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SALDIVAR - LEUDERS

I have an original photo from the (now) Quad-City Times, pub date unk, poss. '40s, of Victor "Nino" SALDIVAR in a quarter-final Golden Gloves (heavyweight) match.

Victor was from Paul's Recreation Gym in Davenport, Scott, Iowa, and he was shown with Dwayne LEUDERS, a novice heavyweight, going down for the count. This photo also hangs in Iowa City, either the municipal library or the university library. The name SALDIVAR was misprinted as SALVIDAR.

If you'd like a copy, just email me.

LEAKE, Joseph Bloomfield: 20th Iowa Infantry, Lawyer, Iowa Legislator, dies on streets of Chicago

Joseph Bloomfield LEAKE was born in Deerfield, Cumberland, New Jersey 1 Apr 1828. My family moved to Ohio where I graduated from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, in 1846. I became a lawyer in 1850 and moved to Iowa about 6 years later where I became a member of the Iowa Legislature.

During the Civil War, I put my political career on hold, stepped down from the legislature and enlisted in the Union Army. I was put into the 20th Iowa Infantry, becoming a lieutenant colonel when the regiment came into being in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. The 20th Iowa saw action in Vicksburg, Mississippi, among others. In 1863 I was wounded and captured by Confederate forces in Louisiana.

I was sent to a camp in Texas where I was the highest-ranked officer. In spite of conditions, I struggled to take care of my fellow Union prisoners until I was exchanged the following year. I returned to the 20th Iowa and continued to fight with them in Alabama. In 1865, I was promoted to Brigadier General, making me one of the youngest Brig. Generals in the state. The same year, the 20th Iowa mustered out of service and I returned home to Davenport and was elected into the Iowa Senate for the 11th General Assembly.

In 1871 I moved to Chicago where I continued my law practice. Between 1879-1884, I served as the U.S. District Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois which included Chicago. I was later the lawyer for the Chicago Board of Education from 1887-1891.

I never really left the Army. The Union Army and the 20th Iowa continued to be a part of my life. I was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic in Chicago and would often travel back to Iowa to attend reunions.

I continued to practice law into my 80s and earned the distinction of being the oldest member of the Chicago bar. On 1 June 1913, I passed away on Cass Street in Chicago, the city that I had served for so long. I was buried in Davenport's Oakdale Cemetery.

This was a script for Oakdale's bi-annual cemetery walk where noted people are portrayed by volunteers who create the character and dress in period clothing at the gravesites. (See Find-a-Grave - death date and marker photos).


3 comment(s), latest 1 month, 1 week ago

PRICE: Hirum / Hiram, railroad advocate, bank president, paymaster general for State of Iowa, Iowa Temperance Society organizer, Commissioner of Indian Affairs [Pres. Hayes].

I was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, 10 Jan 1814, and first employed as a dry goods clerk, later as chief clerk of an iron works. At about the age of 20, I married Susan BETTS (no info). We moved to Davenport, Scott, Iowa, and I again settled into the mercantile business.

In 1847, I was elected first School Fund Commissioner of Scott County and kept the office for 9 years. The following year, I was elected Recorder and Treasurer of Scott County, serving for 7 years. For most of the 1850s, I served as alderman of Davenport. At this time I was able to retire and dedicate my life to public service.

I had a mind for improvment of society and commerce, and was an extreme advocate of the temperance movement, organizing a chapter of the temperance society - The Grand Division of the Sons of Temperance for the State of Iowa. For many years, I served as a representative to the National Division of North America as well as head of the local chapter.

A firm believer in building railroads, I became one of the first people to advocate a railroad from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic Ocean. I served as Secretary for the Mississippi and Missouri Railroad Company, formed in Davenport, and was responsible for building the first railroad bridge across the Mississippi River in Davenport.

Starting with its second year of operation, I served as the president of the Bank of Iowa, a state-run bank. By the time it closed, all investors received every dime back.

During the Civil War, I acted as Paymaster General for the State of Iowa, responsible for paying all of Iowa's soldiers. Iowa didn't have enough money to take care of all of its soldiers so I paid for upwards of 5000 men out of my own pocket. When Camp McClellan in Davenport ran out of bread because the baker could not afford to make it, I paid for it. I saw fit to put myself in harm's way and personally took the pay owed to some of the soldiers to Missouri and made sure they received their money.

After the war, I served as Commissioner of Indian Affairs under Pres. Rutherford B. HAYES [Find-a-Grave says GARFIELD] and would eventually become a member of Congress twice.

