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ALEXANDER SMART m. Lucy SANGER & Emily ELDRIDGE PARKER

Alexander SMART was born 4 December 1835 in Kinard Castle, Farnell Parish, Angus, Scotland to William and Jane Johnston(e)SMART. He was christened 27 December 1835 in Ireland. Living siblings listed in his father's obit (8 total) James Johnston, William, John Johnston and Alexander. William and Jane's 3 sons, Walter, Frances Kerr, and Charles, and dtr Agnes B. Donald not listed.

William was born 14 April 1800 in Brechin, Angus, Scotland. As a gardener/forester for the Carnegie estate, he thought there were better opportunities in the New World. In 1856 he sailed on the "Caroline", registered in Rockland, ME, from Liverpool to Boston and established a home in Andover, Essex, MA. He was a member of the Old Free Church of Scotland and was a man whose record for integrity and fidelity gained him uniform confidence and esteem. William died in Andover, 6 January 1878. No bio info for Jane, born 13 May 1798 in Scotland (no location) and died in Andover 1 September 1855. They are buried in Andover's South Church Cemetery.

Alexander was educated in Edinburgh, Scotland, and throughout his life has manifested many of the sterling traits of his race. He began learning the machinist trade while young and worked at this for 2 years. He worked for the North British Railroad for 2 years as engineer, in the same capacity between Edinburgh and Berwick.

In 1857, he came to the US at 21 years-of-age and settled in Boston as superintendent for Stone & Smart, where his brother (no name) was a junior partner. Alex managed their machine shop until 1859, when he made his way to Davenport, Scott, IA and engaged in farming in the vicinity of the city for about 2 years.

On 15 December 1859 in Chicago, Cook, IL, Alex married Miss Lucy A. Sanger, born in Danvers, Essex, MA, dtr of the late George W. SANGER of Watertown, Middlesex, MA (no mother listed). George was a native of MA and conducted an extensive and successful business as a contractor and builder. He died when Lucy was a child (no date) Lucy SANGER SMART died 26 August 1871 of typhoid and is buried in Davenport's Oakdale Cemetery. Interment date was 15 June 1872 as the body was moved from Dallas County, IA.

Alexander moved to Whiteside County, IL, two years later and again engaged in farming for 5 years. In 1866, he went to Malcolm, Poweshiek, IA and was an agent for the Mississippi and Missouri Railroad which sold its line to the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad Company. Mr. Smart built a grain elevator and engaged in business until 1868 in Malcolm when he moved to DeSoto, Dallas, IA, terminus for the CRI&P. The line was extended to Stuart, Adair, IA, and Alex took charge of the station and continued as agent until 1887. While in Stuart, Alexander served on the school board and was interested in progressive public measures tending to promote community welfare along business and intellectual lines.

Alexander married Emily H. ELDRIDGE PARKER 17 October 1872 in Davenport, Scott, IA. She was born (no date) in 1836 in Gloucester County, NJ, dtr of John M. (MULLEN?) and Mary Ann ADAMS ELDRIDGE. Emily had 2 dtrs in Davenport with husband Dr. Wallace William PARKER who died in a railroad accident on 8 August 1868 in Ames, Story, IA: Ida Helen born 1857 (no date), married Willard B. Conger, and Anna H. born 1860 who died of typhoid on 3 September 1869.

In 1887, Alexander was employed by the Southern Pacific Railroad.

On 15 May 1888, he came to Perry, Dallas, IA and was the agent for the CRIP until 1891, living in Guthrie Center, Guthrie, IA. He then went to Des Moines, Polk, IA and bought out the Blue Line Transfer Co. He carried on business until 1894 when he sold out and organized the Bazalt (basalt?) Hardwall Plaster Co., until 1899 when he again sold out and went to Guthrie Center. Emily ELDRIDGE PARKER SMART died in Guthrie Center on 24 July 1899. He took charge of the CRIP station. The Minneapolis and St. Louis RR purchased this line and Alexander was the gent until his retirement.

He died in Zenith, King, WA on 9 January 1935 where he was living in the Masonic home. He celebrated his 99th birthday there, where he arose at 4:30 each day. His long white beard and cheery smile were familiar to everyone. He joined the Masons in 1869 and was a Shriner since 1906. He was honored as being the oldest Shriner in the world in 1935 at 99 years old. No burial info as of Oct 2014.

BAWDEN: Stephen Phelps is subject of entry in 1882 History of Davenport and Scott County, Iowa

The law has become so complex that it would be difficult for any individual to be equally at home in all departments of practice and, while a lawyer may continue in several fields, it is the tendency of the times to concentrate one's energies upon a special branch. This Stephen P. Bawden does in his attention to probate and title deed branches of law and yet he has won success in other fields and may be termed a general practitioner.

