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GEORGE AND OLLIE JOHNSTONE OF PURVES RD. NEAR MAIN CREEK, VIC., AUST. (YERING, SUNBURY?)

This journal arises from my journal HOW DID SARAH WILSON LEAD ME TO HENRY TUCK? Two years ago when I read Hec Hanson's MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN and saw the mention of George and Ollie,I assumed that George was related to William Johnstone, the grantee of 20C Wannaeue. Armed with genealogical information from Petronella Wilson's GIVING DESTINY A HAND, I realised that George Johnstone could not be a descendant of Sarah Wilson. Just to be sure, I contacted Christie Johnstone, son of the grantee's brother, Robert Henry Johnstone and Catherine, daughter of Henry Tuck Jnr. Christie confirmed that George Johnstone was not related and thought that George had lived near Red Hill.

Peter Wilson's THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO shows that Alex Cairns and Janet Dalgleish were married in Scotland. Their tenth and last child was Walter who married Florence Laughton. Their children were Edna,Jean and Olive.

Trove shows that Walter was involved with the Boneo cricket and tennis club and after the opening of the latter's court (1911,if I remember correctly), the members were entertained at Walter's property "Eureka". It also shows that he was later at Main Ridge. In 1910, Walter was assessed on 87 acres of Barker's and 103 acres, which should have been 143 acres being crown allotment 2, Wannaeue, granted to Alexander who called it (Menstries?) Main. In 1919, Mrs Helen Cairns had this property which was correctly described as 143 acres.

One genealogy page stated that Olive Millicent Cairns,born in 1908, married George Johnstone. The My Heritage page showing all Cairns-Sabine results has a photo of Ollie and shows that she died in 1990.

Diane Johnstone has a page which shows that George's father, George Johnston was born at Yering in 1866, married Sophia Harrison and died at Dromana in 1949. Now,there was a George Johnston at Sunbury in the early 1860's, who was granted land in the Buttlejork (west of Jacksons Creek) part of the town,wrote letters to the Melton Road Board and was appointed in 1865 as one of the trustees of land reserved for the Church of England at Sunbury. Then he seems to have disappeared. The fact that land on De Castella's estate at Yering, Victoria's first vineyard (as wikipedia puts it)was advertised in 1864 might have had something to do with his disappearance!

I have forgotten most of the information that I learned from I.W.Symonds BULLA BULLA, but I do remember that there were some prominent early vineyards at Sunbury: (Bubeck's?)on Vineyard Lane near The Gap, Eadie's Ben Eadie,and two run by politicians, Francis (Goonawarra) and James Stewart Johnston (Craiglee.)

MY MESSAGE TO DIANE JOHNSTONE.
I am more interested in George Johnston's son, George Johnstone. He could be the George Johnstone who married Olive Millicent Cairns (born to Walter Cairns and Florence, nee Laughton,in 1908) and had three children: Alexander, Heather and Ian. I write local history for family historians as itellya on family tree circles. My journal HOW SARAH WILSON LED ME TO HENRY TUCK concerns another Johnstone family which lived near Main Ridge on Shoreham Rd and Roberts Rd.

In MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN, Hec Hanson told an amusing tale about George and Ollie Johnston. " A lady from over on Purves Rd, Ollie Johnson (nee Cairns), used to come to the dances (at the Main Ridge hall) on her own.Her husband,George, didn't dance and would stay home with the kids.One night I got her up for a dance,and as we waltzed around the hall Cocko (Harold Wilson) flicked grass burrs in her direction. These would cling to her dress. We often wondered what George thought about this when she arrived home."

I will be mentioning in the above-mentioned journal that George was not descended from Sarah Wilson, whose daughter Matilda married William Johnson. (Their son, William changed the family name to Johnstone by deed poll.) However I will write a separate journal: GEORGE AND OLLIE JOHNSTONE OF PURVES ROAD NEAR ROSEBUD, VICTORIA to provide background information about the Cairns, Haughton etc families. I wonder if George Johnston's wife was related to the family of Alf Harrison after which Harrisons Rd near Dromana was named.

DIANE'S REPLY.
That would be him. A few of the Johnston(e) clan moved to Main Ridge area from Gruyere, Colstream, Lilydale area. My grandfather was George's brother and Aunty Ol' a lovely lady. I will pass the anecdote above to Alec, I'm sure he'll love it. I will see what I can find out about Harrison. I've never found anything connecting her to Alf Harrison though. Thank you for the invitation to your information, it is hugely appreciated.


AN EMAIL FROM GEORGE AND OLLIE'S SON, ALEX.
Hi
I am the Alex Johnstone you referred to in the email to Diane Howden . I am the son of George and Olive (nee Cairns) . With reference to your �How Wilson led me to Tuck� I have a great deal of curiosity as to how Walter Cairns my grandfather. The only one to marry of a large family living in what was at the time a backwater of Boneo met and married Florrie Laughton a member of a well off family ( Laughtons Foundry creswick st. Footscray) I believe the main connection to Melb at the time would be by steamer up the bay.

There in must lay a story the truth of which I guess I will never learn.

I have read the book by Hec Hansen (I have vague memories of him) that was the first I heard of the burr incident when i read the book.

There has been considerable research done on the Cairns family by Ray Cairns also a Google search of the Cairns family of Boneo will reveal that nearly everyone on the southern peninsular was related at some early stage.

As for the Wilson�s were they from what I have been led to believe Wilson, Cairns. Purvis, Rowley and a number of old families that are all related in some form or other

I will try to send this email and if you receive it and if you feel I may be able to help in your search just ask the question and I will endeavor to answer.

MY SECOND REPLY.
I now believe that the connection between Walter Cairns and Flo Laughton took place at Flinders. William Brent married Flo's sister, Elizabeth (Bessie.) W.C.Brent was on the Flinders Park committee of management by 1896 and was in the area until about 1910. After David Cairns* fell from a wagon while intoxicated and was partly paralysed, his missus ran a boarding house in Flinders for a long time, so Walter probably met Flo during a visit to Flinders.

*While I was looking in my THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO notes for details of David's accident and the tenure in the boarding house, I found something that confirms my theory about Walter and Flo meeting at Flinders.

It was Blacks Camp Davey (1842-1923) who was involved in the accident. He was the second child and son of David Cairns and Janet Thompson who had married in Scotland,and married Elizabeth Russell. During his teens he had driven the cart for Benjie Shaw (who later established the Kangerong guest house in Dromana.) Then his early connection with Flinders started, with David working for Sam Tuck, stock riding for the Barkers (Boneo and Flinders), and breaking horses for Robert Anderson (Barragunda at Cape Schanck and much land in the parish of Flinders.) He also worked on the Cape Schanck lighthouse, South Channel Fort, and for T.B.Muntz on Main Creek Rd.

After David's accident in 1897,the Blacks' Camp property (probably crown allotment 29, parish of Fingal, of 52 acres 2 roods and 25 perches opposite the Cape Schanck turn off, granted to D.Cairns on 19-1-1888) was sold and he and Elizabeth started the Oaklands guest house in Flinders which was finally sold in 1919.

Walter (1870-1956) was, as stated earlier, the son of Alexander Cairns and Janet (nee Dalgleish.) Not surprisingly,he had a sister named Janet (1859-1909) who married William Brent and was buried at Flinders. Just in case you thought that William Brent was a bigamist, I'd better point out that Janet married William C.Brent the Flinders Park trustee, not the bloke that married Bessie Laughton.

Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 20 August 1909 p 1 Family Notices
DEATHS.. BRENT. - On the 16th August, Janet, the dearly beloved wife of W. C. Brent, and mother of J. R. and A. C. Brent, of Flinders, aged 49 years and 5 ... 1115 words

ALEX JOHNSTONE'S REPLY TO MY FIRST REPLY.
My first reply outlined the many Wilson families including those of Sarah Wilson and the unrelated Henry William Wilson, who both started on the Survey, Ray Cairns' birth at his great grandma Neville's at South Melbourne (her daughter had married Michael Cain; hence Neville St on the Cains' Tyrone) etc. Then I asked:

1.Where was George and Ollie's property in Purves Rd in relation to the Purves' Green Hills and the Brady property Mount Evergreen?
2.Also, how big was it and what kind of farming was done?
3.I know that Walter Cairns' property at Boneo was called "Eureka".
(a) Was this crown allotment 2 Wannaeue, including the cemetery?
(b) Was his later property at Main Ridge the one where George and Ollie lived and if not, where was it?

THE REPLY(with my comments in italics.)
Thanks XXX for the info re Wattie & Flo It seems like the probable turn of events.

I have formed a few conclusions, maybe quite likely wrong over the years that I will run past you. Firstly I feel that the Cairns family bought some wealth with them from Scotland,(1) Elizabethâs limestone house at Rosebud Hospital. (2)Edna ( Watties eldest Daughter) & Ned Edmonds limestone house with substantial annex near the Boneo hall.(3) Ray and Charlieâs substantial houses at the Schanck (4) Watties 2 room limestone house at Purves Rd , with substantial annex , furnished with high value cedar and marble topped furniture , even fitted out for gas lighting. Not the picture of pioneer families usually presented, (ie) Slab huts and bullock drays hard work and deprivation. The exception to this seems to be the now non existent Eureka. I believe to have been on the left of Boneo Rd 5 or so Km past the Boneo school. Somewhere opposite a property once owned by Lou Gaffer. The Edmonds place extended from Browns Rd up to and included the cemetery. I believe it would have been inherited from the original settler family , I think it also included the large bald hill , now a vineyard, at the end of Duels rd ,later sold to Bert Herman by Ned and Edna.

