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CHEGWIDDEN FAMILY, NZ.

THOMAS CHEGWIDDEN (1784-1867) =m= 1813 to Ann(e) CHENOWETH/CHYNOWETH
who d.1873 @ 88yrs. They had at least 13 children. (This inc.3 called Elias. The 3rd one survived.)1812 or13 Constantine;1814 Thomas; 1817 Charles; 1819 Elizabeth Chenoweth; 1821 Jane Rilstone; 1822 Josepha Chenoweth; 1825 John Henry; 1828 Richard; 1829 Charles Symons; 1832 Elias; 1834 Arthur Chenoweth; 1836 Walter Thomas Chenoweth.
Elias(I) (1832-1915) =m=1857 to Mary Jane COATH(dtr of Robert COATH/Mary Ann LOWER)b 1838, d.1916. Their childen were :-
1857-58 Emma; 1859-65 Emma Jane; 1861 Mary "Polly"; 1863 William "Will";[All those b Liskeard]. 1865 Elias(II);1868 Annie Coath; 1870 Rose:[All those b London within the sound of Bow Bells]. 1872 Minnie; 1876-81 Robert John; 1879-81 Charles Edward;[These 3 b Napier] 1882 b&d John Chynoweth.(b Wairoa).
The family emigrated on the Ballarat, London to Napier 1872, and settled in Napier.
Elias II =m= in 1888 to Martha Rebecca BLACKBURN and they had 9 children (inc.2 non-survivors). 1888 Mary Coath Lane "May"; 1890 Elias III; 1891 b&d William Edward; 1893 Florence Rose "Florrie"; 1895 Charles "Charlie"; 1898 Emily Gertrude; 1901 Twins. Laura Blackburn & Ethel Minnie; 1904 b&d a girl who lived only 4 hours.
Hope that will do you for now.

CHEGWIDDEN STORIES

For people just starting, there is an old 'young adult' book which you can still find online.
"A True Cornish Maid" by G.Norway. (Blackie & Sons)
The hero & heroine are Chegwidden twins - whether they were based on real children, I don't know, but there are lots of twins along the Cheg branches. There's a great description of Newquay, the bay, and life in the village - AND the smuggling. About 1800 or a bit earlier - when Wesley was preaching around England.
The other book is Dorothy Scannell's book "Mother Knew Best", also available online, which tells about her family (descendants of Walter Thomas Chenoweth Cheg., younger brother of Elias). She has a great sense of humour, and it is a good read.

Cornish Research.

Have you ever tried the website for "THE WEST BRITON & CORNWALL ADVERTISER" 1836-1887 newspaper ? It doesn't have every year of its publication, and those years available sometimes have only 2-3 months recorded. You can't search by surnames. You have to scroll through all the 'news items' - mostly bdm, accidents, court reports etc. Long slow process, but you can turn up some real gems. Well worth a visit.

1 comment(s), latest 2 years, 8 months ago

Cornwall families

I have been doing pre-1850 CHEGWIDDEN & COATH (Cornwall& N.Z.) research for years, now branching out to find names CHENOWETH/CHYNOWETH (who seem to figure a lot in the old criminal records), LOWER, SYMON(S)/SIMON(S). One of these families is supposed to have been Huguenot, but I have not found anything to confirm this, although SIMON is one of the names listed on a Huguenot site.

Looking for HALL & BORTICK/BORTHWICK, Ireland to New Zealand.

George William HALL and Sarah (Sarah Jane)BORTICK/BORTHWICK were married in County Longford, Ireland, in 1863, and were in New Zealand by 1875. George's father is said to have been George John HALL & his mother, Margaret ARMSTRONG (b.1815). Sarah's father, Thomas Edward BORTHWICK.
They had 2 children in NZ, but any born before then (Ireland? Australia?)are not known.
In one of the Irish Roots sites, the name BORTHWICK is said to be very rare in Ireland. It is of Ulster-Scots origin, occurring in Griffith's only 7 times - in Antrim & Belfast City. There is the same result for HALL/BORTHWICK households.
Some of the Halls were in the Waikato from the late 1870s onwards.

