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THE BOURKES AND PAKENHAM RACECOURSE, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA. (and the Cocks and others of Bunyip.)

Journal by itellya

Text wouldn't submit but was luckily saved and will be submitted when the OH NOES gremlins buzz off.
If you still have yesterday's Sunday Herald Sun (9-2-2014) have a look at "Packenham it in" on page 57.

When my twin brother and I were about five we were driven to Grandma Cock's at Bunyip for Christmas dinner. As it was over 100 degrees and dinner was cooked on a slow combustion stove, we were glad to escape to the relative coolness of the blazing sun after our meal. After dad died,my brother and I would be taken to platform 1 at Spencer St Station to catch the train to Bunyip. We loved the train, because, both having ants in the pants, we could spend most of our journey wandering the aisle that ran the length of one side of the carriage. We either stayed with mum's sister, Grace (Mrs Hinson) or Les and Jess Roberts at the top of the hill.

As mum had to work to support us we were later allowed to travel on our own,just like big people, to stay with Auntie Grace or Jess Roberts, who was a life-long friend of mum (nee Edna Cock.) Although we had driven through Pakenham at the age of five, the place had not yet become part of my being. Later, as a typical smutty teenager the name of Pakenham Upper burned its way into the part of my brain that manufactures corny jokes.

When I got a car and a licence, Pakenham became very much part of the romance of the drive to Bunyip, along with places like Officer, Tynong, Nar Nar Goon etc and John Towner's pub. (After John Coleman's career-ending injury, John Towner looked likely to become the next Coleman until he was crudely propelled into the fence and was never the same afterwards.)

Thus when I read page 57 of the Sunday Herald Sun of 9-2-2014, I felt compelled to write a journal about a part of my past,just as I had about Campbells Creek. The headline was "Packenham it in." I would have used "Packenham up"! Daryl Timms' article is presented virtually verbatim with some re-ordering to give genealogy and track information separately. Don't be too hard on Timmsy about his south west gaffe; I have to be on constant guard not to make the same blue.

Gavan and Hughie Bourke (pictured)have vivid memories of growing up in the family home located on what was later to be named Racecourse Rd.There were seven Bourke siblings and their backyard was the racetrack which was founded in 1875. The Bourke link with the racetrack goes back to Ireland in 1838 when Michael Bourke married Catherine Kelly in County Limerick,leaving for Australia on their wedding day and arriving in Melbourne on St. Patrick's Day,March 17, 1839. After five years they gained a squatter's licence and selected land in the Pakenham district. They had 15 children, but two died in infancy and it was their youngest son,David Joseph Bourke, who farmed land on the current racetrack site and allowed races on his paddock.

After the death of David it was sons Hugh and Michael who played the crucial role of keeping the club alive. Despite pressure for the site to become Crown land,the Bourkes agreed to sell the track to the racing club for 25 000 pounds ($50 000)in a deal finalised in 1957. "It was about a quarter of what it was worth,but back then our family wanted it to stay a racetrack forever and we always thought it would, " Hughie said this week.

Brother Gavan agrees that it's sad that the track,on a 27 hectare site and sold for redevelopment for $30 million,will be part of the massive suburbia explosion in the heart of Pakenham. The first races had been annual amateur picnic meetings,the only meetings between 1896 and 1909 being on New Year's Day,but in December 1926 the club moved to regular,professional meetings with the inaugural Pakenham Cup after 4000 pounds (raised with the help of locals) was spent to upgrade and remodel the track as demanded by the government. The Bourkes leased the track to the club for free on the condition that profits benefited public amenities.

It will be an emotional time today (9-2-2014)for the Bourke clan when the track hosts its final meeting-featuring the Pakenham Cup- as the club prepares to move to a new track and multmillion dollar development on 246 hectares of farmland at Tynong , 10 km east of Pakenham and 65 km south west (sic; southeast) of Melbourne.

I don't know whether anyone is writing a Bourke family history. Perhaps it might be a descendant living far
(see comment 2.)

P.183, MEMOIRS OF A STOCKMAN, Harry Huntington Peck.
Old Mrs. Bourke who was the landlady of the Pakenham hotel at
the bridge over the Toomuc creek for so many years was an
institution of the district. She was most popular with the Gippsland
travellers and drovers as she took pains to make all visitors
comfortable. Her fine sons David and Daniel prospered as graziers
and bought good properties, the one Llowalong originally part of
Iiushy Park on the Avon near Stratford, and the other Old
Monomeith, where the next generation Hughie and Michael, trading
as Bourke Bros., are to-day the largest regular suppliers of baby beef
to Newmarket, are well known as the owners of show teams of
first-class hunters and hacks, and of late years have been very
successful in principal hurdle and steeplechase races.

