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Olympic year 2012 some past winner in 1908

If anybody is researching for past winners of the 1908 London Olympics got to your search engine and look for William Kensett Styles (1874-1940) and William Edwin Pimm (1864-1952)The picture is William Edwin Pimm, I cannot upload 2 photos.


3 comment(s), latest 2 years, 3 months ago

Short history of Dr John Styles D.D 1782-1849

This a short history of The Revd John Styles, which may interest some researchers.

The Rev John Styles DD (1782-1849)

John Styles was one of 17 children of John Stiles a carpenter, & Mary Wharton, he was born in the East Anglian village of Thrandeston, Suffolk, England, around 1790 John and Mary Stiles found that earning a living in Suffolk was hard, they were discussing what to do when a relative suggested that they should move to London in the Islington area, where retired rich people from the city of London, and they needed expensive coffins. Later John joined his family firm, but decided to enter the church. He was theological educated at Hoxton College, London and at Gosport College (5 High Street) 1799-? Hants. Helped at Newport IOW Congregational Church, and Birmingham (1802). His first post was at East Cowes, in 1803 later persuaded the churchgoers to build a new chapel at West Cowes. In 1808 he decided to move to Union Street, Ship Street, Brighton, Sussex, he again built a new chapel. In 1823 he moved to the Holland Chapel, North Brixton London. In 1835 to the Claylands Chapel, Clapham Road, Surrey. In 1844 he left London and went to Foleshill Nr Coventry Congregational Church till 1849. He died 22nd June 1849, he was awarded Doctor of Divinity (DD) in 1844 by Aberdeen University

Dr Styles was married three times, he married Sarah Hall Brown in 1803 at St Katherine Cree in the city of London, they had 5 children John, Mary Ann, John Wigney, Marriane, Sarah Hall. John died at Cowes in 1806. Sarah Hall Brown died in 1810. John Married Ann Cooper in 1813 at Streatham London, they had 3 children Mary Read, John Shrapnel, Ann. Ann Cooper died in 1816 in Brighton John Married again in 1817 to a Ann? They had a daughter Mary Ann, who married a Robert Menzies, they had two daughters, Elizabeth and Mary Ann.

Dr John Styles DD was buried at West Norwood Cemetery, SE27 also his daughter in law Susan Styles (Snell) wife of his son John Wigney Styles grave no 2302, and there is no memorial stone on the grave. Lambeth Borough Council runs the cemetery.

Styles family members have also entered non conformist churches, Johns brother Thomas was minister to Great Marlow Congregational Church for 40 years from 1825 to 1865. William Jeyes Styles John Styles nephew was a Baptist minister.

Dr John Styles was a notible character of his time, you need to search on the internet for references of what he did, below is piece by The Revd Sydney Smith about John Styles.

Wit & Wisdom of The Revd Sydney Smith Page 119 - Use of Ridicule

We are a good deal amused, indeed, with the extreme disrelish which Mr. John Styles exhibit: to the humour and pleasantry with which he admits the Methodists to have been attacked, but Mr. John Styles should remember, that it is not the practice with destroyers of vermin to allow the little victims a velo upon the weapons used against them. If this were otherwise we should have one set of vermin banishing small-tooth comb.; another protesting against mouse traps, a third prohibiting the finger and thumb, a forth exclaiming against the intolerable infamy of using soap and water. It is impossible, however, to listen to such pleas. They must be all caught, killed, and cracked, in the manner, and by the in instruments which are found most efficacious to their destruction, and the more they cry out, the greater plainly, is the skill used against them. We are convinced a little laughter will do there more harm than all the arguments in the world. Such men as the author before us, cannot understand when they are outargued but he has given us a specimen, from his irritability, that he fully comprehends when he has become an object universal contempt and derision. We agree with him, that ridicule is not exactly the weapon to be wed in matter., of religion; but the use of it is excusable, when there is no other which can make fools.
Tremble.

From an article on 'Methodism' Ed Rev 1809

Strictures on two Critiques in the Edinburgh Review, on the Subject of Methodism & Mission, with remarks on the Influence of Reviews in general, on Morals and Happenies, by The Revd John Styles. 8vo. London 1809.

Smith the 'small-tooth comb' illustration in his handling of Dr. Monk, Bishop of Gloucester in the Third Letter to Archdeacon Singleton. Mr Styles was again the subject or a literary agitation in 1839, when, having become The Revd John Styles D.D., he published under the auspices of the Society for the prevention for the Cruelty to Animals, a prize Essay entitled 'The Animal Creation its Claims on our Humanity Stated and Enforced.' The tract was replied to in 'A Pamphlet, dedicated to the Noblemen, Gentlemen, and Sportsmen of England, Ireland and Scotland, by TheHon. Grantley Fitzhantinge Berkley MP. The subject is roughly revieved reviewed in an article, Sydney Smith, John Styles, and Grantley Berkeley in Frazers Magazine in August 1839. The Rev. Dr. Styles was a dissenting clergyman of note the author of various published discourses of an occasional character. He also published a Life of David Brainerd and Family Bible, with illustrative notes, in two volumes quarto.