Looking for FRANKLINs from Limerick/Tipperary/Wicklow

George [1] FRANKLIN =m= Mary DWYER. George listed as a gardener. Known children Annie/Nancy (birth date could be anywhere between 1837-44, but probably abt.1839 d.1912 in NZ); George[2] (23.7.1850- 9.4.1926); and Robert (b abt.1851-1913 d. in NZ).
George[2] =m= 1880, Parsontown (now Birr, Offaly)to Alice HAMILTON, and they had 9 children who emigrated via Canada to Honolulu & Calif.
George was a RIC man. Most of their children b Queens County.
I notice in the Limerick records that there are several Franklin/Dwyer couples around that time, and wonder if they could be connected.

Looking for MAY/MAYS/MAYSE - NZ from Ireland

Looking for information about Alex b.abt.1847, & John b.abt.1849, MAY or MAYS of Co.Tyrone, who arrived in Auckland on the "Dover Castle" 14.8.1875, as Assisted Immigrants. They were carpenters. With them was their sister Elizabeth, b. 1854/5. Their father's name is given as Alexander Mays on her marriage record, and Mayse elsewhere. She married Henry HINTON in 1877, and the family seems to have stayed in the Waikato area. Other descendant names connected to this family:- HALL, HENWOOD, BLAND/WALKER, WHITAKER/JONES. The name Alexander suggests they might be of Scots-Irish origin.
I would be interested to find if they stayed in NZ, as I have found 2 records in USA which could be them. I would also like to be able to fit them into the ongoing World DNA project for all the May surname variants.

Looking for the WOODNOTHs of Cheshire, England.

Not an easy family to track, as I have found 19 different variations of the spelling. True! Mostly WOODNOTH in the old records, but sometimes the same family will be "WOODNOTH alias WOODNET", which brings you into conflict with WOODNOTs, who may or may not be related. When they moved across to the potteries, they often got WOODNORTH. In one family, 4 children christened with different surname spellings :- WOODNOTH, WOODNITT, the next chr. WOODNORTH but WOODNOTH when married, and the last chr WOODNAUGHT, but WOODWORTH when married - which is more likely to have been awful writing by the clerk.
In USA there is a DNA project going to try to sort out the lines to see which ones really go back to Cheshire.
Does anybody else belong to this crazy mixed-up family?

3 comment(s), latest 2 years, 6 months ago

Looking for the WOODNOTHs of Cheshire, England.

Not an easy family to track, as I have found 19 different variations of the spelling. True! Mostly WOODNOTH in the old records, but sometimes the same family will be "WOODNOTH alias WOODNET", which brings you into conflict with WOODNOTs, who may or may not be related. When they moved across to the potteries, they often got WOODNORTH. In one family, 4 children christened with different surname spellings :- WOODNOTH, WOODNITT, the next chr. WOODNORTH but WOODNOTH when married, and the last chr WOODNAUGHT, but WOODWORTH when married - which is more likely to have been awful writing by the clerk.
In USA there is a DNA project going to try to sort out the lines to see which ones really go back to Cheshire.
Does anybody else belong to this crazy mixed-up family?

Where did they go? MORAN, VEAL, Yorkshire, Durham.

Trying to find out how & when the HILTON name came into the family line, I made a sudden discovery that Hilton was not as a surname, but a given name - Hilton Mary VEAL, who married Edward MORAN, a paper maker, in 1846. She is in the 1841 Census (indexed as Peal) working as a servant in Richmond, Yorkshire. After their marriage, they remain in Richmond, and are in the 1851 Census (as MORNE), 1861 & 1871 (both as MORAN) - and then they vanish. They had only 2 daughters (going by the Censuses): Elizabeth (b.1850) and Sarah (b.1857). When their daughter Elizabeth gets married in 1885, she uses the spelling MORN. There seem to be hundreds (well, dozens)of Edward Morans up in the North of England (although this Edward was born in Dublin).

No doubt the name Hilton was a surname further back in time. It is possible that Edward died & she remarried to a man who preferred her to be called Mary, so that is the name she would have in the 1881 Census. Or she died & Edward remarried. Or maybe they retired back to Dublin.

Do these family names fit into anybody else's research?

3 comment(s), latest 1 year, 3 months ago