COCK, GIBB AND OTHER NAMES AND THINGS I REMEMBER ABOUT BUNYIP.
COCK AND GIBB.
MEMORIAL TRUSTEES
BUNYIP.-Messrs. E. Dawes, J. Cock, A. Holgate, J. Gibb, and W. Head have been appointed trustees of the soldiers' war memorial. (P. 10,Argus,10-8-1939.)

DISTRICT DOINGS.
NORTH BUNYIP.
On Sunday night Mr. J. Binney, a visitor from Glenferrie, accompanied by Mr.F.W.Cock, of the New Bunyip Hotel, caught a fine blackfish in the Bunyip River. The fish, which measured 23 3/4 inches in length and
13 inches in girth, turned the scale at 4 3/4 lbs. This was the only fish which
the two anglers captured, but it is reported that Mr. Cock caught a cold.

Potato crops at North Bunyip are even better than those on Kooweerup Swamp, but digging has temporarily
ceased owing to the bottom having dropped out of the market. Mr. P. McIvor's crop is estimated to yield
from 10 to 12 tons to the acre, as also will Mr. F. W. Cock's Carmens. Messrs T. Devenay and Geo. Norman
are also digging crops that are giving splendid returns. (Bunyip Free Press and Berwick Shire Guardian (Vic. : 1914 - 1915) Thursday 4 February 1915 p 3 Article.)

Bunyip Rifle Club. The annual meeting of members of the Bunyip Rifle Club took place at the Mechanics' Hall this (Thursday)evening, when Mr. E. Head occupied the chair. The balance-sheet showed a credit of £22 for the year, which was considered satisfactory. It was decided to hold a banquet, to befollowed by a dance, on the evening of Tuesday, 31st August. Office bearers for the ensuing year were elected as follows Captain, Mr. T.
Slattery; vice-captain, Mr. H. Simpson ; hon. secretary, Mr. J. Cock; treasurer, Mr. E. Head. Votes of thanks were passed to those who donated trophies last year. (Bunyip Free Press and Berwick Shire Guardian (Vic. : 1914 - 1915) Thursday 19 August 1915 p 2 Article)

My maternal grandfather, Frederick William Cock,son of John Cock,probably spent most of his childhood and youth on Stewarton/ Gladstone (the northern 777 acres of today's Gladstone Park) which John occupied from 1892 till his death at the very end of 1911. As Fred's father got into trouble for tax avoidance, perhaps they could make an UNDERBELLY episode about my family!

A Technical Charge.
Inspector Allen, of Public Health Department proceeded against Fredk.Cock for having rum under proof in a bottle for sale. Mr. Hamilton, who appeared for defendant, explained that his client was the victim of another
person's fault. The wholesale people in Melbourne did the breaking down, Mr. Cock having nothing whatever to do with it. Even then the liquor was only one fraction under proof. The Inspector agreed to a small fine being imposed with the lowest possible costs. Fined 10/- with 21/- costs. (Bunyip Free Press and Berwick Shire Guardian (Vic. : 1914 - 1915) Thursday 12 November 1914 p 3 Article)

I never met Fred who died before I started my Bunyip holidays but I certainly remember my first Christmas Dinner on what I presume was his Closer Settlement block (down the road from the footy ground.) It was about 100 degrees farenheit and the dinner was cooked on the slow combustion stove. The house was like an oven! It had two rooms, all socialising done in the kitchen, while the bedroom was partitioned with material,one part being Grandma Cock's and the other shared by Uncles Jack, Stan and Ray.

Fred's younger brother, Alf, who remained in the Tullamarine area (Glenview in Annadale Rd), must have visited Fred often because he married a Wood girl whose family lived in Longwarry.
THE ABOVE IS WRONG AND ILLUSTRATES THE DUAL DANGER OF WRITING FROM MEMORY, ESPECIALLY WAY TOO LATE AT NIGHT.MY BROTHER BROUGHT THE MISTAKE TO MY ATTENTION AND HIS EXTENSIVE VALUABLE INFORMATION IS POSTED IN COMMENTS UNDER THE JOURNAL.