My research history of the Pimm's & Styles

My researched started in 1972 when I went to see my grandmother in Southwold Suffolk, she was in her 80s and I thought we would settle a family dispute. She said to me Did you know that your 2nd great grand father a James Norris Pimm, was on an inscription on Tower Bridge in the city of London Why I replied, He was at the opening in 1894. He must have been important, Yes, he was a freeman of the City of London, and Common Councillor to Queenhythe ward. I was working in the city at the time, I checked the monumental inscription, and called to London Guildhall for further information and I got a few leads, such as other children address in London and Staines in Middlesex. She also added, Did you know that James Norris Pimm was the nephew of James Pimm who invented the Pimms Drink, he used to sell oyster in the city Another addition to the tree. After several months I developed a small tree, and by chance I found a c1950 telephone book of the Staines area, and I looked up Pimm, and there was one there. I wrote to that address and found 2 elderly cousins, who supplied me with more family information, which also expanded the tree outwards, but they said that most of the family emigrated to Canada c1900, some came during World War 2, but they gave me 3 clues, a name, a place, a book. The book was called Chocolate Making by Ella Pimm, I wrote for an address through the publishers, and got that contact in Canada. I had a reply with a more expanded family tree, my cousin was stuck for around 30 years, and this was a kick start for more research.

With this new information, I could now add to the tree which expanded from left to right to a landscape, and by then we had three members of the family researching the Pimm Family tree, my cousin Leo Pimm in Canada, decided to opt for research in Chilham Kent which went back to 1508, then the name was Pym, another cousin from Brentwood in Essex decided to investigate my 2nd great fathers wife Martha Farrer, the reason being that my family are gifted with a paint brush! My great grandfather William Edwin Pimm 1864-1952 was a well known portrait and landscape painter in oils and water colours, he had yearly commissions to paint the portraits of the incoming Lord Mayors of London, not only that, he belonged to the Southwood Rifle Club, near Wimbledon and was selected for the 1908 & 1912 Olympic Games. He won Gold, then Silver the following year. He was piped at the post by my Grandfather William Kensett Styles, William Edwin daughter Annie Pimm, my grandmother was also a good shot she won the Daily Mirror Trophy at the age of 14 in 1904 at Bisley, Surrey. Later married William Kensett, in 1911

Harry Pimm was on 10th of February 1895 at Vale of Health Studios, Hampstead Heath, London NW, he was an artist, he was in Antwerp Belgium, during the Great War, he convinced the Germans that he was an American, until 1916 when the American declared war on Germany and was interned at Ruhleben Camp, he was also a commercial artist, and he prepared action pictures to Daily Mirror; there was a story that he was dismissed for drawing a portrait of a famous Military General with his medals drawn back to front. He died in 1957

Victor Lionel was born on 22nd of June 1893 also at the Vale of Health Studios, Hampstead, London NW he was also a talented artist, he went to Essex Ontario in Canada to grow tobacco in 1914 he joined up into the army for WWI, he was an officer in the West Yorkshire Regiment he is mentioned the history of the West Yorkshire Regiment. He was missing presumed died at Ypers, Belguim 1916. There is an entry in the History book of the West Yorkshire Regiment.

Back to Martha Farrer, going back her tree, her ancestors Thomas & Henry Farrer were painters born in London but emigrated to the United States, and they produced many American scenes of life in Landscapes and ships in dock, they are very collectable items today, and going back further a Thomas Farrer married a Mary Elizabeth Banks, going further back the name was a Marjorbanks, who may be a descendant of Robert the Bruce, this I am looking into.

Going further through the Farrer side of the family, my 2nd great Grandfather Thomas Charles Farrer 1838 1891 , through the marriages through McLanes & the Huntingdons is related to G W Bush 8th cousin 4 times removed, that line goes to The Revd John Lapthrop 1583 1633, also has links to the Mitfords as well

This is some my research on one side of my family tree, we have produced a family 200 booklet called Pimms Family History, this is not in general publication, I have a copy, also The Guildhall Reference Library in the city of London.

Now I will finish briefly on other researches of my family. I have through my grandmother Annie Pimm side whose mother was Louise Van Tongelen family the Belgium side of the family, I can traced them back to c1650. My mothers side her maiden name was Carpenter. Family legends say they were related to Sir Walter Scotts wife Charlotte Charpentier, later changed to Carpenter, also links to The Hon John Carpenter, link to the Earls of Shrewsbury, more detailed researched needed here. Finally Styles, they migrated from Thrandeston Suffolk c1792 to Islington, London, from there 4 descendants became non conformist ministers and 3 Styless married into the Dunhill family, and most of their descendants today are from 2 Styless daughters.


