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LIPPINCOTT LINEAGE - #3 James LIPPINCOTT & Anna EAVES in 1687 (Restore's son) to Micajah LIPPINCOTT in 1764 - father of Rebecca LIPPINCOTT who married Duncan Campbell ELDRIDGE in 1829

Restore LIPPINCOTT was born 4th child of Richard and Abigail GOODY LIPPINCOTT on 3 Jul 1653 in Plymouth, England and died 20 Jul 1741 in Burlington County, NJ. He married Hannah SHATTUCK 1674 in Monmouth County, NJ, dtr of William SHATTUCK/OCK. She was born ca 1654 in MA and died in Burlington County, NJ.

Restore/Restoration married Martha SHINN after 1727 (no issue noted)

Children of Restore LIPPINCOTT and Hannah SHATTUCK/OCK:
1. Samuel LIPPINCOTT b 12 Sep 1675
2. Abigail LIPPINCOTT b 16 Feb 1676/77
3. Hannah LIPPINCOTT b 15 Nov 1679
4. Hope LIPPINCOTT b 1681 (no date)
5. Rebecca LIPPINCOTT b 24 Nov 1684
6. James LIPPINCOTT b 11 Jun 1687 in Shrewsbury, Monmouth, NJ; died 11 Jun 1760 in Burlington County, NJ; married Anna EVES ca 1709 in Burlington County, NJ. Anna was dtr of Thomas EVES and Anna/Hannah ???. born 1689 in Burlington County, NJ and died 1773 in Burlington County.
7. Elizabeth LIPPINCOTT b 15 Mar 1689/90
8. Jacob LIPPINCOTT b 1692 (no date)
9. Rachel LIPPINCOTT b 8 Jan 1694/95

Children of James LIPPINCOTT and Anna EVES:
1. John LIPPINCOTT b 1710
2. Increase LIPPINCOTT b 1716
3. Daniel LIPPINCOTT b ca 1714 in Burlington County, NJ and died ca 1776 in Burlington County. Daniel married Hannah CRISPIN first, then Elizabeth PIMM, dtr of John PIMM and Mary ???.
4. Rachel LIPPINCOTT b 1718
5. James LIPPINCOTT b 1722
6. Jonathan LIPPINCOTT b 1724
7. Anna LIPPINCOTT b 1726
8. Moses LIPPINCOTT b 1728
9. Jerusha LIPPINCOTT b 1730
10. Aaron LIPPINCOTT b 1733

Children of Daniel LIPPINCOTT and Elizabeth PIMM:
1. John LIPPINCOTT b 1 Oct 1744
2. Sarah LIPPINCOTT b ca 1746
3. Lydia LIPPINCOTT b ca 1750
4. James LIPPINCOTT b ca 1752 in Burlington County, NJ and died in Burlington County.
5. Rachel LIPPINCOTT b ca 1754
6. Anna LIPPINCOTT b ca 1756
7. Daniel LIPPINCOTT b ca 1758
8. Benjamin LIPPINCOTT b ca 1760
9. Levi LIPPINCOTT b ca 1760 (twins?)
10. Jonathan LIPPINCOTT b ca 1762
11. Micajah LIPPINCOTT b ca 1764. #64 in my ahnentafel. Father of Rebecca who married Duncan Campbell ELDRIDGE

In my ELDRIDGE-BAWDEN Families gene study (see below), I have allied families who married LIPPINCOTTS. I don't have the lineage for these names.
A. Wallace LIPPINCOTT Junior of Waterford, Gloucester Co., NJ who bought land from Duncan ELDRIDGE 14 Dec 1824.
b. Bathsheba MATLACK/LOCK 7th child of John and Mary HANCOCK MATLACK, married Ezekiel LIPPINCOTT (no other info)
c. Anna MATLACK/LOCK first child of John MATLACK Jr (son of above) m. John LIPPINCOTT (no other info)

1 comment(s), latest 4 years, 3 months ago

LIPPINCOTT LINEAGE - Each Line Posted Numerically - #1. Edward LIPPINCOTT in 1541 to Richard LIPPINCOTT in 1615.