I will attempt to find some of the information that I emailed to someone who was researching Alf's Glenview at Tullamarine. Alf's daughter married a Wood lad from Minyip(1) but if I remember correctly his family was related to the Wood family near Bunyip(2). Alf received the grant for his Arundel Closer Settlement block but the name of the person who was originally allocated the block was WOOD.(3)
(1)ENGAGEMENTS.Jean, younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs.Alfred Cock, of Glenview, Tullamarine,to Kenneth C., son of the late Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Wood, of Minyip.(The Argus, Tuesday 7 June 1938 p 5 Family Notices.)
(2) Could take years to find the link.
(3)We take the following from the Sunbury News :-As a result of the special land board, held at the Lands office, the whole of the Arundel and Annandale portions of the Overnewton estate were allotted to settlers, and not one-half of the applicants for blocks could be supplied. The land was subdivided into 22 holdings of areas
ranging from seven to 122 acres, with values ranging from £185 to £1,175, and in the case of the homestead, £3,100, the total value being about £16,000. - Altogether 50 applicants appeared before the board, and these, it was shown by their applications, were worth, on an average, about £300 each, in a number of cases being persons worth over £1,000. Evidence of the applicants was taken, and great difficulty was experienced in determining between the claims in many cases.
The following were successful: Block 1,66a., Patrick Fox, Keilor; block 2, 61a.,T. L. Andeason, Bacchus Marsh; block 3, 52a., J. Angus, Moonee Ponds; block 4, 59a., E. Angus, Moonee Ponds; block 5,70a., A. Wallace, Cranbourne; block 6,80a., J. Buchanan, Launching-place; block 7, 86a., A. Williamson, Moonee Ponds; block 8, 113a., Elizabeth Williamson, Moonee Ponds; block 9, 120a., M.Geraghty, Keilor; block 10, 114a., G.Woods, Longwarry; block 11, 32a., C.Youren, Albert Park; block 12, lla., J.M'Farlane, South Yarra; etc.
(P.3, The Bacchus Marsh Express, 16-12-1905.)



Dad, Jim Gibb, was a full forward who played for Bunyip and was only displaced as full forward in the pre 1940 team by the great Wally Toy (who I presume was Barry's dad.) Dad also played for Longwarry so I could not be accused of favouritism when I umpired a Bunyip v Longwarry game. My older brother,Ken, who attended Bunyip State School and has contributed much to Bunyip's historical record, wasn't a bad footballer but after dad moved to Melbourne to work at Krafts,he was one of several Essendon High School students faced with the impossible task of stopping University High's full forward who was to create history as Hasting's Deadshot Jack (John Coleman.)

It would be hard to imagine Bunyip's modern teams being competitive against the river of little fish (Traralgon), even in the Ablett era (yes,I follow the Ellinbank results), but an un-named Gibb was a prominent member of a team that did give them a run for their money,after a sluggish start.

The final result was-Traralgon, 8 goals 12 behinds ; Bunyip, 5 goals 5 behinds.
For Traralgon J. Wright played a splendid game. Bermingham, Abbott, Peart, M'Lean, Doorty, Groves and Thomas also did splendidly. Bunyip have splendid footballers in Roffer, Gibb, Hansen*, Rowen, M'Namara and Goyder. Warner umpired the game impartially, but he allowed the players too much liberty.(Traralgon Record (Traralgon, Vic. : 1886 - 1932) Friday 3 August 1906 p 3 Article)
*See VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS: PAST AND PRESENT re the 1888 pioneer of Bunyip.

ENCOUNTERED A BULL. Bunyip, 3rd February.
Mr. W. Gibb,butcher, had an experience of an exciting nature on Wednesday. He was driving a bull, and in jumping from his horse to turn the animal it rushed at him, compelling him to take refuge in a tree. There be was kept for an hour and a half, until assistance came, and the animal was driven off.(Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918) Monday 6 February 1905 p 5 Article)
Extracts only.
AT WILSON'S HOTEL,BUNYIP.
Unsold Portion of that fine Property Known as GIBB'S PADDOCK, containing abou108 Acres, Fronting the GARFIELD ROAD, Within-3 Minutes' Walk of BUNYIP RAILWAY STATION. Rich Soil, Suitable of CULTIVATION, GRAZING, FRUITGROWING, MARKET GARDENING &c.
Splendid crops of potatoes and all other vegetables Grown on This Year by Messrs.WALKER and MORRISON.
TITLE, Crown Grant.
BERNARD MICHAEL,Is instructed hy Mr. A. J. GIBB, who has disposed of his business, and Is leaving the district, to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, practically without reserve, his choice property, as above.(The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 24 April 1915 p 3 Advertising)

By the time my holidays at Bunyip started there was no more a Gibb presence in the area but the family was still associated with the Wycheproof area. My brother and I had great fun making sparks on the trip home from Wyche in the dark with the quartz that lined the railway line that ran up the middle of its main street. Another notice gives Charnwood road as the location of Jessie's St Kilda residence in 1928.

