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THE VILLAGE SETTLEMENT PIONEERS AT RED HILL, (NEAR DROMANA) VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

Journal by itellya

This journal was formerly part of a summary of Sheila Skidmore's THE RED HILL. Sheila gave little specific information about the village settlement pioneers on pages 41-3 of her book so I decided to fill the void. I felt that having the following information in the journal about Sheila's book detracted from the flow of the summary, so it will be deleted from that journal.


P.41-3. THE VILLAGE SETTLEMENT. The Dromana Historical Society decided to reprint Sheila's book without any alterations. Hopefully there is now an index. Sheila's description of living conditions is excellent and settlers are quoted without mentioning any names. As in the case of an original pioneer, Frances Windsor, these later settlers have not been mentioned. Therefore, they are detailed below.

To avoid needless typing, certain sources will be abbreviated. MS02= Mornington Standard 30-8-1902 p.2; article entitled "Around Red Hill". FKRO2 = Shire of Flinders and Kangerong rates 1902-3. FKR19 = same shire 1919-20. KH = Keith Holmes.

HISTORIANS-BEWARE OF HASTY ASSUMPTIONS. I was excited to find a newspaper report about the Premier, Mr Patterson, visiting the Red Hill Village Settlement. Unfortunately none of the settlers were mentioned by name. I was rather puzzled that the Premier was afterwards driven to Drouin where he caught a train back to the city. Was Eatons Cutting Road that bad? It transpired that there was another Red Hill Village Settlement, near the railway line between Longwarry and Drouin, one of many communities organised by Rev. Tucker, whose committee included a Mr Rudduck. This leads me to suspect that Nelson Rudduck of Dromana may have had some influence in the Government's choice of our Red Hill for one of its village settlements.


H.TASSELL, 74a, 20 acres fronting main road west of Prossors Lane. The Tassells were no longer on the village settlement in 1902, apparently having been followed there by Tom Sandlants. Edwin Louis Tassell had leased the northern 1000 acres of Jamieson's Special Survey in the 1860's. This was between Ellerina Rd and Tassells Creek, extending east to the corner of Foxeys and Bulldog Creek Rds (Melway 151 K11-12) and became the Bruce Estate. Tassells Creek is now called the Martha Cove Waterway but Tassells Rd at Safety Beach recalls his seemingly brief tenure. Edward Luis Tassell was assessed on the 1000 acres, leased from W.J.T. "Big" Clarke in 1863 and in 1864 Louis Edward Tassell was similarly assessed (N.A.V. 45 pounds.) In 1865, he was called Edwin Louis Tassell.In view of the name changes, I assumed that the family had moved away after the death of the father. However, because of the brief tenure on the village settlement, I suspected that the Tassells were quitters. Out of respect for our pioneers, I could not harbour this suspicion without justification, so it was back to the rate records at the library this morning!

The Tassells were assessed last, on their 1000 acres leased from Big Clarke, in 1868. In the assessment of 4-9-1869, the name of Edwin Louis Tassell was crossed out and replaced with Robert Brown Riddler, leasing from Bruce, who had obviously just recently married Big Clarke's daughter and received, according to Colin McLear, his wedding present.The new occupant morphed into Robert Broome Riddler who was still there in 1873, his land being described as only 100 acres in 1871 despite having the same nett annual value as the 1000 acres in 1870 and 1872!

I tried Trove to find out where the Tassell family was between 1869 and the purchase of the village settlement block and found a nugget! The Argus, 7-5-1874, page 12. "MT MARTHA. Tenders are invited until 12 May, 1874 for a three year lease of Brokil Estate (lately occupied by R.B.Ridler, Esq. butcher, previously by the lateE.L.Tassell, Esq.) containing 1024 acres of good pastoral land, well watered and subdivided, a large portion sheepproof. J.Vans Agnew Bruce, Fletcher St, Essendon."

I have not found a death notice for Edwin Louis Tassell but he had died before May 1874. Perhaps he had died at the Brokil Estate, leaving Clarke without a tenant, thus providing his son in law with the option of choosing a tenant to occupy his wedding present. I am sure that Bruce was the partner in Bruce and Cornish, the firm that built the Mt Alexander and Murray River Railway, which deviated miles from the direct course so it would pass through Big Clarke's estates recalled by Rupertswood and Clarkfield.(The upper part of Tassell's Creek is still called Brokil Creek.)