My LIPPINCOTT line starts with Rebecca LIPPINCOTT, 2nd wife of Duncan Campbell ELDRIDGE. I don't have any of her siblings, so this is also a query. My reference begins in Duncan's bio - Duncan and Rebecca met probably in Haddonfield, NJ, as 'they were childhood friends'. married in Cincinnati, Hamilton, OH on 4 November 1829.

Rebecca was born 23 January 1807 in Haddonfield, dtr of Micajah and Sarah ROBERTS LIPPINCOTT. I have no ROBERTS BMD or lineage either. I have a photo of Rebecca. Email me and I'll send it.

Duncan was married to Rachel BROWN(E) on 8 Jan 1823 in Haddonfield. In 1824 they moved to Rochester, Monroe, NY. She died in 1827 after 18 mos. of marriage and 3 children. Only 1st child Jacob survived who is my 3g-grandfather. My reference says Rachel was possibly a descendant of Henery [yes sp] BROWNE of Mansfield Twp, Burlington, NJ. He may/may not have been her father.

I. Edward LIPPINCOTT b 1541 (no date, place, or other info except son Bartholomew).
A. Bartholomew LIPPINCOTT b 1567 (no date) in Sydbury/Sodbury/Sudbury, Devon, England, married Alice (no maiden) who was born 1571 in Sydbury. She died before 27 Mar 1635 in England. He died after Jan 1632 in East Wood (Eastwood?), Biddleford, Devon, England.
1. Anthony LIPPINCOTT b 4 Nov 1503 in Sydbury m. Margery/Katherine WEARE b 1595 Tregony, Cornwall, England. Anthony died 8 Jan 1619 in Biddleford. Margery also died in England (no date, place). No issue listed except Richard.
a. Richard LIPPINCOTT b 15 Mar 1615 in Stonehouse, Plymouth, Devon(shire), England m. Abigail GOODY 14 Oct 1640 in Roxbury, Suffolk, MA b ca 1621, Northumberland, England, d 2 Jun 1667 Shrewsbury, Monmouth, NJ. She signed a will on 5 Jun 1697 in Shrewsbury. She was buried on 5 Jun 1697 in Friends Burial Ground, Monmouth, NJ. Richard d. 25 Nov 1683 in Monmouth County, NJ.

Children of Richard LIPPINCOTT and Abigail GOODY:
1. Remembrance LIPPINCOTT (male) b 19 Sep 1641 (no location)
2. John LIPPINCOTT b 6 Nov 1644 (no location)
3. Abigail LIPPINCOTT b 17 Jan 1645/46 (no location)
4. Freedom LIPPINCOTT (male) b 1 Sep 1655 Stonehouse Parish, Plymouth, Devon, England; name chosen 'in commemoration of father's release from prison in Exeter' for siding with the Quakers. Freedom married Mary CURTIS b 1655 in Burlington, NJ, d 1697 in Burlington. Btw 1680-97, he was a tanner and blacksmith in Bridgeborough, Burlington, NJ. d 15 Jun 1687 in Willingboro, Burlington, NJ by lightning strike while shoeing a horse.
Freedom's 2nd son, Thomas LIPPINCOTT, was born 28 Dec 1686 in Shrewsbury, Monmouth, NJ. (no other issue listed for Freedom and Mary). Thomas married Mary HAINES on 19 Dec 1711 in Newton, Gloucester(Sussex), NJ. Mary was born 20 Apr 1693 in Evesham Twp, Burlington, NJ, She died 1729 in Evesham/Cinnaminson. He was a member of the Society of Friends (Quaker) btw 1704-1759 in Burlington, NJ. He purchased 1,034-acres extending from Pennsauken River to Swedes Run, joining the No-se-ne-men-si-on Native American tract. He built his first house in 1711. On the northern border lies the village of Westfield.
The Friends Meeting House was erected in 1800 in Thomas' western field. The first and subsequent meeting of Friends in this district (Cinnaminson) was held in Thomas LIPPINCOTT's house until 1800. He signed a will on 23 May 1755 in Chester Twp, (Newton), Burlington, NJ. Thomas died 5 Nov 1757 in Chester. He was an active and useful citizen.
5. Restore/Restoration LIPPINCOTT (male) b 3 July 3 Jul 1653 Plymouth, England d 20 Jul 1741 Burlington County, NJ; married Hannah SHATTUCK/SHATTOCK 1674 Monmouth County, NJ, dtr of William SHATTUCK (no mother) b ca 1654 in MA, died in Burlington County, NJ. Restore LIPPINCOTT m. Martha SHINN after 1727 (no other info, no issue noted).

