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The ARRIVAL of the FIRST SURVEY SHIP - Port Nicholson 1839

Journal by ngairedith

the following was orignally taken from:
The ARRIVAL OF THE FIRST SURVEY SHIP - Lower Hutt Past and Present written in 1941

- the names in capitals are mine for easier searching -



THE ARRIVAL OF THE FIRST SURVEY SHIP


THE ARRIVAL OF THE SECOND SURVEY SHIP


THE ARRIVAL OF THE SETTLERS


ARRIVAL OF LOCAL GEOVERNMENT & the MOVE TO THORNDON



Ngati directed Colonel WAKEFIELD, the leader of the party, to Te Awaiti, in Marlborough Sounds. Here he met the Maori Chief Wharepouri, who was in a position to give legal title to the lands which he desired to purchase.

On the 20th September 1839 the "Tory" arrived in Port Nicholson. Coming up the harbour she was met off Matiu (Somes) Island by a large canoe containing not only Wharepouri, but an older and very dignified compatriot, Te Puni.

Negotiations were opened almost immediately and the story of the subsequent sale of the land around Port Nicholson by the Maori and the description of goods handed over in part payment, is well known.

Under the Agreement every tenth town acre and every tenth 100-acre block of land in the Valley was to be set aside as a native reserve.

The principal Chiefs involved in the transaction were Te PUNI, of Pito-one; WHAREPOURI, of Nga-Uranga; PUAKAWA, of Wai-whetu; and TARINGA KURI, of Kai-wharawhara.

It is evident that the fear of Te RAUPARAHA, of Kapiti, and RANGIHAEATA, of Mana, whose periodic raids disturbed these peace-loving Maori and the vision of the protection of the white men, induced them in no small way to part with their land.
A Deed of Sale was drawn up by JERMINGHAM WAKEFIELD and after lengthy deliberations, at which DICKY BARRETT, a portly white whaler, acted as interpreter, was duly signed on the 27th September 1839.

On the following day Lowry Bay received its present name, and on the 30th September the name of the river was changed from Heretaunga to Hutt, after a Director of the New Zealand Company.
On the same day a party from the "Tory" landed and a flag was hoisted on the shore at Pito-one, with the customary 21 gun salute from the ship, much to the delight and consternation of the Maori and their dogs. Not to be outdone, the Maori danced their wildest hakas and the inevitable feast followed.

Jerningham Wakefield wandered about mystifying the natives by the sound of a concertina which was concealed under the folds of his coat. It was a day of great rejoicing and among the spectators was Joe R. ROBERTSON, the sole white man in the Valley when the "Tory" arrived, who built a boat near the river mouth and made the necessary fastenings out of hoop-iron.

Shortly after this Wakefield left in the "Tory" to make further purchases of land in Taranaki.

by ngairedith Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2011-06-05 21:30:42

PECK of TAITA

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