MONEY. It is likely that Robert Cairns brought some money from Clackmannan when he came out in 1852, as his wife's parents,the Drysdales (pioneers on the other side of the bay)would seem to have done as well. (The mention of Jean White,later in the reply is interesting because Robert White Senior, father of Blooming Bob White and grandfather of Bullocky Bob White, i.e.Robert James>Robert White, came from Clackmannan too and if I remember correctly, his wife's maiden name was Cairns.All the details of this are in my HILL HILLIS journal and Family Tree Circle's toolaroo is about to publish a book about the family.) Robert was intending to farm on Little Scotland (crown allotment 2 section A Wannaeue on the north east corner of Boneo and Browns Rds)but soon turned to lime burning which was so profitable that he was able to assist his brothers, Alex and David to come out in 1854. I believe that their initial capital was greatly increased by this trade , and that the dispersal from Little Scotland and increased emphasis on farming in the 1870's, was due to increased competition from limestone quarries closer to Melbourne, such as at Lilydale. While all the descendants managed to buy land, they were comfortable rather than rich and poor, with David's James of Alva Hill becoming rabbit inspector for the shire and his brother Harry was known as Carrier Harry, and the farming being mainly of the subsistence variety apart from when a contract could be won, such as supplying chaff for cabmen's horses to Stringer's store at Sorrento.

HOUSES. 1.The house at the Rosebud hospital, where Elizabeth died was Eleanora and has heritage protection. See Mornington Peninsula Shire Heritage Study which contains a photo and historical information but not the name. This is on 13AB section A Wannaeue, bounded by the highway, Boneo Rd, Eastbourne Rd and almost Chinaman's Creek,which was purchased by Eleanora Davey and William in the early 1900's, Davey building Eleanora and William in 1919 being assessed on 64 acres of 13AB*.
(*13B of section A Wannaeue, now housing the shops, bottleshop and possibly the medical superclinic at the west corner of Boneo Rd, consisted of 5 acres and from about 1920 was known as Martin's Corner because of Martin's shop which probably still serves as the Blue Mini cafe.)

2.EDNA AND NED EDMONDS'. This was crown allotment 3, section A, parish of Wannaeue, of 143 acres 2 roods and 16 perches at the north west corner of Boneo and Browns Rds with frontages of 718 and 800 metres respectively. This was granted to Walter's father, Alex (and R.Amos, who according to the late Ray Cairns never came to Australia.)
In the last available rate record of 1919, Miss Helen Cairns ((1869-1946) of Boneo, daughter of Alex and sister of Walter, was assessed on 144 acres (c/a 3, A, Wannaeue, this property) and 135 acres(part 13A, section B,Wannaeue.) The 135 acre property would have been the land, mentioned later by Alex, at the end of Duell's Rd. Crown allotment 13A is between the end of Duells Rd (the midpoint of the western boundary) and Purves Rd,indicated roughly by Melway B-F 8 (bottom half) and 9 (top half.)It is likely that this land adjoined Quamby but as the parish map has no acreage for 13A, I can' be sure.

In 1921, Helen and Walter's brother, William, had 64 acres at Martin's Corner but was probably living on "121 acres part 20A, section B, Wannaeue "(probably the whole of 21C, the Brady family's Mount Evergreen, sold when William Brady died and his wife, Rosa nee Roberts, moved back to Rosebud near her beloved Methodist Church.) Mount Evergreen was at Melway 171 K 10,172 A 10.

3. Maroolaba, near Pattersons Rd. I think there's a photo of this in LIME LAND LEISURE. When the grant was obtained the cost of the house (and other improvements) came off the purchase price according to the late Ray Cairns. Details in my transcript TALKING HISTORY WITH RAY CAIRNS.
4.WATTIE'S ON PURVES RD. This was QUAMBY and was south of Davos St (not Davies Lane), according to later information in Alex's email. It was probably west of the bend in Purves Rd (Melway 171 F 9-10.)
5. EUREKA.At about 5km south of the Boneo school, Eureka would be at approximately Melway 259 part C, D1 or 2, on land granted to William or James Patterson or nearer the Cape Schanck turn off,"Blacks Camp" David Cairn's grant, crown allotment 29 Fingal of 52 acres 2 roods and 25 perches. Walter might have bought David's grant after the latter's accident in 1897.(See near end for details about Walter's time on Eureka.



The transition from Eureka to Purves Rd (Quamby) I suspect again was the result of an inheritance of some sort around the 1910 -1920 period .approx 80 acres Here lived Florrie, Wattie and Daughter Olive . The properties Green hills and Mt Evergreen ring no bells with me.
This 80 acre property, Quamby, may have adjoined, or been part of, the 135 acre property on which Walter's sister, Helen was assessed in 1919. As Helen did not die until 1946, it is more likely that the 80 acre Quamby adjoined the 135 acre property at the end of (and obviously accessed by) Duells Rd.

Enter George Johnstone. He purchased around 180 acres next door to Quamby (Arthurs Seat side)including what is now called Davies Lane around the 1930,s from Jimmy Purves. Nature took its course and a marriage looked like happening between George and Ollie. George lived in a shed so decided a house was required so got a brick mould and built a wheel barrow , found a sandy bank at the headwaters of the Drum Drumolock? creek and made the bricks to build a 4 room house opposite the Pig and Whistle cafe on Purves Rd.

The Pig and Whistle (which the owner told me used to be a dairy farm) is at Melway 171G8,directly across Purves Rd from Davos St, which is virtually the southern boundary of 29AB Wannaeue, whose northern boundary is 84 metres south of the Wilsons Rd corner.

lot7- Green Hills being Allotments 29A and 29B, parish of Wannaeue, county of Mornington, containing 301 acres 1 rood 20 perches agricultural and grazing land fenced and subdivided, timber rung and partly cleared, well adapted for orchards, prettily situated in the Arthurs Seat Range from which is obtained extensive views of the bay and Southern Ocean.
(P.2, Argus, 25-3-1891. Sale of the estate of Prof. Hearn of Heronswood, Column 6.)

The Purves would have been leasing Green Hills before the sale because it was while they were building the dairy there in about 1888 that some aborigines scared the living daylights out of two young girls at Tootgarook, as detailed in MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN. Thus it was the southern 180 acres of Green Hills that became George Johnstone's farm. George would have got the material for his bricks at Melway 171 D8, the headwatersof the Drum Drum Alloc Creek.


Along came Alex , Heather and Ian. Wattie and Florrie became older and George and Ollie purchased Quamby. Wattie and Florrie then moved over to middle daughter Jean Whites place on Main Creek RD The substancial house on Quamby fell into disrepair and is now unfortunately non existent.

Couple of other things , I can remember Hec Hansen and I think Alf Hansen shooting kangaroos off horse back with high powered rifles in the Waterfall gully area.I also have a cup, legend has it,that was won by a horse Wattie owned at the Boneo racecourse situated opposite Ken Spunner's (Bunnings)

I'm looking for references to the racecourse and Eureka, but none of the reports or advertisements mention the farm's name except the tennis court opening.
TO STAND THIS SEASON AT Walter Cairns' Farm, Boneo, THE ROADSTER STALLION TIT WILLOW.
(P.3, Mornington Standard, 21-9-1907.) In the summer of 1904-5, Rajah the 20 race winner from India stood at Eureka in between stints at Brady's Mount Evergreen and Randall's Hindhope (the Rosebud Plaza site east to First Avenue and including Hope St.)Walter won prizes at the Dromana and Flinders shows for tomatoes, vegetables and fat lambs.

Tennis. OPENING OF BONEO COURT. After being unavoidably postponed for some time, the opening of the Boneo tennis court was held on Saturday, April 8th. There was a good attendance, and the weather was all that could be desired. The opening set was played by the secretary (Miss Cairns) and Mrs W. Cairns again Miss A. Baker and Miss E. Cairns, the latter coming off victorious after some exciting play. Several sets were played, and the vice-president (Mr E. Cairns) in a short speech declared the court open. Afternoon tea was then served. The President (Mr Richard Baker) was not able to attend, as he is convalescent after a severe illness, but all expressed the hope that he would soon be about again. A very enjoyable evening was spent at 'Eureka,' the residence of Mr Walter Cairns. (P.3,Mornington Standard, 22-7-1911.)


Eureka was opposite a property owned by Lou Gaffer.
Mr. J. Gafer, of Boneo Rd., advised council that he has leased a portion of property, and desires to use a portion of swamp for the purpose of in tense culture. The council will ascertain the legal position re the right to drain.(P.10,Standard, Frankston,11-4-1946.)

All what I have entered here as facts come with the proviso that you are able to cross reference them with info from another source

I hope it all makes sense and fills in some spaces for you, If I can be of further assistance just ask

Regards

Alex







JOHNSTONE BROTHERS OF DARUM AND THEIR LAND NEAR BONEO????

2 comment(s), latest 1 year, 10 months ago

GEORGE BURSTON OF FITZROY AND ARTHURS SEAT (VIC., AUST.) and Shirley Holmes, Red Hill legend.

CAN PARISH MAPS BE WRONG? OH YES THEY CAN.
Anyone can make a mistake and copyists in the Lands Department could be excused for accidentally writing 297 instead of 279 when there is so much,often microscopic, detail to copy. That's what seems to have happened to crown allotment 4,section 3, parish of Kangerong, Robert Caldwell's "Dromana Hill",later known as Fairy Vineyard.

POSTSCRIPT. Boundary dimensions were given in links(hundredths of a chain or 20.1168 centimetres) and were written in almost microscopic numerals.These would have been clear enough on original paper maps unless a copyist had slightly smudged them, but in a photocopy of a photocopy the number of links seems to be different every time you look at it or change the angle of the magnifying glass. I have stated below that the southern boundary of crown allotment 4, section 3, Kangerong was 2258 links,but the online map showed that it was 3500 links. As a result the area of this allotment is probably correct.

The following was originally written in an email about Tar Barrel Corner but is deemed to warrant a journal.

I called in on Keith Holmes while I was at Bentons Square and in the short time available before he headed off to get laser treatment on his eyes, I showed him the comments under my post 1940 and Back To journal re the date and venue because he had not yet been contacted about it. Seems very keen and was looking forward to reading the three Cleine comments with his newly lasered eyes after his appointment.

I thought I had read that Keith's wife, Shirley,was a McIlroy*,so I checked and found that she was a Burston. Keith answered in the affirmative when I asked if she was related to George Burston and added that George had a house in Dromana.

*I had read it, not in a dream or Hill 'n' Ridge as I had thought but in an email about the location of some former hill and ridge residents and I quote:
Back again xxx,

Just a few thoughts that I hope may be helpful. I think that Keith Holmes wife Shirley may have been a McIlroy, but not sure.

I am sure that Hec Hanson mentioned the Burstons in MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN. (There's an index at the end.)

