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THE CAMERONS OF GLENROY, VIC., AUST.-RELATED TO A SAINT!

Journal by itellya

John Kerr built a fine mansion called Kerrsland at the north end of the Glenroy Estate on Pasture Hill,which with Bayview Farm to the south,he had bought from the Donald Kennedy Estate in 1874. Kerr was one of many Scots who built fine homes in Melbourne's north west (such as Alex McCracken's North Park and Theodore Napier's son-in -law
George Page Barbour's Rosebank, both in Woodland St, Essendon) that have been preserved, ironically, by the Catholic Church. Kerrsland became the Broadmeadows Foundling Home for many years, Geohegan College,and then Therry College, named after Melbourne's pioneering R.C. clergy. It is now Penola College, honouring the start of a lifetime of service of Australia's first saint.

The following information was found because of a farm named Glenalin Farm,part of the Glenroy Estate,recently occupied by George Gordon Cameron, that was advertised for lease in 1860 by Donald Kennedy. It was too important to hide in my FARMS IN THE SHIRE OF BROADMEADOWS journal. I have suspected for many years that the Camerons and Kennedys were related. I suspected that Glenalin was later farmed by John Cochrane and sold in 1874 as Glenroy farm (south of Bayview Farm to Rhodes Pde.) P. 78, BROADMEADOWS: A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.

Do you remember your British history re the Elizabeth/Mary and Church of England/Roman Catholic vendettas,and the Scots enlisting the aid of the Catholic French in their bid for independence? That not all Scots were Presbyterians came clearly to mind when I read the following. As a whole ship load of Camerons arrived in early days, I have been hesitant to assume a link between the Camerons of the Glenroy Estate, Ruthven (Crown allotment 10B, Will Will Rook and granted to Angus and George Gordon Cameron,roughly bounded by the end of Kerang Crt on the south,the railway,the Phillip St/Koroit Ave midline and the Northcorp Industry Park) and John Cameron's Stony Fields (Roxburgh Park) in the parish of Yuroke. Now I suspect that there is a link.

More of that later. Here's the information about the Camerons and the future saint.

Cameron, Alexander (18101881)

by Peter Rymill

This article was published in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Supplementary Volume, (MUP), 2005

Alexander Cameron (1810-1881), overlander and pastoralist, was born on 18 August 1810 at Lochaber, Inverness-shire, Scotland, fourth of nine children of John Cameron, sawmiller, and his wife Margaret, ne Fraser. Alexander attended school at Inverroy, near Ben Nevis, and worked as a shepherd before obtaining an assisted passage in the Boyne to Sydney. The healthy, literate, six feet (183 cm) tall, Highland Catholic stepped ashore on 2 January 1839 with 101 other enterprising Camerons. He immediately embarked on an epic, clan trek organized by his unclesdroving sheep to Port Phillip, following the wheel-ruts of (Sir) Thomas Mitchell's wagons three years earlier. One uncle Duncan Cameron (1800-1860) settled on the Glenroy run, now a Melbourne suburb, while another, Alexander 'Black Sandy' Cameron (1791-1858), advanced into Australia Felix to pioneer Mount Sturgeon Plains, near Dunkeld.

On 27 June 1843 Cameron married Margaret MacKillop in St Francis's Catholic Church, Melbourne. They were to have ten children. He continued to overland his sheep westwards to new pastures in South Australia where he was the first to apply, on 19 December 1845, for the forty-eight square-mile (18.53-km) occupation licence surrounding the future site of Penola. This frontier venture, subsequently in partnership with his uncle 'Black Sandy', prospered, as did a lucrative sidelineshipping remounts to the Indian cavalry, prepared by a local horsebreaker and poet Adam Lindsay Gordon who 'received the greatest kindness' from Cameron while recovering from a violent kick to the groin.

Having built the original Royal Oak Hotel by 1848, Cameron encouraged his station tradesmen to establish their own businesses by purchasing eighty acres (32 ha) freehold on 4 April 1850, which he subdivided to found the private township of Penola. In 1852 he initiated the Penola races, renowned for their Highland balls, and would drive through the township to the racecourse, once 'with a piper in full blast and ribbons flying' to the great astonishment and excitement of his nostalgic kinsmen. Full-bearded, handsome and commanding in stature, but with a curiously falsetto voice and a strong Highland accent, he was remembered as 'a sterling fellow . . . like the Highland chief both in person and hospitality'.