Another trove entry which might apply to the Safety Beach pioneers concerns Edward Tassell suing Matthew Ingle Brown of Greenhills, Diggers Rest for wrongful dismissal. He was employed as a boundary rider at 45 pounds a year but also had a right to rations,and to graze cattle and cultivate a small paddock. Big Clarke was not a spendthrift but had made his way in the world by shrewd practical knowledge resulting from hard work. Thus he had sympathy with strugglers and may have arranged a job for Edwin Louis Tassell's lad with a tenant on his huge Rockbank Estate, which was in the parishes of Maribyrnong and Holden. Brown had left an overseer called Allen in charge. Allen fed Edward rotten mutton which caused an argument and Edward's wrongful dismissal by Allen. (The Argus, 23-11-1872 page 4.)

As H.Tassell was the grantee of 74a in the village settlement, it is reasonable to assume that Henry Tassell of Sorrento was connected. S.Tassell was granted a wine licence at Sorrento (Mornington Standard 3-12-1896 page 3) not long after the wife of Henry Tassell of Sorrento had given birth to twin daughters on 23-5-1895 at Fitzroy (The Argus 24-9-1895 page 1.) The birth might have taken place at his mother in law's place or at St Vincent's Hospital which opened at about this time in a row of houses if my memory serves me correctly. Henry would not have been the only Red Hill resident connected to Sorrento. The Heads sold produce there and a descendant presently plays footy for the sharks; Thomas Appleyard who displeased Red Hill residents by closing a main road straddled by his huge property was a Sorrento resident.

There were parcels and goods waiting at Mornington Station for 22 recipients including Tassell.
(Mornington Standard 30-5-1908 page 3.)

One last trove entry shows that Edwin Louis Tassell was interested in municipal affairs. The candidates standing for three vacancies on the Kangerong District Road Board in August 1864 were William Grace (of Gracefield at Dromana and grantee of the block at Rye on which Sullivan, his son in law, built the Gracefield Hotel,replaced in 1927 by Mrs Hunt's Rye Hotel), James Purves (mainly absent owner of the Tootgarook Station, which was run by James, the son of his deceased brother, Peter),Edwin Louis Tassell, Richard Watkin (Dromana Hotel)and Francis Edward Windsor (grantee of about 176 acres between Margaret Davies' grants and McIlroys Rd on which L.Tassell was leasing 25 acres by 1919.) Unfortunately no results of the election or 1865 meetings appear on trove and Colin McLear does not mention the members, so we must wait to see if Edwin was successful.


Like many of the early Survey tenants, the Tassells moved towards the red hill. H.Tassell must have been daunted by the amount of clearing that was required on 74a. However, the 1919-20 rates reveal that L.Tassell of Footscray was assessed on 25 acres, part 13A, Kangerong. This was roughly a third of the 77 acre allotment, granted to Frances Windsor fronting the south side of McIlroys Rd with an extension of Andrews and Nashs Lanes indicating the west and east boundaries.

C.A.74a was occupied by Tom Sandlant by 1902 but he was living elsewhere as there was no house on it.(FKR02) The block was heavily timbered but Tom had been busy clearing and planting four and a half acres of strawberries.(MS02) Robert Henry Holmes owned 74A by 1919.

Keith Holmes remembers 74A being owned by Dave Holmes so he was probably a descendant of Robert Henry Holmes.

C.THIELE. 74b, 20 acres south of Tassell's.
On Charles Thiel's block adjoining (Sandlant's), as well as 5 acres of orchard, strawberries, cape gooseberries, raspberries, wine berries and black currants had been planted. (MS02)Charles' 74B was one of four blocks on which a house had been erected in 1902. (FKR02)

The Ararat Advertiser of 24-4-1915 had this article on page 3.
Mr and Mrs Thiele, old residents of the Red Hill district, were driving towards Dromana on Sunday and it is believed that, when they were descending Eaton's Cutting from Red Hill to Dromana, the horse bolted. At a dangerous turn in the road, the wheel left the buggy and the occupants were thrown heavily to the ground, with the result that Mr Thiele's neck was broken and he died almost immediately. Mrs Thiele is now in a low condition, suffering from severe bruises and shock.

The death notice was on page 13 of The Argus on 24-4-1915.
THEILE (sic).On the 18th April (accidentally killed)at Red Hill, Charles August William , dearly beloved husband of Lena Thiele. (Interred 20 April at Dromana.)
This notice tells us Charles' full name and that of his wife but unfortunately does not reveal his age,
descendants, parents or siblings. There may have been no children."Old residents of Red Hill" in the above article could be a reference to age rather than time spent in the area.

