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residents of 1800s - CAMBRIDGE New Zealand TAYLOR - TYSON

Journal by ngairedith

the following short biographies were taken from the site:
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THE RESIDENTS
Researched and written by ERIS PARKER


TAYLOR, Edmund
Edmund was born about 1836 in Southampton. He enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia in Nelson on 31 October 1863. His Regiment Number was 809 and he was a baker.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.

TAYLOR, James
William Innes Taylor bought up soldiers' scripts after 1866 and J Taylor is noted in 1872 on a farm map drawn by Charles Chitty in a report on the district to the Armed Constabulary Commissioner's Office.
(James Taylor did not take up the land until 1875.)

TAYLOR, William
Bill was aged 22 years and carpenter when he was proposed for the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 22 July 1873. He was proposed again on 30 January 1877 and 'erased' in 1878.
William Taylor aged 35, a labourer, was committed to the Lunatic Asylum upon the medical testimony of two doctors in October 1883.

THOMAS, Charles
Charlie was born 13 August 1875 and married Arabella.
They arrived in Cambridge in 1900 and Charles started a hairdressing business opposite the Post Office. He joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 27 May 1902.
In 1905 Charles sold his business to L Fowler and took up an outdoor occupation - better suiting his health.
He bought back his Hairdressing and Tobacconist business in 1908 and sold it again in 1911, this time to Geo Richards.

THOMAS, Richard F
Richard was born about 1856 and a farmer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 27 March 1883.

THOMAS, William Henry
Bill was born about 1862 and a farmer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 27 March 1883. He injured to his arm in 1886 and received £13 from the end of September to the end of December from his sickness benefit.
He farmed at Hautapu and was a member of the Waikato Fruit Growers' Association in 1895.

THOMPSON, James
James was born in Howick about 1847 and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia as a substitute soldier on 31 January 1865 in Cambridge. His Regiment Number was Private 1643 and occupation was a labourer.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 60 acres - totalling ten shillings.

THOMPSON, Peter
Peter was born in Schleswick, Denmark about 1830 and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia on 29 October, 1863, in Otahuhu. His Regiment Number was Private 504 and occupation was a labourer.
He married Catrina Maria, and their children were Mary, Anna and Catherine.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.
On the electoral rolls from 1873 to 1888 he still has his freehold section at Hautapu and is listed as a carter. He also added more acre sections to his town allotment. Peter died 6 May 1890, Catrina died 23 August 1899 and they are buried together at the Cambridge Cemetery.

THOMSON, James Paton
James was born about 1835 in Allen, Scotland, and was a merchant when he joined the 3rd Regiment of the Waikato Militia in Dunedin, 3 December 1863.
James was aged 31 years and a carpenter when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 28 May 1867. On 18 March 1873 he enrolled with the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers and remained with the troop for two years.
On the 1873 Assessment list at National Archives Wellington James had 1 acre of land - Section No.51.
In 1882 he was a member of the Cambridge & Waikato Reed Band.
A one acre section, No.303, which was given to Edward Gaymer of the 3rd Waikato Militia (as part payment of his 3 years militia service) in 1866, was sold to James Paton Thomson on 4 September 1884.

From 1884-1892 he was the Cambridge Borough Town Clerk. He was also Chairman of the Cambridge Cemetery Committee in 1884 and of the Cambridge School Committee in 1890.
James was an accountant when he married Annie Watson in August 1880. On the Intention to Marry he said he had been in Cambridge 16 years. He was aged 47 and she was 28.
Their daughter Margaret Watson Thomson died aged 18 months on 14 September 1884.
Their son William John Graeme Thomson died aged 7 months on 17 July 1885.
Wife Annie died 23 June 1891 aged 38 years. James died 23 October 1892 aged 59 years and they are buried in the Cambridge Cemetery at Hautapu.

Section 303 (with the house) went to his Executors who sold to Rev Wm Evans, retired Presbyterian Minister, on 30 January 1896.
He transferred it to Alice Eaton Evans, spinster of Cambridge, 13 May 1901 and died in Auckland 1907.
Half of this section was then sold to William John Semmens, 25 September 1908.
In 1910 F A Marcroft bought the property.

THOMSON, William Francis 'Dinah'
'Dinah', Farrier 1470, left for the South Africa War from Kihikihi having been a member of the local Waikato Mounted Rifles No 3 Company. He was a crack shot and achieved his marksman's badge. Dinah joined up as a trooper but as he had experience as a blacksmith he received extra pay as a farrier.
His regiment, the Rough Riders, was camped for a period at Potter's Paddock in Auckland. He won two events there at a military gymkhana - tent pegging and the 'Lloyd Lindsay' competition.
When Dinah's unit reached South Africa, they were to go to the relief of Mafeking but by the time they landed the town had been set free. For twelve months their regiment was engaged in escorting convoys and occasionally had to run the gauntlet of attacks by the Boers, in which he had some narrow escapes.
He recalled a mate of his, Herbert Robinson of Putaruru, being shot through the shoulder, the bullet penetrating the bandolier and smashing the brass cartridges.
He remembered seeing Sergeant Harding of Wellington win the V.C. by going to the assistance of a wounded trooper, placing him on his own horse and running out of the zone of fire clinging to the horse's stirrup.
Dinah returned to New Zealand at the end of twelve months, but re-enlisted in the 9th contingent as Farrier Sergeant 7239. However, when they reached Durban the war was almost over, peace being signed a fortnight later. Apart from a bout of enteric fever, Dinah came through the war unscathed.
He said that a certain amount of sympathy was felt for the Boers and all felt sorry for the plight of their women and children left on the farms.