In the Shire of Flinders rate record of 1919- 1920, George Burston of Fitzroy was assessed on land in the central riding as follows:
189 acres part c/a 4, s(section) 3K (Kangerong); 80 acres c/a 25 c W (Wannaeue); 440 acres c/a 28A and 28B.

In the West Riding, George was assessed on:
268 acres part c/a 1, 2, section B,W. and 100 acres part c/a 2, section B, W.

Description of George Burston's land.
In 1919-20,George had apparently not yet bought his house in Dromana. In 1875, the rate record of the newly formed shire of Flinders and Kangerong consisted of about 10 pages at the most but by 1919 many farms had been subdivided and Dromana (town) residents were listed on pages 102 to 112 with the Kangerong Estate on page 113 and central riding farms from page 114 to 134 where the Dromana Estate started.

CROWN ALLOTMENT 4, SECTION 3, KANGERONG (Melway 159 J-K 9-12.189 acres part c/a 4, s(section)3 K.)
Consisting of 297 acres 2 roods and 29 perches, this was granted to Robert Caldwell (after whom Caldwell Rd was named) who also received the grant to crown allotment 10B.

Crown allotment 4 was bounded on the west by the wedge shaped town common, cum gravel reserve, (which ran from a spot over Boundary Rd from Jetty Rd to Arthurs Seat Rd. The remaining vestige of the wedge shape of this reserved land, now part of Arthurs Seat State Park, can be seen in Melway 159 H-J 11-12 . The width and southern extent of c/a 4 was exactly that of the quarry property shaded grey. The c/a 6 grants of "Simon the Belgian" as Colin McLear put it,(H.B.Simon, after whom Simon's Cutting was named) fronted the road reserve south of the quarry land.

Crown allotment 4 also contained the streets east of Hillview Quarry Rd to about 205 Boundary Rd. This estate was possibly subdivided by Dromana's whirlwind Progress Association president, Spencer Jackson, ,judging by the name of Jacksons Way, after his sales of the Foreshore Estate (on Lou Carrigg's former Racecourse and footy ground land behind the Dromana Hotel) and the Panorama Estate (where streets names indicated a view of Mt Macedon and the You Yangs) in 1927.

Which portion of c/a 4 did George own or occupy. Its Boundary Rd frontage was 4000 links(half a mile or 800 metres but because of the wedge shape of the gravel reserve,the southern boundary was 2258 links*.The depth of c/a 4 was 8100 links. The depth of the estate is 35 chains (3500 links) and the boundary between the estate and the grey quarry land is 39 chains. The depth of the estate (3500 links) multiplied by its mean width (3950 links) gives a result of 136.5 acres.
(*As stated in the POSTSCRIPT above, the southern boundary was 3500 links, not 2258 so the surveyor's very complicated calculation of crown allotment 3 is probably very close to the mark. Alterationsin thecalculation are in bold type.

The quarry land has a mean depth of 4650 links (half of the sum of 4500 links and 4800 links) and a mean width of 3700 links (half of the sum of 3900+ 3500). Length by width gives a result of 172 acres. If we add these two calculated areas, there is a total of 308 acres, about 10 acres MORE than stated on the parish map.
.*

However it is clear that George had land in both present portions of crown allotment 4. Were the streets named after counties and Anne named because of George Burston, Spencer Jackson or some later owner?

* It is possible that the surveyor wrongly calculated the area of crown allotment 4 (called Dromana Hill by Robert Caldwell and Fairy Vineyard by coachbuilders Elliot and Stevenson). The town common and c/a 4 form a rectangle adjoining the east boundary of "Gracefield" (Bryan's Cutting.) The northern boundary was 6 chains (the common) plus 40 chains ("Dromana Hill") making a total of 46 chains. The depth was fairly constant at 81 chains. This gives an area of 372.6 acres.

As stated, the combined calculated area of the town common and Dromana Hill was 372.6 acres. The online map describes the town common as crown allotment 4A but does not give its acreage. Relying on my paper map is risky but it does seem to describe the gravel reserve as consisting of 91 acres and two roods. If we deduct this from the combined 372.6 acres, the acreage of Dromana Hill would seem to be 281.1 acres, fairly close to the total of the housing estate and Hillview Quarry land (279.7 acres) and far short of the 297 acres on the parish map.

CROWN ALLOTMENT 25c WANNAEUE.(80 acres c/a 25 c W .)
This (sort of)triangular allotment, consisting of 79a. 2r. 16p, was granted to the Freehold, Investment and Banking Company of Aust. on 25-6-1905. Across Purves Rd from Seawinds and fronting Arthurs Seat Rd.,it is indicated by Melway 171 F-G1 and some of F2.

CROWN ALLOTMENTS 28a AND 28b, WANNAEUE. (440 acres c/a 28A and 28B.)
GET TO BED!

2 comment(s), latest 2 months, 3 weeks ago

GEORGE SMITH'S WOOLOOWOOLOOBOOLOOK WAS NEAR ROSEBUD (VIC., AUST.) BUT WHERE EXACTLY?

PRIVATE MESSAGE.
Hi XXX,
Do you have a copy of Georgiana's Journal (Melbourne 1841-1865) edited by Hugh McCrae.
The copy that I have is stamped McCrae Homestead. I paid the expensive price of 20c at Parkdale Op Shop. Such an interesting read.

REPLY.
No,I don't have a copy and congratulate you on your bargain purchase at the op shop. I first read the book back in 1988 when I started adding to the 1.5 foolcap pages that then constituted the history of Tullamarine. Georgiana's description of Richard Hanmer Bunbury (an early grantee in the parish of Tullamarine) was superb, her detail (re pioneers) probably only surpassed by Harry Peck in MEMOIRS OF A STOCKMAN.

Your message prompted me to see if the book was available online. It doesn't seem to be in e-book form but Marie Fel's book is, and the following result* led me to information about George Smith's Woolooowoolooboolook (as it is written in Georgiana's Journal.)
*I succeeded once - Page 305 - Google Books Result
https://books.google.com.au/books?isbn=1921862130
Marie Hansen Fels - 2011 - âHistory
But the editor of Georgiana's journal, her grandson Hugh, has been damningly criticised in a recent PhD thesis2 for his prejudiced and manipulative changes to ...



Owen Cain arrived in about 1943 and soon after his arrival,his four year old daughter (Sarah Ann?)who was born in America en route from Ireland,wandered away from "Tyrone" (near Tyrone beach west of Rye's White Cliff.) The story of her ordeal was recorded by young George McCrae; details are included in my LOST journal. At this time, Georgiana was still in Melbourne socialising with Governor Latrobe. One thing that puzzled me was young George's description of the Wooloowooloooboolook homestead being six miles along the Cape Schanck road from his own home.This would place Smith's homestead near Pattersons Rd, Fingal.

In LIME LAND LEISURE, C.N.Hollinshed mentioned that this run was added to the Tootgarook Run in 1850 by Hobson, who then requested that the expanded run be transferred to James Purves. No indication of the location of Smith's run was provided.

Marie Fels expended enormous effort to establish the burial site of Johnny,George McCrae's aboriginal hunting mate,who died after returning from his trip to America with George Smith. He was carried to the burial site, just south of the (McCrae) lighthouse, by George himself, Johnny's distraught father and relatives lining the grave and tying the body in a seated posture.

This land was part of George Smith's lease, described thus by George Smith.

"Having promised Mr McCrae the small piece of land opposite his residence at Arthurs Seat of which I beg leave to offer a description. I request that it be added to the lease about to be issued to him."

Smith described the land as, "the small piece of land between the Cape Schanck rd and the sea commencing near the rocks at the point known as St Anthony's Nose and ending at the creek at the junction of the Point Nepean and Cape Schanck roads nearly opposite the end of Mr McCrae's paddock fence."
(P.314, I SUCCEEDED ONCE.)

Marie Fels believed that the creek was Coburns Creek but it would have been ADAMS CREEK which now lies underneath The Avenue. Descendants of Henry Everest Adams believe that the Rosebud pioneer beached his ship near today's Wattle Place at about the time that the McCraes obtained the lease of Arthurs Seat and was granted 750 acres of land. An Adams family historian has disputed the year of the Captain's arrival, given as 1845 in the Dromana Pioneer Pathway, believing that crown allotment 20 Wannaeue was part of the Arthurs Seat run and Captain Adams would have arrived after 1851.

Crown allotment 20 is between The Avenue and Parkmore Rd, extending south to Bayview Rd. The boundary fence described by George Smith probably ended at or near Adams Creek and the Cape Schanck road junction (with the Point Nepean road) was probably today's Wattle Place. I believe that Captain Adams was granted a (hush hush)lease of the WANNAEUE VILLAGE Reserve (crown allotment 20)for services rendered to the government, perhaps bringing ticket of leave men from Van Dieman's Land circa 1841 to overcome a labour shortage, or shipping supplies from Singapore. The "so-called 750 acre grant" could have also included a lease of land later granted to Back Road Bob Cairns and others on the south east side of what Georgina McCrae called the MOUNTAIN ROAD (later Cape Schanck Rd/ the back road/Hobson's Flat Rd/ Bayview Rd.) The 750 acres could also be a distorted memory of 75 acres of Wannaeue Village purchased as a grant in the 1870's as a pre-emptive right.

I believe George Smith's Wooloowoolooboolook was on the foreshore from Anthony's Nose to Adams' Creek and ran east to at least Jetty Rd, perhaps Boneo Rd (where crown allotments are labelled NO SECTION.) I also believe that Smith's run included crown allotments 5 and 6,section A,Wannaeue, between Boneo Rd and (today's)Old Cape Schanck and now occupied by most of the Rosebud Country Club golf course. Granted to James Purves these allotments may have been the site of the Wooloowoolooboolook homestead where the(so-called*) Mrs Smith nursed young Sarah Ann Cain back to health.
*Marie Fels gives details of the relationship!

The parish map indicates the north east corner of these allotments is roughly 23 983 links from the Arthurs Seat homestead; that's about 240 chains or THREE miles. The south east corner, adjoining the Cairns family's Little Scotland was 5330 links farther south west, about five eighths of a mile. Young George probably didn't have a parish map,odometer or trundle wheel to check his estimate of the distance between his home and Smith's so I guess SIX MILES was a reasonable guess.