Mr. Bawden is one of Davenport's native sons and his parents were Stephen and Mary Ella (WOODWARD) BAWDEN, the former being of English parentage and the latter a native of Pennsylvania. Their removal to the west and settlement at Davenport made this city the scene of the youthful efforts and activities of S. P. BAWDEN as well as of his later years.

Having acquired his literary education in the public schools, he continued his studies in preparation for the bar and after his admission to practice in the courts of the state opened an office in Davenport, where he has since remained. His natural predilection tends him toward probate and similar departments of the law and for five years he devoted almost his entire time to those branches in the office of DAVISON & LANE. Inclination and opportunity were thus satisfied and his thoroughness and capability in this branch of the profession have won him deserved success. His two most dominant characteristics are determined persistence and thorough and honest exactness. In law and especially in real-estate law these traits are of prime importance and guarantee progress.

Mr. BAWDEN has met with good success because of these qualities and is one of the best known of the younger members of the bar in this field of practice. He enjoys the good fellowship of his brethren of the legal fraternity here and all recognize that his advancement has come as the merited and legitimate reward of his efforts and ability.

1 comment(s), latest 4 years, 8 months ago

PHELPS: James Francis, s/o Elihu and Margaret CRUIKSHANKS, m Lucinda TYRRELL and Jennett FINCH, farmer and lumberman

The history of Davenport and its leading citizens contains no name which awakens a feeling of more sincere respect and honest regard than that of James Francis PHELPS, who, in the years of his connection with the city, came to be recognized as an influential factor in business circles and also as one whose efforts in other directions were of far-reaching and beneficial import.

He was born October 6, 1821, at Schroon, Essex, New York. The public school system of that state afforded him his educational privileges and his experiences in youth were those of agricultural life, for he remained upon his father's farm until thirty years of age. Thinking to find broader opportunities in different business lines, he then removed to West Troy and engaged in the lumber business. From that time until his death he was identified with the lumber trade save for a brief period. He continued to make his home in the Empire state until 1876, when he removed to Middlebury, Vermont, settling on a farm with the hope that the experiences of outdoor life might prove beneficial to his health, which had become impaired. The year 1885 witnessed his arrival in Davenport, where he retained his residence until his demise. Since first embarking in the lumber business he retained his interest in the business and became a prominent representative of the lumber trade in this section of the country. He was a leading stockholder in the Lindsey & PHELPS Lumber Company and also in the Cloquet Lumber Company of Cloquet, Minnesota. In business affairs his judgment was sound, his sagacity keen and his enterprise unfailing, and in the years of an active career he won substantial success, his record being that of a man whose course in business affairs measured up at all times to the full standard of honorable, upright manhood.

At Schroon, New York, in 1848, Mr. PHELPS was united in marriage to Miss Lucinda TYRRELL, and unto them was born a son, A. T. PHELPS, who is now Cashier of the National Bank of Watervliet, New York. The wife and mother
died April 5, 1853, and on the 20th of December, 1854, Mr. PHELPS married Miss Jeanette FINCH. Oakdale Cemetery records it as Jennette.

Mr. PHELPS attended and supported the Methodist church. He was a man of high ideals, progressive in citizenship and ready at all times to give loyal support to those projects and movements which are intended for the betterment of the community. He traveled extensively, finding great pleasure in visiting points of scenic and historic interest, especially in his own country. His attachment for America was one of the deep-rooted interests of his life, his love of country being the expression of an unfaltering patriotism.

He continued his residence in Davenport until his death, which occurred April 3, 1906, and was the occasion of deep regret to many who knew and honored him. The physical and moral life were intensely vital in him and the ringing response which his character gave to every test made him a man honored and respected wherever known and most of all where best known. While he won for himself a substantial and creditable position in business circles, he also applied his knowledge and working powers to wider and more impersonal interests in which the general public was largely the beneficiary.

1 comment(s), latest 4 years, 8 months ago

ILES: Mary Louise, m. Wm. GANSERT owner of GANSERT Candy Company - one of largest in Midwest (US)

Mary Louise ILES was the g-dtr of Stephen and Mary TERRILL BAWDEN, and dtr of John and Mary TERRILL BAWDEN ILES born 25 Nov 1871 in Davenport, Scott, Iowa.

She married William Louis/Lewis GANSERT, 13 May 1895 in Davenport's Trinity Episcopal Cathedral.

William was born 31 July 1865 in Rock Island, Rock Island, Illinois, son of John G. or Gustav John and Susan M. (maiden unk) GANSERT.

Until shortly after 1900, Mary and William lived in their home with her father, John ILES on E. 13th St. in Davenport; after that, the GANSERT family moved to their own home in Rock Island, Illinois.

In 1891 Wm founded the GANSERT Candy Company in Rock Island which, according to Mr. GANSERT's obit, developed into one of the largest candy factories in the Midwest (United States).

Wm died 22 Apr 1919 of Oster sarcoma in the family home at 807 22nd St in Rock Island, and is buried on the ILES-GANSERT lot in Davenport's Oakdale Cemetery.

