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Mauer

Anyone interested in me posting my book on the Mauer family of St. Louis, and Elisberry, Missouri?

Children of Isaac and Sarah Morrill: (42)

Footnote: Thwing, Walter, 1908, History of the First Church of Roxbury, Massachusetts 1630-1904, Page 36

3. Sarah, his daughter, born in England ca 1625 married 1646 to Tobias Davis ca 1643-1646. He was born ca 1621 in Massachusetts and died 23 April 1690. She died 23 January 1648-1649 in Roxbury, Massachusetts due to a miscarriage. In 1635 a grant of six or seven acres was made to Tobias Davis for a corn mill and a fulling mill. He had a blacksmith shop close to the estate of his father-in-law, Isaac Morrill. He married 2nd Bridget Kinman in 1649.
Child:
Sarah Davis born 10 February 1646-1647 in Roxbury, Massachusetts married Timothy Stevens. They had ten children: Timothy, Sarah, John, Joseph, Elizabeth, Marie, Hannah, Samuel, Abigail and Nathaniel Stevens

4. Katherine born in England ca 1627 married John Smith 1 August 1647 in Roxbury, Massachusetts.
Children born in Massachusetts:
Waitstill Smith born 11 January 1659 married Charles Davenport and died 9 August born 1747
Children listed in Isaac Morrell (Morrill)s will:
Isaac Smith born 20 June 1655
John Smith born 4 November 1651
Francis Smith born 23 December 1658 Reading, Massachusetts married Ruth Maverick, daughter of Elias and Anna (Harris) Maverick. They had eight children: John, Isaac, Katherine, Abraham, James, Benjamin, Mary and Elias Smith
Abraham Smith born 10 April 1661
Mary Smith born after her grandfathers will

5 Isaac born 26 November 1632 died January 1633 in Massachusetts

6 Isaac born 5 February 1633-1634 died the same day in Massachusetts

7. Hannah born 16 September 1636 in Massachusetts married Daniel Brewer (Bruer), her cousin, son of Daniel and Hannah (?) Brewer 5 November 1652. He was born ca 1624 in England and died 9 January 1708 in Roxbury, Massachusetts. She was born 9 January 1673 in Massachusetts. She died 6 October 1717 in Roxbury, Massachusetts. He purchased or inherited the family homestead, where they lived.
Children:
Ann Brewer born 9 May 1660
Hannah Brewer born 5 July 1765
Daniel Brewer born 7 February 1669 in Roxbury, Massachusetts married Catherine Chauncy. They had one child: Isaac Brewer He was a tavern keeper and was well known in the community

8. Elizabeth born May 1638 died 1638 in Massachusetts

9. Abraham 6 June 1640 died 20 December 1661


Note: Savage, James in A Genealogical Dictionary of The First Settler of New England, Before 1692 Vol. 3 Morehouse-Morse states the following: Ezekiel of Reading (Massachusetts) perhaps a brother to Abraham or son of him (we know this not to be true) or his brother Isaac (also not true) had wife Mary and died on a visit to Roxbury, (Massachusetts) 22 May 1663. His will 31 May 1664 mentions father-in-law and mother, without naming them. His widow probably married 12 August following (1664) to Thomas Hodgman of Roxbury. No children born to them.

Henry of New Haven born 1644 had a daughter Sarah born 1650 and he died 1665.

He then goes into Isaac Morrills information. There is much misinformation when it comes to the dates and names of the Isaacs children. I have also found reference that there were tthree brothers who came to America; however I have never found the name or any more information about the supposed third brother.

New England Historical & Genealogical Register
1852, Vol. VI, Page 184: Early records of Boston

Verbatim

"Isaac ye son of Isaac Morrell borne 26 (9) 1632 & buried (11) 1632.
Issac ye son of Isaac Morrell borne 5 (12) 1633
Abraham ye son of Isaac Morrell borne 6 (4) 1640
Hanna ye daughter of Isaac Morrell borne 16 (7) 1636
Elisabeth ye daughter of Isaac Morrell borne (3) 1638"
Old calendar add two months to convert to new calendar

Insert:
Robert Ring of Salisbury, planter, conveyed to Isaac Morrill of Salisbury, planter, land, 14 1/2 rods by 46 rods, bounded by a highway, highway leading to Hanpton and robert Ring. Wit: Tho: Midget abd Moses Pengry. Ack. 16:2:1670, before robert Pike

Footnotesw:

See: Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Vol. 6, 1675*1678, Page 35
The Essex Antiquarian, 1903, The Essex Antiquarian a Monthly Magazine, Vol. 7, Page 138: Thomas Mudget and Abraham Morrill knew each other before his death












Footnotes:

Thwing, Walter, 1908, History of the First Church of Roxbury, Massachusetts 1630-1904 Pages 18 and 95
Roxbury Church Records, Page 174
Ellis, Charles, 1847, The History of Roxbury Town, Page 71
Drake, Francis, 1908, The Town of Roxbury; Registry Department of the City of Boston, Doc # 93, 1905, Page 111
Ellis, Charles, 1847, The History of Roxbury Town, Page 95
ibid.. Page 95
ibid.. Page 130
New England Historical Genealogical Society, 1912, Vital Records of Reading, Massachusetts to the Year 1850, Page 209
Moyer, Jeannie, Morrell, Morrill Families Association, Vol. 1 #4 December 1981, Page 12
New England Historical Genealogical Society, 1912, Vital Records of Reading, Massachusetts to the Year 1850, Page 209
Williamson, Lois, 1977, Morrill Lineage, Vol. 1, Page 79
* old calendar dates
New England Historic-Genealogical Society, 1852, The New England Historical and Genealogical Society Register, Vol. 6, Page 184
ibid ..Vol. 6, Page 184
ibid ..Vol. 6, Page 184
Williamson, Lois, 1977, Morrill Lineage, Vol. 1, Page 80
New England Historic-Genealogical Society, 1852, The New England Historical and Genealogical Society Register, Vol. 6, Page 184
ibid ..Vol. 6, Page 184
Savage, James A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England, Before 1692, Vol. 3 Morehouse-Morse, most books do not list a ninth child

Will of Isaac Morrill

His will, dated 15 December 1661 and proved 23 January 1661[/2], Isaac Morrill bequeathed to "my dear & loving wife the use of my entire estate during her life; after her decease 40 to "my four grandchildren to wit: John Smith, Isaac Smith, Francis Smith and Abraham Smith" equally; to "my grandchild Mary Smith ... my farm lying between Reading and Andover being more than two hundred acres"; residue to "my two sons (to wit)

John Smith & Daniell Brewer & to my grandchild Sarah Davis" (with some additional household goods for Sarah Davis); what I have given to "John Smith, & his wife Katherine if she outlive him" to be enjoyed by them during their lifetimes and then equally to their now children and any future children. John Smith will have "by my daughter Katherine" to be carefully used so that the children are not "embesselled" or Disappointed; if "my loving wife" as a result of sickness or poverty requires the sale of any property for her comfortable supply, it may be sold; "loving sons Tobias Davis & Daniel Brewer" executors; and "loving friends Thomas Weld & Edward Denison" overseers; witnesses Samuel Danforth and Elisha Cooke.
At probate three nuncupative codicils were added, all representing desires of the deceased made on 19 December 1661: (1) 3 to Roxbury church (evidence of Samuel Danforth, Edward Denison and John Smith); (2) anvils and all smith's tools and instruments to cousin Isaac Morrill (evidence of Tobias Davis and Sarah Morrell); (3) wearing apparel to brother Abraham Morrell, grandchild Sarah Davis, and sons John Smith and Daniel Brewer (evidence of Sarah Morrell)
The Roxbury land inventory lists thirteen parcels for Isaac Morrill, eight of them granted by the town and five purchased. He was one of the largest landholders in town: "Isaack Morrill his two houses, two forges, one barn with out housing and two orchards and a swamp"; "four acres more or less upon Pine Hill south"; "six and twenty acres called by the name Foxeholes"; "fifteen acres more or less called Smithfield"; "one acre and a half in the lower calves pasture"; "nine acres of salt marsh"; "in the second allotment of the last division ... fourth lot ... one hundred and thirteen acres one quarter and ten pole and two hundred and four acres in the four thousand acres, and six acres more or less upon Pine Hill"; "four acres more or less upon the great hill bought of Griffen Craft"; "five acres of the fresh meadow ... bought of John Pieropoynt"; "two acres of fresh meadow ... lately the land of John Scarbrow"; "two acres and a half ... lately the land of Robert Williams" (40)

In May of 1663 Tobias Davis and Daniel Brewer, executors of the estate of Isaac Morrill, petition for the right to lay out the two hundred and four acres that had been granted to him in his lifetime but the court noted that the land where they wanted to lay out the portion had already been taken, however the petitioners could take up land in any place not prejudicing former grants". (41)

Footnotes:
New England Historic-Genealogical Society, 1857, The New England Historical and Genealogical Society Register, Vol. 11, Page 36
Anderson, Robert Charles, 1995, The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633, Vol.1-3, No page # given
Anderson, Robert Charles, 1995, The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633, Vol.1-3, No page # given

The Beginning (1st "chapter" in my book)

1. Isaac Morrill was born 1587 or 1588 & in England and his name is on the register of the ship "Lion" which sailed from London 22 June 1632 and arrived 16 September 1632 (12 weeks at sea) at Boston, Massachusetts. The ships passenger list is as follows:
Isaac Morrill (Isack Murrill )
Mrs. . . . . . . Morrill and
Sarah Morrill
Katherine Morrill
of Hatfield Broadoak, Essex, England [settled at]
Roxbury
Daniel Brewer
Joanna Brewer (Sister to Isaacs wife)

Before sailing Isaac took the Oath of Allegiance from Captain Mason 22 June 1632. Isaac sold land in 1632 in (Kings) Hatfield, Broadoak, Essex, England (for passage?) and was Freed 4 March 1633.