GIBB-In sad and loving memory of our dear Jessie, who departed this life at St. Kilda, on the 23rd October, l928. Lovingly remembered. -(Inserted by her mother, sisters, and brothers,Wycheproof, Sealake, Bunyip, Garfield, and St. Kilda.)
GIBB-In loving thought and memory of our dear sister and aunt, Jessie, formerly of Wycheproof, who passed away at Coongy, St. Kilda, on the 23rd October, 1928. (P.1, Argus, 23-10-1929.)

Another excursion when we were very young was a walk from 63 North St to the end of Epsom Rd to see Polly Stagg, who was related on the Gibb side*, at the Waterloo Cup Hotel. Polly was a nickname of course. As in her framed photo, Polly wore her hair in a bun on her crown.

STAGG. â On December 13, at her residence, Waterloo Cup Hotel, Moonee Ponds, Mary Catherine, loved mother of Bill and Alex, grandmother of Bob and Ken, great-grandmother of Sue and Colin. âA wonderful mate.
(P.14, Argus, 14-12-1949.)

*RANKIN. âOn the 17th September, at the residence of her daughter (Mrs. M. C. Stagg),Waterloo Hotel, Moonee Ponds, Margaret,widow of the late A. D. Rankin, of Bunyip, loving mother of Sarah (Mrs. Gibb, Bunyip),Maggie (Mrs. Davies, Adelaide), Pollie (Mrs.M. C. Stagg), Will Greig (Albert Park), and Yarrie (Mrs. Tanswell, Moonee Ponds), loving grandmother of Will and Alex Stagg, Zeneta Davies, James Gibb, and Russell Tanswell, aged 74 years.(P.1, Argus,18-9-1924.)

* Dad was named after this pioneer whose name indicates an earlier connection with the Rankins. Dad's mother, Sarah (Guy's wife)was born a Rankin as shown in the Rankin notice above.
GIBB.--On the 28th February, at his residence,Wycheproof, James Rankin, beloved husband of Christina Gibb, aged 72 years, A native of Auchinlick, Scotland. A colonist of 54 years. Home papers please copy.
(P.56,Leader,13-3-1915.)

MAISEY.
The unfortunate fatal accident causing the death of Mrs. Maisey of Longwarry,has cast quite a gloom over the township,and much sympathy is expressed for the bereaved father and family.
(South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic. : 1872 - 1920) Wednesday 24 December 1902 p 2 Article)

MAISEY. - On the 10th October, at Ouyen, Bertha, beloved daughter of T. W. Maisey, of Longwarry, sister Mrs. Lewis (Ouyen), brother W.Maisey (Bunyip)*, brother T. Maisey (West Australia**), sister V. Maisey (Ouyen). West Australian papers please copy. (P.1,Argus,21-10-1921.)

Bill Maisey was named on a wing in Bunyip's team of 1902-40.

*See the Roberts entry re Bill Maisey's slaughterhouse.
**It is amazing how many young men from the Mornington Peninsula moved to Western Australia during the depression of the 1890's whose effects were hardly felt in the midst of that colony's gold rush. I wonder how many Bunyip residents had joined the exodus.

STEENHOLDT.

MACNAMARA.

TOY.

NASH.
Another of Mum's friends was Mrs Nash.

NASH .-- on October 6. at her residence, Nash road, Bunyip, Annie Maud, loved wife of the late Reuben Francis, loving mother of Daphne (Mrs Gooding), Stella, Les and Jack, mother-in-law of Eunice (Nip)and Jack, fond grandma of Lynette, Keith, Beverly. Kay, Peter, and John. (P.19,Argus,7-10-1955.)