Another possible location involved other James Purves grants, crown allotments 1,2 and 3 of the parish of Fingal, bounded by The Dunes and Limestone,Truemans and Sandy Rds (Melway 252B4) but this was too far from Cape Schanck Rd to be correct and was probably part of the Boniyong (Boneo) run.

Georgiana's Journal and Marie Fels' I SUCCEEDED ONCE are both well-worth a read.

2 comment(s), latest 2 months ago

GEORGE YOUNG, THE MYSTERIOUS PIONEER OF DROMANA, VIC., AUST.

In A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, Colin McLear discussed many of the pioneers of the 5 280 acre Jamieson's Special Survey, today's Safety Beach, but also extending east to the line of Bulldog Creek Rd. Petronella Wilson's GIVING DESTINY A HAND mentions several more. One of these was George Young Junior.
I am guessing that Thomas Oliver Young was his nephew or great nephew.

YOUNG.-On the l2th May, at 33 Nelson road, Newport, Thomas Oliver, third beloved son of Mary and the late W. W. Young; brother of George,Frank, Andrew, Joe, Elsie and Grace Young. Aged 30 years 6 months. Atrest. Funeral Notice. YOUNG. - The friends of the late Mr Thomas O. Young are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of internment, Williamstown Cemetery. The funeral will leave the residence of his mother, 33 Nelson-road, Newport, at 3 p.m. THIS DAY (Saturday), May 14. -Thomas Lonsdale; Undertaker, Williams town and Newport. (P.2, Williamstown Chronicle, 14-5-1910.)

I make this wild guess because there is so little else (from trove)to indicate that George Young junior ever existed and there are several possible links. The first link is that George Young junior died at Williamstown in 1916. The second is that Thomas had a brother named George. The third is that the second given name of Thomas was Oliver. The fourth is that Thomas had a brother named Andrew.

The first two links need no explanation. Oliver was the name of George's father in law, who died about four years before George's first marriage in 1855. Andrew might have been the name of the father of Janet White, George's second wife who bore him 10 more children. Now these given names were fairly common but you never know!

GEORGE YOUNG'S STORY.
I'll give you the ending before the start!

YOUNG.-In loving memory of my dear husband, George Young, who died 29th September, 1916, in his 86th year, at his son - in - law's, James Johnson, jun , 5 Garden street, Williamstown, leaving a wife and a large family of sons and daughters.-Inserted by his loving wife.(P.2, Williamstown Chronicle, 29-9-1917.)


WHAT MAKES GEORGE YOUNG MYSTERIOUS.
The presence and location of many pioneers is made known through parish maps and ratebooks. If somebody was not a grantee, it can usually be worked out,with great difficulty, where they were living. However, George Young and probably many other pioneers (especially tenants on Jamieson's Special Survey and those leasing crown land)have slipped under the radar because they have moved on before Road Boards were formed and started assessing residents.

The first Kangerong Road Board assessment in 1864 just caught a Connell involvement on the Survey; somebody called Connell had his rates paid at the last minute by somebody called Wilson. George Young had already moved
on,probably to 16 acres in the parish of Balnarring but that was in the future Flinders Road District, where the first assessment was in 1869. If it had been in 1870,we would not have known he was there either.(See the Flinders RoadBoard assessments below.) It is a rare stroke of luck to pinpoint where a pioneer was living from trove. This information is more likely to come from family folklore or an old title deed.

I initially suspected that George Young might be related to Robert Coxen Young or Henry Young. The first was granted 21B Kangerong of 121 acres(Melway 161 E 10-11)and was assessed for a few years, possibly selling out or leasing to the Counsels. The latter owned or leased the 249 acre Gracefield (Melway 159 H9 to the Seahaze Estate at G12.) I think both were men of means and the following, from GIVING DESTINY A HAND, makes it unlikely that George was related.

George's father, also George, was born in Birmingham and, convicted of stealing brushes at the age of 16 was transported to Van Dieman's Land in 1820. Having served his time, he married Charlotte, who had been convicted of highway robbery, in 1826 and George Junior was born in 1828. Charlotte was murdered by being pushed into a fire when the boy was about 7 and his father later married Elizabeth Jones (who had been transported for stealing a purse.)George's father and stepmother were recorded as passengers to the Port Phillip District (Victoria) in 1848. Petronella Wilson speculated that George (junior)worked his passage across and mentioned no siblings (which surely there were unless there was a reproduction problem.)

George Young junior married Jane Wilson at Sarah Wilson's house on the Survey on 18-4-1855. Jane had been born in 1834 to Oliver and Sarah Wilson and had been about 7 when the family arrived on 12-1-1841. George was now 25 and his occupation was given as carpenter. On the same day, possibly simultaneously, Jane's sister, Matilda, married William Johnson. The two couples later moved to Melway 255 H-J 1 with George Wilson, brother of the brides.George and Jane had five children:Jane Ann, George, Mary Jane, John and Sarah.

Jane died at 29 shortly after Sarah's birth on 12-8-1863 and the baby was taken in by Matilda and William. On 2-1-1866,George married Janet White, an orphaned 18 year old from Mt Martha. George Wilson and his fiancee, Mary Jane Connell were witnesses; Mary Jane's father, Anthony, had been granted a huge area of land across three chain road from the grants of Andrew White, who may have been Janet's father.

IN the SUPREME COURT of the COLONY of VICTORIA : Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction.-In the Will of ANDREW WHITE, late of Tubba Rubba, In the parish of Moorooduc; In tho County of Mornington, in the Colony of Victoria, Farmer, Deceased. -Notice Is hereby given, that, after the expiration of 14 days from the publication hereof, application will be made to tho Supreme Court of the colony of Victoria, in its Ecclesiastical jurisdiction, that PROBATE of tho LAST WILL and TESTAMENT of Andrew White, late of Tubba Rubba, in the parish of Moorooduc, in tho county of Mornington, in the colony of Victoria, farmer, deceased, may be granted to Archibald White, of Tubba Rubba aforesaid, farmer ; William White, of the same place, farmer ; and William Armstrong, of Mornington, in tho said colony, clerk of petty sessions, the trustees and executors named in and appointed by tho said will.
Dated this sixteenth day of January, A.D. 1865.
GEORGE JOHN SIMS, l8 Collins-street east, Melbourne, proctor for tho said Archibald White, William White, and William Armstrong, the above-named trustees and executors.
(P.6, Argus, 17-1-1865.)







I have no way of knowing if the G.Young, grazier of Moorooduc, was our George, but I have a fair suspicion that he was. I also suspect that his unfortunate son was named after one of the executors of Andrew White.

MORNINGTON, Tuesday.
A young man named William Young aged 26, a son of Mr G Young grazier of Moorooduc and considered to be one of the best horsemen in the district, met with a fatal accident whilst out riding on Sunday breaking in a young horse. It appears that the horse by some means got its tail entangled in the crupper of the saddle and commenced to buck, ultimately coming down and falling heavily upon the rider, who was severely injured about the head. The services of Dr. Reed were promptly called in, and on examination that gentleman pronounced the injury to be concussion of the brain of a serious nature, and in spite of all that could be done for the sufferer he remained in a partly unconscious state until Monday afternoon, when death put an end to his sufferings. An inquest or magisterial inquiry was not deemed necessary, Dr Reed having given a certificate that death resulted from concussion of the brain, &c.(P.6,Argus, 24-2-1892.)

In GIVING DESTINY A HAND, Petronella Wilson stated that, after his first wife died, George Young had married 18 year old orphan, Janet White of Mt Martha in 1866 and they lived on 16 acres in the parish of Balnarring. This description made me think of Andrew White, whose grants were across three chain road from those of Anthony Connell in the parish of Moorooduc. But first I had to find the 16 acres in Balnarring.

A snatch of the first Flinders Road Board assessment (8-6-1869) is reproduced below.
33. Thomas Bullock house and 59 acres; 34. Hamilton Allen 115 acres; 35. George Young house and 16 acres;
36. William Johnson house and 5 acres; George Wilson house and 32 acres; 37. Edward Grey house and 53acres.

On 7-6-1870,the following were assessed.
49. Thomas Bullock 59 acres; 50. George Wilson 48 acres; Edward Gray 54 acres. (George Young and William Johnson were no longer there! George Young's 16 acre block was obviously part of George Wilson's property.)
I checked every parish up to 1874 and the first Shire of Flinders and Kangerong assessment, and there was no sign of either. I had suspected that if Janet White was related to Andrew White, George and Janet would have been likely to settle in the parish of Moorooduc (which was in another Road District, being north of Ellerina Rd.
And about the grazier's son being named William: William White, executor for Andrew White (Law notice above in italics) was probably related to George Young's second wife, Janet. George had five children from his first marriage and added ten more with Janet including William Henry and Charles Albert.

George Young (1828-1916)b.Launceston married (1855) Jane Wilson (1834-63.) Their children were:
Jane Ann (1856-1938) who married (1880) James Connell. (See the Connell journal.)
George (1857-?) who married Jane Clout and had a son,George.
Mary Jane (1859-?)
John (1861-1947) who in 1888 married Martha Ellen Andrews and had seven children.(Names available.)
Sarah (1863-1943), raised by Aunt Matilda, who married Dromana carpenter, James Matthews, in 1882; no issue.


DEATH OF OLD MORNINGTON IDENTITY The Mornington district has lost one of its oldest pioneers in the person of Mr. Jack Young, who had resided in the locality for many years. The late Mr. Young was the son of the late Mr. George Young, who lived near Tuerong Creek in early days. Mr. Jack Young was born in the district, and can therefore be claimed as Mornington's oldest resident. The funeral took place at the Mornington Cemetery.
(P.1, Standard, Frankston,29-5-1947.)
Jack was probably John (above) born in 1861. I have seen the Andrews family described as an old Moorooduc family.

From E. Young, Tuerong, mentioning that the road between Messrs Pitt and Young's properties was impassable. -Referred to the engineer. (P.3, Mornington Standard, 19-9-1903.)

E.Young was most likely Edward Young, woodcutter, brother of Charles Young and brother-in-law of Jack Skillen.
(P.2, Mornington Standard 6-1-1906.) Charles and Edward would have been among the 10 children of George Young and Janet (nee White.)Charles was accused of stealing a slaughtered pig.