Trooper Victor Kensett Styles 1918-2001 - Italian WW2 irrugular activities

Trooper Victor Kensett Styles, my uncle, was a POW escapee from PG 52 CHIAVARI Chiavari Liguria region, he not talk about his activities, but when he died in 2001, I started to do some research, but with time information has faded.

Trooper Victor Kensett Styles joined with the Italian partisans after he escaped from PG 52. fought with a Russian detachment with the partisans'. With British & Italian patrols he destroyed German vehicles and was Mentioned in Despatches. He escape from a train out side the area of Piacenza Italy near Milan, on the 13th Sept 1943 escaped from a train in December 1943, he was in the area of Castel di Sangro near Campobasso & Avezzano. And was recaptured by the Germans taken to Frosinone, then he escaped, in the Modena, near Bologna in the north of Italy.

He hid for 3 months in Tugliacozzo near Avezzano. April to June 1944, he met up with more partisans, their HQ was at Montefiorino under the command of Major Johnston. In July 1944 met up with Russians at Monte Cantiari, they also went to Monte Tondo, Soave, Verona. Sept 1944 Was in Villa Minozzo, near Modena. Sept 1944 Lama di Monchio, Palagano, south of Reggio nell 'Emila was then sent to Musiara, Neviano degli Arduini, Italy, action on the Pontrremoli November 1944, He was involved with mission called Operation Envelope Blue in February 1945 with Captain Michael Lees. Which I was the attack to the German 51st HQ at Albinea, he was also a team leader in many sorties, but he did not hold an officers rank.

Eventually he was repatriated and was interviewed by MI9, he was recommended a holiday and officer training, later he resigned and decided to take on teaching in London. He was also recommended the British Empire Medal, he never got it because his files had a secret life of 85 years, but I ask for review under the Freedom of Information Act and was released. When he escaped from POW camp and on active service with the SOE, he never got paid! He also did not get his Italian Star until I ask for it in 2009. If you Google his name you will find more information about him.


Following his return to the UK in January 1945, Lance-Corporal Styles was Mentioned in Despatches for his conduct in Italy, and attached to 161 Reconnaissance Regiment. In September of that year he was posted to 100 Officer Cadet Training Unit. He was released to the Army Reserve in June 1946. His military conduct was recorded as exemplary; "A very capable man of excellent appearance and character.

He is meticulous in his work and thoroughly honest and sober." His Mentioned in Despatches citation reads:

As a result of his capture at EL MECHILI on 8th Apr 41, STYLES was, at the time of the Italian Armistice, a P/W in Camp 52 (CHIAVARI). Obeying the instructions of the Senior British N.C.O. he did not try to escape until the Germans had occupied the camp. On 13th Sep 43, during transfer to GERMANY, he and two commandos jumped from the cattle truck near CAORSO, through a hole they had made in the floor. With various companions, and occasionally alone, STYLES travelled to LA META, where he was recaptured on 1st Dec 1943. Three nights later he and another prisoner used a blanket rope to leave their temporary prison, which was inadequately guarded. To avoid suspicion they followed various herds of cattle being driven towards the hills, and in this manner STYLES reached CASTELLA FIUME. Early in April 1944, he decided to try to reach FRANCE; at PIETRALUNGA, however, he joined a partisan group, but after a week's service this was dispersed by the enemy. At the beginning of June 1944, STYLES accompanied a guerrilla unit in two raids on Fascist militia posts near MONTE FIOMINO. Transferring to a more efficient group, he remained an active member until the band was attacked for the second time by Germans at the end of July 1944. He then became attached to a British group, and after participating in sorties against German transport, STYLES was guided with other escapers to an American unit near AUGSIMA at the end of November 1944.


Pimmís & Styles the Marksmen & Women c1900

Annie Pimm was born at Hampstead Heath, London. She was a member of the Southfield's Rifle Club, London she attended Bisley Championships, and won seven prizes in 1907, she must have been the youngest competitor at Bisley. She scored in one event 181 out of 200. She went to school in Antwerp Belgium, she was a ballet dancer, she once performed in front of the King of Norway, she could paint very well, when she lived at Southwold in Suffolk England, she developed small distinctive painting of scenes in Suffolk. She was courted by Huger Von Holst a bronze winner for small bore rifle shooting in the 1908 & 1912 Olympic Games, but her father William Edwin did not tell her and she married William Kensett Styles. Von Holst was very annoyed!!

Annie Pimm "Cissie" (1890-1975), William and Marie Louise's second child, attended school in Antwerp, reflecting the family connection with Belgium. That she shared her father's fixation on shooting is proved by her attainment at age 14 of the National Rifle Association marksman certificate. The illustration which follows pictures her prone at the firing line, legs spread well apart, taking deadly aim, and not at all bothered by the large beribboned hat perched on her head. As the article quotes William "the girl does shoot uncommonly well'

Annie parlayed the modelling of shooting attire into a career in clothes designing; her "charming holiday costume" featured a full-length coat in black cloth faced with velvet (the nation was in mourning for King Edward VII). The design bears her signature "Cissy Pimm".

