reach the women and children were rushed in for safety. When they remained at home, every precaution possible was taken to bar doors and make ready to resist an attack if one should be made. The early settlers, as well as every member of the family, were always determined to sell their lives as dearly as possible in preference to being captured and in all probability die at the stake.
As soon as they could be gathered together, about forty armed men, under Col. Henry Dawalt, started in pursuit on the day of the killing. Ellisons, the Dennys, Houshes, Rices, Hattabaugh and others unknown were in the company, all on horseback. They started in pursuit of The Indians the morning after the killing. They reached the White River about ten o'clock and the stream was rising full and the current swift. They had no boats and rafts had to be constructed out of driftwood to carry them over. The logs and poles were bound together by grape vines and wythes. The day was far spent by the time they got across and all together again. The crossing was made about two miles below the forks. They soon struck a trail and pursued on as rapidly as possible. Andrew Housh was in the lead, as a sort of advanced guard, and coming in sight of the Indian camp which was about two miles below where they had crossed, he yelled back, "Here they are", which alarmed the Indians who had already prepared to break camp and, they fled precipitately. Some shots were fired at them, but none took effect that they knew of.
It being now about dusk, Colonel Dawalt stopped his troop at the camp over night, but early next morning was on the trail of the fleeing savages. They had several ponies and it was not difficult to follow them up. They kept on the trail for two days until they reached a stream called Bean Blossom in the neighborhood of Bloomington. It had been raining hard and the stream was overflowing its banks, so that a crossing under the circumstances would have been quite difficult. Colonel Dawalt consulted his men, and they concluded that it would be very hazardous for them to go much farther west as Indians in large numbers were known to be in that part of the country. Returning to the old Indian camp, they halted for a day to rest and recuperate themselves before re-crossing the river. Luckily, they found a couple of canoes on the river bank that had been used by the Indians which aided them very much in getting back to their home side of the river.
They were gone just a week. Reaching home, their families were brought back from the forts and hiding places and they set about their usual vocations. It was in the fall of this year that the Pigeon Roost Massacre occurred, and it was in the pursuit of those blood-thirsty demons that John Zink and Spurgeon were killed in Jackson County." (The Spurgeon said killed has not been identified, but he may have participated and not killed. I was thought to have been killed in Vietnam by some of the people of my hometown and Colonel William Spurgeon was said to have been killed also, and not. Possibly one of our Spurgin's participated and the story mixed up through the years. Roger G. Spurgeon 12/26/02.)

"Washington County Giants" pages 646-7-8.

In the early times, Washington County was celebrated far and wide as being the home of a race of giants and the wonderful feats of strength performed by some of these men are scarcely believable. There were a number of stalwarts who knew not how strong they were when under any kind of excitement or when their power was put to the test. Among the men who made up the class of giants that gave the county its reputation were Abram Stover, Thomas Denny, James Uppinghouse, James Lee, John Brough, William Cravens and others.
It was generally conceded that Stover possessed the greatest strength of them all and a number of incidents have been handed down relative to his gigantic strength. He was a man of commanding appearance, six feet high, with a huge frame and sturdy manhood. He never vaunted about the superiority of his muscular powers, was never quarrelsome, but stood up for his rights and was ever ready to meet an opponent on friendly terms, even if it came to a fist fight to settle the mooted question. In fact, none of the strong men of early days were prone to be quarrelsome. Had they been vicious and of a fighting disposition, they would have been the terror of the country. When a young man showed that he possessed extraordinary strength and prowess, he always had his champions and backers ready to pit him against any and all comers of like age and experience.
These lists were usually planned for muster days and 4th of July celebrations. A ring was formed in which the contestants met and woe be to the individual who dared to interfere any way in the contest other than to urge his favorite to supreme effort, or prompt him what to do. A public gathering of any kind was a very dull affair if there were not a number of fights, wrestles and foot races to give life to the occasion.
Thomas Denney was always considered a close second to Stover as a powerful man and many of his champions were ready to stake their money on him if a contest between the two men could be arranged. The two men were close friends and could not be induced to engage in a fist and skill contest publicly, but their partisans finally arranged for a "whisky barrel" contest during a public gathering at Salem. The test was to be the taking of a barrel of whisky by the chime, raising it up and drinking out of the bunghole. Judges were selected and a full barrel of whisky was rolled out in the street. It fell to Denney's lot to make the first test. After lifting the barrel which weighed about four hundred pounds, he slowly raised it up and took a drink out of the bung hole. Stover walked up leisurely, laid hold of the barrel, raised it up easily, took his drink and set it down without a jar. There was then some discussion about the decision, each side claiming the victory, but the judges after mature deliberation gave the wager to Stover because he had made a clean lift, while Denney had rolled the barrel part of the way up against his legs.
The test did not exactly satisfy Denney, so meeting Stover in Salem a short time after this test was made, he proposed that they go upstairs into an empty room on the corner of lot 9, north side of the square, and take a friendly set-to in order that the matter would be satisfactorily settled, no outsiders admitted. Stover readily consented and upstairs they went, laid off their coats and began their knock-down test. After sparring a bit, Stover planted one on his mauls squarely on the side of Denny's head and down he went. After taking a few breaths they went at it again when Stover watching his opportunity landed a heavy blow in Denny's face bringing a flow of blood and sending him staggering against the wall. The merchant below hearing something fall heavily upon the floor above, proceeded to investigate the matter. When he reached the room they were just turning for their coats when Denny remarked, "Where shall we go to take it". Often after that time their partisans would endeavor to get up a fight between them, but the response of each would be, "He is a mighty stout man and we prefer to be friends."

Thomas Denny was Captain of one of the eight companies of the Ninth Regiment of Territorial Militia organized by Col. John DePauw in Washington County. Hist. of Wash. Co. p. 707.