THRUPP, William Robert
Bill was born 7 May 1874 and was a labourer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge on 17 September 1901. He took advantage of his sickness benefit at the end of December 1902 for 6 days - £1.
He married Eva Muriel Webster, a domestic servant, in Cambridge on 7 January 1903.

TICKLEPENNY, Frank
Frank was born about 1868 and a labourer when he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 16 April 1888.

TIMMINS, Patrick
Pat was born in Tinigly, Wicklow, Ireland about 1840 and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia on 19 September 1863 in Dunedin. His Regiment Number was Private 150 and occupation was a miner.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence. In 1872 the Waikato Times noted that Pat had rates of 12/6d due on 50 acres.
On 9 July 1879 at the age of 35 years, Patrick enlisted in the Armed Constabulary (No 1554). He was dismissed in Taranaki on 30 December 1879. His one acre section was still in his name into the 20th century.

TROY, Patrick
Pat enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia September 1863 in Dunedin. His Regiment Number was Private 168. On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence. In 1872 the Waikato Times noted that Pat had rates of £1 5/- due on 100 acres.

TUCK, George Albert
George was born in Cambridge 13 February 1884, the son of Charles and Mary. When he enlisted in the South Africa War he was posted to B Squadron of 10th Contingent, Private 8757. They reached South Africa on 17 May 1902 and shortly after, peace was declared. He served in the First World War and was Mentioned in Despatches and awarded the Military Cross. He was the last New Zealand South African War Veteran when he died in July 1981.

TUCKER, Edward
Edward was born in Devon, Exonmouth, about 1838 and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia on 1 December 1863, in Dunedin. His Regiment Number was Private 1014 and occupation was a miner.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence.
In 1872 he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge, giving his occupation as a farmer/settler and from June 1872 until May 1879 he was a member of the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers.

TUCKER, Frederick Lincoln
Born 5 June 1883 at Whangarei where he was educated and served his apprentiship as a painter and paperhanger. His grandfather, R S Lincoln was Auckland's first letter carrier. His father John Tucker lost his life at sea in the ship 'Minerva' in 1892.
Fred came to Cambridge in 1904, lived in Leamington and he joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge 8 October 1907.
On 16 November 1910 he married Alice Maud (daughter of Charles and Sarah Boyce) and they had one daughter Alice Mary 'Mim'. About 1920 they built on Thornton Road from where Fred ran his painting and wallpapering business. After their retirement Fred's interest was bowls and Alice's was croquet.
Fred died in June 1962 and Alice September 1969.

TUCKER, William and Mary Ann
William was born 1836 in Cornwall. His mother died and he was brought up by an uncle. He arrived in New Zealand in 1863 as a farm labourer on the 'Accrington'.
In 1872 he bought one hundred acres at Pukerimu outside Cambridge West town belt which he called 'Pengover'. Through James Hally, solicitor, he sent £7 to Mary Ann Williams in Christchurch and they were married in Auckland on 13 October 1874.
William was a member of the Waikato Farmers' Club, served on the committee of the Cambridge West School where all their children were educated.
In November 1896 William took his first holiday in 25 years when they went to Canterbury to visit Mary Ann's relations.
William died 30 July 1917 and is buried in the Pukerimu Cemetery.
Mary Ann Williams was born at St Kew, Cornwall 17 December 1843 the daughter of Nicholas and Elizabeth nee Mata. (Elizabeth died in Cambridge on 19 June 1886 aged 73 years and is buried at Hautapu.)
Mary Ann arrived in NZ on the 'Celenso' with her brother in January 1870. She died 8 June 1925 and is buried at Pukerimu Cemetery.

William and Mary Ann had seven children:-
William George born 1876; married May McCormack in 1904 and died May 1944.
Elizabeth Ann born 1876 in Cambridge; married Herbert Peppercorn 1902 and died 1956.
Frances (Fanny) born 1880; married Edward Wm Hollever in 1908 and died 1960.
Mary born 1881; married Oliver James Strawbridge 14 June 1911 and died 3 June 1912.
Ivy Harper born 1883; married William Frederick Morse August 1905 and died 14 April 1968.
Harry Salter was born 1884 and served in WWI. He was wounded and gassed and had several operations to remove shrapnel. He farmed 'Pengover' with his brother Jack and died 23 July 1951.
Edward John (Jack) was born 1886 and a rugby rep for Waikato at the age of 17 years. He died 12 September 1963.

Harry and Jack farmed at 'Pengover' until their deaths.

TUDHOPE Thomas
Tom was born in Renfernshire, Paisley, Scotland, about 1845 and enlisted in the 3rd Waikato Militia on 12 November 1863, in Dunedin NZ. His Regiment Number was Private 913 and occupation was a miner.
In Richard Stowers' book 'New Zealand Medal to Colonials' he says that Thomas' service also included Maketu April 1864, and that he died 7 January 1923 in Tauranga.
On the Cambridge rates assessment list for 1869-70 he paid 2 pence an acre on 51 acres - totalling eight shillings and sixpence. In 1872 the Waikato Times noted that Tom had rates of 12/6d due on 50 acres.

TYSON, John
John was born about 1851 and joined the Cambridge Cavalry Volunteers in 1878, remaining with them until they disbanded in 1882.
He joined the Duke of Cambridge Lodge in 1880 giving his occupation as shepherd and his wife's name as Elizabeth. In 1886 and 1887 he applied from Oxford (Tirau) for medical benefits. Then on the electoral roll for 1887 John was a shepherd at Monavale.

by ngairedith Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2011-06-09 16:26:49

PECK of TAITA

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