Children of Restore LIPPINCOTT and Hannah SHATTUCK
a. Samuel LIPPINCOTT b 12 Sep 1675 (no location for following)
b. Abigail LIPPINCOTT b 16 Feb 1676/77
c. Hannah LIPPINCOTT b 15 Nov 1679
d. Hope LIPPINCOTT b 1681 (no date)
e. Rebecca LIPPINCOTT b 24 Nov 1684
f. James LIPPINCOTT b 11 Jun 1687 Shrewsbury, Monmouth, NJ, d 11 Jun 1760 Burlington County, NJ
g. Elizabeth LIPPINCOTT b 15 Mar 1689/90
h. Jacob LIPPINCOTT b 1692 (no date)
i. Rachel LIPPINCOTT b 8 Jan 1694/95
6. Increase LIPPINCOTT (female) b 5 Dec 1657 (no location)
7. Jacob LIPPINCOTT b 11 May 1660 (no location)
8. Preserved LIPPINCOTT (male) b 25 Feb 1662/63 (no location)

In my ELDRIDGE-BAWDEN Families gene study (see below), I have allied families who married LIPPINCOTTS. I don't have the lineage for these names.
A. Wallace LIPPINCOTT Junior of Waterford, Gloucester Co., NJ who bought land from Duncan ELDRIDGE 14 Dec 1824.
b. Bathsheba MATLACK/LOCK 7th child of John and Mary HANCOCK MATLACK, married Ezekiel LIPPINCOTT (no other info)
c. Anna MATLACK/LOCK first child of John MATLACK Jr (son of above) m. John LIPPINCOTT (no other info)

1 comment(s), latest 4 years, 3 months ago

SALDIVAR - LEUDERS

I have an original photo from the (now) Quad-City Times, pub date unk, poss. '40s, of Victor "Nino" SALDIVAR in a quarter-final Golden Gloves (heavyweight) match.

Victor was from Paul's Recreation Gym in Davenport, Scott, Iowa, and he was shown with Dwayne LEUDERS, a novice heavyweight, going down for the count. This photo also hangs in Iowa City, either the municipal library or the university library. The name SALDIVAR was misprinted as SALVIDAR.

If you'd like a copy, just email me.

LEAKE, Joseph Bloomfield: 20th Iowa Infantry, Lawyer, Iowa Legislator, dies on streets of Chicago

Joseph Bloomfield LEAKE was born in Deerfield, Cumberland, New Jersey 1 Apr 1828. My family moved to Ohio where I graduated from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, in 1846. I became a lawyer in 1850 and moved to Iowa about 6 years later where I became a member of the Iowa Legislature.

During the Civil War, I put my political career on hold, stepped down from the legislature and enlisted in the Union Army. I was put into the 20th Iowa Infantry, becoming a lieutenant colonel when the regiment came into being in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. The 20th Iowa saw action in Vicksburg, Mississippi, among others. In 1863 I was wounded and captured by Confederate forces in Louisiana.

I was sent to a camp in Texas where I was the highest-ranked officer. In spite of conditions, I struggled to take care of my fellow Union prisoners until I was exchanged the following year. I returned to the 20th Iowa and continued to fight with them in Alabama. In 1865, I was promoted to Brigadier General, making me one of the youngest Brig. Generals in the state. The same year, the 20th Iowa mustered out of service and I returned home to Davenport and was elected into the Iowa Senate for the 11th General Assembly.

In 1871 I moved to Chicago where I continued my law practice. Between 1879-1884, I served as the U.S. District Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois which included Chicago. I was later the lawyer for the Chicago Board of Education from 1887-1891.

I never really left the Army. The Union Army and the 20th Iowa continued to be a part of my life. I was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic in Chicago and would often travel back to Iowa to attend reunions.

