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HISTORIC ORIGINS OF STREET NAMES ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.

The following is an extract from my Peninsula Dictionary History, which I have not touched for over a year since I read Leila Shaw's THE WAY WE WERE and got sidetracked into Henry Gomm, Joseph Porta etc. The Mount Martha section is based on much speculation and should be taken with a grain of salt.Irvine St has no connection with the Coburg pioneering carpenter. The street names that are simply listed have definite historic origins and I'll have to take a holiday from family tree circles soon (with the occasional visit only) in order to continue with PENINSULA DISTRICT HISTORY and DROMANA AND ROSEBUD ON TROVE.

Other speculation, such as the origin of Hope St in Rosebud, has since been disproved. Hindhope was the original name of the farm including all Hope St house blocks and bounded by Boneo Rd, Point Nepean Rd and First Ave.I will edit this when I have time to read it through. It was Peter Young who was granted Nairn but Airey's did become part of Patullo's Craigbank.


HISTORIC STREET NAME ORIGINS
Co-ordinate given is where the street name is written.
MOUNT MARTHA.
I was tempted to start with Mornington (where I have a relationship to the Harraps dating from 1861) and Green Island where Sam Sherlock settled after working at many occupations and places in and near the parish of Wannaeue. That will have to come later as my original intention was to start with Safety Beach and if I dont control myself, Ill be telling you that the family of Thamer Burdett (H.W.Wilsons wife) might be connected with the naming of a street in Frankston North.
Therefore I will start at Balcombe Creek with what I like to think of as Essendon By The Bay. It is possible that John Thomas Smith (seven times Mayor of early Melbourne and builder of the lovely Ascot House, which still stands in Fenton St, Ascot Vale) started the annual summer migration; a book I read yonks ago in the old Rosebud Library called him a pioneer of the area.
WELLS RD.
I know Wells Rd is nowhere near Mt Martha but Henry Cadby Wells daughter was probably the first white child born on the Southern Peninsula. Robert Rowleys mother and stepfather, Richard Kenyon, along with Captain Adams at McCrae, were the first permanent settlers in the area. Shortly after, Robert arrived and within months, he and his friend, Wells had started a limeburning venture and Polly Wells had been born (7-6-1841).
By 1846, the depression caused a slump in demand for lime and many limeburners had departed while others turned to timber-getting or fishing. In about 1849, Wells, (a bootmaker by trade), returned from Melbourne to launch a crayfishing venture with Robert. It was hugely successful but wishing to see their families for a few days, they anchored in Westernport. The vessel was destroyed because of the huge tidal variation
In 1859, Wells planted a vineyard at Ranelagh in Mt Eliza but before long it was wiped out by a disease that destroyed almost every vineyard in the state. Wells retained his interest in the limeburning industry and visited the Sorrento area many times, probably staying with the Rowleys. (Google The Wells Story.)
MELWAY P.150-1
There are just so many names associated with the history of the area near Essendon found on these two pages that I feel justified in assuming that there was a summer exodus from that area to Mt Martha similar to that from Toorak to Portsea in slightly later times.
KILBURN GR. 150 H1.
See Fairview Ave.

ELMIE TCE. 150 H1
This was possibly the location of the holiday home of a prominent citizen of early Coburg. See Between Two Creeks Richard Broome.

AILSA ST 151 A1
This was possibly the site of a holiday home owned by Robert McCracken of Ailsa on Flemington Hill where Essendon Football Club played its first few seasons.

TAL TALS Cres. 151 C3
This was a name given by early settlers to a local aboriginal group.

CUMBERLAND DR. 151 C1
This was possibly the site of a holiday home of Alex. McCracken who lived at North Park in Woodlands St, Essendon and owned Cumberland which is part of Woodlands Historic Park near Tullamarine Airport.

