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FAIRFAX COLLECTION OF GLASS PLATE NEGATIVES , AUST. (PART 1: PAGES 1- 4.)

I came across these in the National Library of Australia newsletter. You can access them by googling the title of this journal. There are 20 photos per page and I have only included photos of people here. From first impressions the photos mainly concern N.S.W. (*Unless another place is specified in the summary,it can probably be assumed that the person was in N.S.W.and to save the time spent repeatedly typing N.S.W., I will not do so even if it is specified.)

IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE:
FISHWICK, WRIGHT, O'GRADY, BULT, BREAKSPEAR, SHELTON, BEEBY, KITSON, HURWOOD, DE HAVILAND, HAYWOOD, EASTBURN, INDIGENOUS, RYAN, GARRAN, MOLLISON, SHEAVES, FALK, KELLY, TOBIN, MARES, POYNTER, GRIFFITH, DAVY, THOMPSON, BAUKHAUST, O'SHEA, BRANDT.


P.1.
Herbert H.Fishwick; Archbishop John Charles Wright of Sydney 1930; Sir James O'Grady Gov of Tas.
P.2.
Miss Frances Bult N.S.W. 1934; Breakspear at tennis N.S.W. 1931; Jockey Shelton * 1934; Judge Beeby 1927.
P.3.
Mrs Roland Kitson 1932; Cricketer, Alexander Hurwood, bowling, Queensland, 1927; Miss Gladys de Haviland, 1929;
Charles Haywood, radio announcer, 1932; Jockey, W.Eastburn, 1934; Indigenous sailor 1932; Olympic swimmer, Noel Ryan, 1930; Sir Robert Garran 1932; Jim Mollison's plane, Mascot, 1931; Distance runner, Jack Sheaves, 1932;
Cricketer,Norman Falk, batting, 1934.
P.4.
B.Kelly (no given name) 1932 (cricketer?); Aust. cricketer, B.J.Tobin,1933; Mrs Mares, 1931; Sir Hugh Poynter, 1931; Rev.Dr.Edward Griffith,1928; Swimmer, Edna Davy, 1928; F.C.Thompson batting in Queensland,1927; Pianist, Wilhelm Baukhaust, 1926, Jockey O'Shea, 1934; Rev. David Flett Brandt, 1927.


TO BE CONTINUED. (P.5 ETC. IN PART 2 OF THE JOURNAL.)

FIVE DIFFERENT WILSON FAMILIES NEAR MORNINGTON AND ARTHURS SEAT, VIC., AUST.

THE FIVE DIFFERENT FAMILIESWERE:
1.A Wilson family in Mornington from which one parent of Charles Bowman Wilson came.
2. Descendants of BONNIE WILLIAM OF DUNDEE, one of which, a "Tuerong Station" Wilson, was a parent of Charles Bowman Wilson.
3.Descendants of Sarah Wilson as detailed in Petronella Wilson's GIVING DESTINY A HAND.
4.Descendants of butcher turned bullocky turned butcher,Henry William Wilson, and Thamer (nee Burdett, both of whom are buried in Dromana Cemetery) as documented in A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA and LIME LAND LEISURE.
5.Descendants of G.M.Wilson who fought in the Boer War, married Jane,the daughter of Charles Graves Snr,(pioneer on Jamieson's Special Survey, Shoreham storekeeper and owner of "Woodlands" in the parish of Flinders.)


Re 1. I don't document families in places with historical societies but Val Wilson might have details on her excellent Mornington Cemetery website. I can't recall whether this family provided Charlie's mother or father.

Re 2. From Val Wilson's website.
John Bowman Wilson
www.morningtoncemetery.com/.../Wilson.../Wilson-John-Bowman.shtml


John Bowman Wilson,John Bowman Wilson, William Sorell Wilson (photos.)

John Bowman Wilson was born in Tasmania on the 10th of October, 1830, and arrived in Victoria in 1857 with his wife Agnes and family, to try his luck on the Castlemaine goldfields.

John was also accompanied by his brother William Sorell Wilson and his family, who were on their way to manage ‘Truganina’, a property in Derrimut, Victoria.

By 1863, the family had moved to the Mornington Peninsula where, in 1869, John and William purchased ‘Tuerong’. John certainly did not have much luck farming because he became insolvent in 1880 and sold ‘Tuerong’ back to his brother and his own son, Edwin.

The property is now largely subdivided into extensive vineyards, notably Red Hill Estate, Dromana Estate, Tuerong Estate and others. The freeway to Rosebud now passes through where the original property stood.

John Bowman died on the 13th of February, 1893, aged 62 and Agnes died a year later, aged 61. They are buried together in the Mornington cemetery.

With the exception of little Agnes Eliza Wilson, who is buried in the Castlemaine cemetery (died at age 2½ yrs), all of John Bowman and Agnes Eliza’s eleven children grew up and married and had their families, so that the Wilson family is today still well represented by the Victorian descendants of William Hartley Wilson and his wife Margaret (nee Bowman) - John and William's parents.

John’s ninth child, Chas, is also buried in Mornington Cemetery. John's grandson, Charles Bowman Wilson, who was born on 10 November 1903, became the Shire President of Mornington, and the C.B. Wilson Reserve on Wilsons Road in Mornington is named after him.

