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they held HOTEL LICENSES in NELSON 1867

Journal by ngairedith

The first publicans' licences were issued in Nelson in April 1842. There had been considerable public agitation to legalize a trade which had begun to flourish outside the law. Eight licences were issued and another six the following year. All were within the town, except for one at Motueka.

Some of these first public houses lasted only a year or two and left little evidence of their existence. The Ship Inn of J. Collins, The Shamrock Inn of T.K. Warburton, the New Zealand Tavern of Thomas Bright and William White and William Miller's Tavern come into this category. The Auckland Hotel of Richard Mills, in Nile Street East, became a private boardinghouse in 1844.

Others with a short life-span were the Nelson Hotel of William Wright, at the junction of Bridge Street and Haven Road and Edward Ellerm's Lord Collingwood Inn, in Bridge Street. In 1843 the Lord Collingwood Inn was bought by T.K. Warburton and he added a ballroom, which was the scene of a select ball on New Year's Day 1844.
... more at link above

The ANNUAL LICENSING MEETING held on Tuesday, April 16, 1867 for the district of NELSON, was held at the Court-house beofre J. Poynter, sq., R.M., and the following Magistrates:- A. Richmond, N. G. Morse, N. Edwards, Captain Wright, Sheppard, Brunner, Renwick, G. White, W. W. Wells, A. Williams, and others

Some additional info taken from 19th CENTURY NELSON HOTELS
* PART 1 written c1987
* PART 2 written c1988

The following licenses were granted:

TOWN LICENSES
Ann ADAM, - Anchor Inn
... The Shipwright's Arms, on section 61 Haven Road, was licensed by Frederick Freeman in 1860. The six-roomed mud and wood house had been built in 1856. It was taken over by Stephen Adam in 1861 and renamed the Anchor Inn in 1862. Adam died in 1864 and the hotel was then run by his widow, Ann, until the late 1870s. A new Anchor Inn was built in 1883, with Benjamin Osborne becoming landlord and a name change to the Clarendon Hotel. It closed in the 1890s and became a boarding-house

Henry BALY, - Wine and Spirit Merchant

Henry Silvester BUSH, - Steam Boat Tavern
... The Haven Inn was licensed by William Crowther in 1854 and stood on section 39 Haven Road, at the bottom of Russell Street. In September 1856 Crowther respectfully advised lovers of the sport of skittle-playing that a large and commodious covered skittleground was now attached to the Haven Inn.
In the Police Court in April 1858, William Crowther accused Charles Hamilton of forcibly entering the Haven Inn and assaulting him. Crowther had hit Hamilton over the head with a soda bottle. The case was dismissed and both men were bound over to keep the peace.
At the licensing meeting in April 1858 the name was changed to the Northumberland Arms. John Marsden took the hotel over from Crowther in March 1860 and changed the name to the Steamboat Tavern. The hotel was rebuilt about 1864, with Henry Silvester Bush as landlord. Frederick Stock took over in 1872, but died two years later. The Steamboat Tavern had closed by 1887

Robert CARTER, - Lord Nelson Hotel
... On the north side of Bridge Street, between Trafalgar and Collingwood Streets, were the Lord Nelson (18651872) and the Geelong & Ballarat Hotel (18651868)

Hugh CORREGAN, - Miners' Arms
... The Miners' Arms Hotel, built in 1855, was on the north west corner of Hardy and Collingwood Streets. Henry Jasper was an early landlord. The hotel was rebuilt in 1883 and, before this, its name had been changed to the Panama Hotel. The Panama closed in July 1976 and the building is now used as legal offices

Hugh COTTIER, - Albion Hotel
... The Albion Hotel was over the road from the Pier, at the entrance to the Albion Wharf. It was licensed by Frederick Stock in April 1859. Later landlords were Hugh Cottier and Samuel Wadman. It ceased operating as an hotel in the 1880s. The building was demolished in 1910 and the site was later used for the Port police station