He and his family were members of Trinity Episcopal Church in Rock Island. Mary lived in the family home on 22nd St, with her oldest child William ILES GANSERT until 1923 when she moved to Davenport.

In 1925, Mary moved to San Francisco. She died 26 May 1964 in Napa, Napa, California. (California Death Index)

They had 2 children born in Davenport:
1. William Iles Gansert born 13 Jul 1896
2. George B. Gansert born 25 Sept 1897; died 25 Apr 1898 in Davenport.

The home on 22nd St. in Rock Island is now part of the Broadway Historic Association. It was built by Paul Hamilton, a bookkeeper who worked in the downtown firm of Mitchell and Lynde. Information from the association says Mr. Gansert's wholesale firm advertised an odd combination of 'candies, tobacco, oysters and celery' at it's 18th St. store. In the 1940s, the home was converted into a duplex, though owners in recent years have reversed those changes and it is now a private family home. [Association newspaper article]

1 comment(s), latest 4 years, 10 months ago

BAWDEN: George Washington, 7th child of Stephen and Mary TERRILL m. Jennie ELDRIDGE, has 3 "BAWDEN Brothers", alderman, mayor candidate, active in local corporations

George was born 9 May 1859 in Norristown, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, where his father emigrated to run his mining manufacturing business, Sawanee Mining. The family moved to Rockingham Township, Scott, Iowa in Sept. 1860, where Stephen's first land purchase is dated 1 Sept. 1860.

He attended Davenport public schools and graduated from the University of Iowa Law School in 1880 (Iowa City, Johnson, Iowa]. After the death of his father in 1881, George and his mother, Jennie ELDRIDGE BAWDEN moved to Davenport to live with George's sibling, widowed Mary BAWDEN ILES at 614 E. 13th St. (still stands).

George joined the law firm of Judge GRANT. Later he joined C. A. FICKE for 2 years.

On 14 Mar 1885, George married 19-year-old Jennie in her family home at 1530 Farnam. Jennie was born 15 July 1865 on the outskirts of Davenport on a Jersey Ridge Rd. fruit farm where all 9 children were born. She was the dtr of Jacob MULLEN and Mary HIGH WILLIAMS ELDRIDGE, early settlers of Davenport.

For the next 12 years, the BAWDENs made there home in Muscatine, Muscatine, Iowa where George practiced law with Allen BROOMHALL. In 1886 he became vice president of the Iowa Mortgage Co., of which uncle J.B. PHELPS was president.

In 1895 George returned to Davenport to form a partnership with Julius LISCHER. Nephew Stephen PHELPS BAWDEN joined the firm after 1895 graduation from University of Iowa Law School. In 1901 Fred W. NEAL joined the firm which dissolved in 1902 at LISCHER's death. George next formed the firm of BAWDEN and THUENEN. Henry THUENEN became junior partner.

Also in 1895, Jennie's father gave George and Jennie 80 ft. of land on Kirkwood Boulevard to build a home...now 511 Kirkwood Blvd.

George was an active member of the Republican Party and was prominent in Davenport politics. He was elected to 2 terms as 5th ward alderman (he declined a 3rd term, as well as the nomination for mayoral candidate). He was vice president and counsel for the Iowa and Illinois Railroad at the time of the building of the interurban line between Davenport and Clinton, Iowa. In 1902, GEorge became a stockholder and president of the Times Corporation which published the Daily Times newspaper under teh direction of E. P. (Phil) ADLER
George was Chancellor Commander of the Knights of Pythias and a member of the Davenport Turner Society.

He suffered from diabetes. In the Spring of 1905, he went to Excelsior Springs, Lafayette, Missouri to regain health where he died 23 March 1905 (see obit blog) at age 46. AFter George's death, Jennie and their 3 sons, Albert Ralph (A.R.), George Ray (Ray) and Harry ELDRIDGE lived in this home until 1911. They later lived at 1203 E. Second Avenue (9th St.) with Jennie's nephew's wife, Edna BAWDEN, (Stephen Douglas). Jennie lived there until 1928.

Jennie died 1 April 1959 in the DAvenport home of her daughter-in-law, AR's wife, Margaret Theresa HART BAWDEN ("Tess} at 29 Edgehill Terrace. Jennie was a member of the First Presbyterian Church at Kirkwood and Iowa [mother Mary was the first of this family to join]. Jennie and the boys rented pew #32 for 25 cents over and above the weekly tithing. She servied 2 terms as president of the Ladie's Society. Both she and George are buried in Davenport's Oakdale Cemetery with her parents.

Their 3 sons, all born in Muscatine, Muscatine, Iowa (seperate blogs for each)
1. Albert Ralph "A.R." born 6 Aug 1886
2. George Ray "Ray" born 27 Nov 1890
3. Harry ELDRIDGE born 8 Sept 1894