SINCLAIR ST. 150 K1
This was possibly the site of a holiday house of Mrs Sinclair who had a farm fronting Rosehill Rd in West Essendon. The origin of the name could also have something to do with the family of Peter S.Sinclair, a grantee in Rye Township, after whom Sinclair St in Rye was obviously named. Peter only owned his land fronting Weir St for a decade so he might have been a speculator. If so, Sinclair St in Somerville might also be named after a member of his family.

LEMPRIERE AVE. 150 G2
HERE I WILL DISCONTINUE USING This was possibly the site of etc.
Lempriere at one time owned St Johns, a farm granted to Major St John who was famously libelled by J.P.Fawkner. This property became Essendon Aerodrome.
A member of the Lempriere family with very French Christian names was assessed on land in Sorrento in about 1880.
PRESCOTT AVE. 150 H2
Prescott was probably a developer who subdivided land here and at Safety Beach. He may not have been a resident of Sorrento but he was a guest at a wedding there. The newspaper account of the wedding of Florence Maud Dark and George Sutton is reproduced on page 77 of Jenny Nixons FAMILY, CONNECTIONS, SORRENTO and PORTSEA. Unfortunately, no date is given for the article but it may be from about 1920. My hunch is that Sutton and Prescott were friends from Mornington. One day, while walking in Mornington, I inspected an old house called Sutton Grange. Always on the lookout for historical connections, I wondered if it had any connection with the place east of Castlemaine and Faraday. This fine house might have been where George Sutton lived.

IRVINE AVE. 150 H2
Irvine was a prominent carpenter in Coburgs early days. Notice the proximity to Elmie Tce. See Broomes history.

RAMSAY CT. 150 J1
Ramsay built Clydebank in West Essendon, which now serves as a Catholic College.
From New Zealand, he invented a boot polish and named it KIWI.


FAIRVIEW AVE. 150 K2.
There were two farms in Tullamarine with this name but a nearby street makes it clear which one is associated. The Kilburns received land grants in Keilor Rd in what is now called East Keilor and Keilor Park, and also bought part of the subdivision of Thomas Napiers land at what is now Strathmore. Mrs Kilburn also owned 400 acres bounded by Sharps and Broadmeadows Rds at Tullamarine; this farm, which she called Fairview, was later split into Brightview and Dalkeith.

DURHAM CT. 151 A3.
Durhams owned and possibly subdivided McMeikan land at Kensington in the 1880s. Perhaps he found Mt Martha too hilly and moved to the very flat Durham Pl. in Rosebud.

DEAKIN DR. 150 F2.
Although the street may have been named by others to honour his contribution to Federation, he did defeat Alexander McCracken for the seat of West Bourke and represented the area from which these prominent holiday makers came, and he might have shared their summer relaxation at this watering place as promoters such as Dromanas Spencer Jackson so quaintly put it.

PENLEIGH CRES 151 A2.
You might have noticed that many of the families mentioned are Scottish. Some of their daughters would have been educated at Penleigh in Park St, Essendon.

SHERWOOD CRES. 151 A3.
Alexander McCracken was heavily involved in the Oaklands Hunt Club and many of the post hunt get-togethers took place at Cumberland and the Inverness Hotel (near the north end of the runway). Eventually the hunt club established its own headquarters on a property called Sherwood. (See 178 D6.) Ref. The Oaklands Hunt by D.F.Cameron-Kennedy.

Another possible reason for the name is that there might have been a family of this name in the area. The 1879-80 Kangerong assessments record that George Sherwood, journeyman, and William Copeland, journeyman, constituting a firm called Sherwood & Co., had 173 acres and a building in the parish. This would have been crown allotment 10 A of just under 173 acres granted to G.Sherwood on what looks like 19-8-1876. This land was bounded by Tumbywood Rd, Eatons Cutting Rd and Mornington-Flinders Rd and extended east to the end of Holmes Rd. It is probable that Sherwood had moved on by 1900 and the property is not even mentioned; it might have been absorbed by Thomas Appleyard or passed into the hands of creditors during the depression of the 1890s. By 1910, it had become the property of Charles Bennett of St Kilda.
No detail of which trade Sherwood was following is given, but readers may wonder what a journeyman was. A tradesman could progress through three stages. Usually an apprenticeship lasted seven years during which a lad would live with his master, receiving little payment other than food and shelter. On successful completion of the term, he would become a journeyman. He could conduct business on his own account but as can be seen, he probably would not have a nest egg to do so. Most likely, he would wander from place to place, working for various master tradesmen, picking up new ideas and techniques that might enable him to submit a piece of work to the guild and qualify as a master. The term journeyman comes from the French word for day and the master for whom he was now working had to pay him for each days work.
Perhaps Sherwoods father was a master tradesman and actually owned the company. Therefore Sherwood and Copeland could obtain equipment and materials, but they could not employ anyone until they reached the status of Master.