Robert DISHER, - Trafalgar Hotel
... George Taylor took the Anchor Inn in 1852. In November 1854 he advised that the building was to be replaced and that he trusted, in a short period, to be able to provide superior and comfortable accommodation for both man and horse. The new building deserved a new name and, the following March, Mr & Mrs Taylor advertised that their new and extensive premises, the Trafalgar Hotel, would be open in a few weeks.
Mrs Taylor had secured the services of an experienced French cook, which would enable her to provide dinners in a superior style. An active and efficient tavern waiter had also been engaged and visitors could depend on receiving attention and civility. In conclusion they trusted that the Trafalgar would, like the illustrious battle which gave it name, not be forgotten by the 'men of Nelson'. This building stood until 1907, when the Trafalgar Hotel became an elaborate three storey structure

Joseph EDWARDS, - Prince of Wales Hotel
... The Prince of Wales Hotel was in Collingwood Street, between Nile and Manuka Streets. It was run by Joseph Edwards, in a five-roomed cottage, from 1864 to 1867. Its moment of fame came in August 1866, when a barman rescued nine year old Henry Webb from a runaway horse and took him into the hotel. Henry suffered broken bones, but there was hope of a recovery

Edward EVERETT, - Bank Hotel
... The Bank Hotel stood next door to the Masonic in Hardy Street and was destroyed in the 1867 fire. The building was owned by Edward Everett and had been built in 1859. Originally the location of the Nelson Club, it had become an hotel in 1865

Charles GENTRY, - Wakatu Hotel
... The Wakatu Hotel, the best known of the early public houses, stood on the north-west corner of Trafalgar and Bridge Streets. It had been built in 1843, by the merchants Nathan and Joseph, to replace their store at Auckland Point. They sold-up in August 1843 and the building was leased to James Williams, who continued to use it as a store and auction rooms. In October 1844, Williams absconded in debt to Alexander Perry, another merchant, who then rented the building. Perry converted it for use as a public house, and it was licenced as the Wakatu Hotel early in 1845. The first landlord was John McDonald, a gardener of Brook Street.
The Wakatu Hotel, described as commodious premises, included a billiard room and was an important social centre in the early days of the settlement. It was the scene of many public and private meetings and testimonial dinners. When it closed, The Colonist noted that a visit to the Wakatu Hotel had been regarded by country residents as the one relief from their struggles, as they had always been sure of finding congenial company there.
The Bank of New South Wales bought the property in 1877 and advertised the buildings for removal. The buildings and their contents were auctioned on 13 July 1877. The contents, which included spittoons, found a ready market and the buildings were purchased for thirtynine pounds by Thomas Harley, who had been born on the premises.
Next door to the Wakatu Hotel in Bridge Street stood the Galatea Hotel, built in 1868. Thomas Askew was the first landlord. The licence was taken by Mrs Russell in 1873 and the name changed to the Exchange Hotel. The Exchange closed on 17 September 1951 and its licence went to the Metropolitan Hotel

James GRAHAM, - Thistle Inn
... Further along Bridge Street, the Thistle Inn stood between Harley Street and Provincial Lane. It was built in 1855, was still there in 1876, but had gone by 1887

Henry JASPER, - Pier Hotel
... The Pier Hotel was built on section 34 at the Port by Hooper & Co in 1859. It was licensed by Joseph Winterburn and had nine rooms. In 1885 a new Pier Hotel was built alongside the existing building. The Pier closed 9 September 1967 and was demolished 1 October 1967

W. JENNINGS, - London Tavern
... The London Tavern, built in 1857 on section 60, was double-storeyed, with thirteen rooms. In January 1858 the Nelson Examiner reported that Mr F. Stock had opened his spacious hotel with a sumptuous dinner, and the toast drunk "success to the landlord". It suffered a succession of landlords and by 1873 had ceased to operate as an hotel. It became a boarding house and private residence, until finally taken for school grounds in the 1970s

John JERVIS, - Commercial Hotel
... In 1843 the Lord Collingwood Inn was bought by T. K. Warburton and he added a ballroom, which was the scene of a select ball on New Year's Day 1844. Warburton had also held the licence for the Commercial Hotel in Bridge Street. In 1843 the Commercial was taken by J. Cockburn. It was described as extensive premises and included a billiard room

Thomas MARTIN, - Rising Sun
... The Rising Sun Hotel, in Waimea Road near the corner with Van Dieman Street, was built in 1857 and licensed by John Goldsworthy in 1858. Thomas Martin presided in the 1860s, followed by H. Hall, J. R. Gilbert and Alfred Bradley. The hotel was rebuilt in 1883 and continues in the same building