ROBERTS.
Les and Jess Roberts had four boys, Jack, Don, Colin and Billy. Don was a champion footballer and is pictured in a 1955 photo of the team that beat Drouin.
This is the Bunyip team which defeated Drouin last week.
Back (L. to H.): K.Goldie, C. Hales, G.O'Donnell, N. Heatley, M.Phillips, T. O'Dea, K.Russell.
Middle Row: R.Ledger, G. Hoskins, D.Roberts, R. Horley (c.),C. Vanderbist, K. McGhee, R. Manson.
Front Row: B. Smith, J. McGhee, I. McDonald, J.Kavanagh. (P.12, Argus, 8-7-1955.)

The Argus showed Bunyip's vice-captain,Don Roberts, celebrating the victory over Drouin with his wife and young son Geoffrey in an article that explains how Bunyip became giant killers. There are other photos that might be of interest.(BUNYIP, SLING IN HAND, SLAYS THE FOOTBALL GIANTS
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Monday 4 July 1955 p 8 Article Illustrated)

Don later moved to Diamond Creek and with creative landscaping made his above ground poll look like an inground pool. Colin was a ball of laughs. Jack married Molly and lived next door to his parents in Princess St, separated by a vacant allotment in which Billy kept his horse.


My first ride on a horse and Billy's apprenticeship in North St, Ascot Vale.
Billy Roberts,then about 16, owned a thoroughbred horse which grazed on a vacant block between the Princess Street houses of his parents (Les and Jess)and his older brother,Jack Roberts.It had a stable on what was a vacant block to the north of his parents' house,sheltered by a row of pine trees which had probably lines the boundary of an early large township estate. Billy was determined to become a jockey and was eventually apprenticed to trainer Bill Bones whose stables were on the south side of North St,Ascot Vale near East St.
He was proud of his horse and wanted me to enjoy my first ever ride. Against my better judgement, I accepted the invitation, and following his instructions, managed to mount the beast. Despite Billy's instructions,the horse refused to move but a slap on the rump got him moving- at a million miles an hour. In a few blurred seconds he'd covered the length of the paddock despite me almost breaking his neck with the force I generated through the reins, and stopped with his breast almost touching the fence, his head on the other side calmly surveying the grass on offer there while I realised that I was still alive. My second ride was a bareback ride on one of Ben Hall's huge horses that pulled his Cobb and Co. coach in the 1970's.

I know exactly how Mulga Bill felt. Pedal backwards they said!
The Roberts House now seems to be a vacant block on the Google Earth satellite view. It was on the east side of 13 Princess St. I remember thinking how much fun it would be running around number 13 under the veranda,which fully surrounded the house- and still does.Behind Les and Jess's house was an old wooden shed which held as many wonders as a trash and treasure market,including a once-loved bike. I'd never ridden a bike but I reckoned that if I could stand on the pedals,I'd be able to sort it out. Les and Jess mustn't have owned a car because there was no driveway or wide gate,just a narrow path winding to the front gate. I opened the gate and surveyed the culvert (over the ditch that serves as a gutter in West Gippsland),both of which lined up very nicely with Parsons St. Back to the bicycle which I'd previously leaned against the outside of the shed! My pre-flight check complete,it was up,up (down,down actually) and away. A pity I hadn't noticed the absence of brakes! All too easy,thought I as I skilfully negotiated the winding path,the narrow gateway and the culvert.I don't think I saw a single vehicle before I hit the West Gippsland gutter at the bottom of Parsons St and flew over the railway fence. This was probably about 1951 when I was about 8 years old and luckily for me,petrol was probably still in short supply after the war; traffic in Bunyip at that time was far from bumper to bumper. As the bike approached the speed of sound,I spied Wrecker and his fellow louts walking up Parsons St. Sensing my terror (perhaps the scream was a telltale sign) they advised me to pedal backwards,presuming the bike had a foot brake. Unfortunately it didn't;it was a fixed wheel and even slowing the rotation of the pedals was impossible.

Bill Maisey's Slaughteryard. It is possible that the blocks on the north side of Princess St were typical acre blocks 20x 200 metres but township blocks were usually half acres (20x 100 metres)and I think that was the situation. We'd (Johnny "Wrecker" Roberts,my brother and me,perhaps another one or two)walk up the paddock where Billy grazed his horse and then a similar block behind that and perhaps through a Maisey Paddock. The slaughteryard would probably be about 200 metres due north of Jack and Molly Robert's place. I wonder if it's heritage-listed.

Badminton.

John Wrecker Roberts.

RODGERS.
Ally Rodgers was a regular visitor to Jess Robert's house. His surname was probably actually Rodger.