He settled in Roxbury, Massachusettss ca 1639 along with other emigrants of the Nazeing Community. In the Ancient Transcript, there is a loose leaf, somewhat worn and obscure, but in tolerable preservation, written about the year 1639, at any rate, between 1638 and 1640, as appear from the names and handwriting. Being, by nearly ten years the oldest record in the Town Books, and containing an accurate and, no doubt, complete list of the inhabitants, it is here copied. It was after 1638 because James Astwood came then and before 1640 because George Alcock died then. Isaac Morrill owned 204 acres worth 17 or seventeen pounds. (See below)

A note of ye estates and persons of ye inhabitants of Roxbury.

Acres Persons & Estate

27 1/2 Daniel Brewer 9
204 Isaac Morrell 17 00 00 00
&

When an inventory was taken of livestock in the town Isaac Morell had 1 goat and 3 kidds. Isaac was one of the richest men in Roxbury Isaac Morel for the house he lives in 00 12 00 to be paid to the school in taxes 1645, he was an officer board member of the first free school in Roxbury, an original donor of the Free School, he agreed to collect the school money and pay it over to the schoolmaster , a selectman in 1653, he was a constable in 1659 and it is known he was a blacksmith, making ornamental iron works for churches, houses and ships, as was his brother Abraham. A trade learned from their father perhaps?

He had two houses and two forges and one of Isaac Morrill's two forges belonged, in 1720, to his great-grandson, Samuel Stevens. People were well supplied with arms. For instance, in the parlor of Isaac Morrill, there hung a musket, a fowling piece, three swords, two belts of bandoleers (for holding powder and bullets), a pike, a half pike and a corselet. & Isaac Morrill's estate in Roxbury contained fourteen acres. Isaac was a member of the Honorable Artillery Company of Boston, Massachusetts the year it was charted, 1638. He became a member of the First Church, Roxbury, Massachusetts and church records of the Salisbury First Church of Salisbury, Massachusetts show both Isaac (Isaak) and his wife were members as of 4 May 1687. , & Isaac died six months after his brother Abraham and is buried in The Old First Burying Place in Roxbury, Massachusetts. He left only daughters, his sons having all died young. His will is printed in Genealogical Register, XI, Page 35. A small piece of headstone was found marked:

Isaac Moril
Aged 74 year
Dyed 18-10-1662

In 1913 this small piece of history was embedded in a newer stone marking the burial sites of Isaac Morrill, his family and Abraham Morrill. Sarah, his wife, was born in England ca 1600 and died 9 November 1672 in Roxbury, Massachusetts.