Charles McGEE, - Nelson Hotel
... Others with a short life-span were the Nelson Hotel of William Wright, at the junction of Bridge Street and Haven Road and Edward Ellerm's Lord Collingwood Inn, in Bridge Street. In 1843 the Lord Collingwood Inn was bought by T. K. Warburton and he added a ballroom, which was the scene of a select ball on New Year's Day 1844

Charles MOORE, - Post Boy Hotel
... The Post Boy Hotel, at the corner of Vanguard and Gloucester Streets, was licensed by George Potter in 1868, in a house built in 1866. His widow continued to run the hotel for several years after his death in 1872. The building was condemned by the Licensing Committee in 1930 and a new hotel opened in December of that year, with the name The Club. In March 1939 the name reverted to the Post Boy

Stephen OWENS, - Mitre Hotel
... The Mitre Hotel, on the north-west corner of the intersection, was built in 1859. Another victim of the 1866 fire, it was rebuilt the same year and was renamed the Criterion Hotel in the 1870s. It had become the Temperance Hotel by 1887, which must have gladdened the heart of the Temperance Hall over the road. It lasted until 1912

Joseph PORTHOUSE, - Royal Hotel
... Information on a fire in the old Royal Hotel, Bridge Street, in March 1915, has been found since writing part one of this article. The replacement for this building combined with the Metropolitan Private Hotel on the corner, to open as the new Royal Hotel in 1916

George POTTER, - Coach and Horses
... The Freemasons' Arms, on the north-east corner of Trafalgar and Bridge Streets, was licenced in 1842 by F. A. Lloyd. It became a centre for members of the Oddfellows Lodge, who held their meetings there. Thomas Sullivan, a central figure in the Lodge, held the licence from 1846 to 1854 and, in 1847, the name was changed to the Oddfellows' Arms. It was the venue for Lodge dinners and for their charity occasions for widows and orphans. In 1856, the Oddfellows built their own hall and transferred their activities to it.
William Akersten took the licence in 1858 and changed the name to the Marine Hotel, reflecting his interests at the Port, where he had a well-known chandlery. Akersten advertised that Lloyd's Register, Marryatt's signal books, charts of New Zealand and many works of reference in nautical matters, would always be found on the table of the Captain's Room
Charles McGee took over in 1859 and the Marine Hotel was advertised to let in January 1864. George Potter, the new licencee, gave the hotel a new name the Coach and Horses. The building was replaced in stages, beginning with the Trafalgar Street frontage in 1870. This was added to in Bridge Street in 1877 and there were later extensions along Trafalgar Street. The hotel had its final change of identity in 1906, when it became the Central Hotel. It closed in December 1972 and the licence went to the new Rutherford Hotel. The building still stands. see photo

George RICHARDSON, - Golden Fleece Hotel
... The Fleece Tavern was built at the corner of Nile Street and what is now Rutherford Street in 1858. George Richardson held the licence until his death in 1869. The name changed to the Golden Fleece in the early 1860s. The hotel was the venue for Nelson Building Society meetings for many years. In May 1904 Alexander Handel advertised that he had taken the Golden Fleece, which had been thoroughly renovated and refurnished "accommodation and liquor will speak for themselves". The hotel was rebuilt in 1916. An application was granted in December that year for the Golden Fleece to carry on in temporary premises. The new building was half completed, but the contractors were experiencing difficulty in obtaining bricklayers. On the application of Mr E. Moore, the name was changed to that of the Dominion Hotel

Frederick STOCK, - Custom House Hotel
... The Customhouse Hotel was built in 1865, opposite Akersten's store at the Port. John Hitchcock was the first licensee and others included Mrs Beaver, John Gilmer and then his wife. In the early hours of 26 November 1903 the hotel was gutted by a fire, which also destroyed the Union Steamship Company's Office. Frank Dakin the landlord, his family and other occupants escaped with minor injuries, but Mr Bridle lost his bicycle