In 1911 Annie married William Kensett Styles, the alternate rifleman chosen by her father. His family came from Thrandeston in Suffolk, where they had been known as Stile, Stiles and Styles. In 1782 John Stiles moved to Islington London. Around 1850 Dr. John Styles was a prominent Congregational clergyman who wrote pamphlets and built chapels across the country. He married three times. One of his grandsons The Revd William Jeyes Styles started the Baptist Times.

William Edwin my Great Grandfather, Born 10th of December 1864 at 4 Eglington Road, Bow, Middx, he was a well-known Victorian/Edwardian painter, he studied at Antwerp, and was lover to Louise Van Tongelen, (later divorced 1917 ref PRO) It is believed that she got pregnant, then his father James Norris said that he should get married as soon as possible. They were married at St Mary's Church Staines Middx in October 1888. William Edwin was very talented, he got commissions to paint the Lord Mayors of London, which is every year, he has had his worked displayed in the Royal Academy, and Suffolk Street galleries, He represented Great Britain in the 1980 & 1912 Olympic Games, for smallbore rifle shooting, he won Silver in 1908, and Gold in 1912 London. During the WW1 he was sent to the front lines to sketch out the German Lines on the Western Front, he lived in Alfriston Sussex, between the wars, and then he moved to Miami, Florida in 1940 from Liverpool to New York to live with his daughter 'Mieka', he died in 1952. Details of WEP sailing from the UK to NY Sailed 28th June 1940, from Liverpool to New York, his occupation was an artist, the ship was the Samaria, the official number was 145925, the master name was W C Battle the steamship line was Cunard White Star it had 788 passengers on board.

William Edwin Pimm (1864-1952). third son of James Norris Pimm and Martha, in 1904 was operating a "fine arts" shop in the Brompton Road and was living in Southfields near Wimbledon. Later he devoted himself to painting, his talent no doubt derived from the Farrer's, whom he is said to have resembled. He had a continuing commission to do portraits of the Lord Mayors of London. Three of his pictures were exhibited in the Royal Academy. He was still doing portraits up to the time of his death.

William was a skilled guitar player long before the instrument became identified with rock groups, giving memorable musical evenings for his relatives and friends. His grandson, William de Tongres Styles, was pictured in the newspaper playing the identical 150 year old guitar.

Among William's many accomplishments was figure-skating at which he was considered the best of the family. In those times the sport comprised cutting actual figures - double, triple and. quadruple jumps were unheard of. Many today would be surprised to learn that the Thames in the 1880's froze in winter. He also skated at Wimbledon Common, South London, England.

As a world-class shot William was a member of the England small bore rifle team at the 1908 and 1912 Olympics, winning two gold medals and a silver, plus a sixth place in the individual moving target event. A fellow-member of the teen' was his future son-in-law William Kensett Styles, who won a gold in 1908 and a silver in 1912. William was so addicted to this sport that before marrying his daughter Annie to Styles, he betrothed her to a member of the 1908 Swedish rifle team, a certain Johan Hubner von Holst. Perhaps Annie was annoyed at not having been consulted on this; in any case the marriage did not take place. Was this the sort of action that led Phyllis Van den Hurk to label William eccentric?

In the picture you will see 3 of William Edwin Pimms children, Victor Lionel, Annie, Henry (Harry).


STILES & STYLES of Thrandeston Suffolk & Islington London England

150 Years in Islington

An address given by WILLIAM KENSETT STYLES on 16th April 1934 to the Islington Art Society

I have been asked to read a short paper on the history of our Family at Islington, and I propose to take the lives of four men and one boy in turn, five consecutive generations The first one was John Styles, the second son William Jeyes Styles, the third his great grandson William Kensett Styles, and the fifth his great-great grandson William De Tongres Styles. All of whom lived in Islington at some time in their lives.

To begin with, John in the year 1773 at a remote hamlet in Suffolk called Thrandeston, but pronounced in that district Thrawnson, a young man named married a young woman named Mary Wharton. Things in Suffolk were pretty bad at that time, as generally seem to have been, and some friend told him that if he wanted to make his fortune he should set up for himself as a carpenter in a in a village which was to the North of London, some way out, called Islington, and which was growing because of the number of persons retired there, and who were having big houses built there, and who died
and would require costly coffins.

As John Styles was celebrated coffin maker this last fact appears to have appealed to him as much and accordingly, in the year 1783, John Styles and his wife Mary, accompanied by a little maid who refused to leave them, took their places in the carriers cart after waiting on a convenient grassy patch (which still exists on the Norwich road) set forth for London.