The following tenders were accepted : Street sweeping and lamp lighting Charles Young, 30s per week. Supplying 150 yards of metal (spalls) from Tuerong quarry-W. White, 5s 6d per yard. (P.5, Mornington Standard, 21-1-1905.) William White would have been related to Janet White, George Young's second wife. I presume Charles was performing his work in Mornington itself.

George Young's last child with Jane, nee Wilson, was Sarah. She was raised by her aunt, Matilda Johnson, and married James Matthews of Dromana. James was a carpenter and arranged funerals for Hector Gamble of Frankston. He also did the Dromana, Cape Schanck, Flinders mail run.

OBITUARY JAMES MATTHEWS Mr. James Matthews passed away at Bush Nursing Hospital, Mornington, on Monday, September 24 at the age of 85 years. He was born at Dromana, and lived there all his life. His parents were early settlers of Dromana. His wife predeceased him. The funeral was to the Dromana Cemetery. The coffin bearers were: Cr. Rudduck, Mr. J. F. Cross and Mr. A. H. Cross (nephews), Mr.F.Debney. Rev. E. Shackell read the burial service. Messrs. Hector Gamble and Son conducted the funeral arrangements.
Standard (Frankston, Vic. : 1939 - 1949) Thursday 4 October 1945 p 3 Article.

DROMANA Mr. J. Matthews, a well-known identity, died at Mornington Hospital recently. He is survived by a wife. The deceased had resided in Dromana for many years. (P.2 same paper and issue!) Sarah died in 1943 so the first report is right and the second is wrong! They had no children.

James Matthews served as President of the Dromana Sports Club, was a trustee of the recreation reserve and supplied materials for the maintenance of the mechanics' institute. Like many, he suffered from the 1939 fire at Dromana.

The local undertaker Mr. J. Matthews who is aged 79 years was almost trapped in his workshop. His home and workshop were destroyed and tools worth £300 and six coffins were lost.(P.2, Argus, 10-1-1939.)



ANOTHER 10 FOR GEORGE.
George and Jane's first child, Jane Ann married James Connell in 1880 at the age of 24, by which time her father would have provided her with a collection of half brothers, two of whom are mentioned below.
After marrying Janet White on 2-1-1866, George had ten more children including William Henry and Charles Albert who were working with Jane Ann's 14 year old son, Anthony Connell, in the Tuerong quarry when the lad was killed.

THAT'S THE YOUNG HORSE!
Mr. J. Oldfield had a narrow escape from a serious accident on Monday. A horse and trap belonging to Mr. Young, of the Three Chain road, bolted from Mornington with the winkers off and without a driver, and ran into Mr. Oldfield's jinker at Mr. Monk's corner, breaking the shaft, and doing other damage. The same day a horse belonging to Mr.Connell bolted in the main street, breaking the shafts also.
(P.2, Mornington Standard, 12-1-1902.)

WAS THIS CHARLES ALBERT YOUNG'S HOUSE?
During a thunderstorm on Monday, a five roomed house owned by Mr C. Young at Tuerong, was burnt to the ground. The chimney was struck by lightning, and the whole place set on fire. The building was uninsured.
(P.2, Mornington Standard, 24-8-1912.)

5 comment(s), latest 1 year, 8 months ago

GOLD MINING AND "BLAIR'S" NEAR DROMANA, VIC., AUST.

Advertising
Mornington Standard (Frankston, Vic. : 1911 - 1920) Saturday 2 November 1912 p 2 Advertising

GOLD MINING (Column 4, item 4.)
BLAIR'S (Column 3, item 2.)

Sometimes when I'm looking for something on trove,I happen to notice another item on the same page. I read it out of curiosity but not wanting to be sidetracked, especially when a massive amount of time will be required to correct digitisation, I get back onto the original search. Unfortunately,my memory is so good that I will remember this chanced-upon item years later, and wishing to post it in reference to the subject currently under discussion, spend countless hours trying to find it again.

One such item, LAKE V JONES, that I have been looking for during the past two years, was found by chance again last night and posted as a comment regarding 858 Pt Nepean Rd, Rosebud in my FERRIER, HUTCHINS journal. In that comment I mentioned another case, JAMIESON V LAKE/LEAK/LEAKE, that I had discovered by chance and had never been able to find again. My latest attempt involved a JAMIESON,WANNAEUE search on trove.

I have included such chance finds in "Notes" journals re the Tullamarine,Blackwood,Mornington Peninsula etc. areas but I thought it best to make this morning's finds the subject of a new journal. The digitisation is not corrected but the print on the actual newspaper is easy enough to read.

GOLD MINING.
Much has been written about the Tubbarubba diggings in LIME LAND LEISURE, THE GOLDEN PLAINS OF TUBBARUBBEREL and so on. They were in James Hearn's easternmost grant in the parish of Moorooduc and to the south at the eastern end of Jamieson's Special Survey in the parish of Kangerong. There were rushes circa 1860 and again during the 1890's depression when the mysterious Mr Eaton (BERNARD Eaton) was a major operator and the Moat boys found a watch that had been a missing clue in the Schnapper Point murder case about two decades earlier. Not much success had been found at these diggings although Mr Barnes was apparently an exception.

Jamieson's Special Survey's western end is indicated exactly by the north and south boundaries of Safety Beach and it extended east to the line of Bulldog Creek Rd. The northern 1000 acres,north of the line of the Martha Cove Waterway (formerly Tassell's Creek) was by 1864 owned by John Vans Agnew Bruce (after whom Bruce Rd was named)and leased by Edwin Louis Tassell until his death and then others. Bruce, who with Cornish built the Murray River and Mt Alexander railway to Sunbury and beyond, and lived in Essendon, spent the summer "season" there and employed Maria Stenniken,who married Godfrey Wilson,as a servant.

The southern and major part of the 5280 acre survey was owned by William John Turner (Big)Clarke and was leased by many pioneers of the Dromana area, as detailed in Colin McLear's A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA. Luckily the workers in the Titles Office caught my infection of enthusiasm and provided me with free copies of the subdivision of Clarke's Estate, and all the lot boundaries are transposed on my Superpages. Lot 14 has the eastern end of Wallaces Rd as its northern boundary and the eastern boundary is the line of Bulldog Creek Rd south to the northern end of Junction Rd. The western boundary runs north from the top left corner of Melway 161 G7 to meet Wallaces Rd about 40 metres east of the barrier in 161 G3. As you will notice, Bulldog Creek runs diagonally through lot 14 and the 40 acres that O'Connor applied for would have been along this approximately 70 chains (1400 metres) portion of Bulldog Creek.

As mentioned before,much has been written about the Tubbarabba diggings circa 1860 and in the 1890's (although names of the diggers are not much mentioned) but little has been seen about later mining there.

BLAIR'S.
William Allison Blair bought most of his Mornington Peninsula land because of what was under it. It is wrongly stated by Charles Hollinshed in LIME LAND LEISURE that Blair settled at Ngarveno near the (future) Moonee Valley but it was actually (Netherly?-See Blairs of Essendon journal.) This was the site of the former Essendon Technical School at Melway 28 D4.

The Mornington Peninsula west of Boneo Rd was in the early days the preserve of lime burners.William Allison Blair,a lime merchant bought as much land as he could at West Rosebud and mainly south of Rye Township to displace these pioneers, getting their kilns and creating a near monopoly. Irish tenants' rights hero, Charles Gavan Duffy,bought much land west of Owen Cain's Tyrone to subdivide. It was inevitable that the two would clash as Blair sought land further west. There was a huge court case with each accusing the other of employing dummies. One parcel of land in dispute between the two could not be decided so Sidney Smith Crispo suggested that it be proclaimed a village and it was. It was named after Sorrento in Italy which had so impressed Duffy during his voyage to Australia.

Blair, whose son married a daughter of John Murray Peck of Lebanon and lived at "Wannaeue" (now Red Rooster, Melway 16 J9), later moved to a farm at Braybrook. When the Lilydale quarries opened,peninsula lime lost its value and this probably convinced Blair that buying land for subdivision rather than what was under it was a better prospect.However with so much land on his hands that had lost much value because of the 1890's depression, it was noted in the 1900 rates as "In lig." which I presume meant insolvency. The lime burners had loosened the topsoil providing a suitable habitat for ti-tree and rabbits. The former Blair "Lime" land along Browns Rd was bought from the banks for a song by James Little Brown who transformed the devastated area into the beautiful pasture we see today.

Blair's as mentioned in the advertisement was certainly not bought for its lime deposits.

GORDON BOYINGTON'S RECOLLECTIONS: MOONEE PONDS, CARRUM DOWNS, FRANKSTON ETC., VIC., AUST.

Why has this duty been thrust upon me? My neighbour has had dizzy spells so I spent some time with him, resulting in the need for another journal, despite the fact that I have the Red Hill Dictionary History, the Pioneers' Pathway and the Watson/Stirling on the go as well as so many other unfinished journals. Since 1988, I have been recording information that would otherwise have gone to the grave and there don't seem to be enough hours in a day!

Gordon Boyington's father, Alfred, joined the Royal Navy as a boy but when W.W.1 started he was too young to be allowed into combat. However he managed to rejoin using documents that weren't his. After he'd had three ships sunk underneath him he figured he'd used all his luck and transferred to the army. He hadn't used it all and managed to survive the carnage at Flanders. After he was discharged he emigrated to Australia, meeting Gordon's mother on the voyage out. Gordon was born nine months and a few days after their marriage.

Gordon remembers his time living in Aspen St, Moonee Ponds(Melway 28 H7.) as a four year old. Later they lived at Carrum Downs before moving to Daly St in Frankston and then Station St in the same town. He recalls that Cranbourne Rd was sealed as far as the cemetery and was just a dirt road thereafter.

The organist at the Church of England at Carrum Downs, Mr Hadwin, used to travel in his T model Ford car to houses in the area teaching organ, piano and another instrument.