Children of MARY HATTABAUGH and THOMAS DENNEY are:
12. i. JUDGE GEORGE5 DENNEY, b. 1812, Washington County, Indiana; d. March 31, 1885, Washington County, Indiana.
ii. EDITH DENNEY, b. Abt. 1806, Washington County, Indiana; m. GEORGE H. DUNCAN.
13. iii. JOSEPH DENNEY, b. April 09, 1808, Shenandah Valley, Virginia; d. April 02, 1888, Washington County, Indiana.
iv. ELIZABETH DENNEY, b. 1823, Washington County, Indiana; m. ISAAC JUDY.
v. MARY ANN DENNEY, b. 1824, Washington County, Indiana; d. 1861, Washington County, Indiana; m. JEFFERSON BOTTS.

Notes for JEFFERSON BOTTS:
Corporal, Company E, 53rd, Indiana

vi. AMANDA DENNEY, b. 1832, Washington County, Indiana; m. JOHN ELLIOT.
vii. PALINA DENNEY, b. 1820, Washington County, Indiana.

7. GEORGE JR.4 HATTABAUGH (JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born 1792 in Virginia, and died December 1837 in Washington County, Indiana. He married MARY (POLLY) ELLISON December 30, 1817 in Washington County, Indiana.

More About GEORGE JR. HATTABAUGH:
Burial: Plattsburg, Monroe Twp, Washington County, Indiana

More About MARY (POLLY) ELLISON:
Burial: Plattsburg, Monroe Twp, Washington County, Indiana

More About GEORGE HATTABAUGH and MARY ELLISON:
Marriage: December 30, 1817, Washington County, Indiana

Children of GEORGE HATTABAUGH and MARY ELLISON are:
i. ELIZA5 HATTABAUGH, b. 1818.
ii. NANCY HATTABAUGH, b. 1820.
iii. ANGELINE HATTABAUGH, b. 1822.
iv. MARGARET HATTABAUGH, b. 1824.
v. GEORGE HATTABAUGH, b. 1827.
vi. ELIZABETH HATTABAUGH, b. 1829.
vii. ROBERT HATTABAUGH, b. 1831.
viii. JULIA ANN HATTABAUGH, b. 1835.

8. MICHAEL4 HATTABAUGH (JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born 1791, and died Abt. 1826. He married JANE STALKER.

Child of MICHAEL HATTABAUGH and JANE STALKER is:
14. i. JOHNATHAN5 HATTABAUGH, b. 1826; d. 1904.

9. MARTIN4 HATTABAUGH (JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born 1797 in Virginia, and died 1872 in Washington County, Indiana. He married LUCY WESTON in Washington County, Indiana. She was born 1812, and died 1898 in Washington County, Indiana.

More About MARTIN HATTABAUGH:
Burial: Hattabaugh Cemetery, Washington County, Indiana

More About LUCY WESTON:
Burial: Hattabaugh Cemetery, Washington County, Indiana

More About MARTIN HATTABAUGH and LUCY WESTON:
Marriage: Washington County, Indiana

Children of MARTIN HATTABAUGH and LUCY WESTON are:
15. i. SAMUEL5 HATTABAUGH, b. February 12, 1847; d. July 17, 1924, Washington County, Indiana.
ii. MALINDA HATTABAUGH, b. April 15, 1838, Washington County, Indiana; d. March 20, 1920, Washington County, Indiana; m. SETH BOLING.


Generation No. 5

10. GEORGE WILLIAM5 HATTABAUGH (JACOB JOSEPH4, JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born November 30, 1823 in Washington County, Indiana, and died December 09, 1898 in Washington County, Indiana. He married SARAH BOLING February 13, 1845 in Washington County, Indiana, daughter of RANDOLPH BOLING and JANE GRAVES. She was born March 11, 1826, and died September 27, 1892 in Washington County, Indiana.

More About GEORGE WILLIAM HATTABAUGH:
Burial: Plattsberg Cemetery

Notes for SARAH BOLING:
Sarah Boling, daughter of Randolph Boling and Jane Graves, was born in Washington County, Indiana in 1826 and Married George William Hattabaugh on February 13, 1844. This record is found in the Bride Index Book E. p. 29, Washington County, Indiana. Their children were remembered by their Granddaughter Sarah Lauena (Denny/ey) Spurgeon, and this list was passed on to me. Sarah Lauena Denny Spurgeon was raised by her Grandparents George William and Sarah Boling Hattabaugh. Sarah is a direct descendant of Pocahontas. The last names of Randolph, Graves and Boling are found on the Cherokee rolls.

More About SARAH BOLING:
Burial: Plattsberg Cemetery

More About GEORGE HATTABAUGH and SARAH BOLING:
Marriage: February 13, 1845, Washington County, Indiana

Children of GEORGE HATTABAUGH and SARAH BOLING are:
16. i. ANN MARIAH6 HATTABAUGH, b. November 18, 1846, Washington County, Indiana; d. Washington County, Indiana.
17. ii. ELISA JANE HATTABAUGH, b. July 20, 1848, Washington County, Indiana; d. October 29, 1917, Washington County, Indiana.
18. iii. JUDGE ISAAC COLLUMBUS HATTABAUGH, b. December 24, 1851, Washington County, Indiana; d. October 1927, Lewiston, Idaho.
19. iv. JOSEPHINE A. HATTABAUGH, b. October 22, 1855, Washington County, Indiana; d. January 27, 1932, Washington County, Indiana.
v. MARY HATTABAUGH, b. 1857; m. (1) AMBROSE POLLARD; m. (2) RUSH.

11. JACOB JOHN5 HATTABAUGH (JACOB JOSEPH4, JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born August 07, 1844 in Washington County, Indiana, and died May 10, 1918. He married MARY JANE WEDDLE April 17, 1866. She was born 1846, and died 1902.