See much more in:
Stories 2 | Bonnie William - Bonnie William from Dundee
bonniewilliam.com/stories-2/
... Hastings farms of William Sorell Wilson & Family · Tuerong, Murder, Mystery, ... the Bonnie William clan to bring to our attention stories and documents about ...

Re 3. See my journals about Sarah (including how she led me to Henry Tuck),George Young and the Connells of Moorooduc as Petronella's book may not be borrowed. Names: LAURISSEN JOHNSON CHANGED TO JOHNSTONE, GOMM, CONNELL ETC.

Re 4. See sources quoted or google WILSON THAMER BURDETT GODFREY STENNIKEN to find a few of my journals about the family, and WILSON TOWNSEND MOUTH TO MOUTH for an extraordinary tale about the saving of a Wilson lad.

Re 5. Former councillor David Jarman started it all off when he suggested that I contact Peter Hemphill about the BACK TO RED HILL, adding that Peter was a "(grandson of Jerve Wilson) orchardist who served in the Boer war." Peter didn't know of any relationship to Sarah Wilson's descendants and Jean Rotherham told me to check with Bev Laurissen who was quite sure there wasn't one. I thought that Boer War records might give details about the soldier's parents but I couldn't find his service record.

That was when janilye came to the rescue.

And this is what I wrote to Peter.

Peter,
Your grandfather may not have been a descendant of Sarah Wilson, pioneer on Jamieson's Special Survey, but your grandmother was the daughter of Charles Graves, who with a partner named Brown-Lee (according to a heritage study) leased the whole survey in 1851 when Henry Dunn's lease expired.

Charles was a hawker who travelled to Melbourne to buy goods that he would sell all over the peninsula, including the Cairns family's "Little Scotland" on the north east corner of Browns and Boneo Rds. His partner in the hawking business was Mary McLear whose husband had been killed near the Plenty River at the end of 1849; she arrived on the survey shortly after Charles Graves. Young George McLear helped by taking a change of horse to Frankston when Charles was coming back from Melbourne and his brother Bill accompanied Charles on one amusing visit to Little Scotland.(Pages 99,.34-5 A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.)

Charles bought and fenced the property at Dromana which became the McLear family's "Maryfield" before becoming a storekeeper at Shoreham and a landholder in the parish of Flinders. As soon as I saw janilye's statement that your grandfather married Jane Graves, I knew who would be her father. Two death notices for Jane's brother prove that it was Charles Graves senior, the former hawker.

by janilye on 2015-01-25 16:18:36
Good heavens all this chasing your tails when you should have asked me!!
His name was Gervaise Maison Wilson and his service number was 508.
You'll find him on the Nominal Roll page 248.
All information is held at the Australian War Memorial which is now all online or a phone-call away.
Happy Australia Day.
by janilye on 2015-01-25 16:28:37
NAME: Gervaise Mason Wilson
BIRTH YEAR: abt 1880
AGE: 85
DEATH PLACE: Dromana, Victoria
FATHER'S NAME: Alfred
MOTHER'S NAME: Flora Hunt
REGISTRATION YEAR: 1965
REGISTRATION PLACE: Victoria
REGISTRATION NUMBER: 20045
SPOUSE: Christian Jane Graves married 1908

by janilye on 2015-01-25 16:50:32
I see he was listed in the electoral rolls as Gervase Mason, however on his enlistment into the 3rd. Contingent the spelling of his name was Gervaise Maison.
Private Wilson was invalided back to Australia om 2 May 1901
Off to War.

by itellya on 2015-01-25 17:46:46
Thanks janilye, you're a marvel!


GRAVES.- On the 19th September, 1929, at Corowa (N.S.W ), Charles, son of the late Charles and Jane Graves, brother of T.J. Graves, Mrs J Symonds (Flinders), and Mrs G M Wilson (Red Hill), formerly of Flinders and Mornington.
GRAVES.-On the 19th September at Barina, Corowa, Charles, beloved brother of Isabella (Mrs Symonds), Thomas, and Jane (Mrs Wilson), aged 58 years, late of Flinders, Victoria.
(P.1, Argus, 20-9-1929.)


Extract from my journal:
RED HILL NEAR DROMANA (VIC., AUST.) POST 1940 and proposed BACK TO RED HILL.
GRAVES' (c/a 15, section A,Flinders,s/w corner Punty Lane and Tucks Rd. Only 190 acres. Melway 255 J5, H6, fronting the north west side of Punty Lane with the western boundary being from the creek in the exact centre of G6 to a point almost opposite 425 Tucks Rd.In 1900, Charles Graves Snr and Jnr were assessed on 374 acres, Flinders. I cannot establish where the other 184 acres were. )

A little farther along the road toward the coast we come to "Woodlands," a property of nearly 400 acres, belonging to Mr Graves, a very old resident of the district. Besides having a large orchard and garden, the
owner of "Woodlands" goes in largely for poultry farming. Mr Graves also conducts one of the oldest storekeeping businesses in the southern part of the Mornington Peninsula. The property is in good order and crops of any sort should grow well in the rich chocolate soil.
(P.2, Mornington Standard,20-9-1902.AROUND FLINDERS.)
See A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA re Charles Graves and his business partnership with Mary McLear before moving to Shoreham.

2 comment(s), latest 11 months ago

FOOTY NEAR TULLAMARINE, VIC., AUST. AND BULLA, OAKLANDS AND BROADMEADOWS RESIDENTS 1915.