McLEOD RD. 150 F4.
The McLeods were pioneers in the parish of Holden. (See 176 A11.)



HALL ST. 150 E4.
The Halls received grants near Lemprieres St Johns and Kilburns Fairview and next to Kilburns grant in Keilor Rd. Joseph Hall had the Tuerong run briefly.

BARROW ST 150 F4.
Jim Barrow was an owner of Gladstone, which makes up the northern 777 acres of Gladstone Park.

SPENCER, JACKSON, PANORAMA 150 G5.
Spencer Jackson did much to promote Dromana. He even wrote a history of Dromana but some of its pages look suspiciously like an advertisement for his Panoramic Estate at Dromana. The history is not for loan but is available at Rosebud Library.


GLENCOE DR. 153 A1.
Glencoe was the Duncan farm just north of the McLeod farm in the parish of Holden. It was on this farm that the famous Sunbury Music Festival was held. Ref. Bulla Bulla I.W.Symonds. (See 352 J5.)

NAIRN PL. 150 G7.
If I remember correctly (this whole work is written from memory as I gave all my maps, notes and the 3500 pages of Dictionary History of Tullamarine and Miles Around to custodians when moving to Rosebud) Nairn was granted to Captain Airey but became part of David Patullos Craig Bank. It was west of Wildwood Rd where it bends near the turn off to the Brannigans St Johns. (See 177 C3.)

HEARN RD. 150 E4, CLARKES AVE. 145 B8, BRUCE RD 150 F10.
Hearn had the Mt.Martha Run and in1865 appears to have built the forerunner or original 4 rooms of Heronswood at Dromana. He also received the grants of extensive property on both sides of Purves Rd on the south side of Arthurs Seats summit. His son, James married a daughter of W.J.T.(Big) Clarke who had bought Jamiesons Special Survey, the property south of Hearns run. Colin McLear said that Clarke gave another son-in-law, (a Mr Bruce of the family that produced a prime minister) part of the survey as a wedding present. This was probably the northern 1000 acres leased by E.L.Tassell. ( Hollinshead stated that Clarke sold it to him at a profit of 600 pounds). Big Clarke was looked after in his last days at James Hearns Roseneath in Woodlands St, Essendon. Woodland St apparently got its name from a huge Clarke property. The Roseneath estate was earlier owned by E.Clarke and later owned by William Salmon who donated Salmon Reserve to the council.
Sources: Wannaeue map, Kangerong rates, Dreamtime of Dromana, Lime Land Leisure, Essendon &Hawstead map, Essendon rates, Lenore Frosts books on Essendon homes and street names.
N.B. Big Clarkes son, W.J.Clarke, built Rupertswood at Sunbury (the birthplace of TheAshes) and named it after his son.


FAIRBAIRN AVE. 150 C7.
The Fairbairn family settled near Ballan very early. Like Hugh Glass, Big Clarke and John Aitken near Sunbury, they bought grants on the way to Newmarket to rest and fatten their stock. Fairbairns was on the south side of Raleighs Punt Road. Today it is Fairbairn Park. Fairbairn owned an impressive house (called Ardoch Towers if my memory serves me right) just north of the Essendon Footy Ground.