More About JACOB JOHN HATTABAUGH:
Burial: Plattsburg, Monroe Twp, Washington County, Indiana

More About JACOB HATTABAUGH and MARY WEDDLE:
Marriage: April 17, 1866

Children of JACOB HATTABAUGH and MARY WEDDLE are:
i. ANNIA S.6 HATTABAUGH, b. 1867.
ii. FANNIE C. HATTABAUGH, b. 1869.
iii. ANGELINA HATTABAUGH, b. 1870.
iv. INFANT HATTABAUGH, b. 1871.
v. JOHN J. HATTABAUGH, b. 1874.
vi. MARTHA A. HATTABAUGH, b. 1876.
vii. FRANCIS C HATTABAUGH, b. 1879.
viii. MARGARET E. HATTABAUGH, b. 1882.
ix. GEORGE E. HATTABAUGH, b. 1884.
x. LILLIE HATTABAUGH, b. 1886.
xi. VIRGIL C. HATTABAUGH, b. 1888.

12. JUDGE GEORGE5 DENNEY (MARY4 HATTABAUGH, JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born 1812 in Washington County, Indiana, and died March 31, 1885 in Washington County, Indiana. He married MARIAH LUMLEY June 28, 1836 in Washington County, Indiana, daughter of WILLIAM LUMLEY. She was born 1814, and died November 21, 1869 in Washington County, Indiana.

Notes for JUDGE GEORGE DENNEY:
In the "History of Washington County, Indiana 1804", page 720, George Denny was named as a Justice of the Peace in 1839 and 1845.

More About JUDGE GEORGE DENNEY:
Burial: Kossuth Cemetery

More About MARIAH LUMLEY:
Burial: Kossuth Cemetery

More About GEORGE DENNEY and MARIAH LUMLEY:
Marriage: June 28, 1836, Washington County, Indiana

Children of GEORGE DENNEY and MARIAH LUMLEY are:
20. i. THOMAS OLIVER6 DENNEY, b. 1840, Washington County, Indiana; d. March 31, 1885, Washington County, Indiana.
ii. JULIETT DENNEY, b. 1837.
iii. SARAH E. DENNEY, b. 1843.
iv. WILLIAM S. DENNEY, b. 1848.
v. SUSAN M. DENNEY, b. 1853.
vi. GEORGE F. DENNEY, b. 1855.
vii. MARY A. DENNEY, b. 1859.

13. JOSEPH5 DENNEY (MARY4 HATTABAUGH, JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born April 09, 1808 in Shenandah Valley, Virginia, and died April 02, 1888 in Washington County, Indiana. He married SARAH MINERVA ELLIOT June 28, 1830 in Washington County, Indiana, daughter of WILLIAM ELLIOT and ELIZABETH FOX. She died July 06, 1880 in Washington County, Indiana.

Notes for JOSEPH DENNEY:
From "The History of Lawrence, Orange and Washington County, Indiana 1884, p.904:

Joseph Denny, a native of Virginia, was born April 9, 1808, the second of nine children in the family of Thomas and Mary (Hattabaugh) Denny, the latter a native of Pennsylvania and the former of Virginia. During 1809 they came to Washington County, Ind., and settled in Monroe Township, where they spent the remainder of their lives. He died March 13, 1843 and Mrs. Denny survived him until 1878. They lived in the fort at Kossuth during the war of 1812. Joseph Denny received a practical education, although raised amid the hardships of a pioneer life. He remained at home until his marriage, when he brought a part of the farm now owned by James F. Burcham. He now owns the old homestead farm. He was married June 28, 1830, to Minerva, a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Fox) Elliott. Ten children were born to them, seven of whom -- Thomas, Joseph, Jacob, James, Mary, Ellen and Edith, now Mrs. C. G. Chambers -- are living. Mrs. Denny died July 6, 1880.


More About JOSEPH DENNEY:
Burial: Kossuth Cemetery

More About SARAH MINERVA ELLIOT:
Burial: Kossuth Cemetery

More About JOSEPH DENNEY and SARAH ELLIOT:
Marriage: June 28, 1830, Washington County, Indiana

Children of JOSEPH DENNEY and SARAH ELLIOT are:
21. i. JOSEPH6 DENNEY, b. September 15, 1838, Washington County, Indiana; d. January 25, 1903, Washington County, Indiana.
22. ii. JACOB DENNEY, b. November 17, 1842, Washington County, Indiana; d. April 16, 1910.
iii. JAMES DENNEY, b. August 17, 1849, Washington County, Indiana; d. December 24, 1943; m. JEMIMA CATHERINE NICHOLSON; b. March 07, 1855, Washington County, Indiana; d. December 05, 1929.

More About JAMES DENNEY:
Burial: Kossuth Cemetery

More About JEMIMA CATHERINE NICHOLSON:
Burial: Kossuth Cemetery

iv. MARY DENNEY, b. October 09, 1840; d. April 28, 1914.
v. ELLEN DENNEY, b. September 27, 1845, Washington County, Indiana; d. May 07, 1919.
vi. EDITH DENNEY, b. 1847, Washington County, Indiana; d. 1908; m. CHARLES CHAMBERS; b. October 20, 1854; d. October 19, 1921.

More About EDITH DENNEY:
Burial: Kossuth Cemetery

More About CHARLES CHAMBERS:
Burial: Kossuth Cemetery

vii. ELIZABETH DENNEY, b. November 18, 1836, Washington County, Indiana; d. June 27, 1875.

14. JOHNATHAN5 HATTABAUGH (MICHAEL4, JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born 1826, and died 1904. He married ELIZABETH WALKER.

Children of JOHNATHAN HATTABAUGH and ELIZABETH WALKER are:
23. i. ERASTUS S.6 HATTABAUGH, b. 1857; d. Abt. 1907.
ii. REBECCA HATTABAUGH, b. 1854.
iii. NEWTON HATTABAUGH, b. 1863.
iv. MARTHA HATTABAUGH, b. 1860.
v. JAMES HATTABAUGH, b. 1867.
vi. ALICE HATTABAUGH, b. 1867.
vii. ORTHO HATTABAUGH, b. 1870.
viii. JOHNATHAN JR. HATTABAUGH, b. 1874.