Most pioneers worked from dawn to dusk but Saturday was THE BIG DAY. They would work on Saturday morning (as even the V.F.L. players did and Jock McHale, famed Collingwood coach and a foreman at Carlton and United Breweries, once kept an opposition player late at work before a Grand Final involving his team and the Maggies.)
Saturday was the day for footy and feasting. The second activity occurred at the local dances. Not one man would dare admit that the only reason most of them attended the dances was to scoff down the entries in the COMPETITION! Every family had to bring a plate and while no wife or mother would admit it, there was a fair dinkum competition to surpass the culinary skills of all the other women.

Most footballers did pre-career training. Because of their workload and the lack of lighting, most bush footballers would have relied on their experience at State School up to Grade 8 (Merit Certificate.) The old cliche of four laps of the cricket pitch probably summed up any training that was done.

NEAR TULLAMARINE.
TULLAMARINE had a team in the late 1920's, according to Harry Heaps, who was a nuggety rover in the words of one of his team mates. In 1929 the Tullamarine school played the Keilor school at Keilor as a curtain raiser to the men's match.(Sunshine Advocate, 16-8-1929, page 7.) In the school match, all of Keilor's best players could equally well have been claimed as descendants of Tullamarine pioneers, the Fox, Wallace and Brown families living on the Tulla side of the Arundel bridge and David MilburnMcHALE, FOX, WALLACE, BROWN, DALLEY having leased "Fairfield" (400 acres north of Sharps Rd and west of Broadmeadows Rd) in 1868. The best of the Tullamarine boys were Dalley (Springbank or Mansfield's Triangle), Crotty (Broomfield), Reddan (Hillside), Parr (The Elms or Annandale).

In the men's game, one of Keilor's best was Graco, whose family had previously lived at Broadmeadows Township before the accident and was probably the grandfather of Essendon and Doutta Stars' Alan Graco. Tulla's best were Furphy (water cart family and relative of Bill Parr), Kelly, Reddan and Free. This was a competition match.
Tullamarine was playing against Coburg Amateurs, Campbellfield, Braybrook, Richmond United, Prestige, Keilor and Sth Brunswick. (Sunshine Advocate 19-7-1929, page 7.) The next year, these teams comprised the North Division of the Junior League with Sth Brunswick replaced by Moreland Amateurs and Richmond City in the South Division. Tullamarine's uniform was black and gold; were these colours later adopted by Broadmeadows and passed on to Westmeadows (the tigers)? Tullamarine probably did not have a team earlier because it lacked a ground. Then at the suggestion of Alec Rasmussen (foundation secretary of the Tullamarine Progress Association for 30 years until 1954 and much - loved teacher)the T.P.A. bought 6 acres that had belonged to drover, Noah Holland. (The reserve grew by another acre in recent decades when Handlon's block on the north west was added.)The Association donated this to council in late 1929. In 1931, most of the players must have gone to Broadmeadows.

The Keilor Football Club wikipedia states that the first match in Keilor was against a junior Essendon club in 1894. It goes on to say that Keilor was a founding member of the Keilor and Broadmeadows Association and won three premierships before joining the Essendon District Football League in 1930. Unless Keilor had two teams, it seems that the Keilor and Broadmeadows Football Association only lasted a few years, with 1928 probably its last season.

Broadmeadows and Bulla had a very old rivalry, playing annual games for many years from before 1893. The game in 1895 was typically rough according to the Bulla correspondent and a Bulla fellow, who had gone to West Australia for the gold rush, wrote home asking how many had been killed and how many injured. (Grace was listed as one of Broadmeadows' best players in this game but the name should be Graco; the accident had not yet happened.) Incidentally this chap was working with a Mr Burnside who was probably James Burnside of Deer Park. Bulla also played matches against Sunbury Seniors and Sunbury Juniors in 1894 and played the Sunbury F.C. in 1903 and 1905 (on the Asylum ground. In 1904 they played a game against the Melbourne and Metropolitan Board of Works Employees Football Club. Apparently player numbers were not great but in 1906 interest seemed to have revived and the black and reds planned to join the Gisborne District Association.

The Essendon Gazette and Keilor, Bulla and Broadmeadows Reporter described the opening annual meeting of a new club at the Inverness Hotel on page 2 of its 22-5-1915 issue. I stated earlier that footy seemed to galvanise communities in times of depression as a way to brighten life a bit and W.W.1 was every bit as depressing as the financial hardships of the 1890's and 1930's. This was the Oaklands, Broadmeadows and Bulla Football Club which played at the Oaklands ground opposite the Inverness Hotel. This hotel was at the north end of the north-south runway in Melbourne Airport and the ground would have been across Bulla Rd on the hotel's 58 acres (Melway 177 G 11 approximately.)