There is a possibility that Charles was a descendant of Doncaster pioneer, Gottlieb Thiele, who planted the first orchard in that district in 1853. After arriving in 1849, Gottlieb set up as a tailor in Melbourne before spending time at several places including Red Hill .GOTCHA! These places were on the diggings and this red hill was near Castlemaine. (The Argus 8-5-1953, p.19; Box Hill-Doncaster Centenary. Their Gold grew on trees.) A photo of Gottlieb accompanies the article. With the area being so close to Melbourne, available land for orchards would have been snapped up quickly, so Gottlieb's descendants would have had to look elsewhere after a while, and no doubt the payment terms on the Red Hill Village Settlement would have been reasonable.

The assessments of 28-11-1914 show that the name of Thiele Charles had been written for assessment number 892. The surname had been crossed out and replaced with White. On 9-11-1915, Eden White, a Main Creek farmer, was assessed on 74b.By 1919, Herbert Alfred Hall of Middle Brighton was assessed on 74b.


H.P.PROSSER.74c? and d of 20 acres each fronting the west side of the second half of Prossors Lane. In 1902, Edward Bowring was assessed on 74C and the article said that Edward had been on the block for 12 months. He had planted 2 acres of orchard and also had 2 acres of strawberries as well as currants and raspberries. He'd been successful with summer vegetables. Thomas Harvey was building a 4 roomed house on the block (which was noted in the 1902 assessment, one of only four on the village settlement at that time, another being on 74D.)

Keith Holmes said that Edward Bowring was on the last block on the right but as Prossors Lane does not go to the south boundary of the village settlement as shown on the Balnarring parish map (because of an extremely steep slope), he could have been referring to 74C.

The 1919 assessments show that Henry P.PROSSOR was assessed on 74c as well as another 32 acres of settlement land. It appears that the rate collectors had finally discovered the correct spelling of the grantee's surname. And where was Edward Bowring? By 1910 he had moved to 18A Kangerong, 60 acres granted to Henry Dunn at the south corner of White Hill and McIlroys Rd. By 1919 he was on part 19 Kangerong slightly to the east and across McIlroys Rd, Bowring Rd being the east boundary of the 27 acre block.
Rates (in this shire) rarely had entries indicating the owners of land but it is likely that Edward was leasing in 1902 and 1910 but owned the 27 acres in crown allotment 19 (which must have included 8 acres of Red Hill township blocks, as mentioned by Sheila) at Melway 161 A11.

It is possible that Edward Bowring was related to John Bowring Journeaux, a grantee in Balnarring parish near Tubbarubba. Florrie Bowring married Herb Littlejohn . The first Littlejohns in the area were William Alfred and Frederick, sons of a convict who had settled in Brunswick after gaining his ticket of leave. They had land across the road from each other near Moat's Corner. After a while Fred moved to Coburg and William to Red Hill. William was a builder and was followed in this trade by his son, Fred, who married Florrie Bowring in 1935 but died at only 25.(Thelma Littlejohn, their daughter.)
Fred and William Littlejohn had lot 9 of 205 acres and lot 11 of 130 acres in 1919. Lot 9 is inside the curve of the Nepean Highway with the non-historic Bluestead Cottage at its north west corner (160 H3-4) and lot 11(160J-K 5) is north of Dunns Ck Rd to a point opposite No 665 with its frontage to the highway extending a little less than halfway to Wallaces Rd.

74D. Henry P. Prossor was assessed in 1902 on 40 acres on 74D, 74C obviously being leased to Edward Bowring. As mentioned previously Henry was assessed on 40 acres (74 E and 74C) and 12 acres (part 74E).C.A.74E was stated as being vacant in the 1902-3 rates and later was bought in two parts, the northern (74E1)of 7 acres by Fred Nash and the southern (74E) of 12 acres by Henry Percival Prossor. Therefore, the 40 acres consisted of 74D and 74C in 1919.
Also assessed in 1919 was Norman Prossor. He had 43 acres and building, part 71A1 Balnarring. This crown allotment, bounded on the west by Mornington- Flinders Rd, on the south by Stony Ck Rd, with its eastern boundary and northern extent indicated by Pardalote Dr, consisted of eighty three and a half acres so Norman's portion probably fronted Mornington- Flinders Rd with the western tributary and Musk Creek forming the eastern boundary; Musk Creek joins Stony Creek in 190 G9.One might ask why there was a 71A1 when there was no 71A. I believe that 71A was to be alienated in two parts, but the grantee, Alfred Head, bought both parts on 26-5-1882 after obtaining the grant for 71B,of 116 acres south of Stony Creek Rd, much earlier.