footnotes:
Hoyt 1897, Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury, Page 766
Savage, James, no publish date listed, A Genealogical Dictionary of The First Settlers of New England, Before 1692, Vol. 3 Morehouse-Morse
Braintree and Bocking Heritage Center, Braintree, Essex, England, England Ships Passenger List of the Lion from Sussex settled in Boston then Roxbury. Children Daniel, Anne and Joanna listed on ship. With brother John Brewer
Morrill, Francis, 1916, The Ancestry of Daniel Morrill of Hartford with his Descendents and some Contemporary Families, Page 10
Annie Smith, 1914. Morrill Kindred in America, list Sarah as Isaacs wife name, original ship listings I have seen list only Mrs. Morrill.
Thwing, Walter, 1908, History of the First Church of Roxbury, Massachusetts 1630-1904, Page 48 list: Sarah (Freeman) Morrill, sister to Joanna (Freeman) Brewer
Morrill, Francis, 1916, The Ancestry of Daniel Morrill of Hartford with his Descendents and some Contemporary Families, Page 10
Probate Record Office, London, 8 Charles I (Essex) File 416
Ellis, Charles, 1847, The History of Roxbury Town, Page 124
ibid.. Page 17
ibid.. Page 19
Ellis, Charles, 1847, The History of Roxbury Town, Page 50 Also New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 1848, Vol. 2, Page 52 list: Early Records of Roxbury, The document of which this is a copy belongs to and appears to have been a fly-leaf in the earliest book of records of the town of Roxbury. There is no date upon the paper, it was on or after 1634 and not after 1643.
Drake, Francis, 1908, The Town of Roxbury; Registry Department of the City of Boston, Doc. # 93, 1905, Page 50 list; What appears to be a fly-leaf from the original book of town records. Its date is somewhere between 1636 and 1640. The figures on the right of the names, sometimes erroneously supposed to indicate the number of persons in the respective households, have an evident correspondence with the number of acres given in the column on the left, and perhaps a calculation in pounds and shillings.
Registry Department of the City of Boston Records Relating to the Early History of Boston, Document 93. -1905, Page 50
Ellis, Charles, 1847, The History of Roxbury Town, Page 37
Thwing, Walter, 1908, History of the First Church in Roxbury, Massachusetts 1630-1904, Page 48
Ellis, Charles, 1847, The History of Roxbury Town, Page 51
Morrill, Francis, 1916, The Ancestry of Daniel Morrill of Hartford with his Descendents and some Contemporary Families, Page 10
Ellis, Charles, 1847, The History of Roxbury Town, Page 124 and Drake, Francis, 1878, The Town of Roxbury: Its memorable Persons and Places, Page 111
Registry Department of the City of Boston, Records Relating to the Early History of Boston, Document 93. -1905, Page 111 and Ellis, Charles, 1847, The History of Roxbury Town, Page 124
Registry Department of the City 0of Boston, Records Relating to the Early History of Boston, Document 93. -1905, Page 105
Ellis, Charles, 1847, The History of Roxbury Town, Page 80 and Drake, Francis, 1878, The Town of Roxbury: Its memorable Persons and Places, Page 105
Ellis, Charles, 1847, The History of Roxbury Town, Page 20
Hoyt, David, Vol. 1, 1897, Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury, Pages 418-432
Essex Institute, Historical Collections: Salisbury Church Records, Vol. 1, Page 24
New England Historic-Genealogical Society, 1881, The New England Historical and Genealogical Society Register, Vol. 35, Page 23
Department of Cemeteries Roxbury, Massachusetts, Document 1904
Smith, Annie, 1912, Morrill Kindred in America, Vol. 1, Page 17
ibid.. Page 17
Some information about Isaac taken from: Ellis, Charles, 1847, The History of Roxbury Town, Page 124

Change of Calendar years

Change of Calendar

In the year 1751 the English Parliament passed an act by which the old style of computing time was altered to the new. Eleven days were to be taken from September 1752 and the first day of January was to be the first day of the year, instead of March 25 as formerly. This last change accounts for the double dates so often found between these two periods. Thus it was that the year 1752 began on the first day of January, The 3rd of September was reckoned the 14th, and that intermediate eleven days were omitted from the calendar. The new style was first adopted by Catholics in 1582 and not generally by Protestants till sometime after. Russia has still not changed to using the new dates. To meet the wishes of both the Catholics and the Protestants it was customary from the first settlement of this country till 1752 to give double dates from January 1st to March 25th. Thus January 9 1725 would be written January 9 1724-25 or 1724/25. March was the 1st month and April the 2nd ect., all dates before 1752 are in old style. To convert a day to the new style or present dates you must add ten days from 1500 to 1700, 1600 was a leap year and eleven days from 1700 to 1752. Example September 2 1625 becomes September 12 1635.

Last of NH and MA town histories with 1 canada town

Salisbury, Massachusetts was founded in 1638 as a "plantation". In the spring of 1639, the records show that the grantors agreed that each settler should have two pieces of meadowland and a certain amount of planting land, according to wealth of the granteesfour acres to every one hundred pounds.

A strip of territory extended from the Merrimac river north a distance of almost ten miles, including also within its scope what is now the town of Seabrook, a portion of Hampton and Kingston, all three in New Hampshire, the Powwow River on its western border, which separated it from Amesbury and its eastern boundary the Atlantic Ocean.

The first settlement was very near the ocean, where the original land grants were made, and later become known as the East Parish. At first this collection of settlers named their community Colchester, but the General Court in 1640 changed the name to Seabury, by which name it was first incorporated as a town. A goodly number of the immigrants in this town came from Seabury, England.

Of the families first settling Salisbury, Massachusetts the Curriers built ships, saw-mills and laid the first brick for a woolen-mill, the Morrill's, Ensign Morrill and his two sons operated the first machinery, the Browns were merchants and mechanics of note, the Rowell's operated brick yards and saw-mills and built the first brick building in 1628 the Franklin Hawk building where the first public meeting on slavery was held.

Salisbury, New Hampshire was founded in 1768.

South Hampton, New Hampshire was incorporated in 1742. This town was one of the first granted by Governor Benning Wentworth. When the New Hampshire-Massachusetts border was established in 1741, territory that was in Amesbury and Salisbury, Massachusetts, became part of New Hampshire. South Hampton was chartered in 1742 from that territory.