Let us for moment, while they are travelling down the London road consider the affairs, politically at that time. Things were generally (except perhaps in Suffolk). We had just made peace with America, peace had been made between France and Spain and even while they were riding in the coach, a curious document was being drawn up, entitled The Definitive Treaty of "Peace and Friendship, between His Britannic, Majesty The most Christian King, signed at Versailles on the 3rd September 1763, which recited that the two George the Third by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick, and Luxembourg and Treasurer, and Elector of the Holy Roman etc., and the most Serene and most Potent Prince Louis the 16th, By the Grace of God the most Christian King, being mutually desirous of putting an end to the war, proceeded to do so. It is a curious document, because George, having called himself King of France, could not refer Louis as the King of France, but merely as the most Christian King, which apparently covered everything else he could possibly be.

John and Mary in due time, by slow degrees, arrived in Islington. and set up housekeeping in one of the small houses still standing In the courtyard opposite Tyndale Terrace, as it then was (now Tyndale between 191 & 192 Upper Street and this house the site of as authentic a ghost story as one can have It appears that, a few years after they settled there, one evening between 9.0 and 10.0 o'clock the having gone to bed early, as they did in those days, John Styles was awakened by a knocking or raping at the front door, and putting his head out of the window he saw that the person knocking was a woman dressed a bonnet and shawl, could make out in the dim light.

As she took no notice of his questions as to who she was and what she wanted, and persisted in continuing to knock, he called to the Charlie or watchman, whom he heard going by in the Upper street is to come and see what the woman wanted, and, as he the carrying his lantern coming up the little passage (which anyone can see for themselves to this day is so narrow that you can touch it with your elbows as you walk up it), he went downstairs and unbolted the front door, to find, to his astonishment that there was nobody there. He asked the watchman to stand in the passage to anyone escaping, and borrowing his lantern went through the courtyard and the shed where he kept his ladders, paints and suchlike, but could find no one. Three or four days afterwards he learnt, by post, that his mother had come in from a walk, had sat down in her armchair still -with her bonnet and shawl on, and had died (as is the fashion in our family. with some rapidity') at or about the time when the figure had appeared rapping on his front door. John and Mary soon found themselves surrounded with a family of small children, and it is curious, in these days of theatres, cinemas and suchlike, to look back and see how poor folk used to amuse themselves in the evenings. Apparently they were still comparatively struggling, and could only afford one rush light candle, which of course, gave a very dim light, not enough to read by; and their amusement was for John and Mary to tell tales of old Suffolk, or to play alternately on the old fiddle, which was kept hanging in a baize bag at the back of the kitchen door, and to join in singing old Suffolk songs, such as Gee up, Dobbin. This fiddle was made on Old London Bridge and it is a tradition in the family that it has belonged to us ever since it was so made. One of these (John the second) was ultimately destined to become Dr John Styles the well-known parson and pamphleteer of Brighton who was thought worthy of mention in Nelsons Islington (Second Edition). Nelson also very kindly and patronizingly refers to John and Mary Styles as being "worthy people" in a footnote in the book. I have one rather amusing story of Dr Styles and our Society. At one of our shows I was pleased to be informed that amongst the exhibits would be a print of, Dr John. When I examined it at the show I found it was a picture of a strikingly handsome young man with black curly hair. Now Dr John at the time of the print was not so young, nor hand-some, nor was his hair black or curly. I asked for an explanation. The serial number was all right and no one could throw any light on the mystery. Months afterwards I heard the explanation. Wall space was short, and the pictures were framed with two in each frame back to back. Had I only turned it back to front all would have been well. Dr John was sup-posed to be a very clever man, but when I tell you he married three times you will join with me in doubting the statement.

As the Styles grew up they intermarried with various Islington families, notably the Tidmarshs, the Millards and, in the next generation, with the Dunhills, and I often wonder how much my cousin the celebrated Thomas Dunhill, the composer. Owes to pre-natal influence and the old family fiddle. John Styles did not do very much good for himself financially, never having very much capital, until in a fortunate moment he was visited by a patron of his son William Styles, who had been working in Ireland as a journeyman carpenter at the castle of some well-known Lord (whose name unfortunately is not preserved'). Part of the work consisted of building a circular wooden case, and before this could be completed the architect died. Somebody told the noble Lord that young Styles was quite competent to finish the job by himself as he had Fade a scale model of the staircase in his spare time to amuse himself and on my grandfather being asked if he, could finish it he replied quite confidently that he could, and did. To his surprise, some time later they were visited at Islington by the noble Lord in question, who asked why they had not gone in for building houses themselves to which my great-grandfather replied that he had not got even the money for buying the ladders necessary for the work. Whereas his lordship said, I will fit you out everything you want,' which he did, with the consequence that in a very' short time they were enabled to repay the loan and to move into the much larger double fronted houses backing on their own, in the Upper Street, which was, Waddens the hairdressers. One of my great grandfathers tales was that he was once held up between the Angel,' Islington and Sadler's Wells Theatre. He was a little man, but he had in his pocket a cherished meerschaum pipe in a case, which he promptly pulled out and snapped at the man's head as though it were a pistol. The man thinking it was a flintlock, which had mis-fired and might be snapped successfully a second time, promptly ran for his life. My great-grandfather died somewhere about the year 1832, in much the same manner as his mother had done before him, curling himself up for his last nap on, a sofa which my grandfather had made for him, and which I still have. He is buried in St Marys, Islington, and curious may see his tombstone to-day on the back the church, the inscription on which begins lies the body of John Styles, Carpenter, of this Parish," etc., etc.