Gordon's brother, Raymond, was a professional boxer, known as Snowy Boyd, who fought the Australian middleweight champion (NAME)four times during the mid 1940's. Gordon gave the sport a go too, the venue for their bouts being the West Melbourne Stadium in Dudley St, North Melbourne, near the railway bridge. I asked Gordon if he remembered Russell Horsborough, and the name rang a bell, but Russell probably fought under a ring name too. Russell used to live at 21 McConnell St, Kensington, two houses from me, and introduced me to boxing as a skinny 11 year old at the Kensington Police Club where I knocked a triple Australian champion off his feet: Frankie Flannery was probably affected by a liquid with an Arabic name at the time.

Gordon's brother, Raymond, was a very good horseman and was involved with a camping facility at Mt Eliza where suburbanites could live with nature. It was location. During the second world war, American servicemen were stationed at a girls' school near Mt Eliza; from Gordon recognising my description of Old Mornington Rd, I believe the school was Toorak College. The Principal of the college kindly supplied part of its history "The Echoes Fade Not" which states that on 15-4-1942, Colonel Davey of the Australian Army phoned to ask that the army's request to use the Toorak College property. On the last Friday of the term 1 vacation the Government revoked its decision to use the property which led to frantic activity notifying boarders' families that they could return and unpacking textbooks, crockery and photographs.
Despite this, Gordon insists that the college was used by the Americans, so a road trip will be necessary in order to clear up the confusion.

MOONEE PONDS.
When Gordon spoke about Moonee Ponds, my thoughts turned to a book that the almost 100 year old Gordon Connor had given me in 1998. Called Memories, it compiled the life highlights of members of the St John's (Essendon) Friendship Club. Gordon's father was a bootmaker at Moonee Ponds, where Gordon C. was born on 17-7-1899. Gordon was married in the original bluestone St John's in 1927 and moved to Strathmore. He and his neighbours stared in amazement at the first brick veneer house they'd ever seen, expecting it to collapse. I'll let Gordon C. paint a word picture of the depression that Gordon B.'s parents faced.

"Depression days which were very sad for those out of work.Those of us who were working helped those who weren't so lucky. We formed a committee and every week bought groceries with the money donated. (The committee members) doled it out as evenly as they could." I hope there was a committee in Moonee Ponds too!

Gordon B. recalled the Moonee Theatre in Puckle St, where Gordon C. had seen his first film in 1912. Thank you Gordon Connor! Now back to Gordon Boyington, who will hopefully tell me more of the Moonee Ponds of his boyhood.

There are two very good reasons that Gordon can remember little else about Moonee Ponds. He was only about four and remembers only walking to the milk bar in Puckle St for a treat. Such treats would have been few and far between. Gordon's father was frantically looking for work as so many others were. Gordon went to live at Moe with a Scottish woman who had worked as a maid with Gordon's aunt. Her husband was foreman of a gang maintaining railway lines in that area. Younger brother, Raymond was taken in by a Protestant minister in the Moonee Ponds area.Gordon went to school at Moe for about two years, with his unofficial aunt's two sons (older than Gordon) ensuring that he did not get into trouble. The family was reunited when the chance arose to live on a big block on the Brotherhood Settlement at Carrum Downs.

Gordon remembers that at his eighth birthday party at Moe, he was dared to climb onto the table at his "aunt's" house. He fell of course, headfirst onto a cabinet and breaking his nose.

CARRUM DOWNS.
As soon as Gordon spoke of a scheme to settle jobless families at Carrum Downs, I thought of another book donated to me, this time by Steve Johnson, a descendant of Henry Cadby Wells. Called "Fishing, Sand and Village Days" it recorded the history of the Frankston area 1900-1950 and provided training to three long-term jobless people.

The Brotherhood of St Laurence Settlement at Carrum Downs (Melway 100 F-G 1) was founded in 1935 when Father Gerald Tucker initiated a program to move unemployed men down from Melbourne. Father Tucker also envisaged the settlement helping pensioners and in 1948 moved to the settlement to organise the transition.

Lois Lambert recalled that little, bespectacled, grey-haired Father Tucker was quite eccentric. He always wore little tight rings* around his legs and leathers, and used to walk in from Carrum Downs to Frankston. Lois was proud that she remembered this remarkable man so well. (*Probably metal bicycle clips.)

Harley Klauer lived near Seaford Station and his family used to send the big catches to Melbourne but after small catches of mixed fish Harley would put an angler's basket over his shoulder and tramp around the district to the far side of Carrum Downs. Harley remembered the Brotherhood bringing old houses from Melbourne and putting them on blocks in the bush for the poor people from Melbourne. He recalled children chewing crusts of bread for something to eat. (The idea was for the jobless to be self-sufficient but at this early stage vegetables, chicken etc weren't ready for the table.) Harley was so moved by the Brotherhood's work that he donated a whole basket of fish.

Lloyd Walton's brother was the manager of the settlement. After helping out during visits to his brother, he was asked to set up a dry cleaning factory to employ older residents, but it would have been too expensive. A while later he took on the maintenance on the settlement. LLoyd discussed the wood or coke stoves used for cooking, the oval portable galvanised baths and copper-heated water, the outdoor toilets, but this was the way of life for almost everybody, not just Carrum Down residents. A bright old lady started a kindergarten at Carrum Downs because the area lacked one. If someone's milk or paper hadn't been taken in, neighbours would always check if that person was all right. Once there was suspicion that Miss Vann might have had a mishap, and, the door being locked, Lloyd climbed in the window- to be confronted by Miss Vann and her rolling pin.
Loyd said that Father G.K.Tucker would have been able to inspire audiences to walk through brick walls, despite his stutter. Although he wasn't practical, Father Tucker was a dreamer, whose dreams always came true.
Father Tucker led by example and even refused invitations to tea because he'd then have to accept all invitations and would not be an example of the self-sufficiency he wanted the settlers to develop.

Miss Turner told of how Father Tucker had been appalled by the poverty in Fitzroy and obtained financial assistance from Mr Coles. The single men used to live in Kempton Court and then up in Cafeteria (i.e. Cox Court.) When the depression ended, men got jobs and moved away. She pointed out that Father Tucker would not suffer fools but regarded him as a saint.

Mr Lomax, Licensee of the Carrum Hotel, gave Carrum Downs residents their first experience of radio at the Carrum Downs school in about 1924. Carmen Tomlinson thought that they listened to 3AR and they probably did but the station probably had nothing to do with the A.B.C.* The letters stood for "Associated Radio", a firm whose transmitter and tower were in Airport West. (*At that time.) The radio concert appears to have taken place on Saturday, 28-2-1925.(P. 2, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 18-2-1925.

GORDON'S MEMORIES OF CARRUM DOWNS.
Due to terrible headaches, Gordon is finding that memories come in flashes and often halt at the end of his tongue. However, he has drawn a map of the Brotherhood Settlement and described some nearby residents.

The entry road of the Settlement was most likely today's Tuxen Ave. Entering from Frankston-Dandenong Rd, Gordon would see, on his left, a dam which was built in about 1938, a vacant block, probably of one acre, and then a house occupied by Mrs Pope and her 13 children; Gordon thinks she might have been a widow.Then there was an elderly widow living on her own.

Gordon remembers a shop which was on the south corner of Tuxen Ave which opened about six months after the Boyington family arrived. Then there was vacant land and a track which may have been today's Weigall Avenue. On the far corner of this track lived Mr and Mrs Hadwin. Further on was another track heading south up a slight rise to a place where outdoor services were held in Summer. This track might have been Church Hill Crescent. There was a (describe) altar and concrete blocks for the worshippers to use as seats.

Mr Hadwin, the organist mentioned earlier, and his wife lived over the entry road from the Boyingtons' first house. Gordon used to walk, with billy in hand, to a dairy farm diagonally across Frankston-Flinders Rd from the settlement.

Two nearby farmers that Gordon remembers are Caine/Kane/Cain?) and Broderick. Caine's farm was near Amayla Crescent, west of Caine's Bend (Melway 100 D4.) Gordon was trying to pinpoint the location of Broderick's farm when I saw it: Broderick Rd !(100 E-F 3.) SEE BELOW RE CAINE AND BRODERICK.

The Boyingtons' first home was opposite Mr Hadwin's, their second on (Caine's?)farm, entered from Frankston-Flinders Rd and the third on the Settlement again but way back in the bush.

Gordon and Raymond attended Carrum Downs Primary School. It was a one-teacher school and the teacher, Mr Parker, wore a grey pin-striped suit.There are no prizes for guessing that the children referred to him as Nosey! Probably in 1938 a female assistant was appointed and took charge of the lower grades. Unfortunately Raymond was one of her pupils and when he undid his shirt to show what he had brought for "Show and Tell", she screamed very loudly at the sight of the blue-tongued lizard.
THROUGH THE BUSH TO SCHOOL


BRODERICK.
Jack Broderick of Carrum Downs came third in an examination for a Frankston High School scholarship donated by Dr Kennedy of Frankston. (P.2, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 26-11-1926.)

John Leo Broderick, probably the above scholar, was to marry Irma Carmen Hayes of Elmore on 15-5-1943. (P.6, The Argus, 14-5-1943.)

Gordon remembers the Broderick farm being operated by two brothers. Their father, John, had died in 1927 leaving a widow, two sons and two daughters. (P.1, F&S Standard, 1-4-1927, OBITUARY.)

J. Broderick and S.Hadwin played leading roles in the Carrum Downs Concert Club's production of "Circus Days".
(P.4, Standard (Frankston), 2-6-1939.)

John Leo Broderick, dairy farmer of Dandenong Rd, Carrum Downs must have been a keen golfer but wasn't so keen on the vagrant who stole his clubs.(P.3, Standard, 3-4-1942.)

John's brother was probably A.Broderick of Carrum Downs who advertised 100 tons of 2 ft firewood for sale. (P.2, F&S Standard, 20-1-1939.