I died 30 May 1901 [no location]. I am buried in Davenport, Scott, Iowa's Oakdale Memorial Gardens. Marker says HIRAM.

This is a script for Oakdale's semi-annual cemetery walk where notable citizens are characterized by volunteers in period clothing at each grave site. [see Oakdale website]


SANDERS: Addison Hiatt b. Cincinnati, OH comes to Davenport, Scott, IA, becomes newspaper editor, Commish of Camp McClellan, Lieutenant Colonel, Brevet Brigadier General, Postmaster Acting Governor,

I was born in Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, 12 Sept 1823, and trained as a printer. I plied my trade in Davenport twice in 1845 and 1846 before moving here. I came to help my brother Alfred keep his newspaper running, the Gazette. I took over editorial duties so he could focus on the business end. By the end of 1856, Davenport had grown large enough to sustain a daily paper, and I decided to settle permanently, becoming the editor of the Daily Davenport Gazette. I married Amelia BARROWS, dtr of prominent local doctor, E. S. BARROWS, and they both rest beside me in Davenport's Oakdale Memorial Gardens aka Oakdale Cemetery.

I received a commission in the Union Army as an aide to Samuel KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa. I was next appointed commissioner of Camp McClellan, near the Village of East Davenport, one of several mustering locations and the primary location for military encampments west of the Mississippi River. Here the multitude of volunteers who had signed up to fight against the South were trained and organized into military units.

In 1862, the 16th Iowa Infantry was formed. Gov. KIRKWOOD asked me to become its commander, an offer which I respectfully declined. I had seen poorly qualified individuals put in command and I would rather a trained officer be placed in charge. This impressed Gov. KIRKWOOD and he granted my wish, placing Capt. Alexander CHAMBERS as colonel. They appointed me lieutenant colonel.

The 16th Iowa first saw combat at Shiloh, one of the largest battles of the early Civil War and one of the Union's few successes [Apr 6-7, Shiloh, TN]. The regiment was reinforcements arriving on the second day - we could hear the sounds of fighting from the front line when we landed at Pittsburgh Landing. We fought at the Battle of Corinth in Mississippi where I was severely wounded. I was taken prisoner by the Confederates during the Battle of Atlanta. While in prison, I suffered starvation and sickness, and recovered after the prisoner exchange. I was promoted to Brevet Brigadier General and I was discharged in 1865 for disability.

I returned to Davenport and served the City as postmaster. In 1870, I accepted an appointment as Secretary of Montana Territory and later became the acting governor and Registrar of the United States Land Office in Montana. After my time in the West, I retired to Davenport.

In my later years, I was run overy by a horse team in West Davenport and decided to convalesce at the Iowa Soldiers Home in Marshalltown, Iowa. I passed away there 7 Nov 1912. My body was returned to Davenport to be buried.

This script was used in Oakdale's bi-annual cemetery walk where volunteers portray noted citizens as if they still exist at each gravesite. (see website)


WILLIAMS: Doris Lucille marries John Iles GANSERT in Inyokern, Pasadena, California, becomes dir. of Kansas City, MO Hospital Medical Clinic

Obit:
Doris W. GANSERT, 65, Prairie Village, a former laboratory director for a Kansas City hospital, died 23 Sept 1988 at Trinity Lutheran Hospital.

Mrs. Gansert worked for Trinity Lutheran Hospital 31 years and retired as administrative director of the hospital laboratory in July 1988. The School of Medical Technology at the hospital was named for her when she retired.

She was born in Ottumwa, Iowa, and lived in the Kansas City area most of her life. {Obit says Springfield, Illinois}

Survivors include 2 brothers, Robert E. WILLIAMS, Ottumwa, Iowa, and John B. WILLIAMS, Omaha, Douglas, Nebraska. The body was cremated. (no burial information). The family suggests contributions to the Missouri Repertory Theater or the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

Doris was the wife of John ILES GANSERT (see sep. blog), born 5 Apr 1921 in Rock Island, Rock Island, Illinois. Both were graduates of Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa. son of William ILES and Helen DETJENS GANSERT. She was the dtr of John B. WILLIAMS of Ottumwa, Iowa.

1 comment(s), latest 5 years ago

BAWDEN: Stephen Phelps is subject of entry in 1882 History of Davenport and Scott County, Iowa

The law has become so complex that it would be difficult for any individual to be equally at home in all departments of practice and, while a lawyer may continue in several fields, it is the tendency of the times to concentrate one's energies upon a special branch. This Stephen P. Bawden does in his attention to probate and title deed branches of law and yet he has won success in other fields and may be termed a general practitioner.