Thus came grandfather William Styles on the scene to take possession of the larger business and the house. He was always (thanks perhaps to his early upbringing) very keen on music, but he shared my dislike for the fiddle as he called it, preferring the 'cello and the double bass. He was a member of what was known, I believe, as The Islington Harmonic Society', together with one Birdseye a hairdresser who lived near him and other village worthies. My father told me that grandfather was very fond of Bach (which he would pronounce Batch to rhyme with Hatch) and he used to practice his part on the double-bass, whistling the treble air to himself (which only he could hear), while the whole house could hear the doleful strains of his accompaniment, and my Father has told me that he has sat on the stairs and cried for the very dolefulness of the noise. In 1840 my grandfather married for the second time, one Mary Anne Jeyes, the daughter of John Jeyes, once a prominent City merchant in oil and salt mostly who lived in Upper Thames Street of all places, where my grandmother was born. He was a person of some importance, resident magistrate for the Tower Hamlet, and it is told of him that he had the task of receiving all the French refugees who escaped and got to London by boat at the time of the French Revolution. The order was that all those unfortunate persons should be landed as, the Tower Steps and taken straight to his house in custody, where they were lined up for identification by their friends and relations who had reached here previously. There were sore very distressing scenes witnessed as they were all of them in rags and disguises arid most of then quite penniless. It was a difficult thing to know what to do with them, as they were not the sort of people to whom one could give money. The women set up as washerwomen mostly, to do the delicate work of laundering the elaborate frilled shirts the men of that period wore; but as regards the men it was much more difficult to find some excuse for giving then money. The City merchant did not want to learn fencing, and so one had to go through the form of asking the Frenchmen to teach the young ladies of the City deportment: how to come into a room, how to sit down on a chair, how to curtsey, how to bow and leave the room, and then two or three guineas were slipped into their hands coupled with the, warmest thanks for their valuable services, some of them drew for a living. My Father had an album with very erode drawings of ships and suchlike, signed by some of the noblest names of France, in his possession. John Jeyes had two children; and his son, John Jeyes the second, went into the service of the East India Company and died in India at a comparatively early age. When my great-grandfather Jeyes retired he went to live at Ilford, which was then, of course, a most salubrious country village, and his house was situated where The Ilford Photographic Plate Works now stand. The Islington family used to visit him, driving from Islington in a little pony chaise, which was kept in the stables still standing at the bottom of Purley Place a side turning off Park Street, and my Father has told me that after they left the bottom of Canonbury Lane and crossed the Essex Road, there were no more houses (that is to say rows of houses) until they got to Ilford. This was some where in the late forties. My great-grandfather Jeyes was a most severe martinet On one occasion my Father, who was only about 4 or 5 years of age at the time, pulled down a backgammon board and spilt the draughtsmen on the floor. Great-grandfather at once rang the bell and ordered that his mother should take my father home, and I remember the shouts of laughter with which we greeted the story as my Father said he was wearing a white leghorn hat with an amber bow under the left ear, and when we looked at my Father with his long grey hair and grizzled moustache and beard, and tried imagine what he looked like with such a hat on, the results were absolutely disastrous. History repeated itself 30 years afterwards when I recounted to my family one of Rackshaws first customers, my Mother having carried me in there to buy a piece of red velvet to make me a bonnet. My irreverent youngsters greeted the information with shouts of laughter also.