CARRUM DOWNS ROAD NAMES.
BRODERICK RD.-see above.
LATHAMS RD. Ashton Latham of Carrum Downs was a member of the Frankston Methodist Circuit Choir.(P.4, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 6-3-1936.) In a concert in 1925, the performers included Ashton, Misses D and V.Latham and Mrs Latham.(P.2,F&S Standard, 21-8-1925.)
BAWDEN ST. As well as being a frequent performer at concerts, Mr Bawden was the foundation secretary/ treasurer of the Carrum Downs branch of the Victorian Wholesale Milk Producers' Association. (P.4, F&S Standard, 8-8-1923.) Mr Bawden was probably Hubert Bawden, but may have been his father, Mr J.Bawden who had died before Hubert's marriage in 1927. (P.4,F&S Standard, 9-9-1927.)
COLEMAN RD.Masters Jack, Arthur and Alex Coleman's recitations and Mr Bawden's usual mandolin solos were some of the items in a concert reported on page 4, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 22-10-1924.
Mr Coleman attended the meeting to form a local branch of the milk producers' association (see Bawden.) Mrs G.Coleman was passing Latham's farm on the way home from Seaford when a gunshot (to frighten off birds)spooked her horse which resulted in Mrs Coleman and her younger son being thrown from the cart and rendered unconscious; while the son recovered quickly Mrs Coleman was unconscious for some hours.
HALL RD. It is possible that this road was named after a Frankston councillor because the surname has not been mentioned in articles relating to Carrum Downs.






THE SLEEPOUTS FOR CEREBUS SAILORS AND THEIR WIVES ETC.)

GRANTEES AND EARLY OCCUPIERS IN KENSINGTON, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

All details about the grantees and early occupants of land, such as Kensington Park, will be found in my Kensington Pioneers journal. The main reason for this journal is to attach a map showing the crown allotments. the grantees, the location of Peter McCracken's dairy etc. I could not attach two maps on the same journal.

My original map was hand drawn with biro (with countless hours spent trying to scale down a Lands Department map on an A3 sheet so it would fit onto an A4 page.) The reproduction was shocking being very faint etc. Neil Mansfield, who wrote the fantastic 600+ page "The David Mansfield Story", has volunteered to improve my graphics. He has been working on this map for days! Unfortunately I had not picked up the fact that some initials could have stood for more than one grantee; Neil of the sharp eye did though. I am awaiting a response from the Kensington Association History Group, with which I was last in contact in about 1999, to clear up this ambiguity.


1 comment(s), latest 3 years, 3 months ago

GRANTEES NEAR RED HILL, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA (and Alfred Downward.)

The map, which I'll enlarge when my computer genius sons next visit, covers the area shown on Melway maps 159-161,171 and 190-1. (Incidentally, while working this out, I discovered Tar Barrel Corner, Melway 191 F4, about which janilye's question prompted my Red Hill journal.) I used a tourist map as my base; it showed only main roads so I had to estimate the course of creeks and roads such as McIlroys, Callanans, Whites etc which form (as closely as terrain permits) crown allotment boundaries. The courses of roads on the base map are not very accurate so some allotments are not the right shape on my map.
As stated in the Red Hill Pioneers journal, the area now in Red Hill and Red Hill South is located in three parishes, Kangerong, Balnarring and a small part of Wannaeue which was called Red Hill and Main Creek. The boundaries of these parishes, indicated by K, B AND W, are shown with double lines.I will list the grantees, starting at the top left corner of the appropriate part of each parish and reading left to right. The grantee's name is followed by a number which is rounded off to the nearest acre and a date if it is on the parish map.

BALNARRING. See Tubbarubba journal for updates re Alf Downward's grants.
All the land, almost 1000 acres, bounded by Bulldog Creek, Foxeys, Tubbarubba, and Myers Rds was granted to Alfred Downward, possibly in about 1905 when he bought another block inside the curve of Myers Rd just to the south. Alf was a popular member of parliament being often called upon to achieve aims such as improvements to the stockyards at Moorooduc Station. Rye often enlisted his support but Downward and Albress were obviously two words the pupils did not learn to spell, being rendered as Downard and Albas.The area that Alf bought north of Myers Rd had formerly been part of the Tubbarubba diggings which had been reserved from alienation at the request of locals.
The diggings provided a livelihood for many in the late 1880's when Bernard Eaton, brother of the late Watson and probably father of Maude, started operations and during the 1890's depression when the Moat boys found evidence that could not be produced at the 1874 "Schnapper Point" Murder trial, so named because the trial was held at Mornington although the murder occurred at the diggings.
Alf, who had earlier lived in Tasmania,according to Joan Downward, first bought land on the western side of Wilson Rd in Mornington. He acquired it in 10 acre lots, the grantee PRICKMAN ( a hard name to forget) or a later owner having subdivided it. Alf called his property Redwood because of the redwood gums (the correct name)that grew there. Balcombe of The Briars owned the land between Redwood and Strachans Rd and he or a later owner called it Redgum Flat! The redgums are a botanical curiosity because until the homestead 10 acres was put up for sale by Alf's elderly daughters (Miss Downward and Mrs Pitt after whom streets were named)and locals requested protection for the trees, botanists had not known of any redgums growing south of Frankston.
Alf Downward's election to parliament was disputed and among the witnesses who testified at the inquiry was Thomas Gomm of Dromana who drowned a few years later in 1898. He was the son of Convict Henry Gomm and the brother of Rosebud's Harry ("of whom little is known" according to LIME LAND LEISURE) and William of Hastings, none of them related to Somerville's Henry Gomm, although they had him surrounded.
South of Myers Rd.
80B, A.Downward, 44, 1905. 80A, J.Oswin, 83, 4-7-1888. 15. J.Journeaux, 308, 2-11-1882. 14A, J.Davey, 122, 20-1-74. 14BC.Fooks, 122, 21-7-74. 79A, J.Davey 129, possibly 1874. 79B, G.Sherwood, 129, 29-11-72. 55,J.Oswin 2x140, A.4-8-74, B.25-8-72. 78A, W.Gibson, 190, 22-7-74. 78B,J.B.Journeaux, 95, 22-6-77. 78B2 and 54A, J.Smith, 255, 4-5-85. 54B, A.Duff, 169, 12-11-73.
To Mornington-Flinders Rd/Arthurs Seat Rd corner.
72A, R.H.Holding, 140, 20-2065. 72B, J.Pitcher, 140, 8-7-68. 73 AB, 215, no date. 74, Red Hill Village-see Pioneers journal. 77,88, W.Aitken, 305, 10-4-81. 81,82A, J.R.Thompson, no acreage, 18-2-74. 82B, 83A1, B.Tonkin, 275, 27-7-75. 82B1, J.Hindmarsh, 61, 14-3-71. 82BB1, 64, 27-7-75. T.Attenborough, mentioned in the Pioneers journal had lots 53 and 52 which both extended from the line of Tonkins Rd to Merricks Rd, a total of 544 acres, 16-12-71.
Back to Mornington-Flinders Rd.(5th time lucky!)
71A, A.Head, 83, 26-5-84. 71B, A.Head, 117, 5-6-74.
75A, J.McConnell, 182, no date. 75B, J.McConnell, 122, 2-6-71.
89A, J.Simpson, 142, 8-3-84. 89B, W.Bayne, 142, 8-9-80.
87-85, J.Buchanan, 1040, first part in 1872. The Wightons, mentioned in the Pioneers journal, then had 710 acres whose north east corner was the Thompsons/Meyrick Rd corner. J.Palmer had lot 51 of 281 acres, fronting Merricks Rd, between the Wightons and Attenborough (no date.)
Back to Mornington-Flinders Rd.
&0 AB, W.Hopcraft 178. 69A, M.Byrne 93. 69B, F.Bullock, 97, 6-10-75. 60AB, A.Allan, 117. 67AB, E.Gray, 107. 66A, George Wilson, 40, 24-2-82. Quarry 2 ac. Military purposes, gazetted 1889, 20 ac. 66B and 65, Helen Bayne (spinster!) 140 , lot 65 14-3-81. 90, 91, J&J Bayne, 322, 4-7-79. 92, J.Buchanan, 107. 93-6, William Roy, 514, 9-1-79, 64A, J.Bayne, 70, 16-3-81. 97,98 J.R.Thompson,251, 24-8-69.
Much land near the coast was granted to Alex Wighton, J.Palmer and Thomas Hamilton.

KANGERONG.(EAST OF WHITE HILLS RD TO BOUNDARY RD.)Dates generally not clear but those that are will be given in the Pioneers journal.
As well as enlarging my map, I will also have to correct it. George Peatey's grants are shown as being at the east corner of White Hill Rd, but they were actually at the east corner of Harrisons Rd. The land between White Hills and Harrisons Rds (north of the recreation reserve, the old racecourse) was granted to William Moat. Moats Corner (Melway 160 H5)is a very historic location name. Incidentally, the name is pronounced as Mowatt.
27a, 27c,George Peatey, 101. 27?,Alf Harrison, 63. 26a,James Clydesdale, 43?, 26b and 25a, W.J.McIlroy 350.
25b, L.N.Matheson, 119.
Not shown on map; between Dunns Ck and Myers-JunctionRds: 24, C.Downward, 116? 24b, Andrew Fritsch,103.
27? and 20c, Thomas Appleyard,429. 20b, S.L.Loxton, 106. 20a, W.Kemp, 100. The parish map is so hard to read that I accidentally called the allotments east of Loxton and Kemp 26 on the map; it should be 21.
21a, C.Counsel, 121. 21b, Robert Coxon Young (he of the 5 roomed house)121. ??a,b, J.Davey, 156. William McIlroy, 150.
Eaton's Cutting Rd, the somewhat scary link with Dromana takes its name from Watson Eaton, the area's amateur doctor, who settled on 150 acres west of the Red Hill end of the road before his death in 1877, resulting from a fall while riding to attend to a patient. This land was granted to his executor, Rebecca Griffith who was not his sister, as I had earlier supposed. Its northerly and westerly extent is shown by the Dromana boundary, the bend being its north western corner.
Between Eaton's Cutting Rd and White Hill/Sheehans Rd: 9, Charles Golding(cordial manufacturer)263, 18-4-1890,
10A George Sherwood,172? ac, 10-2-1856?, 10 B, Robert Caldwell, 172 ac., 10-1-1868?