I will use this journal to tell you a bit about some of those who attended the meeting.All locations are from Melway. Unfortunately I know nothing of the President, Dr Brown. The vice-presidents were Alex McCracken Jnr (North Park, 28 J1, and Cumberland, 178 C12)and H.H.Daniel (Narbonne, 177 K4).The patrons were Alex McCracken (V.F.L. President from its formation, almost until his death shortly after this meeting); Alister Clark (Glenara, bounded by Deep Creek, Bulla Rd, the Inverness and roughly Perimeter Road just north of the east-west runway; famous rose breeder and soon to become chairman of the Moonee Valley Racing Club), W.D.Peter (not Peters as in the paper, who at various times owned properties such as Chandos , bounded by the south east end of Freight Rd, Derby St, Wright St, Moonee Ponds Creek and Mickleham Rd, and Overpostle, 3 G-K east to Deep Ck and south to Jacksons Ck); D.Brannigan (probably still "St John's Hill" accessed via St John's Rd, 384 G-J5 and 800 metres approximately to the north;member of a famed equestrian family); Maurice Quinlan (see the Quinlan journal); and A.F.Ozanne M.H.R. (I've only seen this name once in the area, as grantee, with James McConnell, of the land bisected by Puckle St, Moonee Ponds); Alec. Forbes (descendant of a pioneer 6 miles from Melbourne near Broadmeadows in 1850?); H.C.Gibb (Husband? of Eleanor Gibb who ran the Inverness Hotel and later the Essendon Hotel, now the Grand, south of Woodland Park as seen in "The Stopover That Stayed"); Islip; Fitzgerald, Robert Ralston; Archie Campbell; Keith McNeill (all Oaklands); Thomas Kingshott (Broadmeadows 6 A6), M.Hoctor (Broad St? Broadmeadows where Jack Hoctor was born but possibly on a farm such as Rocklaw ); John Lane (Gowrie Park, west of the terminal building to McNabs Rd and used as a landing field in early days; about 4 Lane boys fought in W.W.1); John and James Gilligan (whose deaths are related in the Horse journal and properties in the Reddan journal);Lawlor, Hartney (both Bulla); Phillip Hill (Danby Farm 5B3); Semmell (Essendon), Walsh (Broadmeadows), Jock West (descendant of one of two pioneering blacksmithing brothers just south of the Bulla/ Keilor Rd junction at North Essendon whose biographies appear in "Victoria and its Metropolis"); Frank Wright (Strathconnan, as for Chandos but not quite as far north as the Western Ave ,or Lockhart's, corner.)

2 comment(s), latest 4 years, 11 months ago

FOOTY ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST. (SEAFORD'S SAND PIT!)

Most pioneers worked from dawn to dusk but Saturday was THE BIG DAY. They would work on Saturday morning (as even the V.F.L. players did and Jock McHale, famed Collingwood coach and a foreman at Carlton and United Breweries, once kept an opposition player late at work before a Grand Final involving his team and the Maggies.)
Saturday was the day for footy and feasting. The second activity occurred at the local dances. Not one man would dare admit that the only reason most of them attended the dances was to scoff down the entries in the COMPETITION! Every family had to bring a plate and while no wife or mother would admit it, there was a fair dinkum competition to surpass the culinary skills of all the other women.

Most footballers did pre-career training. Because of their workload and the lack of lighting, most bush footballers would have relied on their experience at State School up to Grade 8 (Merit Certificate.) The old cliche of four laps of the cricket pitch probably summed up any training that was done.

In the days that shops traded every day but Sunday until late, when Rosebud was playing at home (on the Village Green opposite the later hotel, where Doug Bachli practised his golf), all the shops would shut and the whole community would flock to watch the Buds. No doubt, most teams had similar support from their communities.

There was desperation for a game of footy. The Mornington Peninsula Football League would probably be surprised to find out that Moorooduc, Balnarring and Tuerong once had teams, mainly between 1890 and 1910 and in the 1930's, both eras of depression where footy could relieve misery. The team at Somerville was called "Railways" for a while. The smaller places competed in a second tier competition called the Peninsula District Association. Flinders once had a team and won this competition's premiership in 1906, the year it was formed by Paddy Gomm of the Somerville family (Murray Gomm.)The senior body was called the Mornington Peninsula Football Association .

The Wongs of the market garden by Chinamans Creek on David Cairn's Elenora at Rosebud West were stars for Rosebud. One of the boys was very impressive when he trained at Sandringham in the 1930's, probably on his way home from the Vic. Market. Colin McLear has much history, including photos, of the Dromana team in his "A Dreamtime of Dromana".

The Mornington Football Club drowning tragedy is well documented but what has never been mentioned is that one of Laurie Wilson's ancestors was spared because he had to work on that day to clear up a backlog of deliveries from his boss's cutting cart. (See Laurie's website BONNIE WILLIAM OF DUNDEE re the Wilsons of Tuerong etc.)

Because of low populations (such as in some country leagues today), it was necessary for neighbouring areas to band together or for clubs to find recruits from outside their area. In complaints about games found in newspapers, the cause was more often about these imports (such as Somerville's Gomms) rather than unfair play. Sorrento was lucky to have a source of players to supplement the locals because of its popularity as a resort, but some of the locals weren't bad, such as Stringer, whose namesake was best on ground in Sorrento's premiership last year. Incidentally, the cricket and footy results on the peninsula read like a local history, but this does not apply near Tullamarine.