15. SAMUEL5 HATTABAUGH (MARTIN4, JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born February 12, 1847, and died July 17, 1924 in Washington County, Indiana. He married ELIZA ELLEN WESTON, daughter of WILLIAM WESTON and LOUISA ENGLAND. She was born October 11, 1853 in Washington County, Indiana, and died December 24, 1937 in Washington County, Indiana.

More About SAMUEL HATTABAUGH:
Burial: Hattabaugh Cemetery, Washington County, Indiana

More About ELIZA ELLEN WESTON:
Burial: Hattabaugh Cemetery, Washington County, Indiana

Children of SAMUEL HATTABAUGH and ELIZA WESTON are:
24. i. WILLIAM J.6 HATTABAUGH, b. January 02, 1878; d. December 15, 1966.
ii. CURTIS HATTABAUGH, b. September 21, 1884; d. July 17, 1937; m. ELTHA; b. 1885.

More About CURTIS HATTABAUGH:
Burial: Winslow Cemetery, Washington County, Indiana


Generation No. 6

16. ANN MARIAH6 HATTABAUGH (GEORGE WILLIAM5, JACOB JOSEPH4, JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born November 18, 1846 in Washington County, Indiana, and died in Washington County, Indiana. She married THOMAS OLIVER DENNEY March 23, 1865 in Washington County, Indiana, son of GEORGE DENNEY and MARIAH LUMLEY. He was born 1840 in Washington County, Indiana, and died March 31, 1885 in Washington County, Indiana.

Notes for ANN MARIAH HATTABAUGH:
Ann Mariah Hattabaugh married Thomas Oliver Denny/ey and of this union six children were born. Thomas and Mariah were second cousins and their common progenitors were George and Mary (Coiner) Hattabaugh. Thomas O. Denny died of consumption. Ann Mariah died before him, also, of consumption. The children of Thomas and Mariah were raised by their grandparents George and Sarah Hattabaugh. My Grand mother, Sarah Lauena Denny Spurgeon, a child of Thomas and Mariah, passed this information down to her children and it was passed on to her grandchildren. Grandma also stated that she was descended from Pocahontas through her Grandmother Sarah (Bolling) Hattabaugh, though she didn't know the lineage. Lauena married William H. Spurgeon, also of Washington County, Indiana.

More About THOMAS DENNEY and ANN HATTABAUGH:
Marriage: March 23, 1865, Washington County, Indiana

Children of ANN HATTABAUGH and THOMAS DENNEY are:
i. SARAH LAUENA7 DENNEY, b. December 22, 1867, Salem, Indiana; d. December 15, 1957, Beaverville, Illinois; m. WILLIAM HARRISON SPURGEON, October 15, 1885, Salem, Indiana; b. January 12, 1863, Salem, Indiana; d. July 13, 1945, Rural DeMotte, Indiana.

Notes for SARAH LAUENA DENNEY:
Sarah Lauena Denny is a descendent of progenitors The Emperor Powhatan, George Hattabaugh and Thomas Denny. She was called Lou or Louie and most didn't know her first name was Sarah. Cousin Grace Lauena (Spurgeon) Woods corrected me on the proper spelling of her second name, since Grace Lauena was named after grandma. Lauena was not spelled right most of the time, even on her tombstone.

The last name, Denny, is in the Cherokee Rolls.