DALKEITH HOUSE. Being so far from Essendon on the Bay, this is pure conjecture, but there might have been some connection with Tommy Lofts farm, Dalkeith, at Tullamarine. (See Kilburn and Fairview.) Tommy Loft owned land on the west side of Truemans Rd in 1920, which adds to the possibility of a connection.







Safety beach and dromana now on USB.






BURTON ST 159 C9
There might be a connection with the Burrell or Coburn families.
It might also have been intended to be Burston Ave. I cannot be sure that, in 1919, George Burston of Fitzroy had 368 acres of the Arthurs Seat Pre-emptive Right because the same section and allotment was used to detail land there, and at Boneo. If he did there would be another 272 acres to account for.
Since 1900 and probably the 1890s depression, Catherine Burrell had owned 70 acres and the Coburns 88 acres. The Rudducks Wonga was 25 acres, Judge Higgins had Heronswood on 10 acres, the Hearns nearby had 40 acres and the Cornells had 10 acres where Smythe had built the hut for old Tom who tended his wattles. Charles Wedge of Ringwood had 26 acres taking us to a total of 637 acres, so with a few subdivision blocks the 640 acres are accounted for. Hmmm! By the way Burston also had 709 acres in another riding.


CHARLES ST 159 A10 HENRY ST 159 B10 CATHERINE ST 158 K 12
BURRELL ST 158 K12 COBURN AVE 159 B9 BARTELS ST158 K10.
Charles was the given name of one of the four Burrell brothers who took over the Arthurs Seat estate in 1851 with their sister Kitty. The author of Rosebud: Flower of The Peninsula said that he married Miss Coburn.
Henry was another of the four Burrell brothers. By 1910, he was living in East Melbourne but he was leasing a house and 4 acres from the Coburn family, possibly Killarney.
Catherine Burrell and her four brothers took over the McCraes Arthurs Seat Run in 1851. Brook and Joseph were the two brothers after whom streets were not named unless the author of the book mentioned under Charles St made a mistake. Rate records do little to verify the names of the brothers but they do indicate the shrinking acreage of the Burrell property. In 1864, Charles Burrell had a six-roomed house and a large garden (orchard) on 34 acres and Burrell had an eight-roomed house and large garden on a 42 acre frontage and the remaining 4400 acres of the Run. Edward Burrell was assessed on a slab hut and 15 acres.
In 1865, the rate collector assessed only Joseph Brooks Burrell, on the 640 acre pre-emptive Right. By 1879, Joseph John Burrell, grazier, was assessed on 580 acres, leased from C.Burrell. In 1900 and again in 1910, Catherine Burrell was assessed on 70 acres. I had assumed that she was a widow but she might have been Kitty who arrived with the four brothers. Her next- door neighbour was Caroline Coburn, possibly mother in law of Charles Burrell, living on the 88 acre Springbank.
The first mention of the Coburns that I have transcribed was from the assessments compiled for the 1887-8 year; W.J.Coburn was assessed on 370 acres. He might have been leasing part of the Arthurs Seat Pre-emptive Right of 640 acres. The author of Rosebud: Flower of the Peninsula states that Mr Coburn built several houses including Killarney in 1891 and Springbank in 1894. She says that Springbank burnt down in 1912 but the Coburns must have given the name to another house that he had built, as their address was still Springbank in 1919. The house on the site of the one that was burnt down was built in 1927.
In 1910, Mrs Caroline E.Coburn, a farmer, was assessed on the 88 acres of Springbank while William John Coburn, farmer of Springbank, was assessed on two allotments on Crown Allotment 17 (near McDowell St.)
By 1919, Miss Catherine Burrell had only 40 acres. The remaining 30 acres must have been sold to such as Frank and June Cornell (10). David Cairns Jnr (10) and Back Road (Now Bayview Rd) Bob Cairns may have had the rest. There is no mention of the Coburns in the West Riding, but there is a separate listing for the Springbank Estate.
The lots themselves were of little value and, no matter whether one or five lots were owned, the nett annual value was almost always two pounds. As mentioned before, Springbank consisted of 88 acres. C.W. Coburn was assessed on 44 acres and part of lots 4 and 5. Mrs S.Burrell who was living at Springbank, Dromana (or more correctly Dromana West as McCrae would be called for another couple of decades), had lots 8, 9, and 4 and 5 (of which Coburn had a part.) Charles N.Coburn, of Caulfield, had lots 22-5, 30-32, 22-81, 59, 60, and 87-95. (Thats right; assessed twice on lots 22-25!) E.J.Alexander (Queensland), Edith Anderson (Camberwell), and The Phillips (Murrayville), like the above, had buildings and thus a NAV of ten pounds or above.
The Bartels family from Oakleigh had property with a total NAV of L12.J.Bartels had lots 11, 18, 19 and buildings, while Mrs E.J. and E.C. and A.C. Bartels had lots 61-64. No doubt this family later did their own subdividing.