Norman Prossor married May Holmes, the daughter of William and Emily Holmes.(Sid Prosser, their son, and brother of Norma Bright.)
Henry Percival Prossor was at Boneo before he moved to Red Hill in about 1893. (Sid Prossor.)


W.MARSHALL.74G, 19 acres at the east corner of Prossors Lane.

In August 1902, Mr Marshall was chiefly growing peaches and apricots,which did not seem to be as successful as the usual fruits. He was also growing vegetables and strawberries.(MS02)

At the Dromana Show in 1897, Mrs D.Marshall came second, behind Mr H.Prosser,a fellow Red Hill resident, in a category for vegetables. (MS 23-4-1897, P.3.)

In 1898, W.Marshall of Red Hill requested permission from the Flinders and Kangerong Shire to cut saplings in front of his property.(MS 29-9-1898, p.3.)

The largest strawberry patches were on the properties of J.McIlroy and J.Shand but those of W.J.McIlroy, Arkwell, Marshall and H.Prosser were fruiting heavily. (MS1-8-1903, p.3.)

Colin McLear says much about William Marshall in "A Dreamtime of Dromana". P. 27 William Marshall was an early tenant on Jamieson's Special Survey, living roughly near the intersection of Pickings Rd and Lansell Ave in Safety Beach. John and Mary Ann McLear had done well on the famous John Oxley's property at Cambden, N.S.W. and in 1846 moved to the River Plenty where they took up residence on the property of Mr Green, after whom Greensborough was probably named (and whose descendants might have owned Green's Bush near Red Hill.)

On Boxing Day,1849, John McLear, who had employed William Marshall as a groom for his horses, attended a race meeting, near the Plough Inn, Plenty, with William Marshall. John had won a bet but John Holland refused to pay up and tried to hit John with sticks and a whip, which William confiscated.One of Holland's mates hit the back of John's head and killed him. It would be likely that William would have accompanied the widow, Mary Ann, to Jamieson's Special Survey, especially if he had come with her from N.S.W.

William might have been already married upon their arrival in 1851 because he was one of a number of Survey tenants whose children attended a private school on the east side of the Nepean Highway about 400 metres north of Wallaces Rd (near the Hickinbotham of Dromana Winery.)

In 1863, he was leasing 70 acres from Big Clarke, which had shrunk to 60 acres in 1865, his house still of two rooms. His name does not appear in my transcription of the 1879 rates but I did not record assessments in Balnarring rates. Alex Marshall, the first postmaster in Red Hill in 1871 had been succeeded in this post by 1873 (see page 23 in summary.) It is possible that William, the groom and 1851 Survey tenant was born about 1825 and had sons named Alex and William in about 1850. This would have made Alex about 23 when he took on the post office and William about 40 when he bought 74G.

By 1919 Frederick Nash senior owned 74G, which now houses the Greek church.


F.NASH. 74f, 19 acres south of Marshall's and 74(E1), south of 74f, containing 7 acres.

In August, 1902, Mr Nash had 6 acres of the usual fruits and more cleared and ploughed. (MS02.)
The 1902-3 assessments show that F.Nash was assessed only on 74F and that 74E was vacant. Fred Nash must have bought 74 E1 of 6 acres 2 roods and 25 perches after this time and Henry Prossor his 12 acre share.

By the 1919 assessment Frederick Nash Snr was assessed on 8 acres (part 74E), 37 acres and buildings(74 F, 74G ) as well as 40 acres (lots 6 and 7,part crown allotments 73A, 73 B.) Mrs Emmie Nash was assessed on 20 acres (lot 5, part crown allotments 73A, 73B.) Frederick Nash Jnr was assessed on 25 acres, part 13B, Kangerong.

Crown allotments 73 A and B, west of the village settlement, were granted to James McKeown. The family later moved to Dromana where they bought William Grace's grant, Gracefield , crown allotment 5 of section 3, Kangerong, consisting of almost 250 acres ( roughly Melway 159 G-H 9-11.) Gracefield Ave may have been the entrance to this farm. In about 1892, James and his son, Henry, built the Aringa Guest House at the north west corner of Foote and Clarendon Sts, which provided a living for his girls until after World War 2. The above details come from Colin McLear's "A Dreamtime of Dromana" and the Kangerong parish map. Now I will quote Colin.