SNAPSHOTS.
THE PENINSULA.
Balnarring F.C. appears in the papers between 1904 and 1938. The club obviously became Red Hill but not in 1937 when a Red Hill-Balnarring District F.C. was proposed. (Mornington and Somerville Standard 9-4-1937 page 8.)Balnarring had earlier combined with Flinders to form a team for the 1890 season (Mornington Standard, 25-4-1891, page 3.)
Baxter was fielding a team on a mud heap by 1938 and in 1944 a junior team from Baxter and Somerville played a game against the Frankston scouts. They merged as Pearcedale-Baxter before the 1948 season but had already played under that name in 1947.
Flinders (from which the Crib Point club was formed if I remember previous research correctly)had a combined team in 1891 with Balnarring,as stated earlier. The naval base would have provided a supply of players but probably denied many locals a game. The annual meeting of the Peninsula District Football Association was reported on page 7 of the Frankston and Somerville Standard on 12-4-1930. It was attended by delegates from Langwarrin, Frankston, Mornington, Red Hill, Seaford, Tyabb, Naval Depot, Flinders, Dromana and Rosebud. Flinders applied to enter a team and Moorooduc was not entering a team for the season. It was resolved that the body not amalgamate with the M.P.F.A.
A check on Red Hill confirmed that the club had already existed before 1937 and that the idea of the combined club was to form A and B teams but it was given permission to withdraw both teams in May 1937 with the area being added to the Dromana-Rosebud recruiting area.
THE FOLLOWING IMAGE OF A JUNIOR TEAM FROM FRANKSTON WAS TAKEN AFTER THE SCOUT JAMBOUREE FOR WHICH THE GRANDSTAND WAS BUILT. IT WAS SUPPLIED BY STEVE JOHNSON, A DESCENDANT OF HENRY CADBY WELLS.


13 comment(s), latest 1 year, 3 months ago

FOR JUDITH DURHAM OF "THE SEEKERS" FAME - YOUR MATERNAL ANCESTRY.

THE MYSTERIOUS PATERNAL GREAT GRANDFATHER OF JUDITH MAVIS COCK AND HER SISTER.
When I was talking to Ken Bucher today and mentioned that Susan Peatey was the midwife at the birth of Rose Bucher at Rosebud in 1867, he said that Nurse Durham was the midwife at the birth of another member of the Bucher family.
THIS REMARK REMINDED ME OF THE CONFUSED ANCESTRY ON JUDITH DURHAM'S WEBSITE AND I RESOLVED TO PRODUCE SOME CLARITY.

Emily King and her sister Elizabeth both married Greek fishermen.

EventMarriage Event registration number3393 Registration year1882
Personal information
Family nameKING Given namesEmily SexFemale Spouse's family namePANWTEO Spouse's given namesDimitri Antoni.

EventMarriage Event registration number1453 Registration year1872
Personal information
Family nameKING Given namesElizabeth SexFemale Spouse's family nameTELO Spouse's given namesFote

It was through Emily and Elizabeth that the early Rosebud map drawn by George Fountain's daughter(s) makes the following comment about the Rosebud Fishing Village block on the west side of Durham Place (c/a 20) granted to Fort Lacco on 16-10-1872, in the year of his marriage to Elizabeth:
"DURHAM RELATED TO LACCOS."

HAS itellya GONE COMPLETELY MAD? No, the registrars were completely mad. How could they possibly write Fort (or Forti) Lacco as Fote Telo? Can I find Fort's death record?

EventDeath Event registration number4813 Registration year1915
Personal information
Family nameLACCO Given namesFort SexUnknown Father's nameLacco Jno Mother's nameMary (Comeo) Place of birth Place of deathDromana Age72

And Elizabeth's?
EventDeath Event registration number16170 Registration year1934
Personal information
Family nameLACCO Given namesElizth SexUnknown Father's nameKing Jno Mother's nameUnknown (Unknown) Place of birth Place of deathDromana Age79

And Elizabeth Lacco's death notice inserted by her sister, Emily?
LACCO.—On the 6th August, passed peacefully
away at Rosebud, Elizabeth, wife of the
late Fort Lacco, beloved mother of Mary, John
(deceased), Christie (deceased), Annie, Emily,
Mitchell, Margaret, grandmother of Bobby,
Lucy, Edna, Kenneth, Harold, Alick, George,
and Gwen, great-grandmother of Douglas aged
[?] years, a colonist of 77 years. —At rest.

LACCO.—On the 6th August, passed peace-
Fix this textfully away, at Rosebud, Elizabeth Lacco, dearly
loved sister of Emily, Ellen, Clara and the
late William King. —Peace, perfect peace.
(P.1, Argus, 7-8-1934.)
The second notice, concentrating on the King family was probably inserted by Emily.

And Emily's death record?
EventDeath Event registration number6672 Registration year1950
Personal information
Family nameDURHAM Given namesEmily Trin SexFemale Father's nameKING William Elijah Mother's nameElizabeth (Lane) Place of birthPORT MELBOURNE Place of deathPARKVILLE Age88

There was no death notice for Emily, just a funeral notice which mentioned that the funeral would leave from an address in Mount Alexander Rd, Essendon. There is no doubt that this was the residence of Emily's grand daughter (Hazel) who had given birth to Judith Mavis Cock in 1943 while her D.F.C. winning husband was serving abroad. Emily would probably have been living with her son, Antonio if he had not died in March 1950.

DURHAM.—On March 11 (suddenly) Tony, loving husband of Jessie, son of Emily Durham, late of Rosebud.—Sadly missed.
DURHAM. — Tony, loving father of Hazel, father-in-law of Bill, loving grandfather of Beverley and Judith.—Sadly missed.(P.10, Argus, 14-3-1950.)