More About SARAH LAUENA DENNEY:
Burial: December 18, 1957, DeMotte Cemetery

Notes for WILLIAM HARRISON SPURGEON:
In 1865, when William was about 2 years old, his father died. Family tradition says that he died of milk poisoning. Later, in 1878, William's mother married Johnathan Winslow. William was about 15 years old when this happened. William stated in later life that he did not get along with his step-father. Johnathan wouldn't let him go any place, so he would throw the saddle and bridle over the horse, and walk it a ways from the barn, being sure to keep out of sight of his step-father. Then, he would tighten up the saddle and gear and ride away. I guess, this is how he got away from home to court his bride. After he and his sister Suze received their inheritance from their Grandfather, and when he was about 22 years old, Willliam married Sarah Lauena Denny, on October 15, 1885.
William and Lauena bought a farm down at the bottom of "Lick Skillet Hill" in Monroe Township. The house, barn and chicken house set high up on the side of a hill, and the lane to the house weaved in and out of a creek bed that ran on the south side of the property. While living here all their children were born, Hattie born1886, Ellis born 1889, Nellie died in infancy, Ada born 1895, John Murray born 1898, Azalia born 1901, Beulah born 1904 and Joseph born 1906. The good farm land was used for farming rather than put a building on it. I visited the farm in the early 1990's, and none of the buildings were left standing. All that was left of the place was an open well. I was snooping around, when I by chance met an old Gentleman, Mr. Roy Ewing, who was at least 90 years old. He knew my grandparents and kindly show me around the old farm, and told me where all the buildings were at in the years past. At the corner of William's property was the Delaney Presbyterian Church. The property on which it stood was donated by William before it was build on June, 2 1904. It was being used for farm storage but, when I looked inside I could see that when it was a church it must have been beautiful. The walls were of naturally finished wooden boards which were still elegant as I looked in. Pastors James Hogue and Floyd Shafer, who held services in the church for years must have been proud of the beautiful wooden interior. When we finished our tour of the farm in my truck, Mr. Ewing asked me where the family got off to. He said that he used to play with John Murray as a child. I told him the family move to DeMotte. He told me to come back any time as we parted and that he was glad to meet me. For me to meet someone who knew the family more than seventy years after the family moved away was just short of miraculous. I was indeed happy to meet him also.
About 1907, William moved his family to a farm southeast of DeMotte, Indiana, that was bought from Henry Wood. The sand and muck lands of the farm was part of the Blue Sea. This large sea, which stretched from Wolcott to the Kankakee River was actually a large swamp that was drained in the early 1900's when a deep channel was dredged, clearing the Kankakee River. According to family tradition, by 1909 all the family was homesick and they sold the farm and moved back to Vallonia, Indiana, not far from Salem. At Vallonia, they raised onions on their farm. Here, Lauena became one of the first woman telephone switchboard operators. A cousin told a story that while Lauena was operating the switchboard, she looked up and saw a small child driving up the lane in a horseless carriage. She exclaimed, "Look there, that child has no business driving at that age." A close look revealed that her son, Joseph was at the wheel, barely able to see where he was going.
In 1912, William bought the same 100 acres that he had bought and sold on the families first trek north. This was the last move for William and Lauena and they made their home at this farm for the remainder of their years. By the time William had grandchildren, he was driving a horse drawn school bus. Cousin Janet in her old age tells of how she loved to see "that old country Gentleman" come up the lane with his horses to take her to school. Cousin Lee stated that William had a set of Morgan work horses that he was very proud of. Lee said that the Morgans were bread bigger then and were smarter than most work horses. They pulled together rather than separately as many other breeds. Lee said that William won a lot of bets pulling his Morgans against other horses that were bigger.
The "Great Depression" of the 1930's made hard times for most people in the United States. The farmers, however, were better off than most since they had a means to raise food. William and his family was, like most farmers of these bad times, mostly self sufficient. Lauena would raise turkeys and sell them every year to pay the taxes on the property.
World War II began in the late 1930's. William's youngest son, Joseph, joined the Army. Grandchildren Dale and Fred Schwanke joined the Air Force, while Doris Schwanke went in the Army and served with General Eisenhower's staff. Other of the family went, but I am ignorant of all who participated. On Doris' last leave home, William told her that he would not be around to see her again. His premonition proved true. In 1945, William became ill. Cousin John Spurgeon, a young lad at the time, was looking sad and down hearted being hurt and confused with what was going on with Grandpa. Grandpa noticed John's dilemma and reached down and patted John on the head saying, "Don't worry son, there ain't no Spurgeons died till he was at least eighty." After a pause he continued. "Unless someone shot him first."
William died shortly after at 3:33 P.M. July 13, 1945. His funeral was held at the Todd Funeral Home and he was buried in the DeMotte Cemetery. Many of the neighbors of Uncle John Muray heard of William's death and went to Murray's ripe wheat field and harvested it for him in this time of mourning. Aunt Ada thought very highly of their neighbor's consideration for their grief at this time.
Lauena remained on the farm until she was near death. She died at Beaverville, Illinois in a nursing home, one week before her ninetieth birthday. She too, was shown at the Todd Funeral Home and was buried in the DeMotte, Cemetery next to William. William and Lauena were members of the Methodist Church of DeMotte and took an active part in the community's church and welfare life. William was a deacon of the church. William and Lauena had 31 grandchildren.
Fred Schwanke (William Ferdinand), grandson of William and Lauena, a son of Ada and Earl Schwanke was born in 1918. He went to college at Indiana University and was a navigator on a bomber aircraft in WWII. After the war, he became a lawyer and set up practice in Monticello, Indiana. He married Imogene Snider and they had two children, Cheryl L. and Michael F. Fred and Imogene also had over a dozen foster children. After my father had died, Fred took a special interest in me. He became my father role model about the time I (Roger Spurgeon) became a teenager. He also insured that I knew the family on my father's side. He was a father and friend to me and I am deeply grateful to him and Imogene.
William and Lauena's children were: 1. Hattie 1886-1976 m. Harry Lusk, children Robert L., Grace E., Mildred, Glen Wm, Pauline, Harry C., and Eugene. 2. Ellis H. 1889-1968 m. first Rosa Hellen Snow, second Hulda Clark, children Kenneth R., Carl M., and Maurice R. 3.Nellie B. died in infancy. 4. Ada E. 1895-1972 m. Earl Schwanke, children Janet, Wm Ferdinand, Doris M., Marcella, Dale W., Earl Boyd, Bethel, Leland, Verlin (Gus), and Norma (died two years old). 5. John Murray 1898-1978 m. first Clara Terpstra second Ida (Terpstra) Schnelle, children first marriage Harry Bill, Grace Lauena, children second marriage John A., Clara Mae, Charles M., Jerry Joe and step-son James E. Schnelle. 6. Azalia M. 1901- m. Jay Pettet, child Eugene. 7. Beulah E. 1904-1970 m. first Millard Hart, second John Hissian children first marriage Shirley, Carol. 8. Joseph Thomas 1906-1961 m. first Edith Cox, second Ermil Maryla( Lilly) Spencer, children first marriage Paul Robert, Charles Roy, children second marriage Roger Glen and step-children Dallas D. Spencer, Essie K. Spencer and Calvin Duane Spencer.

William is connected to his Joseph Spurgin's family set by various court proceedings, settlement of Grandfather's estate and by 1840 through the 1880 census', and by his death certificate.

More About WILLIAM HARRISON SPURGEON:
Burial: July 16, 1945, DeMotte Cemetery

More About WILLIAM SPURGEON and SARAH DENNEY:
Marriage: October 15, 1885, Salem, Indiana

ii. BENJAMIN JACKSON DENNEY, b. December 25, 1865, Washington County, Indiana; d. February 13, 1947, Washington County, Indiana; m. EMMA JAMISON, December 09, 1896, Washington County, Indiana; b. December 31, 1872, Washington County, Indiana; d. October 11, 1968, William's Convalescent Center.