Jonathan Akrill THORNTON, - Victoria Hotel
... previously Bridge Hotel

Richard TOWNSEND, - Greyhound Inn

Joseph TRIMBLE, - Masonic Hotel
... Opposite the Commercial Hotel, on the north-east corner, stood the Masonic Hotel. Built of wood in 1850, it was destroyed by fire on 7 November 1867. It was replaced by a two storied brick building and its rather harsh appearance was softened by the later addition of stone facings. The Masonic Hotel was demolished 16 April 1955. The Bank Hotel stood next door to the Masonic in Hardy Street and was destroyed in the 1867 fire. The building was owned by Edward Everett and had been built in 1859. Originally the location of the Nelson Club, it had become an hotel in 1865

W. K. WATERS, - Geelong and Ballarat Hotel
... On the north side of Bridge Street, between Trafalgar and Collingwood Streets, were the Lord Nelson (18651872) and the Geelong & Ballarat Hotel (18651868)

John WHENT, - Prince Albert Hotel
... The Prince Albert Hotel was built in 1857, a little further along Nile Street East from its namesake. Owned by Hooper and Dodson, the first licence holder was Joseph Edwards. He was followed by G. Herwin and William Good. The Prince Albert was rebuilt in 1888, opening on 12 November of that year, and this building survives today

John WILSON, - Bush Inn

William WRIGHT, - Ship Hotel
... The Ship Hotel was licensed in 1866 by William Wright, in a building put up in 1861 and added to in 1865. It was on section 35 at the Port and later landlords included James Jacks and Joseph Moreling. The name changed to the Tasman Hotel in 1912 and the hotel closed 16 July 1966, making way for the present Tasman Tavern


COUNTRY DISTRICTS
Henry John Louis AUGARDE, - Turf Hotel, Stoke

William AUTY, - Motueka Hotel, Motueka
... The first publicans' licences were issued in Nelson in April 1842. There had been considerable public agitation to legalize a trade which had begun to flourish outside the law. Eight licences were issued and another six the following year. All were within the town, except for one at Motueka

Thomas William BENFIELD, - Star and Garter, Richmond
... Lower down Queen Street today, the Star and Garter Hotel still serves the travelling public and local people under the management of Mr Jack Pretty. The present roughcast building was built to replace the old wooden building which was demolished after being damaged by fire in 1950. The first building was sited off the roadway. A curved carriageway was a distinguishing feature of this hotel, only removed when the establishment was rebuilt, although several structural changes had been made. Mr J. R. Dodson was the owner in 1880 and onwards. Numerous landlords have served loyally over the years. Some who were there before 1900 were: 1860 R. Disher, 1865 R. Malcolm, 1867 T. W. Benfield, 1873 W. Tovey, 1886 J. Harris, 1892 Matthew Green, 18951903 J. Schroder, who was relieved by Mr Hurley and son. And so the list goes on spanning 133 years of service since George Snow conferred the name of a well known London Inn on the first hotel in Richmond

C. BLACK, - Wheat Sheaf, Richmond

Newman BOSELEY, - Bay View Hotel
... MURDER at the BAY VIEW HOTEL

John DISHER, - Spring Grove Hotel, Spring Grove

A. HUBBARD, - Elephant and Castle, Ranzau

George LYNE, - Swan Inn, Motueka

George Fairweather MOONLIGHT, - White Hart, Richmond
... Built in 1867 by George Moonlight, almost opposite the Red Horse, was the White Hart, displaying a white deer with wide spread antlers. Following George Moonlight was Mrs Kite in 1871, J. Hay 1888, Victor Granville 1889, Henry Satherley 1890, Mr Brocklebank 1898. It, too, was razed by fire and rebuilt as a boarding house. Mrs Windlebourne kept that for a number of years. John Sharp was owner in 1887. The Gladstone Park Motor Camp caretaker lives in the third building to be erected on the site

John RYAN, - Plough Inn, Richmond

H. WARREN, - Red Horse, Richmond


BILLIARD LICENSES
John DEVONPORT, - Commercial Billiard Saloon

R. DISHER, Trafalgar Hotel


The application of Adolphus DIDSON, for a license at Riwaka, was refused


PHOTO
the COACH and HORSES HOTEL
- formerly the MARINE HOTEL until 1864 -

by ngairedith Profile | Research | Contact | Subscribe | Block this user
on 2011-12-06 05:14:32

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