The Camerons' 18-year-old niece Mary MacKillop joined the growing family as governess in 1860. In 1863 Cameron's wife Margaret died, as did his eldest daughter in childbirth. Selling Penola station next year, he expanded his pastoral holdings on Mount Sturgeon Plains, in Victoria, and at Avoca Forest, near St Arnaud. On 14 February 1867 at Duck Ponds, Geelong, with Catholic rites, he married 23-year-old Ellen Keogh; they lived in Melbourne at Moreland Hall, Coburg. Cameron died there on 2 September 1881 and was buried in Melbourne general cemetery. His wife, their three daughters and four of their five sons, and one son and five daughters of his first marriage survived him. He left a net estate of 72,000 that included over 22,000 freehold acres (9000 ha) and 53,000 sheep. Known to his contemporaries as 'King' Cameron, he has been commemorated as the founder of Penola by a life-sized bronze statue by John Dowie, erected by public subscription in the main street beside his Royal Oak Hotel.

Select Bibliography
Pastoral Pioneers of South Australia, vol 1 (Adel, 1925)
V. Feehan, Alexander Cameron--King of Penola--A Biographical Sketch (Melb, 1980)
P. Rymill, The Founders (Penola, SA, 1995)
W. Milne, Notes of a Journey from Adelaide to the South Eastern District of SA, January 1863 (manuscript, State Library of South Australia).


History of Glenroy - Moreland City Council, Victoria, Australia
www.moreland.vic.gov.au Home About Moreland Local history&#8206;
Scottish settlers, Angus, Donald, Duncan and George Gordon Cameron rented land from Hughes and Hosking. The Camerons called their farm the 'Glenroy ...
Glenroy Run Farm
Glenroy was in the Will Will Rook parish. Eleven out of fifteen portions of Will Will Rook land were sold at auction in September 1838. The biggest buyers of land were John Hughes and John Hosking who bought 5000 acres. Scottish settlers, Angus, Donald, Duncan and George Gordon Cameron rented land from Hughes and Hosking. The Camerons called their farm the 'Glenroy Run'. Glenroy was named after a narrow glen (valley) in Invernesshire in Scotland. The Camerons leased the land until the 1850s.


Show corrections - NLA Australian Newspapers - corrections
trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/correction/4792799&#8206;
MOONEE PONDS -Mr George Gordon Cameron Glenroy, Mr John Cameron, Deep Creek, Mr Donald Cameron Stony Field COLIBAN -Mr John Cameron. (N.B. Moonee Ponds was short for Moonee Moonee Chain of Ponds and meant anywhere near the creek,which was the western boundary of the Glenroy Run. John Cameron was on Warlaby as revealed by a notice published by Robert McDougall ( see comment of 30-11-2013 re BULLA ROAD BOARD under my journal, DICTIONARY HISTORY OF BULLA.)

12 Sep 1882 - Family Notices - Trove
trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/11552650&#8206;
CAMERON -On the 9th inst, at Ruthvenfield, near Campbellfield, John Cameron, eldest son of the late Donald Cameron, of Ruthvenfield, aged 43 years.

Roxburgh Park Homestead - Mantello Holden
www.mantelloholdenrp.com.au/OurHistory&#8206;

Thanks to Yvonne Kernan and her family for the documents relating to the sale of Roxburgh Park in 1949

In a "Heritage Study of the Former Shire of Bulla District, 1998' Roxburgh Park was described as 'of regional historical and architectural significance' first house constructed early c.1850's and second house constructed 1895.

The first owner was Donald Cameron a Scot and he named the property 'Ruthvenfield'*, again reflecting its Scottish origins as Ruthvenfield is a village, in the parish of Tibbermore, county of Perth, Scotland and the bluestone and granite house built sometime after 1848. In the 1949 sale for the property it is stated 'A Granite Quarry of Monumental & Building Stone of excellent quality, a valuable asset is situate on the Southern Boundary' this is possibly where the materials for the original bluestone and granite dwelling house were extracted from.

(*Donald was assessed on "Stony Field" in the Broadmeadows rate book of 1863! I assume that John* Cameron,who later farmed the property changed the unflattering name. *John Cameron received the grant for crown allotment 2 of section 6, Yuroke of almost 40 acres east of Stony Field,bounded on the south east by Cliffords Rd on the south east-i.e. David Munroe Drive- and roughly Thomas Brunton Drive on the north west. The Pascoe Vale/Somerton Rd roundabout was the south west end of Cliffords Rd and the south east corner of Stony Fields.