18A (S.E. cnr White Hills and McIlroys Rd),(shown as H) Henry Dunn, 50, "Four Winds". 18c (shown as C), S.P.Calder (son of the C.R.B. chairman and Red Hill Show Committee President if I remember my trove correctly), 22?, R.Ringrose (south of Calder and Dunn, 59ac F.E. (Frances?) Windsor 17 a,b,154 ac (plus 23 ac at the north end of 13 straddling the creek), 16A, T.Milner88 ac., 11-12-1862, 16B W.McIlroy 88 ac, 15B, J.Holmes & Co.105 ac., 1872? 15A, J.Holmes, 105 ac., 8-7-1887?
CLOCKWISE BACK TO SHEEHANS RD.14B, W.McIlroy, 103 ac., 1864, 14 A, ditto, 103 ac, 1890?, 13 AB, Margaret Davies, 130 ac., 1877?, 12ab, J.Arkwell, 2x 71 1/2 ac., 1862 and 1870?, 11AB, J.Wiseman, 43 and 93 ac?

William Calder owned Four Winds, which was sold in 1929 following his death. Ringrose was an early pioneer and seems to have arrived 1864-5.

WANNAEUE GRANTEES.
29, Ben Hards, 371 acres, probably 1860's, 28A, James Davey Jr, 159 ac, 5-9-1878 (see DAVEY journal), 28B John Griffith,136 ac., 4-5?-1885, 27A, Robert James,160 ac., 6-4-1897?, 27B1, John Hopcraft, 86 ac, 1-2-94 (see below). Land further south was generally considered to be Main Ridge and was mainly granted to the Shand and Brady families, the latter's homestead being called Mt Evergreen. The Shand steam saw mill provided packing cases and probably employment to the hill men.
Between Main Creek and Purves Rds, early grantees included Professor Hearn of Heronswood and lime merchant, W.A.Blair, but William Hillis (see Davey journal) was part of the fabric of Red Hill.On the other side of Purves Rd, the descendants of [b}Peter Purves, the unsung pioneer of the Tootgarook Run had Green Hills, and several other properties of which they were grantees.
William Hopcraft lived across Mornington Flinders Rd from John Hopcraft. In about 1878, Robert Adams was farming, on license from the Crown, in the angle of this road and Tucks Rd and one of the Sawyers of Moorooduc/Bittern parishes was just south of John Hopcraft. Little surprise that the Hopcrafts were related by marriage to the Sawyers and Adams families! If you wanted the death notice for the mother of the Sawyer children fathered by Isaac Sawyer, it would be useless entering Sawyer on trove. Try Renouf and discover the link with the Prosser and Griffith families!


2 comment(s), latest 3 years, 3 months ago

GRAY'S HILL, TULLAMARINE, VIC., AUST. KISSING NEIGHBOURS.

Gray's hill was described by the late Wally Mansfield a quarter of a century ago as the eastward climb up Mansfields Rd, Tullamarine, from Deep Creek. This meant little at the time because I had not yet inspected Bulla rates and it was not for another decade that I saw a plan of John Pascoe Fawkner's subdivision of Crown Allotment 13 A in the parish of Tullamarine. It is likely that it was Malcolm Ritchie walking from Overpostle on Tullamarine Island (Melway 3 J3) to Aucholzie (4 F6) in the following article. They might have been going in the opposite direction but in each case, Ritchie would have passed the Gray family's "Bellno" and young Gray's problem most likely happened as he walked uphill.

The coroner held a second inquest at the same place (Tullamarine) on the body of Charles Edward Gray, aged twenty-eight years, who died on the 27th ult. On Wednesday morning deceased, accompanied by a farmer, named
Ritchie, were proceeding to a farm belonging to the latter person, but they had not walked 200 yards when deceased fell down and complained of a pain in one of his legs. He became worse, and suffered from pain in the
region of the heart until the time of his death, which occurred within an hour after his illness. A post-mortem examination made by Mr. Gibson showed the cause of death to have been effusion into the pericardium. A verdict was returned that deceased died from disease of the heart.
(P.5,Argus,2-6-1868.)

MARRIED.
On the 26th ult., at North Melbourne, by the Rev.John Reid, Mr. Malcolm Ritchie, Aucholzie, Keilor,to Miss Jane Gray, daughter of Mr. Donald Gray,Bellno, Deep Creek.(P.4, Argus,2-10-1856.)

GRANT-RITCHIE.-On the 28th inst., at Aucholzie, by Rev. Hugh McKail, Angus Francis Grant, Yarrawonga, son of John Grant, Esq., Seafield, to Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Malcolm Ritchie, Esq., Aucholzie, Tullamarine.
(P.1, Argus,30-1-1880.)
Seafield (Melway 4 J7) was across McNab's Rd from Aucholzie and young Angus and Elizabeth had probably been schoolmates at the Seafield school under Samuel Lazarus. William took over Craigllachie,(Melway 4A2) directly across Deep Creek from Donald Gray's Bellno but he displeased David Mansfield by blocking the road that joined Loemans Rd to Gray's Hill on Mansfields Rd via the ford.

From J. R.Thompson, solicitor,Melbourne, stating he had been consulted by Mr. David Mansfield with reference
to a fence which obstructs and is placed across the Government road leading from his client's property at Tullamarine to Sunbury. He understood the fence was on that part of the road that crosses 'Tullamarine Island.' His client asked that the council, whose duty it was to keep open for public use and free from obstruction every road on the public highways, would take steps to have the said fence removed.

The Secretary said the road was on Grant's property on Tullamarine Island (Loeman's)road and there was a swing gate available. The President said he understood the road was only required to bring stock to Sunbury, a saving of four miles being effected. The track was not safe for vehicular traffic, but a slight deviation on to Peters' property (Overpostle, now owned by William Peter)would give a good crossing. (etc.)
(P.2,Sunbury News, 22-8-1903,Bulla Shire.)

1 comment(s), latest 9 months, 1 week ago

GREEN HILLS, PURVES RD., ROSEBUD/DROMANA, VIC., AUST.

While writing the George and Ollie Johnstone journal, I determined from Alex Johnstone's email that George's 180 acres bought from James Purves was the southern portion of The late Dr Hearn's Green Hills.(Lot 7 below.)
In the advertisement re Dr Hearn's estate in 1891,Green Hills was obviously the name of a farm, just as Roselands was the name of the farm across Purves Rd.
GREEN HILLS-MELWAY 171 C-F7,west to Gardens Rd, south to Davos St.
ROSELANDS- MELWAY 171 G-K 7,8, from Wilson Rd corner south to opposite the Davos St corner, and fronting Rurves and Main Creek Rds.

lot7- Green Hills being Allotments 29A and 29B, parish of Wannaeue, county of Mornington, containing 301 acres 1 rood 20 perches agricultural and grazing land fenced and subdivided, timber rung and partly cleared, well adapted for orchards, prettily situated in the Arthurs Seat Range from which is obtained extensive views of the bay and Southern Ocean.

Lot 8 -Roselands being Allotment 22, parish of Wannaeue containing 265 acres 2 roods 22 perches good grazing land, fenced, separated from Green Hills by Government-road.
(P.2, Argus, 25-3-1891, Sale of the estate of the late Dr.Hearn of Heronswood,column 6.)

While investigating Walter Cairns' Quamby and Ned and Edna Cairns' land at the end of Duells Rd, I discovered in my transcription of the 1900 rates:DAVID CAIRNS, 260 ACRES,13AB, WANNAEUE, GREENHILLS.
What's more, James Purves was assessed on 180 acres, 14AB Wannaeue, not 29AB,despite Hector Hanson's statement that "up at 'Green Hills' the men were clearing the land,putting in underground wells and building the shingle roofed sheds and dairy" in the late 1880's when Emily Purves and her younger sister Frances had their frightening encounter with seven aborigines at Tootgarook.

13AB, MELWAY 171 B-F9,from Davos St to opposite 463 Purves Rd and west to Two Bays Walking Track.
14AB, MELWAY 171 d-E11, fronting Purves Rd (south of a point opposite No.463) and Browns Rd (to a point opposite No. 27.)

Crown allotments 14AB were granted to James Purves on 10-11-1869. This was probably the son of Peter Purves Senior,not Peter's architect brother. It is likely that James had bought his land in the parish of Fingal and 14AB with money inherited from his father circa 1860 when Peter died.

It seems that the name of Dr. Hearn's farm "Green Hills" had been used to describe the locality, as in the case of John McKerchar's "Greenvale" and John Brock's "Janefield" near Bundoora. Purves Rd (the Government road in the 1891 advertisement) seems to have been known as Green Hills Rd by 1899.



DEATHS. QUINAN. On the 21st of June, at 'Green Hills.' Dromana, Victoria, Frances Emma, in her 85th year, relict of the late R. D. D. Quinan, and mother of Mrs, John Laird, Gawler, Mrs. James Purves, Victoria, and Robert and Arthur Quinan, W. A., and sister in-law of Lady - Ribton, Henry and Dr. E. Quinan, Dublin, Ireland. Dublin papers please copy.
Family Notices. Bunyip (Gawler, SA : 1863 - 1954) Friday 5 July 1907 p 2

LENZ-PURVES - On the 20th December 1899 at St John's Church Dromana by the Rev M M Witton. Gustaf F.P. LENZ of Gawler, South Australia to Emily*, eldest daughter of James Purves, Green Hills, Dromana.
Family Notices. The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 7 April 1900 p 9
(*See the encounter with the aborigines above.)


Red Hill and Mornington Horticultural Society. DROMANA SHOW.
Mornington Standard (Vic. : 1889 - 1908) Thursday 25 March 1897 Edition: MORNING. p 3 Detailed lists, results, guides
... ferns, dried and mounted in book or card, etc. First. 5s, gift of J, Baldry, Esq., Green Hills, Dromana; ... value £110s, gift of Mrs. Purves, Green Hills, Dromana

John Baldry was assessed on 161 acres, Wannaeue in 1900.This was crown allotment 8 of 161 acres and 30 perches,granted to John on 25-20-1902,located at Melway 254 E5, south of the equestrian ground and containing
the part of the Baldry Circuit walk east of the tributary arising in D4. The boundaries of Green Hills were expanding rapidly but Alex Johnstone, who family came after 1920, had never heard the term!

gravelling on Green Hills road, J.Purves £15 31 5d ;
Shire of Flinders and Kangerong.
Mornington Standard (Vic. : 1889 - 1908) Thursday 2 November 1899 p 2 Article (Tenders)

See the MURRAY GOMM journal for some PURVES genealogy.