Much of the area was already settled when the boundary line was changed, and some residents petitioned to become part of a town closer to them. The east end was annexed to Hampton Falls in 1742 and the west side was separated to form Newton in 1748. At one time, the town was home to over twelve different religious sects.

Stanstead County, Canada is situated in the southern part of that portion of Lower Canada, which is called the Eastern Townships. It is bounded on the north by the counties of
Shefford and Sherbrooke, east by Sherbrook County, south by the State of Vermont, USA and west by Miesico and Shefford counties. It is about thirty-eight miles long from east to west and twenty miles wide from north to south and contains about six hundred and thirty square miles.

Wilmington, Massachusetts was first settled in 1665 and was officially incorporated in 1730, from parts of Woburn, Reading and Billerica. Minutemen from Wilmington responded to the alarm on April 19,1775 and fought at Merriam's Corner in Concord. Wilmington men also fought at Bunker Hill. The Middlesex Canal passes through Wilmington.Chartered in 1792 and opened in 1803. It provided freight and passenger transport between the Merrimack River and Boston.

NH and MA towns

Hampstead, New Hampshire was originally a part of Amesbury and Haverhill, Massachusetts. It was first settled in 1728 and was incorporated by New Hampshire in January 1749.

Hampton, New Hampshire originally included Hampton Falls, North Hampton, Kensington and Seabrook settlements. It was originally a part of Massachusetts and was settled as a town in June 1639.

Haverhill, Massachusetts (see Atkinson, New Hampshire)

Hawke, New Hampshire was originally a parish of Kingston. It was chartered in 1760 as Hawke, after Admiral Sir Edward Hawke. The town was renamed to Danville in 1836 after early settlers, at least three of whom had been named Daniel.

Kingston, New Hampshire incorporated on 6 August 1694 once included East Kingston, Danville, Sandown and part of Hampstead. The First Church was organized 29 September 1725

Loundon, New Hampshire was incorporated in 1773 and was named for John Campbell, 4th Earl of Loudoun.

Lyme, New Hampshire was granted a charter 8 July 1761, but settlement did not begin until May 1764, by emigrants from Connecticut.

Roxbury, Massachusetts was first settled in 1630. It was located midway between Dorchester and Boston, Massachusetts. Roxbury, Massachusetts included West Roxbury, Jamaica Plain and Part of Brookline and is now part of Boston, Massachusetts. It was eight miles long from east to west and two miles wide from north to south.

Rye, New Hampshire was incorporated in 1726 and was the site of the first settlement in New Hampshire, established by David Thompson in 1623 at Odiorne's Point, which he called Pannaway.

This township was originally part of Portsmouth called Sandy Beach, and it was incorporated as a parish of New Castle in 1693 when that town separated from Portsmouth. In 1726 it was separated from New Castle, and incorporated as Rye, after the borough of Rye, a flourishing English Channel town. Rye's eight-mile length of coastline is dotted with old names such as Wallis Sands, Jenness Beach, Locke's Neck, Ragged Neck, Rye Harbor, and Odiorne Point.

In 1876, the thriving village of Gosport on Star Island in the Isles of Shoals was annexed to the town. Rye is the only New Hampshire town with Atlantic islands, having annexed four of the Isles of Shoals; the remaining five islands belong to Maine.

1 comment(s), latest 3 years, 5 months ago

looking for katie nee nottmeier ehlers

Surname research results
found the following for Mo & ILL

New info in bold

Katie Pauline Nottmeir: b. 1900 d. 23 Dec 1996
Nottemeir, Nottemeyer, Nottmeyer

MO b. 1910-1960 = negative
MO b. pre 1910 = negative
MO d. = negative


Nottmeier, Adele L
Spouse: William F Nottmeier (1905 - 1989)*
Zion Cemetery
Saint Joe
Monroe County
Illinois, USA
b. 1908 d. 2000

Nottmeier, Albert G.
b. Aug. 12, 1911 d. Oct. 5, 1970
Blue Springs Cemetery
Blue Springs
Jackson County
Missouri, USA

Nottmeier, Albert Heinrich
b. Oct. 31, 1909 d. Jun. 19, 1980
Saint Paul Evangelical Bu...
Waterloo
Monroe County
Illinois, USA
Albert was the son of Frederich Nottmeier & Katherina Nagel. He married Susan Folk (1915-1988) 26 April 1936 at the Redeemer United Church of Christ, St. Louis, MO. They had a son Norman.

Nottmeier, Alice Elizabeth Huss
b. Dec. 4, 1922 Oakwood (Marion County) Marion County, Missouri daughter of Carl and Tempie (Thomlinson) Huss
d. Feb. 16, 2003 Fulton, Callaway County, Missouri
Auxvasse Cemetery
Auxvasse
Callaway County
Missouri, USA
She was married to Henry Nottmeier on Jan. 11, 1946. He preceded her in death.