In 1882 the dwelling was then described as 4 rooms built with stone walls and partitions of brick with a slate roof and timber cottages used for bedrooms along with various outbuildings and various family members seem to have been running the property after Cameron died.

Thomas Brunton a flour miller purchased the property in 1895. It was not long before plans were made to build a red brick house on the property and said to be the present building on the site. Brunton is attributed to being the person who named Roxburgh Park after his birthplace in Roxburgh, Scotland. It was again described in the 1949 sale as 'of brick' and built on an elevated position'. Brunton bred cattle, horses and Shropshire sheep on the property 'originally established by the late Hon. Thom Brunton, MLC as a country home and Stropshire Stud Farm'.


Sue O'Neill and Angela Evans did a great job of recording gravestone inscriptions at the Will Will Rook Cemetery.
R4 G5
IN LOVING MEMORY OF / ANGUS CAMERON[ / WHO DIED AT MELBOURNE / 20TH MARCH 1871 AGED 87 YEARS / ALSO HIS WIFE / ISABELLA KENNEDY* / WHO DIED AT RUTHVEN / 23RD AUGUST 1863 AGED 72 YEARS / ALSO THEIR CHILDREN / JAMES / FOURTH SON, DIED AT RUTHVEN / OCTOBER 1862, AGED 40 YEARS / ELIZABETH / THIRD DAUGHTER, DIED AT RUTHVEN / 17TH JULY 1863, AGED 31 YEARS / ALSO THEIR GRANDSON / ANGUS CAMERON / ELDEST SON OF GEORGE GORDON CAMERON / DIED AT GLENROY 26TH MARCH 1859 AGED 7 YEARS / ALSO OF / ELIZABETH KENNEDY / WIFE OF DUNCAN MCPHERSON / DIED AT TULLOCH, MICKLEHAM / 8TH AUGUST 1880 AGED 80 YEARS / ERECTED BY R. B. MCP. STEVENSON.
(* This would most likely be Isabella's second given name and an indication of her mother's maiden name as seen in so many family naming patterns. Perhaps that was the Cameron/Kennedy family link.)This would be the family that owned 10B Will Will Rook.


R9 G1
TO THE MEMORY / OF / DONALD CAMERON / BORN AT EUROKE / MARCH 1855 / DIED JUNE 3RD 1861 / ALSO HIS MOTHER / SARAH CAMERON / WHO DIED / FEBRUARY 1862. This means Stony Field.Possibly John's younger brother.

R10 G5
ERECTED / BY / JANE CAMERON / IN MEMORY OF HER FATHER / JOHN CAMERON / NATIVE OF INVERNESSHIRE BORN 1818 DIED FEB. 1854 / AGED 37 YEARS / AND HIS WIFE / SUSAN / NATIVE OF STANLEY, PERTHSHIRE / DIED 1855, AGED 27 YEARS.

GLENALIN FARM.
TO LET, GLENALIN FARM, Moonee Ponds,Broadmeadows, portion of the Glenroy Estate,lately occupied by Mr. George Cameron. The farm contains about 593 acres, fenced in, and subdivided into paddocks, whereof about 300 acres have been under cultivation. There is a substantial dwelling house on the farm, with dairy, stable, and other farm offices attached, all in good repair. Entrance may be had immediately. Apply to J. S. Ogilvy, 65 Queen
street; or to the Hon. Donald Kennedy, of Dundonald, near Broadmeadows. (P.8,Argus, 6-10-1860.)

Where was Glenalin Farm?
The most obvious choice because of the specified 593 acres would be section 10 of the parish of Will Will Rook. This consisted of 10B, Ruthven (403 acres), 10A,between Ruthven and Camp Rd,granted to Alexander Gibb of Meadowbank (142a 2 r. 3 p.) and 10C, north of the Will Will Rook cemetery, granted to Neil Campbell (42 acres.)

This might have been the pre-emptive right of the Glenroy Run,the homestead block. As long as the rent was paid to the government on time each year,nobody else could buy it. The total acreage above is 588 acres, only 5 acres short.

The land for the Will Will Rook Cemetery (10 acres)was supposed to have been donated in the 1850's by Neil Campbell who received the grants for the 40 acres to the north and most of Campbellfield to the east. Perhaps the trustees leased the northern,unused half to the Camerons for grazing to keep the grass down.This would have been exactly 593 acres.