I have always understood that my grandfather was at one time what we now speak of as a 'big noise the old Islington Vestry. It was due to him, so I have always understood, that the curious spectacle is presented in the Upper Street off four public buildings all in a row came to pass. If you will remember. The Old Vestry Hall (which now The Lido Picture Palace). The Police Station, Unity Church and the Fire Station all come in a row together side by side and the explanation that I was given was this:- It appears that, the ground - originally belonged to a man who went to Australia and subsequently vanished and was never heard of again. The ground lay derelict many years until my grandfather could bear it no longer, suggested that it should be 'borrowed' on behalf of the Parish until such time as the owner returned to claim it saying, that no private individual could possibly face the results of such an action, but that the Vestry had got no soul to be saved and no backside to be kicked' I remember also hearing his account of the finish of the old Toll Gates which stood at the junction of the High Street and Upper Street. When the appointed hour struck or was on the point of striking, a hansom cab came dashing up to be the last one to pay, as the hour actually struck the crowd rushed at the gates and fences and tore them to pieces. He also said he remembered that, before the City Road was made, numbers of people used collect at the Angel until there were 12 or 15 in number, and they walked down to the City in a solid body over the Finsbury fields, making as much noise as they could, to persuade any possible footpads that they were a really larger party than they actually were. A very interesting character, who was a friend of my grandfather, was one F.J.Minasi. He was, at that time, a schoolmaster, his school being situated in the road running up by the side of the Agricultural Hall, the school house itself standing at the back of what was recently Huntsman's shop. He was a most amusing old chap, and told me, with great glee that when he ran for Islington Vestry as a young man against my grandfather, my grandfather said he admired his 'something' cheek, but that he would not get the seat until he had finished with it, and then he was welcome to it. I remember the awe with which I regarded Mr Minasi when I was a small boy. He was a little man with a very big nose, and all his life was known as 'Old Beak'. I could never have believed then that in future years I would come to regard him with affection. He had a strong bump of humour, and I remember on one occasion when as a very small boy they had given me the only possible remaining prize they could at prize-giving, which was the good conduct prize, and I came up plus a most glorious black eye to take it, the Vicar of Islington, who was presenting the prizes, looked at me in dismay and said In a very audible aside "Is his conduct really good?" and I heard 'Old Beak say in an equally loud aside, His Father is a Baptist Minister, but I fear he favours his Grandfather, who was anything but one. There is a story told of Minasi that he forbade any of his scholars to patronise any of the penny gaffs, which flourished at the time of the Worlds Fair on the opposite side of the Upper Street, fat women, and the like. One day he called up certain of the boys by name, accused then of patronizing the shows and soundly flogged them. He told me afterwards that he caught them out (he being an ardent astronomer) by going on to the, roof of the schoolhouse with his big celestial telescope directed on to the booths right across the Upper Street and taking the names of the boys as they entered, and came out. One of Mr Minasis enterprises was to found the Islington Gazette. My grandfather must have done very well for himself because he practically retired from business in 1840 Then he married my grandmother, and he went to live at what is now 28, College Street, Islington, which backed on the Old Church Missionary College, which was originally a famous house marked on the maps as 'Esquire Harveys. There in the year 1842 my Father was born, and perhaps for a moment we may digress and consider the political state of affairs in that year as we did before.

Things had altered very much since the year 1783. In the year 1842 the King of Prussia came to England was Godfather to the 'Prince of Wales; Sir Robert Peel was pressing the repeal of duties, on articles of consumption, and wanted to institute the income tax, an idea for which he has been soundly cursed by many thousands of people ever since. An attempt was made to shoot the Queen in that year; the Serfs in Russia were emancipated in that year, and Arnold of Rugby and the Marquis of Wellesley (better known as the 'Iron Duke)died. My Father had no vocation 'or either carpentry or building, and. I imagine, to my grandfather's horror, became a schoolmaster, and ultimately a Baptist Minister. My first memories of him as such are at Providence Chapel, in Upper Street (which is now I believe occupied by the British Legion, but the courtway or alley up which it is situated is called Providence Place'). It was attended largely by the local shopkeepers and suchlike and his Principal Deacon was John Andrews Haslop, whose name one is glad to see preserved over his shop in the Upper Street, although he has been dead, unfortunately, for many years. He was the 'Harmoniumist' of the Chapel also. My Father continued to live in the old house at 28 College Street after my grandfather's death, who died a few months before I was born, in 1874. My Father was the only one of us to go outside London for a wife, my Mother having come from High Wycombe. So not only are we now five generations of Londoners, but we are, with the exception of my Mother, Cockneys on both sides, and in defiance of the tradition that the third generation of Cockneys inevitably dies out I must say that every one us has been at least 2 inches taller than his Father, my great-grandfather having been a little man of about 5 feet 6 inches in height, my grandfather having been 2 inches taller than that, my, Father having been 5 feet 10 inches, and I stand 6 feet. One, at least, of my sons bids fair to be taller than I am.

To revert again for a moment to F J Minasi I was somewhat amused when I joined The Islington Historical Society to find that he had almost become a legend or myth. They were very proud of the fact that they had some letters of his in his own handwriting about and asked me if I had ever heard of him. When I told them that I attended his school when I was such a little chap that I was hardly as tall as his table, and had years afterwards subsequently gone there for a year when I became Head Boy, and sat the identical table for special tuition, they appeared somewhat amazed. Of the five generations of us three have actually been born in Islington, one in the Upper Street and two in College Street in the same house. I remember one soft night in June when the wind was in the South West and rain about, my Father carrying me up to the top room of our home at 1 College Street (this was about the year 1881) and telling me to look over towards the Agricultural Hall and listen. (In those days there was only one storey to the old Islington High School in Barrisbury Street and one could see for miles South)' from the top storey from the houses. Presently the bells of the City began to chime, and Father said, No, not that, not that one. NOW! Those are Bow Bells, and always remember you were born a Cockney within the sound of Bow Bells. I will conclude by relating the remark of a friend of mine who knew me well enough to be rude, who when I told him last year that it was our, 150th year in Islington remarked, 'I don't see that proves anything, except perhaps that the tradesmen in Islington must be singularly complaisant.