Mr. Bawden is one of Davenport's native sons and his parents were Stephen and Mary Ella (WOODWARD) BAWDEN, the former being of English parentage and the latter a native of Pennsylvania. Their removal to the west and settlement at Davenport made this city the scene of the youthful efforts and activities of S. P. BAWDEN as well as of his later years.

Having acquired his literary education in the public schools, he continued his studies in preparation for the bar and after his admission to practice in the courts of the state opened an office in Davenport, where he has since remained. His natural predilection tends him toward probate and similar departments of the law and for five years he devoted almost his entire time to those branches in the office of DAVISON & LANE. Inclination and opportunity were thus satisfied and his thoroughness and capability in this branch of the profession have won him deserved success. His two most dominant characteristics are determined persistence and thorough and honest exactness. In law and especially in real-estate law these traits are of prime importance and guarantee progress.

Mr. BAWDEN has met with good success because of these qualities and is one of the best known of the younger members of the bar in this field of practice. He enjoys the good fellowship of his brethren of the legal fraternity here and all recognize that his advancement has come as the merited and legitimate reward of his efforts and ability.

1 comment(s), latest 5 years, 1 month ago

PHELPS FAMILY HISTORY: Israel b 3 Apr 1681 in Westfield, Hampden, MA, m. Rachel JONES (no info)

I. Israel PHELPS b 3 Apr 1681 in Westfield, Hampden, Massachusetts; m 7 Mar 1703 Enfield, Hartford, Connecticut to Rachel JONES (no info) Israel died 16 Apr 1713 in Enfield

[Israel's older brother John PHELPS (jr) b 8 Dec 1779 in Colebrook, d Oct 1839 Granville, Licking, Ohio]

A. Israel's son David PHELPS b 25 Aug 1716 in Enfield, m. 29 Mar 1737 in Enfield, Margaret COLTON, dtr of Josiah COLTON (no mother), Josiah was born 30 Dec 1685 in Longmeadow, Hampden, Massachusetts. m. Margaret PEASE {no info), 6 Jan 1706 in Enfield. David died 13 Jan 1803 in Enfield.
1. David's son John PHELPS b 11 Feb 1756 in Colebrook, Litchfield, Connecticut, m. Anna BAKER on 22 Mar 1779 in Colebrook, who was born 23 Apr 1738 Colebrook. John d 13 Oct 1841 in Colebrook; Anna d 4 Apr 1797 in Colebrook.

John's son Elihu PHELPS b 10 Apr 1782 in Colebrook, m. 19 Aug 1816 in Schroon [River?], Essex, New York Margaret CROOKSHANKS/CRUIKSHANKS (var sp) who was born 1795 (no date) in Salem, Washington, New York (no death date), Elihu died 7 Dec 1856 in Schroon.
1. Rensselaer (Female) b 19 Apr 1818 Schroon, Essex, New York; d 27 Apr 1857 - no spouse info
2. Orin J. b 29 Nov 1819, Schroon, no death date, Essex, NY, m. Jane MAYNARD, Jane POWELL 5 Oct 1853 Schroon.
3. James Francis b 6 Oct 1821, Schroon d 3 Apr 1906 in home 1223 3rd Ave., Davenport, Scott, Iowa, bur. Oakdale Memorial Gardens, aka Oakdale Cemetery, Davenport, m. 1. Lucinda TYRRELL b 1828 m. 1848 (no date) in Schroon, 2. Jennett FINCH b 5 Jun 1829, m. 20 Dec 1854.
4. Sanford b 26 Aug 1823 Schroon, d 31 Oct 1842 Schroon
5. Anna b 6 Jul 1825 Schroon d 4 May 1882 Schroon m. 18 Apr 1844, N. Hudson, Essex, New York, Daniel WYMAN b 6 Apr 1816 (no info)
6. Elizabeth b 25 Aug 1827 Schroon m. 12 Apr 1849 Schroon, Pelopidas POTTER b 26 Oct 1820. No death info for Liz.
7. Margaret b 11 Feb 1830 Schroon, m. 10 Feb 1847 Crown Point, Essex, NY, Calvin Walker HEUSTIS b 1817 (no date), no dod for Margaret.
8. Mary Helen b 31 Jan 1832, Schroon, d 22 Oct 1912, Davenport Scott, Iowa bur. Oakdale, m. 8 Jul 1859 Schroon River, Essex, NY, James Edwin LINDSAY b 12 Apr 1826 (see sep blog), Lindsay died 13 Oct 1915 in Schroon?? or Davenport, Scott, Iowa
9. Emily b 19 Jun 1834 Schroon, m. 9 May 1859, Schroon, Darius Jacobs RICHARDS, no dod for Emily
10. Amelia b 29 Aug 1837 Schroon, d 29 May 1919 New Rochelle, New York, m. Hawley Silas HEPBURN b 2 Mar 1840
11. John Baker (J.B.) b 19 May 1840 Schroon m. 20 May 1889 Davenport, Cornelia Rebecca WOODWARD ("Cornie")
b Jan 1864 in double ceremony with sister Mary Ella "Ella" WOODWARD and Stephen Douglas BAWDEN in the Woodward
home in Rockingham Twp, Scott, Iowa, dtrs of Benjamin Beckwith and Elizabeth Evans MORGAN WOODWARD. JB died of heart attck 16 Jul 1900 in Davenport. Bur Oakdale. This writer's link thru Stephen BAWDEN.
12. Eunice Ellen b 30 Sept 1843 Schroon, d 17 Jun 1928, Davenport; m. Major Eugene B. HAYWARD on 7 Apr 1864 in Schroon while Eugene was on a brief furlough. He was born 25 Oct 1842 in Essex County, New York. He died 3 Feb 1927 Davenport. 1 son Elmer Leland b 26 May 1866 in Port Henry, Essex, New York and 1 dtr Ellen Imogen b 1877 (no date).
13. Charles b 1855 no date, Schroon, no other information.