AUXVASSE - Alice (Lottie) Elizabeth Nottmeier, 80, of Auxvasse, died Sunday, Feb. 16, 2003, at the Callaway Community Hospital in Fulton.

Survivors include one son, Jerry Huss and wife, Cookie, of Auxvasse; one grandson, Jody Huss of Auxvasse; one great-grandson, Ethan Huss of Columbia; one sister, Sarah Jane (Bert) Hudson of Auxvasse; and numerous nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her parents; one daughter; one grandson; and 13 brothers and sisters

Nottmeier, Armin C b. Jun. 9, 1905 d. Jan. 26, 1974
Saint Paul Evangelical Bu...
Waterloo
Monroe County
Illinois, USA
Spouse: Bertha M.

Nottmeier, Arnold
b. Sep. 3, 1913 d. Oct. 16, 1993
Saint Johns Cemetery
Valmeyer
Monroe County
Illinois, USA
Spouse: Emma Nottmeier (1913 - 1971)

Nottmeier, Arthur W
b. unknown d. May 30, 1986
Saint Paul Evangelical Bu...
Waterloo
Monroe County
Illinois, USA

Nottmeier, Audrey A Mueller
b. Jun. 9, 1923 d. Oct. 20, 2010
Zion Cemetery
Saint Joe
Monroe County
Illinois, USA
Audrey was the daughter of Tony and Anna Mueller. She married Vernon Nottmeier, 1923-1972 (son of Frederich Nottmeier & Katherina Nagel) 12 May 1956. They had 2 children: Martha & William. After Vernon died (1972) she married George Nagel 1909-1984 (son of Henry Nagel & Carolina Ackermann).
Nottmeier, Bertha M
b. May 4, 1908 d. Jan. 6, 1990
Saint Paul Evangelical Bu...
Waterloo
Monroe County
Illinois, USA
Spouse: Armin C. Nottmeir

Nottmeier, Bonnie
b. Mar. 9, 1923 d. Jun. 26, 1999
Saint Paul Evangelical Bu...
Waterloo
Monroe County
Illinois, USA
Spouse: Wilbert Nottmeier

Nottmeier, Carl
b. 1870 d. 1907
Zion Cemetery
Saint Joe
Monroe County
Illinois, USA

Nottmeier, Carl
b. May 24, 1866 d. Jul. 3, 1918
Pyrmont Lutheran Cemetery...
Pyrmont
Morgan County
Missouri, USA
Spouse:
Martha Rebecca Schnakenberg Nottmeier Boerger (1880 - 1957)
Children:
Henry L. Nottmeier (1914 - 1994)*
Irene Katharine Nottmeier Krauss Mossman (1917 - 1992)*

Nottmeier, Charles L
b. May 13, 1889 d. Jun. 20, 1922
Zion Cemetery
Saint Joe
Monroe County
Illinois, USA

Nottmeier, Christine
b. unknown d. unknown
Zion Cemetery
Saint Joe
Monroe County
Illinois, USA

Nottmeier, Emma
b. Feb. 14, 1913 d. Aug. 29, 1971
Saint Johns Cemetery
Valmeyer
Monroe County
Illinois, USA
Spouse: Arnold Nottmeier (1913 - 1993)*

Nottmeier, Ernest, Sr
b. Oct. 26, 1908 d. Nov. 10, 1987
Holy Cross Lutheran Cemet...
Emma
Lafayette County
Missouri, USA
Spouse: Nora L.
Son of Carl and Emma Nottmeier

Nottmeier, Ernest, Jr
b. Dec. 31, 1932 in rural Concordia, he was the son of the late Ernest Nottmeier Sr. and Nora Langkrahr Nottmeier.
d. Sep. 26, 2009, 76, of Emma at Long Shoal Campground near Warsaw, MO
He married Barbara Arvieux Dillon May 19, 1984, who survives of the home
He was a surveyor for several years, was employed for 18 years by Missouri Department of Transportation and was a farmer until retirement. He was a member of Holy Cross Lutheran Church

Children:
Jerry Nottmeier preceded his father in death
William Nottmeier preceded his father in death
Debbie Nottmeier married Bailey of Sedalia
Janet Nottmeier married Dillon of Sedalia
Belinda Nottmeier married Nicholson of Sweet Springs

four grandsons; one granddaughter; nine great-granddaughters; four great-grandsons; one sister, Bonnie Bohlman of Concordia; and a nephew

Funeral services will be held at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2009, at Holy Cross Lutheran Church in Emma, Burial will be in the church cemetery, Emma, Lafayette County Missouri

Nottmeier, Frieda E
b. 1895 d. 1960
Saint Paul Evangelical Bu...
Waterloo
Monroe County
Illinois, USA
Spouse: George F. Mottmeier

Nottmeier, George F
b. 1891 d. 1965Saint Paul Evangelical Bu...
Waterloo
Monroe County
Illinois, USA
Spouse: Frieda E.