Notes for BENJAMIN JACKSON DENNEY:
OBITUARY SALEM DEMOCRAT, February 19,1947:

Benjamin J. Denney, 81 years of age, died Thursday, Feb. 13 at his home on State Road 135 north of Salem, after a lingering illness and five years of blindness. Sept. 30, 1946 he suffered a broken hip.
Son of Thomas O. and Maria Hattabough Denney, he was born Dec. 25, 1865 in Washington County, Indiana, where he spent the greater part of his life.
Most of his mature years were devoted to farming.
His marriage to Miss Emma Jamison took place Dec. 9, 1896.
He was a member of the Methodist church. Friendly, thoughtful and kind hearted, he won for himself numerous friends.
The funeral was held at 11 o'clock Sunday morning at the Dawalt Funeral Home by the Rev. Carnet Lewis pastor of the Campbellsburg Methodist Church. Interment was in Crown Hill cemetery, Salem. The survivors are the widow; two sisters Mrs. Hallie Waller, Mrs. Louie Spurgeon, DeMotte; one brother George Denney, DeMotte and several nieces and nephews.
The pallbearers, nephews of Mr. and Mrs. Denney were: James H. Johnson, Scottsburg, J. M. Spurgeon, Monon, Joseph Spurgeon, DeMotte, Charles Jamison, Indianapolis, Ralph Jamison, Bedford and Roy Jamison, Monon, Ind.

More About BENJAMIN JACKSON DENNEY:
Burial: Crown Hill Cemetery, Salem, Indiana

More About EMMA JAMISON:
Burial: October 14, 1968, Crown Hill Cemetery, Salem, Indiana

More About BENJAMIN DENNEY and EMMA JAMISON:
Marriage: December 09, 1896, Washington County, Indiana

iii. MARY FLORENCE DENNEY, b. December 23, 1871, Washington County, Indiana; d. March 19, 1906, Washington County, Indiana; m. GEORGE E. COKER, December 05, 1889, Washington County, Indiana.

More About MARY FLORENCE DENNEY:
Burial: Kossuth Cemetery

Notes for GEORGE E. COKER:
7 CHILDREN

More About GEORGE COKER and MARY DENNEY:
Marriage: December 05, 1889, Washington County, Indiana

iv. CARRIE ALICE DENNEY, b. November 11, 1874, Washington County, Indiana; d. October 17, 1896, Washington County, Indiana; m. SAMUEL PEUGH, May 12, 1892, Washington County, Indiana; b. April 09, 1869, Washington County, Indiana; d. April 22, 1897, Washington County, Indiana.

Notes for CARRIE ALICE DENNEY:
1 SON AND 1 DAUGHTER

More About CARRIE ALICE DENNEY:
Burial: Plattsburg, Monroe Twp, Washington County, Indiana

More About SAMUEL PEUGH and CARRIE DENNEY:
Marriage: May 12, 1892, Washington County, Indiana

v. GEORGE W. DENNEY, b. December 13, 1876, Washington County, Indiana; d. February 06, 1966, Jasper County Indiana.

Notes for GEORGE W. DENNEY:
Never married.

vi. HALEY ANNIA DENNEY, b. July 18, 1872, Washington County, Indiana; d. April 16, 1957, Jasper County, Indiana; m. (1) NOBLE WALLER; m. (2) JACOB WESTON, January 05, 1888, Washington County, Indiana.

Notes for HALEY ANNIA DENNEY:
1 DAUGHTER

More About HALEY ANNIA DENNEY:
Burial: Plattsburg, Monroe Twp, Washington County, Indiana

More About JACOB WESTON and HALEY DENNEY:
Marriage: January 05, 1888, Washington County, Indiana

17. ELISA JANE6 HATTABAUGH (GEORGE WILLIAM5, JACOB JOSEPH4, JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born July 20, 1848 in Washington County, Indiana, and died October 29, 1917 in Washington County, Indiana. She married ISAAC C. BAKER July 01, 1869 in Washington County, Indiana, son of ISAAC BAKER and REBECCA WILLIAMS. He was born 1839 in Washington County, Indiana, and died July 10, 1890.

More About ELISA JANE HATTABAUGH:
Burial: Plattsburg, Monroe Twp, Washington County, Indiana

More About ISAAC C. BAKER:
Burial: Plattsburg Cemetery

More About ISAAC BAKER and ELISA HATTABAUGH:
Marriage: July 01, 1869, Washington County, Indiana

Children of ELISA HATTABAUGH and ISAAC BAKER are:
i. CORA7 BAKER.
ii. SARAH BAKER.
iii. LILLIE BAKER.
iv. LOLA BAKER, b. January 11, 1890.
v. CARRIE BAKER.
vi. ELISHA BAKER.
vii. HORACE L. BAKER, b. December 13, 1879, Washington County, Indiana; d. November 19, 1918; m. MEDA GILSTRAP.

Notes for HORACE L. BAKER:
Private in the 12th US Infantry WWI

More About HORACE L. BAKER:
Burial: Plattsburg Cemetery

viii. LEWIS BAKER.
ix. MONTE BAKER, d. December 02, 1949; m. IVY SPURGEON; b. December 13, 1875, Washington County, Indiana; d. October 21, 1941, Washington County, Indiana.

More About MONTE BAKER:
Burial: Blue River Quaker Cemetery

Notes for IVY SPURGEON:
Ivy is the Daughter of William and Priscilla Winslow Spurgeon.

More About IVY SPURGEON:
Burial: Blue River Quaker Cemetery

18. JUDGE ISAAC COLLUMBUS6 HATTABAUGH (GEORGE WILLIAM5, JACOB JOSEPH4, JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born December 24, 1851 in Washington County, Indiana, and died October 1927 in Lewiston, Idaho. He married ALLIE MCCLAIN December 16, 1875 in Jamestown, Indiana.