And now for my million dollar bet. In Tony's death record his mother's name should be Emily (King) but I bet that his father's surname will not be PANWTEO.
EventDeath Event registration number2869 Registration year1950
Personal information
Family nameDURHAM Given namesAnthony Demetria SexMale Father's nameDURHAM Demetria Panucca Mother's nameEmily (King) Place of birthROSEBUD Place of deathESSENDON Age67

It's a fair bet that Anthony (and his mother, Emily) had both been living with Hazel and William Alexander Cock in Mt. Alexander Rd, Essendon in 1950. His father's name was not DURHAM. HIS GIVEN NAME OBVIOUSLY CAME FROM EMILY'S FIRST HUSBAND, WHOM EMILY MARRIED IN 1882. Anthony would seem to have been born in about 1883.

Mr Durham, Emily's second husband and Tony's STEPFATHER, did not have Greek given names at all! Tony was only about 4 when his father (died?*) and Emily married again.

EventMarriage Event registration number5814 Registration year1887
Personal information
Family nameDURHAM Given namesFrancis William SexMale Spouse's family namePUNWETO Spouse's given namesEmily


DURHAM—PUNWETO - On the 23rd November, by licence. at St. Mark's Church, Fitzroy, by the Rev. J.,F.Stretch, LL.B., Francis William Durham, to Emily Punweto, both of Clarendon-street, South Melbourne.(P.1, The Age, 28-11-1887.)
I found no death record in Victoria for Punweto in any year or a birth record for Anthony Punweto.

THIS IS ANTHONY'S MARRIAGE RECORD.
EventMarriage Event registration number5222 Registration year1908
Personal information
Family nameDURHAM Given namesAnty Demetra SexUnknown Spouse's family nameSMITH Spouse's given namesJessie.

THE MARRIAGE RECORD OF ANTHONY'S DAUGHTER, HAZEL.
EventMarriage Event registration number15797 Registration year1938
Personal information
Family nameDURHAM Given namesJessie Hazel SexUnknown Spouse's family nameCOCK Spouse's given namesWilliam Alexander.

HOW JUDITH MAVIS COCK BECAME JUDITH DURHAM OF "THE SEEKERS"
When Judith started singing with Frank Trainor's band, she adopted the maiden name of her mother Hazel, nee Durham, as her stage name. There is much more precise detail on her website regarding her career, but not regarding her ancestry because of all the inconsistency in birth, death and marriage records.

Rosebud is proud to be associated with THREE female vocalists who enabled The Seekers to perform great music over the years but it was Judith who shot the group to fame in the 1960's.

SUMMARY OF JUDITH DURHAM'S MATERNAL ANCESTRY.
1882. Her great grandmother, Emily, nee King, marries Dimitri Antoni Panwteo (Panweto or Punweto).
C.1883. Their son Tony is born. No documentation found of the father's death or a divorce.
1887. Emily Panweto or Punweto, nee King, remarries to Francis William Durham who becomes Tony's stepfather.
1908. Judith's grandfather marries Jessie Smith.
1913. Judith's mother, Hazel, is born.
EventBirth Event registration number21375 Registration year1913
Personal information
Family nameDURHAM Given namesJessie Hazel SexFemale Father's nameAnthony Demetra Mother's nameJessie Amelia (Smith) Place of birthELSTERNWICK
1938. Judith's mother, Hazel marries William Alexander Cock.
1943. Judith is born.

FOSTER, SHARP AND CROTTY OF TULLAMARINE, VIC., AUST.

17 comment(s), latest 2 years, 9 months ago

FRANK STONE AND THE NAME/ EARLY HISTORY OF FRANKSTON, VICTORIA AUSTRALIA.