PEARSON.
From my holidays at Bunyip as a youngster, I seem to recall a Pearson Street or Road.

An accident of a very serious nature occurred to Mr John Pearsson (sic), of Bunyip, on Wednesday last at North Bunyip. It appears that Mr Pearson, who is in the employ of the Shire Council, was engaged with several others in clearing the Tonimbuk-Bunyip road, at Telegraph Hill, and was assisting with a forest devil,which was anchored to a stump, when the cable broke, causing the handle to fly back with terrific force and strike the unfortunate man across the abdomen. He was rendered unconscious for the time being, and later regaining consciousness suffered great pain. Mr W. Browne conveyed the sufferer home, and Dr. Lee, of Warragul was sent for. On arrival the doctor ordered the patient's removal to the Warragul Hospital where he was conveyed by
train the same evening.-"Express." (Kooweerup Sun, Lang Lang Guardian and Cranbourne Shire Record (Vic. : 1918) Wednesday 25 September 1918 p 3 Article)

KRAFT.
During our visits to Bunyip, mum used to attend Crazy Whist nights in a hall on the west side of Parsons St and about halfway up the hill. I was only a boy but I remember that two of her friends were Nell Kraft and Mrs McNamara who was very old. I knew nothing about the Kraft family at the time but trove is full of references to the Kraft hall and hotel. As dad had moved from Bunyip, after working at the Longwarry (Butter?) Factory, to work at Kraft near the Flinders St station, my childish imagination led me to believe that the Bunyip family had started Kraft Foods but the Wikipedia entry for the firm makes it clear that this was not so.

BUNYIP.
A successful fancy dress ????ing carnival was held on Wednesday night, 17th inst., when prizes were won by
the following :âBest fancy costume-Miss Nellie Kraft ; (etc.) (Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Thursday 25 June 1914 p 2 Article)

ST THOMAS'S.
My memories of the delightful Church of England involve mum's great friend, Jess Roberts, and Hughie Pound,both stalwarts of the church.

St. Thomas' Church, Bunyip, which is to be opened by the Bishop of Gippsland on Sunday. 28th inst., is indeed a building which the town has every reason to feel proud of. The ceremony will commence at three o'clock, after which a baptismal service will be held. On the same evening a service will also be held.
(South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic. : 1872 - 1920) Wednesday 24 December 1902 p 2 Article)

PERMEWAN WRIGHT'S FASCINATING CHANGE SYSTEM.

Surnames: BOURKE COCK GIBB HINSON KELLY MAISEY POUND ROBERTS
Viewed: 648 times
by itellya Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2014-02-10 01:47:34

Itellya is researching local history on the Mornington Peninsula and is willing to help family historians with information about the area between Somerville and Blairgowrie. He has extensive information about Henry Gomm of Somerville, Joseph Porta (Victoria's first bellows manufacturer) and Captain Adams of Rosebud.

Do you know someone who can help? Share this:

Comments

by itellya on 2014-02-10 07:18:53

SORRY,THE GREMLINS HAVE STRUCK AGAIN.

by itellya on 2014-02-12 04:07:51

from Pakenham who never reads the sports pages and would never have found this article. Whovever, get onto Hughie and Gavan now because they obviously have a fair grasp of the genealogy, but even more importantly, I bet they have a trove of anecdotes that you'll never find in B,D&M. or even trove.I wouldn't fancy sorting out which of the Bourke-Kelly marriages is yours without help from Hughie and Gavan.

Let's see what trove can tell us about my maternal ancestors (pioneers of Broadmeadows Shire) and others at Bunyip and the Bourkes at Pakenham.
BOURKE/PAKENHAM.

COCK/BUNYIP.

by itellya on 2014-02-14 03:30:53

I had saved trove and google information about the first use (1858?) of Pakenham (the parish) which came from an officer in the peninsular war, but was also the maiden name of the Duke of Wellington's wife and the name of a British Prime Minister; one article about David Bourke of "Mount Bourke" at Pakenham; and several articles about Bunyip, such as Jack Cock being a trustee of money that Mr Shelley had left to beautify the town, that were intended to provide a documentary background to the anecdotes about Bunyip and Wycheproof that I intended to tell.