Nottmeier, Henry
b. Oct. 7, 1862 d. Aug. 21, 1918
Zion Cemetery
Saint Joe
Monroe County
Illinois, USA

Nottmeier, Henry L.
b. Nov. 3, 1914 d. Apr. 27, 1994
Auxvasse Cemetery
Auxvasse
Callaway County
Missouri, USA
Henry L. Nottmeier married Alice Elizabeth "Lottie" Huss on Jan. 11, 1946.

Parents: Carl Nottmeier (1866 - 1918) Martha Rebecca Schnakenberg Nottmeier Boerger (1880 - 1957)

Nottmeier, Luella C
b. Feb. 6, 1909 d. Jun. 26, 1994
Saint Paul Evangelical Bu...
Waterloo
Monroe County
Illinois, USA

Nottmeier, Marie
b. Oct., 1828 d. Sep. 15, 1867
Holy Cross Cemetery
Wartburg
Monroe County
Illinois, USA

Nottmeier, Mina
b. 1874 d. 1943
Zion Cemetery
Saint Joe
Monroe County
Illinois, USA

Nottmeier, Nora Louise Lena Langkraehr
b. Sep. 5, 1910 d. Jan. 26, 1990
Holy Cross Lutheran Cemet...
Emma
Lafayette County
Missouri, USA
Spouse: Earnest Sr.
Daughter of Louis Langkraehr and Emilie Kueck

Nottmeier, Susan B Folk
b. Jun. 20, 1915 d. Mar. 26, 1988
Saint Paul Evangelical Bu...
Waterloo
Monroe County
Illinois, USA
Susan married Albert Nottmeier (son of Frederich Nottmeier & Katherina Nagel) 26 April 1936 at the Redeemer United Church of Christ, St. Louis, MO. They had a son Norman
Nottmeier, Vernon Leland 58728985
b. Jun. 19, 1923 Monroe County, Illinois
d. Mar. 14, 1972 Monroe County, Illinois
Zion Cemetery
Saint Joe
Monroe County
Illinois, USA
Vernon was the son of Frederich & Katherina (Nagel) Nottmeier. He married Audrey Mueller (daughter of Tony & Anna Mueller) 12 May 1956. They had 2 children: Martha & William

Nottmeier, Wilbert 34157501
b. Nov. 3, 1917 d. Apr. 22, 2001
Saint Paul Evangelical Bu...
Waterloo
Monroe County
Illinois, USA
Spouse: Bonnie

Nottmeier, William F 58725390
b. 1905 d. 1989
Zion Cemetery
Saint Joe
Monroe County
Illinois, USA
Spouse: Adele L Nottmeier (1908 - 2000)



kate

More town Info from MA and NH

Boscawen, New Hampshire was originally granted a charter in 1732 as Contoocook, after the river of the same name. In 1760, the town was incorporated as Boscawen, in honor of an English admiral, Edward Boscawen, who fought under General Amherst in the conquest of Canada. Admiral Boscawen was responsible for the capture of the fortress at Louisburg, Nova Scotia. The Contoocook Fort on the Merrimack, one of the first log forts constructed for protection against the Indians, was built here in 1739. In July 1997 the New Hampshire State Veterans Cemetery was established by legislature in Boscawen on 104 acres previously used as a state forest. Population, Year of the First Census Taken: 1,108 residents in 1790

Canterbury, New Hampshire was chartered 13 October 1727. Original settlers were James Gibson lot 14, Paul Gerish lot 9, Nathaniel Morrill lot 112 and John Shepard lot 143. Jeremiah Clough bought lots 68 & 69 in 1738. In 1736 when Jeremiah Clough Jr. was born, he was believed to be the first white child born in Canterbury, New Hampshire. In January of 1773 the citizens living in the southeasterly portion of Canterbury petitioned to be set off as a separate parish.

Chester, New Hampshire was incorporated in 1722. Chester once included Candia, set off in 1763, Auburn, Raymond, large parts of Hooksett and Manchester. First called "the chestnut country", it may have been the first of the settlement grants by Massachusetts selected for expansion of growing populations in the seacoast. The name may be derived from Cheshire, Chester being the county seat of Cheshire in England.

Danville, New Hampshire was incorporated in 22 February 1760 as Hawke was a part of Kingston, New Hampshire. The name was changed in 1836 to Danville.