GEORGIANA PL. 159 A11.
Georgiana Place is named after Georgiana McCrae who supported her husband in his bid to establish a successful Run at Arthurs Seat. A cultured lady, she was asked by Gov. Latrobe to accompany him at the opening of the first Princes Bridge when his wife did not feel well enough to attend. In her famed diary, she recorded life in the infant colony with descriptions of pioneers rivaled only by those of Harry Peck. How else would I have known that Captain Bunbury (granted section 1 of the parish of Tullamarine, and head of the Water Police at Williamstown) had lost the use of his right arm but could paint beautifully left-handed?
Now doubt the walls of the Arthurs Seat homestead displayed some of Georgianas fine paintings. The McCrae homestead can provide a glimpse into the life and times of Georgiana. The artistic tradition at the homestead was carried on by John Twycross, who married one of the Burrell girls; noted as a photographer later, he produced some beautiful paintings, which are housed in display drawers in the new Burrell Room.



A NAVIGATOR THEMED ESTATE? 159 A12 and pages 170-1.
Poole St may be named after Captain J.Poole who commanded a 368 ton barque named the Indus. The Maitland Mercury of 12-2-1853 reported the arrival of the ship from Melbourne.
Parkes St, named after Sir Henry Parkes (the father of Federation whose enthusiasm was caught by Alfred Deakin) seems to be the exception to the theme; perhaps it was a later addition to provide access to the water tower.
Somers Ave seems to be part of the estate too. This was named after Lord Somers, the Governor from 1926-1931 who started a youth camp on Merricks Creek.
Matthew. Flinders, Cook and Bass need no explanation but an examination of the monument outside the Dromana Museum will help to explain the choice of Murray and Bowen. Have a look at it on a Sunday afternoon drive and visit the museum.
Dorothy Crt probably resulted from the subdivision of a homestead block later.

CAIRN (sic) RD 158 K12
This road was intended to be named after Robert Cairns, or Back Road Bob as he was known- as he lived on Cape Schanck Rd, which has been renamed Bayview Rd. He received grants for almost 180 acres on the east side of the back road with the northern and southern boundaries indicated by the extent of streets named after British cars. His northern boundary divided his property from the Arthurs Seat Pre-emptive Right and the southern boundary had bends which are the northern boundaries of the present Rosebud Golf Course. His land extended to Melway 171 A2.


GELLIBRAND ST 158 J11
Joseph Tice Gellibrand was one of the members of the Port Phillip Association on whose behalf John Batman made his purchase of thousands of square miles on the north and west of the bay. Gellibrand, appointed attorney-general of Van Diemans Land, took up his post in 1824 but the despotic Governor Arthur probably conspired to ensure his dismissal within a couple of years.
In 1827, he and Batman applied for a grant in the Port Phillip District (as Victoria was called until it gained Separation) but the request was refused. In 1835 he joined the P.P.A. and devised the treaty. After landing at Westernport in 1836 and strolling to Melbourne and then to Geelong, accompanied by William Buckley, and then towards Gisborne, then Melbourne, then the Plenty River, he went back to Tassie for a well-earned rest. He returned with George B.L.Hesse and, landing at Geelong on 27-2-1837, they set off to follow the Barwon River to its junction with the Leigh River and then cut across to Melbourne. They disappeared and no trace was ever found of them.