Today,I made my fifth attempt to submit this result of about six hours of work. After highlighting it,I clicked paste instead of copy and lost the lot. Sorry.

by itellya on 2015-01-02 11:03:52

THIS JOURNAL,THE BOURKES AND PAKENHAM RACECOURSE, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA. (and the Cocks and others of Bunyip.), HAS BEEN RESUMED.

by itellya on 2015-01-13 05:17:32

PROVIDED BY KEN GIBB.COMMENTS ABOUT MY INFORMATION.
p 1.para 5.
Presume Packenham being in quotes are "quotes ".
p 3.para 4.
You do not mention that Fred COCK was also at Boolara & somewhere near Tatura ( fruit growing).
Fred died 1932.
p 3. para 5.
Alf (m) Isabella Grace WRIGHT of Greenvale @ East Melb. 2/5/1902.
p 3. para 6.
Ken Gibb in a hungry individual effort kicked one goal, Coleman with much help kicked 11.
p 3. para 7.
Bunyip v Traralgon match -- you mention a report ( Traralgon Record 1906 ), this would " if our GIBB family would be Billy Gibb"
a very fearless Wycheproof footballer, brother of Andy, "Guy",Jim ( hairdresser ) brought down by Andy.
p 4. para 1.
Unless BILLY was also a butcher - possible - as I/we cannot find any occupation,this would be Andy who I could not mention Andy
being put off by a bull, plus Grace Taylor never mentioned it.
p 4. para 2.
That land was on Garfield side of the "new 'State school - 1930, and ran thru to Pound Road Where Andy had a dwelling.
p4. para 4/5.
Jessie -- can of worms here.
Born same time ( 1865 )to Christina ( no father )as her mother gave birth to here 2nd last child Isabella, so Mary Webster had two children
to look after whilst Christina did the cooking and housework things to gain favour.
Christina Webster & J.Rankin GIBB were (m) 25 July 1871.
p4. para 6.
Similar situation with Polly STAGG connection with GIBB. Polly had previously had "The Vale of Avoca " hotel at Charlton.
p 4. para 8.
Sarah Greig was born Margaret McDonald to Margaret Mcdonald on 19/9/1870 - again no father.
Mother Margaret ( m ) William Greig 13/6/1872 -- so you see we had trouble researching Sarah & Jessie.
Margaret (McDonald) -- Greig - ( a second (m) -- then Donald RANKIN -- her yardman at Royal Mail Hotel - Wycheproof.
Donald Rankin is (b) at Bunyip.
Last for the night.
p 4 . para 9.
See previous re Sarah 9 i.e. mention RANKIN.
The Rankin ( given name throughout our descendants ) commenced WELL BEFORE THAT.
Andrew Gibb 1767 - 1839 (m) Mary Rankin 1795.He was FACTOR to Lord Auchinleck for 50 years.
The first occurance of Rankin was Wilhelmina RANKIN Gibb (b) 1795.
On top of that Andrew Gibb 1798 - 1874 ( son of previous ) (m) Jane Rankin ( no relation ) 1851.
Rankin given name appears at least eight times since Wilhelmina --who was supposed to be a boy -- birth cert.

Ken ----- some food for thought.
Just a lasty -- Pearson Street is what you descibe as Parsons Street -- Google.
The hardware cum General Store where Don worked in the 1940 s. was Pearsons.


p 5. para 1 / 2.
Wrong Bill Maisey.
The one you refer to was (b) c1913.
He was dec. when Marie ( wife ) sat with us at Bunyip 100 year night in 2003 -- good weekend actually.
Slaughterhouse -- see p.6 corrections.
Roberts.
Les & Jess had FIVE BOYS -- you forgot Max -- to my knowledge still living, he and Billie were at the 120th.
SS 2229 reunion.

p 6. para 2.
Les never had a car or horse.
Parsons Street is Pearson street.

p 6. para 3.
Bill Maisey's Slaughteryard was actually built by Andy Gibb in the very early 1900's -- Grace's notes.
Yes it should be Heritage listed as unbelieveably it is still standing altho' rest of condition may be suspect.
I remember it well as Don,Colin & I loved to see the BOLT go thru' the cows head & I pickedup those "now delicasies "
of Lamb's Fry,Brains,Sweetbreads & Tripe, ( for free ) from Bob Maisey before Bill took over.

Rodgers.
Ally was Jess's brother as he was to Ada Hogan ( Rodgers ) -- have photo's & there is one in St. Thomas's Hall.

St. Thomas' Church.

On land donated by Major A' Beckett & rumour has it he kicked in quite a bit of cash also.

End of lesson

Ken

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