The Wells family is thought of in association with Frankston but many people would be unaware that Henry Cadby Wells was a much earlier pioneer near the Heads. All the details are on the web in THE WELLS STORY. His daughter, later Mrs Kelly, probably pipped the Skelton child for the honour of being the first white child born near the Heads.
I had seen references to Frank Stone before I came across this website in which Frank Stone's hotel is mentioned. The Frankston wikipedia states that Frank Stone may not have even existed. Perhaps the first fishermen to make their base at the south end of Long Island did not exist either because their names also did not appear in documents or newspapers!
Wells and his young, pregnant wife walked all the way from Melbourne to join Robert Rowley in a limeburning venture near the Heads two or three years before Dennis and Honora Sullivan arrived in 1843. Robert Rowley married Christina Edwards in 1859 but there was no mention of this in Victoria; she was from Longford in Tasmania! The lime burning did not last long because the depression, reaching crisis point in 1843, reduced demand for mortar in Melbourne. However, Henry teamed up with Robert again in 1849 to crayfish in Westernport and built Clark's Cottage two decades before Sorrento Village was declared at the suggestion of Sidney Smith Crispo of the Coastal Survey.
Frank Stone was obviously part of the Wells family legend. With such a proud pioneering history, why would the family feel the need to invent a pioneer: Frank Stone? Family legends do contain errors, such as the belief that Captain Henry Everest Adams of Rosebud was the legitimate son of Lord Vivian.However there would be no reason to invent Frank Stone.
Frank Liardet, Charles Franks,( murdered in 1836, not 1856 as in one website), and General Franks have been advanced as possible origins of Frankston's name. And I believe that one of these three was honoured in the official naming of the settlement circa 1853! Why am I discussing Frank Stone then?
Bendigo was officially named Sandhurst but the diggers insisted on the name that they used, and Bendigo it became. Frankston means Franks' Town and with a slight change to the pronunciation at the end could be said as Frankstone. Perhaps the pioneers such as the McCombs, who may not have known Stone, but would have been given the goss. about the area's pioneer from the Wells family, decided that it wasn't worth kicking up a fuss because they could just pronounce it their way.
While researching "The Mysterious Henry Gomm", I found a notice that a Henry Gomm had placed about finding a boat that had been washed ashore at Red Bluff (Argus 29-9-1864 page 1 column 5.) I thought this was Convict Henry or his son but I now suspect that it was Somerville Henry. In the same column was a notice about a purse that had been lost between Brighton and Tyabb, and I believe that it was also placed by Henry Gomm, who first lived (temporarily) near Somerville in 1861 and moved Margaret and family there in 1867. The un-named owner of the purse said that a reward could be claimed at Frankstone Hotel. Passing through, he must have heard stories about the early publican or heard the pronunciation of the hotel's name.
Why was it that so many editors or typesetters used Frankstone instead of Frankston for the village and parish, even in announcements of Crown land sales? One would have thought they would have been working from written information provided by Government departments and surely the clerk who prepared such would have had the official spelling of names to refer to. The newspapers are littered with references to Frankstone during its first "official" decade, in the report of the Moorabbin market gardeners' picnic in 1882 (perhaps Somerville Henry taught them the historic pronunciation), and even as late as the 1930's.In the case of Queensland papers, the spelling could have been caused by confusion with their own Frankstone, but why would the name be written so often with an e by Victorian newspapers?
Why is there so little mention of Frank Stone? There is a possibility that Thomas Stone and his brother (Frank?) went to the diggings (before 1853)and that descendants finished up as pioneers of the mountainous area near Sylvan.
Strangely, there was a FRANKSTON HOTEL at Snapper (sic) Point in 1856. Samuel Packham was granted a licence for the Frankston hotel at Frankston and Thomas P.Stone for the Bush Inn at Prahran.(Argus 16-4-1856, page 6.) Stone was the chap, at the diggings with his brother, who wrote from Geelong complaining about the gold escort. There are two possible reasons for William Edwards' hotel at Mornington being called the Frankston. Firstly, Frank Stone might have opened the hotel that probably later became the Schnapper Point and the Royal (Rennison, William Edwards, Lawrence Murphy etc). Did Frank Stone start this hotel after a successful stint at the diggings and then take on the Bush Inn with Thomas Stone? The second possibility is that another licence had been transported to a new location.
It is unlikely that this was the case with John Boswell Clark's Mornington Hotel at Sorrento; "Lugger" Clark had skippered limecraft and probably just liked the name.If I remember correctly, there had been a Mornington Hotel near Wolfdene but it became a private school. It is certain in the case of Collier and John Campbell's Rye Hotel at Tootgarook/White Cliff; this had been opened in Dromana in 1859 and the licence was continued in the latter area, thus giving it the present name. William Edward's biography in Victoria and Its Metropolis is as baffling as that of Somerville's Henry Gomm. It stated that he was, in 1888, running the Schnapper Point Hotel in Dromana. This shows that he had probably transported a licence from Mornington. (The hotel was probably on the FJ's site at the corner of Jetty Rd, Rosebud; that being the only reason that a 2 acre block, lot 86 of crown allotment 18,Wannaeue, would be regarded as sufficient security for a loan from Captain Adams of about 200 pounds. It was definitely not in Dromana, where the Dromana and Arthurs Seat were the only hotels.)William Edwards had run other Hotels before 1888 and he-or more likely his father- may have had the Frankston and transported the licence. But if this was the case, how come the Frankston Hotel was still operating under that name in Frankston?
I present a new theory, that the suburb's name is a merger of the original Frank Stone and the official Frankston. It would be really ironic if the government had decided to name the town Frankstone and a clerk had thought the e was a mistake and dropped it. To restore historic integrity, if that actually happened, the e could be taken from McCombe St in Rosebud and placed on the end of Frankston, thus honouring John McComb of Seaford, who bought "Hindhope" from the Riggs,and Frank Stone, the pioneer of Frankston!

POSTSCRIPT. steve74, a descendant of Henry Cadby Wells has sent me some great material about the naming of Frankston and the Wells family. As I do not write history if it already exists (and is accessible), I will not repeat all of Steve's information; I await a journal from Steve about the extended Wells family.
C.Evelyn Liardet wrote a letter to the editor of The Argus refuting a claim in the Victorian Historical Magazine (March 1916, vol.5, No.1) by A.W.Greig that Frankston was named after Frank Liardet, and stating that his grandfather and uncle had told him that the town was named after Charles Franks. He enclosed a reply from the Lands and Survey Department regarding Frankston's name. Frankston was so-named almost a year before a Liardet application for land was made on 20-1-1855.Charles Wedge had a run adjoining Franks' near "Mt Cotteril"
but later had a run which included the site of Frankston and may have suggested that the village be named after his unfortunate neighbour of circa 1836.
A source I discovered while searching for other information stated that Frank Stone was the young son of the early publican so the aforementioned Thomas Stone (publican at Prahran in 1856) may have been the publican at Frankston and father of young Frank. Frank Liardet squatted near Frankston in 1843 without a licence and publican Stone may have also been operating without a licence, which would explain the lack of records. Knowing Steve 74's determination, I am hoping that he will soon come across documentary proof of Stone in Frankston.