Researching PIMM, DUNHILL, TIDMARSH, MILLARD, STYLES, JEYES, MENZIES families in London


Pimm & Pym Family from Kent and London City

My researched started in 1972 when I went to see my grandmother in Southwold Suffolk, she was in her 80s and I thought we would settle a family dispute. She said to me Did you know that your 2nd great grand father a James Norris Pimm, was on an inscription on Tower Bridge in the city of London Why I replied, He was at the opening in 1894. He must have been important, Yes, he was a freeman of the City of London, and Common Councillor to Queenhythe ward. I was working in the city at the time, I checked the monumental inscription, and called to London Guildhall for further information and I got a few leads, such as other children address in London and Staines in Middlesex. She also added, Did you know that James Norris Pimm was the nephew of James Pimm who invented the Pimms Drink, he used to sell oyster in the city Another addition to the tree. After several months I developed a small tree, and by chance I found a c1950 telephone book of the Staines area, and I looked up Pimm, and there was one there. I wrote to that address and found 2 elderly cousins, who supplied me with more family information, which also expanded the tree outwards, but they said that most of the family emigrated to Canada c1900, some came during World War 2, but they gave me 3 clues, a name, a place, a book. The book was called Chocolate Making by Ella Pimm, I wrote for an address through the publishers, and got that contact in Canada. I had a reply with a more expanded family tree, my cousin was stuck for around 30 years, and this was a kick start for more research.

With this new information, I could now add to the tree which expanded from left to right to a landscape, and by then we had three members of the family researching the Pimm Family tree, my cousin Leo Pimm in Canada, decided to opt for research in Chilham Kent which went back to 1508, then the name was Pym, another cousin from Brentwood in Essex decided to investigate my 2nd great fathers wife Martha Farrer, the reason being that my family are gifted with a paint brush! My great grandfather William Edwin Pimm 1864-1952 was a well known portrait and landscape painter in oils and water colours, he had yearly commissions to paint the portraits of the incoming Lord Mayors of London, not only that, he belonged to the Southwood Rifle Club, near Wimbledon and was selected for the 1908 & 1912 Olympic Games. He won Gold, then Silver the following year. He was piped at the post by my Grandfather William Kensett Styles, William Edwin daughter Annie Pimm, my grandmother was also a good shot she won the Daily Mirror Trophy at the age of 14 in 1904 at Bisley, Surrey. Later married William Kensett, in 1911

Harry Pimm was on 10th of February 1895 at Vale of Health Studios, Hampstead Heath, London NW, he was an artist, he was in Antwerp Belgium, during the Great War, he convinced the Germans that he was an American, until 1916 when the American declared war on Germany and was interned at Ruhleben Camp, he was also a commercial artist, and he prepared action pictures to Daily Mirror; there was a story that he was dismissed for drawing a portrait of a famous Military General with his medals drawn back to front. He died in 1957

Victor Lionel was born on 22nd of June 1893 also at the Vale of Health Studios, Hampstead, London NW he was also a talented artist, he went to Essex Ontario in Canada to grow tobacco in 1914 he joined up into the army for WWI, he was an officer in the West Yorkshire Regiment he is mentioned the history of the West Yorkshire Regiment. He was missing presumed died at Ypers, Belguim 1916. There is an entry in the History book of the West Yorkshire Regiment. I am on a possible lead that he was married in Portsmouth in 1914, before he went to Belgium.

Back to Martha Farrer, going back her tree, her ancestors Thomas & Henry Farrer were painters born in London but emigrated to the United States, and they produced many American scenes of life in Landscapes and ships in dock, they are very collectable items today, and going back further a Thomas Farrer married a Mary Elizabeth Banks, going further back the name was a Marjorbanks, who may be a descendant of Robert the Bruce, this I am looking into.

Going further through the Farrer side of the family, my 2nd great Grandfather Thomas Charles Farrer 1838 1891 , through the marriages through McLanes & the Huntingdons is related to G W Bush 8th cousin 4 times removed, that line goes to The Revd John Lapthrop 1583 1633, also has links to the Mitfords as well

This is some my research on one side of my family tree, we have produced a family 200 booklet called Pimms Family History, this is not in general publication, I have a copy, also The Guildhall Reference Library in the city of London.

Now I will finish briefly on other researches of my family. I have through my grandmother Annie Pimm side whose mother was Louise Van Tongelen family the Belgium side of the family, I can traced them back to c1650. My mothers side her maiden name was Carpenter. Family legends say they were related to Sir Walter Scotts wife Charlotte Charpentier, later changed to Carpenter, also links to The Hon John Carpenter, link to the Earls of Shrewsbury, more detailed researched needed here. Finally Styles, they migrated from Thrandeston Suffolk c1792 to Islington, London, from there 4 descendants became non conformist ministers and 3 Styless married into the Dunhill family, and most of their descendants today are from 2 Styless daughters.


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