I continued to practice law into my 80s and earned the distinction of being the oldest member of the Chicago bar. On 1 June 1913, I passed away on Cass Street in Chicago, the city that I had served for so long. I was buried in Davenport's Oakdale Cemetery.

This was a script for Oakdale's bi-annual cemetery walk where noted people are portrayed by volunteers who create the character and dress in period clothing at the gravesites. (See Find-a-Grave - death date and marker photos).


3 comment(s), latest 3 months, 1 week ago

PRICE: Hirum / Hiram, railroad advocate, bank president, paymaster general for State of Iowa, Iowa Temperance Society organizer, Commissioner of Indian Affairs [Pres. Hayes].

I was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, 10 Jan 1814, and first employed as a dry goods clerk, later as chief clerk of an iron works. At about the age of 20, I married Susan BETTS (no info). We moved to Davenport, Scott, Iowa, and I again settled into the mercantile business.

In 1847, I was elected first School Fund Commissioner of Scott County and kept the office for 9 years. The following year, I was elected Recorder and Treasurer of Scott County, serving for 7 years. For most of the 1850s, I served as alderman of Davenport. At this time I was able to retire and dedicate my life to public service.

I had a mind for improvment of society and commerce, and was an extreme advocate of the temperance movement, organizing a chapter of the temperance society - The Grand Division of the Sons of Temperance for the State of Iowa. For many years, I served as a representative to the National Division of North America as well as head of the local chapter.

A firm believer in building railroads, I became one of the first people to advocate a railroad from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic Ocean. I served as Secretary for the Mississippi and Missouri Railroad Company, formed in Davenport, and was responsible for building the first railroad bridge across the Mississippi River in Davenport.

Starting with its second year of operation, I served as the president of the Bank of Iowa, a state-run bank. By the time it closed, all investors received every dime back.

During the Civil War, I acted as Paymaster General for the State of Iowa, responsible for paying all of Iowa's soldiers. Iowa didn't have enough money to take care of all of its soldiers so I paid for upwards of 5000 men out of my own pocket. When Camp McClellan in Davenport ran out of bread because the baker could not afford to make it, I paid for it. I saw fit to put myself in harm's way and personally took the pay owed to some of the soldiers to Missouri and made sure they received their money.

After the war, I served as Commissioner of Indian Affairs under Pres. Rutherford B. HAYES [Find-a-Grave says GARFIELD] and would eventually become a member of Congress twice.

I died 30 May 1901 [no location]. I am buried in Davenport, Scott, Iowa's Oakdale Memorial Gardens. Marker says HIRAM.

This is a script for Oakdale's semi-annual cemetery walk where notable citizens are characterized by volunteers in period clothing at each grave site. [see Oakdale website]


SANDERS: Addison Hiatt b. Cincinnati, OH comes to Davenport, Scott, IA, becomes newspaper editor, Commish of Camp McClellan, Lieutenant Colonel, Brevet Brigadier General, Postmaster Acting Governor,

I was born in Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, 12 Sept 1823, and trained as a printer. I plied my trade in Davenport twice in 1845 and 1846 before moving here. I came to help my brother Alfred keep his newspaper running, the Gazette. I took over editorial duties so he could focus on the business end. By the end of 1856, Davenport had grown large enough to sustain a daily paper, and I decided to settle permanently, becoming the editor of the Daily Davenport Gazette. I married Amelia BARROWS, dtr of prominent local doctor, E. S. BARROWS, and they both rest beside me in Davenport's Oakdale Memorial Gardens aka Oakdale Cemetery.

I received a commission in the Union Army as an aide to Samuel KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa. I was next appointed commissioner of Camp McClellan, near the Village of East Davenport, one of several mustering locations and the primary location for military encampments west of the Mississippi River. Here the multitude of volunteers who had signed up to fight against the South were trained and organized into military units.

In 1862, the 16th Iowa Infantry was formed. Gov. KIRKWOOD asked me to become its commander, an offer which I respectfully declined. I had seen poorly qualified individuals put in command and I would rather a trained officer be placed in charge. This impressed Gov. KIRKWOOD and he granted my wish, placing Capt. Alexander CHAMBERS as colonel. They appointed me lieutenant colonel.