"James McKeown was born in 1831 and died aged 88 in 1920. His wife, Catherine Townsend McKeown was born at Port Fairy (I think it was then called Belfast) in 1841 and died in 1928. James migrated to New Zealand in 1853, moving to Warrnambool in 1856. His sister, Mary, had married Hill Hillas in Ireland in 1846 and migrated to Red Hill in 1855 and taken up farming. James travelled to Red Hill in 1862 and purchased 200 acres of farming land south of the current oval. He returned to marry Catherine at Koroit and they travelled to Red Hill in a bullock cart in 1863. His orchard was called Musgrove Farm and he built a wooden house on the property called Glenbower. In 1874, James cut and sold timber piles for the building of Dromana pier. The Red Hill property was sold to the Sheehan family in 1889when the family moved to Dromana.

The twelve children of James and Catherine were:
Anna (b.1864, d. 1950), Henry (b.1865, d.1916), James (b.1867, d. 1935), Williasm (b.1869, d.1950), Isabella (b.1871, d. 1932), Arthur (b. 1873, d.1937), Eva (b. 1874, d.1953), Maud (b. 1876, d.1945), Ethel (b.1879, d.1964), Ernest (b.1881, d.1941)Ada (b.1883, d.1887), Edith (b.1886, d.1987.)"

THERE IS MUCH MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE McKEOWNS IN COLIN'S BOOK. IF YOU CAN'T FIND A COPY, REQUEST MORE INFORMATION IN "COMMENTS".

73A and 73B, Balnarring each consisted of 107 acres 2 roods and 32 perches, thus making a total of 215.375 acres. Keith Holmes told me that this became two farms of unequal size, Glenbower (adjoining the future village settlement) and Wildwood (adjoining William Henry Blakeley's 72A, which now houses the Consolidated School.) The two farms seem to have been jointly owned (by the Holmes family?)and subdivided by 1902 when properties described in "Around Red Hill" had to be west of the village settlement. The 1919 assessment shows that William A. Holmes had 147 of the 215 acres while Fred Snr and Emmie Nash had 60 acres, and Alexander Prossor 49 acres. It seems that the rate collector was fazed by all the new subdivisions (with hundreds of unknown ratepayers) and accidentally labelled Alex Prossor's land as part of 73A instead of 75A which was south of the village settlement and other Prossor land. This 49 acre block was until recently (1918-9) occupied by Charles William Ward.

In 1919, Frederick Nash Junior had 25 acres, part of 13B Kangerong. Crown allotments 13A and B, west of Andrews Lane, consisting of almost 130 acres, was granted to Margaret Davies, who was obviously a widow. The western boundary of 13B (now the Kindilan Society property) just happens to be Nashs Lane (Melway 191 A4.) As no more rate records are available on microfiche, I can only speculate that young Freddy bought more land nearby or was at the end of the lane.

It is possible that the Red Hill Nash family was descended from Charles Nash of Fairview and Bayview in Tullamarine.



H.PROSSER.74(E), 12 acres at the end of Prossors Lane with the opposite boundary parallel with Shoreham Rd.
This land was still vacant in 1919, possibly because it was too steep. Fred Nash bought the northern 7 acres (74E1, now Trevor Holmes' Cherry farm) and Henry Prossor the southern 12 acres, part of which is now owned by the Edwards family, and about 8 acres (including the old homestead) by Trevor Holmes.
The name Prossor/Prosser means son of Roger, being a mutation from ap Prosser. (Prossor website accessed through Holmes genealogy website.) See 74 C and D for other Prossor details.


T.HARVEY.74h, 20 acres fronting Arthurs Seat Rd from the general store to the Mechanics Rd corner.

In August 1902, Mr Harvey of "Fernside" had a 9 acre orchard which was a model of neatness, 5 acres of strawberries and gooseberries, passionfruit bearing heavily and Japanese plums.

In 1902-3, F.Harvey was assessed on 74H. By 1919, 74H was occupied by Samuel L.Holland.

Keith Holmes recalls Ethram Harvey. Ethram may have been the son of Thomas Harvey, who was building a house on the block occupied by Edward Bowring in 1902 and was probably the grantee of 74h. Edward Bowring married a Harvey girl according to Keith Holmes, so he may have married the daughter of Thomas Harvey.