Glenroy Farm consisted of lot 4 (388 acres 3 roods 35 perches) and lot 5 (210a. 1 r. 25p.)east of the railway line. (P.78 B.A.F.H.) It was between Rhodes Pde/Boundary Rd and roughly Hilton St and included the Northern Golf Course site,where it adjoined Fawkner's Box Forest Co-Op. land. This is close to the required acreage but the western boundary, the railway, was not built until 1872.

A third possibility for the location of Glenalin Farm is also part of the Hughes and Hosking grants bought by the Kennedy's over a decade earlier. Donald had partitioned the land in 1857,presumably when Pascoe Vale was properly made to Somerton Rd to link with the new road to Sydney,Duncan getting the land east of this road to the creek, about a third of the land.

As mentioned before, lot 4 in the 1874 subdivision of the Glenroy Estate,the part of Glenroy farm containing the buildings,consisted of 388a. 3r. 35p. I have seen no mention of Duncan farming his land, so there is no reason why,despite roadside fences,Glenalin farm could not have straddled Pascoe Vale Rd with the 300 acres of cultivation on Glenroy Farm and grazing on 205 acres between the road and the creek on Duncan's land.

Lot 4 of the subdivision was the northern half of section 1, Will Will Rook, which consisted of 1174 acres.
Lots 4 and 5 totalled about 599 acres, so that means that there were 575 acres between the railway line and the creek or about 503 acres between the road and the creek. Because of the route of the road and the course of the creek south of Fran St,it is likely that Duncan's land west of lot 4 would consist of about 200 acres, and west of lot 5 about 300 acres. Lot 4 extended onto Duncan's land would total about 589 acres and lot 5 about 510 acres.

If the former was Glenalin Farm, its southern boundary is indicated by the Pascoe Vale Rd/Barwon St corner and the northern by Muntz Ave (named after an early Broady Shire engineer), and Hilton St.

AND THE SAINT!
Extract from:Mary MacKillop - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_MacKillop&#8206;
Mary Helen MacKillop RSJ, also known as St Mary of the Cross MacKillop, was an Australian of Scottish descent who has been declared a saint by the Catholic ...
&#8206;Early life and ministry - &#8206;Founding of school and ...

MacKillop started work at the age of 14 as a clerk in a stationery store in Melbourne.[8] To provide for her needy family, in 1860 she took a job as governess[12] at the estate of her aunt and uncle, Alexander and Margaret Cameron in Penola, South Australia where she was to look after their children and teach them.[8] Already set on helping the poor whenever possible, she included the other farm children on the Cameron estate as well. This brought her into contact with Fr Woods, who had been the parish priest in the south east since his ordination to the priesthood in 1857 after completing his studies at Sevenhill.
MacKillop stayed for two years with the Camerons before accepting a job teaching the children of Portland, Victoria in 1862. Later she taught at the Portland school and after opening her own boarding school, Bay View House Seminary for Young Ladies, now Bayview College, in 1864,[13] was joined by the rest of her family.

Founding of school and religious congregation.
Fr Woods had been very concerned about the lack of education and particularly Catholic education in South Australia. In 1866, he invited MacKillop and her sisters Annie and Lexie to come to Penola and to open a Catholic school.[8] Woods was appointed director of education and became the founder, along with MacKillop, of a school they opened in a stable there. After renovations by their brother, the MacKillops started teaching more than 50 children.[14][15] At this time MacKillop made a declaration of her dedication to God and began wearing black.[16]
On 21 November 1866, the feast day of the Presentation of Mary, several other women joined MacKillop and her sisters. MacKillop adopted the religious name of Sister Mary of the Cross and she and Lexie began wearing simple religious habits. The small group began to call themselves the Sisters of St Joseph of the Sacred Heart[8] and moved to a new house in Grote Street, Adelaide. There they founded a new school at the request of the bishop, Laurence Bonaventure Sheil OFM.[12] Dedicated to the education of the children of the poor, it was the first religious institute to be founded by an Australian.

Surnames: CAMERON KENNEDY KEOGH KERR MCCRACKEN MCKILLOP NAPIER
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by itellya Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2013-11-30 18:50:42

Itellya is researching local history on the Mornington Peninsula and is willing to help family historians with information about the area between Somerville and Blairgowrie. He has extensive information about Henry Gomm of Somerville, Joseph Porta (Victoria's first bellows manufacturer) and Captain Adams of Rosebud.

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Comments

by itellya on 2013-12-04 02:17:25

See comment 1 under my journal SOME FARMS IN THE SHIRE OF BROADMEADOWS, VIC., AUST. and Broadmeadows Township pioneers.

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