The attached image, supplied by Steven Johnson, is of a Frankston football team, probably taken before W.W.2. Was this the original uniform of the Frankston club? It is not in colour but could explain the name of the Frankston Bombers F.C. I could not introduce a footy photo into this Frankston journal without trying to trace the origin of organised footy in Frankston.
The Frankston juveniles (State School?) had issued a challenge to the juveniles at the Point (Mornington) in 1880 but no reply had been received. (South Bourke and Mornington Journal 1-9-1880, page 2.)
The earliest report of organised matches found so far was in 1887. Frankston beat Mornington 4 goals to nil. Frankston's best players were Sadler, Kelso , O'Grady, Bentick, Westaway and Clark. (SB&MS, 22-6-1887, P.2.)
As mentioned in the FOOTY ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA journal, complaints about opponents importing players were frequent. Frankston F.C. secretary, J.C.Sadleir accused Mornington of having no less than seven Melburnians in his letter which appeared on page 3 of the Mornington Standard of 5-10-1889. This date had obviously been some time after the game had been played. A team representing the Essendon District was named to play Frankston at Frankston. It is of interest that a member of the Essendon team was names Saddlier and was probably related to the Frankston secretary.(North Melbourne Advertiser, 2-6-1888 page 3.) In view of Janilye's comment of 13-3-2012, this surname appears to have been Sadlier.

As I scanned "Football, Frankston" on trove decade by decade, I couldn't help gawking at Frankston items unconnected to footy.

JOHN CARR, FRANKSTON PIONEER.
John Carr had a problem that I have rarely seen mentioned on trove but was part of the reason that Hugh Glass of Flemington (and a grantee at Rosebud) ended his life with an overdose. The problem was scab in sheep. On page 7 of the Argus of 15-9-1866, John Carr gave notice that his run, being a part of Mt Eliza, situate at Frankston, was affected by scab. This land was most likely in the parish of Frankston, that is north of Eramosa-Canadian Bay Rds. No doubt this run occupied most of the 3000 acres later proposed as the site for a new Melbourne cemetery.

Almost four years later, John Carr, was on another run, this time in the parish of Lang Warren and his sheep had again been affected by scab. (Argus, 17-8-1870, page 3.) On page 8 of the Argus on 12-4-1878, Carr's farm of 320 acres near the township at Frankston was offered for sale at 3 pounds per acre. Oh well, I thought, early squatter buys pre-emptive right and then leaves! Not finding much more on trove, I tried a straight google search. The Potts Family website soon convinced me that the Carr family was significant in Frankston's history.

This family was very religious and musical. It was also related to the Allchin family of Mornington. If I remember correctly, the Allchins lived at one of Mornington's historic houses, Sutton Grange, and were involved in the Mornington Football Club drowning tragedy. John Carr senior preached in Frankston as early as 1855 and was personally responsible for the building of the first Wesleyan Church in 1860.He used to travel on horseback to take services at Mentone, Cheltenham and Brighton. (It is likely that on many occasions he continued on to Melbourne to preach or lecture at the Temperance Hall or Gospel Hall- see the Argus 8-11-1873, page 1; 31-10-1874 page 1; 11-5-1875 page 8. The Chairman for John's lecture in 1873, entitled "Advance Victoria", was John Nimmo, who was prominent in politics and the temperance movement (Australian Dictionary of Biography.)

John Carr's great great grand daughter, Deborah Mary Collins was baptised in the Frankston Methodist Church in 1959. The Potts family history pages have much more information such as John's early land purchase, the musical expertise, and his daughter's near-death in a dam. It is claimed that Kars St was named after John Carr and was mis-spelt. No pioneer or prominent figure seems to have been named Kars, and it is possible that there is a link with the city and province of Kars in Turkey, besieged by the Russians in the Crimean War. Kars St was originally called Young St and the name was changed by the council without any consultation, according to an old Frankston resident in "Fishing, Sand and Village Days", a pre-1950 oral history.

Carr children were among the first pupils at the school started in 1855. John first lived on the foreshore near the hotel sites and then on Skye road in a house built of brown stone and bricks. John Carr used to produce lime from shells that he gathered at the foot of Oliver's Hill.(Frankston and Somerville Standard 22-2-1930, p.6, History of Frankston.)

YOCKINS.
(Argus, 25-3-1865 page 8.) FRANKSTON. A house and garden, fine situation, close to the jetty, Bay Frontage; also 9 acres of land near the above. Apply to Mr Yockins, Frankston.
The first three stores in Frankston were those of Mr Staples, Mrs Yockins and Mrs Spriggs. (Last source in Carr, 1930.)
Sarah, wife of Thomas C.J.Yockins and mother of Thomas C.Yockins of Yambuck, died on 20-1-1880 at Frankston, aged 66. (Illustrated Australian News, 16-2-1880, page 30.)
Mr H.C.Tocknell had been appointed registrar of births and deaths during the absence on leave of Mr.T.C.J.Yockins (South Bourke and Mornington Journal 28-7-1880 page 2.)
A writer wondered who would serve on the bench at the newly established Court of Petty Sessions in Frankston, pointing out that the nearest J.P., Captain Baxter, lived five miles away. Apparently there was a requisition, bearing a huge number of signatures, requesting the appointment of Messrs Cattanach and Yockins as local justices.Both men were highly respected in the town. (South Bourke and Mornington Standard 3-5-1882, page 3.)


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