Epping, New Hampshire was incorporated in 1741. This was one of the last towns chartered by Massachusetts Governor Jonathan Belcher prior to the establishment of New Hampshire as an independent province. Epping, once a parish of Exeter, was incorporated as a separate town in 1741. It was probably named for Epping Forest, a suburb of London used by royalty for deer hunting, which was likely familiar to Governor Belcher. Epping was the home of three of New Hampshire's governors: William Plumer (1759-1850), David Morrill (1772-1849), and Benjamin Franklin Prescott (1833-1895).

Epsom, New Hampshire was incorporated in 1727. Epsom was one of seven towns chartered by Massachusettss authorities in 1727 long before New Hampshire became an independent province, when John Wentworth was Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts. The name most likely came from Epsom, England, home of the Earl of Derby, who had established horse racing stables there at about the same time the town was chartered. Epsom Downs became famous for its Derby horse race. England's Epsom was also known for the curative value of its mineral springs, the source of Epsom salts

Exter, New Hampshire was settled in the spring of 1638 by persons banished, for their religious beliefs, from Boston and the Massachusetts Bay Colony

Fort Edward, New York was still wilderness in 1700, prior to the construction of any forts, the area was known by the old Indian name of Wahcoloosencoochaleva or the "Great Carrying Place". At this point on the Hudson River with rapids and falls, further travel by water to the north was not possible. The Indians would leave the Hudson at Bond Creek carrying their canoes overland to the headwaters of Lake Champlain. War played an important part in the early development of this area.

Sir Francis Nicholson was sent here during Queen Anne's War to erect a stockade and build a road to Fort Ann in 1709. This fortification became know as Fort Nicholson only to be abandoned shortly thereafter.

In 1731, John Henry Lydius, a Dutchman from Albany, erected a fur trading post here known as Lydius House or Fort Lydius. This was Fort Edward's first documented structure. A sketch of this house was included in a survey made by a Frenchman named Anger in 1732.

Again, war caused the construction of another fort under the direction of Phinehas Lyman during the French and Indian War. Sir William Johnson changed the name of the fort from Fort Lyman to Fort Edward on September 21, 1755. It was named in honor of Edward, the Duke of York and Albany, grandson of George II and brother of George III. At this time a large military hospital complex was constructed on the island, presently known as Rogers Island.

Franklin, Massachusetts was first settled by Europeans in 1660 and was officially incorporated in 1778. The Town is also home to the birth place of America's father of public education, Horace Mann. Franklin is home to what may be the nation's oldest continuously operational one-room school house (Croydon, New Hampshire's school dates to 1780, but there is debate as to whether it is truly "one room"). The Red Brick School was started in 1792 and the building was constructed in 1833 and was operational until 2008.

Franklin, New Hampshire was incorporated in 1828 and situated at the junction of the Pemigewasset and Winnipesaukee Rivers, where they meet to form the Merrimack River. This territory was originally known as Pemigewasset Village. Franklin was created from portions of Salisbury, Andover, Sanbornton, and Northfield, and named in honor of Benjamin Franklin. Franklin is the location of Daniel Webster's birthplace, which was in the portion of Salisbury taken to establish the town. Franklin was incorporated as a city in 1895. Franklin was known for a machine-made hosiery mill that used a process developed by the Shakers.

Gilmanton New Hampshire was chartered in 1727, but the first year round occupation was not until 1761-63.


Hope this helps someone
kate

Abraham Morrill

It is most likely that most of the Morrills of the Northeast part of the country are descendants of ABRAHAM MORRILL. So opens most of the books I have found written on the Morrills or the descendents of Abraham Morrill.

In doing the research for this book I came across a few other interesting facts. Most of Abrahams male and quite a few of the female descendents were educated people for the times. The males could read and write many leaving books in their wills. When one considers the cost of owning a book in the 1600 and 1700s,, the Morrills must have considered the cost worthwhile.

Many were active in government, either on the local or state level. They represented their towns in the State legislative, owned, and ran their own businesses. Many also seemed to be blacksmiths; trades handed down by father to sons. Most owned not just the lot of land their houses sat upon, but large acreage and farms. One even owned a square mile of land by the time he died!

When the call for arms came, to help with the struggle for freedom in the new country, they answered the call! From sixteen to sixty, they went to fight. Ezekiel Morrill, at the age of 70 and six of his sons served in the Revolutionary War as well as cousins and uncles.

They were a religious lot, not a few of them becoming deacons of their churches or reverends of their towns. Some even were a bit to far ahead of their times and ran against the grain, but even with that they were still accepted as an integral part of the community.

While this book is mostly facts and dates take a few moments, while you are reading, to look between the lines. Read the wills I have included and think about what they left behind to the next generation. Was it a book? Or perhaps the pewter plates and spoon? Most people of the early colonial times ate from wood or earthen bowls, with carved wooden spoons.

And lastly, while we do not know much about the women who raised, married and buried the men named Morrill we know they came from good stock, as we are a part of them.


kate