Notes for JUDGE ISAAC COLLUMBUS HATTABAUGH:
OBITUARY, October 7, 1927:

Another of Lewiston's Pioneer citizens, I. C. Hattabaugh, answered his final summons at the family residence, 1716 G. Street, Sunday morning at 4 o'clock. Mr. Hattabaugh's health had been on the decline for some time but it was only during the past two months that he found himself forced to forsake his office and remain at home.
In passing, not only Lewiston loses a valuable citizen, but hundreds throughout the state will suffer the loss of a good friend and counselor. His life in Idaho as a territory and as a state was replete with interesting chapters of its progress, in which he figured prominently. His many finer attributes attracted about him a very large circle of friends and acquaintances, who will share their sorrow with the surviving family.
Mr. I. C. Hattabaugh had lived a half century among the people of Idaho. His early life and the last few years of his old age were spent in Lewiston among the friends he knew so many years. He was born in Washington County, Indiana, on December 24, 1851. He grew to early manhood in Indiana and the only son of George W. and Sally Hattabaugh. His parents passed away some years ago. Mr. Hattabaugh has two sisters living, Mrs. Josephine Denny, of Salem, and Mrs. Pollock, of Indianapolis, Indiana. At Plattsburg and at Kossuth, Indiana, he obtained his early education, graduating from the high school in the latter place. After finishing school, he moved to Jamestown, Boone County, Indiana. There on December 16, 1875, he married Allie Miller and to this union were born two children, M. Reese Hattabaugh, born at Jamestown in 1877 and Nonia Bradbury, deceased, born in Lewiston, Idaho, in 1879. The son is a prominent attorney at Grangeville.
Mr. Hattabaugh came to Idaho when the state was a territory, in 1878. Like many others coming westward in those early days, he arrived at Kelton, Utah, the terminal of the Union Pacific, and then overland by wagon and team to Lewiston. In the early 80's and 90's Mr. Hattabaugh was quite active in the civic and political life of Nez Perce county. He served as deputy assessor, deputy sheriff, deputy auditor and in 1884 was elected auditor of the Nez Perce county, and served the people two terms in this office. When Latah county was created out of a part of Nez Perce, he was named as clerk of the district court at Moscow and was later elected county treasurer of Latah county. He served also in Lewiston in early days as councilman. At Moscow, he with other citizens, among whom was the late W. J McConnell and ________ Sweet was quite prominent in bringing about the location of the state university at Moscow. Later he was named president of the board of regents of that institution.
At Moscow for many year, Mr. Hattabaugh conducted an abstract, real estate and insurance business. He was later associated with the Elder-Butterfield Implement Company, and became the manager of the Grangeville Implement Company at Grangeville in 1901. In 1910 Hattabaugh was named by Governor James H. Hawley as state insurance commissioner of Idaho, and served in this capacity during Governor Hawley's term. In 1909 he disposed of his interest in the Grangeville Implement Company and moved to Lewiston, where, with his wife, has been residing until his death. During the past few years he has been engaged in insurance work and was the justice of the peace in his home precinct.
Mr. Hattabaugh was a member of the Masonic order and was in 1892 elected grand master of Masons. He was also a Shriner, a member of the I.O.O.F and of the W.O.W. and United Artisans. He was a charter member of the B.P.O.E. of Moscow lodge, No. 249, and was the district deputy exalted ruler of the state, and helped organize the Wallace lodge of Elks. The genial figure leaves his devoted wife and son in Idaho and two sisters in Indiana to mourn his death.
The body is at the Bassar parlors, where, on Tuesday at 10 o'clock, a brief service will be held, the Rev. E.A. Wolfe delivering the message, the remains then being conveyed to Grangeville where the main funeral service will be held the same afternoon at 8 o'clock under the auspices of the Masonic Lodge. Burial will be at Grangeville. -- The Lewiston, Ida., Tribune.


More About JUDGE ISAAC COLLUMBUS HATTABAUGH:
Burial: October 1927, Grangeville, Idaho

More About ISAAC HATTABAUGH and ALLIE MCCLAIN:
Marriage: December 16, 1875, Jamestown, Indiana

Children of ISAAC HATTABAUGH and ALLIE MCCLAIN are:
i. M. REESE7 HATTABAUGH, b. 1877.
ii. NONIA HATTABAUGH, b. 1879.

19. JOSEPHINE A.6 HATTABAUGH (GEORGE WILLIAM5, JACOB JOSEPH4, JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born October 22, 1855 in Washington County, Indiana, and died January 27, 1932 in Washington County, Indiana. She married FLANDERS DENNEY, son of MORRIS DENNEY and SALLIE GORDON. He was born November 11, 1859, and died March 03, 1932.

Notes for JOSEPHINE A. HATTABAUGH:
OBITUARY:

Josephine Adelaide Hattabaugh was born October 22, 1855 in Washington County and passed away January 27, 1932. She was the daughter of George William and Sally Boling Hattabaugh. There were five children in this family, one brother and two sisters have preceded her in death.
She was first married to Charles Conner who died soon after. She was later married to Flanders Denny. To this union four children were born. Two died in early childhood. Another son, Thomas U. passed away, April 3, 1930.
The survivors are her husband, one daughter, Vinnie Frances, one sister Mrs. Mary Pollock, of Indianapolis, two grandchildren, John and Frances Denny, and a daughter-in-law, Mrs. Okie Denny, of Indianapolis, and a number of nieces and nephews.
She has been a member of the Plattsburg M. E. Church almost since its organization.
She was a good mother and a generous neighbor. No one ever left her door hungry. Her years of suffering were many, but she bore them patiently.

More About JOSEPHINE A. HATTABAUGH:
Burial: Plattsburg, Monroe Twp, Washington County, Indiana

More About FLANDERS DENNEY:
Burial: Plattsburg Cemetery

Children of JOSEPHINE HATTABAUGH and FLANDERS DENNEY are:
i. VINNIE FRANCIS7 DENNEY, b. December 02, 1886; d. February 18, 1965.
ii. THOMAS U. DENNEY.