1 comment(s), latest 5 years, 1 month ago

PHELPS: James Francis, s/o Elihu and Margaret CRUIKSHANKS, m Lucinda TYRRELL and Jennett FINCH, farmer and lumberman

The history of Davenport and its leading citizens contains no name which awakens a feeling of more sincere respect and honest regard than that of James Francis PHELPS, who, in the years of his connection with the city, came to be recognized as an influential factor in business circles and also as one whose efforts in other directions were of far-reaching and beneficial import.

He was born October 6, 1821, at Schroon, Essex, New York. The public school system of that state afforded him his educational privileges and his experiences in youth were those of agricultural life, for he remained upon his father's farm until thirty years of age. Thinking to find broader opportunities in different business lines, he then removed to West Troy and engaged in the lumber business. From that time until his death he was identified with the lumber trade save for a brief period. He continued to make his home in the Empire state until 1876, when he removed to Middlebury, Vermont, settling on a farm with the hope that the experiences of outdoor life might prove beneficial to his health, which had become impaired. The year 1885 witnessed his arrival in Davenport, where he retained his residence until his demise. Since first embarking in the lumber business he retained his interest in the business and became a prominent representative of the lumber trade in this section of the country. He was a leading stockholder in the Lindsey & PHELPS Lumber Company and also in the Cloquet Lumber Company of Cloquet, Minnesota. In business affairs his judgment was sound, his sagacity keen and his enterprise unfailing, and in the years of an active career he won substantial success, his record being that of a man whose course in business affairs measured up at all times to the full standard of honorable, upright manhood.

At Schroon, New York, in 1848, Mr. PHELPS was united in marriage to Miss Lucinda TYRRELL, and unto them was born a son, A. T. PHELPS, who is now Cashier of the National Bank of Watervliet, New York. The wife and mother
died April 5, 1853, and on the 20th of December, 1854, Mr. PHELPS married Miss Jeanette FINCH. Oakdale Cemetery records it as Jennette.

Mr. PHELPS attended and supported the Methodist church. He was a man of high ideals, progressive in citizenship and ready at all times to give loyal support to those projects and movements which are intended for the betterment of the community. He traveled extensively, finding great pleasure in visiting points of scenic and historic interest, especially in his own country. His attachment for America was one of the deep-rooted interests of his life, his love of country being the expression of an unfaltering patriotism.

He continued his residence in Davenport until his death, which occurred April 3, 1906, and was the occasion of deep regret to many who knew and honored him. The physical and moral life were intensely vital in him and the ringing response which his character gave to every test made him a man honored and respected wherever known and most of all where best known. While he won for himself a substantial and creditable position in business circles, he also applied his knowledge and working powers to wider and more impersonal interests in which the general public was largely the beneficiary.

1 comment(s), latest 5 years ago