In the 1910-11 assessments, E.Harvey and Joseph Harvey, Red Hill farmers, were assessed on 213 acres (23b and 23b2 Wannaeue) and 144 acres (24 Wannaeue) respectively. It would seem fairly easy to locate these properties but the rate collector did not help much. James W.Gibson, the grantee, had 24 Wannaeue of 114 acres so Joseph Harvey could not have been there. E.Harvey's land was actually 23B (about 153.25 acres) and 23A (almost 60 acres), both granted to William Hillis. Access to 23A was via Wilson Rd at its south west corner and this allotment went north halfway to Whites Rd (roughly Melway 171 H6.) Crown allotment 23B was west of this, with frontages to Whites Rd and Main Creek Rd (roughly 171 J-K 5-6.)
Joseph Harvey might have had 24B, of 145 acres, granted to Nelson Rudduck of Dromana or 24D and 23A1 of a combined 146.7 acres but John and James Bayne, Shoreham graziers, still had their grant so Joseph must have had 24B. The north east corner of this strangely shaped allotment was in Heath Lane (the original end of Main Creek Rd) 70 metres from Arthurs Seat Rd and the road frontage continued south 227 metres to roughly the site of the Miceli Winery (Melway 190 A3.) There it met 24A of 50 acres, granted to J.Pierce but occupied by James McIlroy of Red Hill. which fronted Main Creek Rd and the eastern 425 metres of Whites Rd. Joseph's block fronted the next 425 metres of White's Rd, from which point the western boundary headed nor nor west to, roughly, the top left corner of Melway 171 J3.

Also in the 1919-20 assessments, T.J.Harvey of Healesville had 25 acres, part 25A, Wannaeue. Crown allotment 25A, granted to Peter Watson and consisting of almost 83 acres was on the south side of Arthurs Seat Rd(roughly Melway 171 J 1-2 , K2)and had a frontage to the northern 70 metres of Heath Lane; it was north of 24B which Joseph Harvey had occupied in 1910.

T.S.PARRY. 74i, 20 acres south of Harvey's with its south east corner roughly across the road from the south boundary of the Red Hill South Community Reserve.

In August 1902, Mr Parry had a two and a half orchard which had been planted in that year. The rate collector was a little confused in the 1902-3 assessments and had assessed Neaves on 74i (with Parry written above Neaves) and has assessed Davidson on 74J instead of 74K.

This block became "Kia Ora" a farm owned by a member of the Holmes clan (Keith Holmes.). The 1919 assessments seem to indicate that it had been bought by James Andrew Holmes; there was a house on the property which must have been built by Parry some time after 1902.

G.NEAVES. 74j, 19 acres south of Parry's about opposite the Station Rd corner.
In August 1902, Mr Neaves had 4 acres cultivated, mainly strawberries.

George Neaves was still on 74J in 1919. He had erected a building on it by 1902, according to that year's assessment. George's daughter, Eva, went to school with Ruth Holmes. (Keith Holmes.)

W.DAVIDSON. 74k of 17 acres opposite Centrepoint.

W.Davidson was assessed in 1902-3 (see 74i.), but the rate collector was confused.Unless my transcription was faulty, the Davidson block was not mentioned in "Around Red Hill" written in August, 1902. By 1919, 74K was occupied by Mrs Frances Edwards.
Mrs Davidson was "Dolly" Nash, who could not move one of her arm and always had it clad in a stocking.Mr Davidson's sister married a Cavanagh from Balnarring.(Keith Holmes.)

A very confused entry in the 1910-11 rates indicates that rates on a property were to be written off. The property, of 60 acres, 18A Kangerong, seems to have been leased by Jonathon Davis and to be the estate of William Davidson, care of Mrs Edwards of Red Hill. The land,on the south corner of White Hill and McIlroys Rd, had been granted to Henry Dunn and formed all or part of his "Four Winds". The block was almost square with its western boundary extending to a point opposite Tumbywood Rd.


Areas are rounded to the nearest acre. Frances, Elizabeth and Frederick Sts are not on the village settlement but are on 75A, Balnarring, granted to J.McConnell.

by itellya Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2012-08-22 01:53:57

Itellya is researching local history on the Mornington Peninsula and is willing to help family historians with information about the area between Somerville and Blairgowrie. He has extensive information about Henry Gomm of Somerville, Joseph Porta (Victoria's first bellows manufacturer) and Captain Adams of Rosebud.

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