20. THOMAS OLIVER6 DENNEY (GEORGE5, MARY4 HATTABAUGH, JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born 1840 in Washington County, Indiana, and died March 31, 1885 in Washington County, Indiana. He married ANN MARIAH HATTABAUGH March 23, 1865 in Washington County, Indiana, daughter of GEORGE HATTABAUGH and SARAH BOLING. She was born November 18, 1846 in Washington County, Indiana, and died in Washington County, Indiana.

Notes for ANN MARIAH HATTABAUGH:
Ann Mariah Hattabaugh married Thomas Oliver Denny/ey and of this union six children were born. Thomas and Mariah were second cousins and their common progenitors were George and Mary (Coiner) Hattabaugh. Thomas O. Denny died of consumption. Ann Mariah died before him, also, of consumption. The children of Thomas and Mariah were raised by their grandparents George and Sarah Hattabaugh. My Grand mother, Sarah Lauena Denny Spurgeon, a child of Thomas and Mariah, passed this information down to her children and it was passed on to her grandchildren. Grandma also stated that she was descended from Pocahontas through her Grandmother Sarah (Bolling) Hattabaugh, though she didn't know the lineage. Lauena married William H. Spurgeon, also of Washington County, Indiana.

More About THOMAS DENNEY and ANN HATTABAUGH:
Marriage: March 23, 1865, Washington County, Indiana

Children are listed above under (16) Ann Mariah Hattabaugh.

21. JOSEPH6 DENNEY (JOSEPH5, MARY4 HATTABAUGH, JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born September 15, 1838 in Washington County, Indiana, and died January 25, 1903 in Washington County, Indiana. He married JOSEPHINE ROBERTSON, daughter of ALEXANDER ROBERTSON and CORNELIA LUMLEY. She was born October 15, 1838, and died March 20, 1912.

More About JOSEPH DENNEY:
Burial: Kossuth Cemetery

More About JOSEPHINE ROBERTSON:
Burial: Kossuth Cemetery

Children of JOSEPH DENNEY and JOSEPHINE ROBERTSON are:
i. CAPTOLIS7 DENNEY, b. August 22, 1860, Washington County, Indiana; d. August 29, 1860, Washington County, Indiana.
ii. OSCAR DENNEY, b. August 23, 1863, Washington County, Indiana; d. March 14, 1864, Washington County, Indiana.
iii. JOSEPH ALEXANDER DENNEY, b. August 05, 1875, Washington County, Indiana; d. April 28, 1952; m. MARY JACKSON; b. January 31, 1878; d. October 15, 1942.

More About JOSEPH ALEXANDER DENNEY:
Burial: Kossuth Cemetery

More About MARY JACKSON:
Burial: Kossuth Cemetery

22. JACOB6 DENNEY (JOSEPH5, MARY4 HATTABAUGH, JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born November 17, 1842 in Washington County, Indiana, and died April 16, 1910. He married HINDAGA G. CALLAWAY, daughter of NOBLE CALLAWAY and MARTHA NICHOLSON. She was born February 21, 1851 in Washington County, Indiana, and died April 24, 1909.

Notes for JACOB DENNEY:
From the "History of Washington County, Indiana, 1804" pages 904, 905:

Jacob Denney, a son of above (Joseph Denny), was born November 17, 1842. He received a good practical education; remained at home working on the farm until twenty-eight years of age. He then rented a farm in Jackson County for two years, after which he managed the Dr. T. M. Tuckers's farm for four years. In 1877, he bought the farm of 160 acres upon which he still resides. He was married January 7, 1871, to Hindaga Callaway, a daughter of Noble and Catharine (Nicholson) Callaway. They have had six children, four of whom -- Reese M., Thomas M., Ammie B. and Hindaga are living.

More About JACOB DENNEY:
Burial: Puegh Cemetery

More About HINDAGA G. CALLAWAY:
Burial: Puegh Cemetery

Children of JACOB DENNEY and HINDAGA CALLAWAY are:
i. REESE M.7 DENNEY.
ii. THOMAS M. DENNEY.
iii. AMMIE B. DENNEY.
iv. HINDAGA DENNEY.

23. ERASTUS S.6 HATTABAUGH (JOHNATHAN5, MICHAEL4, JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born 1857, and died Abt. 1907. He married MARY JANE BORDER.

Children of ERASTUS HATTABAUGH and MARY BORDER are:
i. ALMA O.7 HATTABAUGH, b. 1898; d. 1969; m. ARTHUR GILBERT.
ii. NELLIE M. HATTABAUGH, b. 1894.
iii. ANNIE E. HATTABAUGH, b. 1896.

24. WILLIAM J.6 HATTABAUGH (SAMUEL5, MARTIN4, JOHAN GEORGE3, JOHAN MICHAEL2 HATTABAUGH/HATTENBACH, JACOB1) was born January 02, 1878, and died December 15, 1966. He married HULDA HOPKINS, daughter of ARCH HOPKINS and MARY PAYNE. She was born September 14, 1888, and died April 08, 1964.

More About WILLIAM J. HATTABAUGH:
Burial: Winslow Cemetery, Washington County, Indiana

More About HULDA HOPKINS:
Burial: Winslow Cemetery, Washington County, Indiana

Children of WILLIAM HATTABAUGH and HULDA HOPKINS are:
i. MARY ELLEN7 HATTABAUGH, b. 1908; d. 1948.

More About MARY ELLEN HATTABAUGH:
Burial: Winslow Cemetery, Washington County, Indiana

ii. LAWRENCE HATTABAUGH, b. December 11, 1914; d. November 17, 1944; m. GLADYS GREEN.

More About LAWRENCE HATTABAUGH:
Burial: Winslow Cemetery, Washington County, Indiana

Surnames: HATTABAUGH
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by RogerG Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2012-11-08 10:49:28

RogerG , from Kingman, Indiana, USA, has been a Family Tree Circles member since Nov 2012.

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