The 16th Iowa first saw combat at Shiloh, one of the largest battles of the early Civil War and one of the Union's few successes [Apr 6-7, Shiloh, TN]. The regiment was reinforcements arriving on the second day - we could hear the sounds of fighting from the front line when we landed at Pittsburgh Landing. We fought at the Battle of Corinth in Mississippi where I was severely wounded. I was taken prisoner by the Confederates during the Battle of Atlanta. While in prison, I suffered starvation and sickness, and recovered after the prisoner exchange. I was promoted to Brevet Brigadier General and I was discharged in 1865 for disability.

I returned to Davenport and served the City as postmaster. In 1870, I accepted an appointment as Secretary of Montana Territory and later became the acting governor and Registrar of the United States Land Office in Montana. After my time in the West, I retired to Davenport.

In my later years, I was run overy by a horse team in West Davenport and decided to convalesce at the Iowa Soldiers Home in Marshalltown, Iowa. I passed away there 7 Nov 1912. My body was returned to Davenport to be buried.

This script was used in Oakdale's bi-annual cemetery walk where volunteers portray noted citizens as if they still exist at each gravesite. (see website)


WILLIAMS: Doris Lucille marries John Iles GANSERT in Inyokern, Pasadena, California, becomes dir. of Kansas City, MO Hospital Medical Clinic

Obit:
Doris W. GANSERT, 65, Prairie Village, a former laboratory director for a Kansas City hospital, died 23 Sept 1988 at Trinity Lutheran Hospital.

Mrs. Gansert worked for Trinity Lutheran Hospital 31 years and retired as administrative director of the hospital laboratory in July 1988. The School of Medical Technology at the hospital was named for her when she retired.

She was born in Ottumwa, Iowa, and lived in the Kansas City area most of her life. {Obit says Springfield, Illinois}

Survivors include 2 brothers, Robert E. WILLIAMS, Ottumwa, Iowa, and John B. WILLIAMS, Omaha, Douglas, Nebraska. The body was cremated. (no burial information). The family suggests contributions to the Missouri Repertory Theater or the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

Doris was the wife of John ILES GANSERT (see sep. blog), born 5 Apr 1921 in Rock Island, Rock Island, Illinois. Both were graduates of Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa. son of William ILES and Helen DETJENS GANSERT. She was the dtr of John B. WILLIAMS of Ottumwa, Iowa.

1 comment(s), latest 5 years, 2 months ago

BAWDEN: Stephen Phelps is subject of entry in 1882 History of Davenport and Scott County, Iowa

The law has become so complex that it would be difficult for any individual to be equally at home in all departments of practice and, while a lawyer may continue in several fields, it is the tendency of the times to concentrate one's energies upon a special branch. This Stephen P. Bawden does in his attention to probate and title deed branches of law and yet he has won success in other fields and may be termed a general practitioner.

Mr. Bawden is one of Davenport's native sons and his parents were Stephen and Mary Ella (WOODWARD) BAWDEN, the former being of English parentage and the latter a native of Pennsylvania. Their removal to the west and settlement at Davenport made this city the scene of the youthful efforts and activities of S. P. BAWDEN as well as of his later years.

Having acquired his literary education in the public schools, he continued his studies in preparation for the bar and after his admission to practice in the courts of the state opened an office in Davenport, where he has since remained. His natural predilection tends him toward probate and similar departments of the law and for five years he devoted almost his entire time to those branches in the office of DAVISON & LANE. Inclination and opportunity were thus satisfied and his thoroughness and capability in this branch of the profession have won him deserved success. His two most dominant characteristics are determined persistence and thorough and honest exactness. In law and especially in real-estate law these traits are of prime importance and guarantee progress.

Mr. BAWDEN has met with good success because of these qualities and is one of the best known of the younger members of the bar in this field of practice. He enjoys the good fellowship of his brethren of the legal fraternity here and all recognize that his advancement has come as the merited and legitimate reward of his efforts and ability.

1 comment(s), latest 5 years, 3 months ago