PARKMORE RD 158 H11
Parkmore was a comfortable house built in 1896 by Mr Holloway, an architect. A lovely fountain graced the garden. Parkmore was later occupied by Mr and Mrs Fair. The Clemingers bought it in 1908 and introduced tented accommodation. This information comes from Rosebud:Flower of the Peninsula, which as well as being not for loan is no longer kept in the local history room at the library. I have written a summary of its information, with notes, under the same title.
The rate assessments for 1900-1 show that Albert Holloway had 5 acres and a building; it would have been too much trouble to call it a house, let alone give its name!
Wises 1893-4 directory lists Albert Holloway as a resident of Rosebud and gives his occupation as builder, as does their 1895-6 directory. This historic house is still standing although well hidden by a high fence and perimeter foliage and will soon be completely hidden from view by new housing. See details of Parkmore and subdivision of Crown Allotment 19 in ADAMS CORNER by Ray Gibb (available at Dromana Museum.)

LONSDALE ST 158 K12
William Lonsdale was appointed Police Magistrate for Port Phillip District as soon as Governor Bourke received permission to form the new settlement and was hurried off in Captain Hobsons Rattlesnake, arriving on 29-9-1836. Bourke was anxious to impose control on the illegal settlers before things got out of hand. Lonsdale could have been dictatorial, given the additional powers invested in him but he was generally applauded for his even-handed attitude. When Latrobe arrived, he served under him until his boss retired in 1854.

WATTLE RD 158 J 11,12
The road to Portsea (as the highway was known) was called Esplanade where it skirted the foreshore through Dromana and Rosebud. The Avenue at McCrae was the boundary between the Arthurs Seat Pre-emptive Right and Captain Henry Adams grant , allotment 20 of the parish of Wannaeue. I doubt that The Avenue was made to Cape Schanck (Bayview) Road in the early days. The only people that came from the east to ADAMS CORNER before the mid 1860s would have been those calling at the Arthurs Seat homestead before going to the solitude of the Cape Schanck, Boniyong or Tootgarook runs. If they werent stopping at the homestead and did not want to wait for low tide so they could get around Anthonys Nose on the beach, they would enter Cape Schanck Rd at Foote St in Dromana.
However, if they did stop at the homestead, they would take a route that headed west with the least arduous ascent. This would explain the crazy angle at which Wattle Rd (now Wattle Pl.) leaves the beach road. Even before the McCraes settled on their run, Captain Adams had a house on Adams Corner, built from his schooners timber in 1839-40 and it is likely that anyone choosing the beach route around Arthurs Seat instead of the steep climb out of what would become Dromana would enjoy his company and hospitality before proceeding. There was no road along the foreshore and many creeks (Adams, Eeling and Peateys and others before Jetty Rd) as well as the Tootgarook Swamp near Chinamans Creek (with jungles of ti tree) that would deter travelers from taking that route.
When Henry Cadby Wells and his wife were walking to the heads to join young Robert Rowley in a limeburning venture in 1841, it is likely that they stopped at Henry Adams place for the night. As they prepared to leave the next morning they would have seen some of Adams workers heading off in a south westerly direction.
Where are they going in the dark?
Can you see those piles of bark?
They go out in any sort of weather
And strip the wattles for tanning leather.
The demand for wattle bark in Melbourne would lead to this track, made by the earliest travelers, being used by bark gatherers who would have to go further up the mountain each day as they depleted the supply along the wattle road and then at the end of it.

BARODA ST 158 G12 MITCHELL ST, LYON ST 158 F12 MADURA ST 158 H 12
All of these streets seem to have a link with the Maddens of Travancore, which was part of the old Flemington Estate of Hugh Glass.Both Baroda and Madura are street names in the Travancore Estate ((29 A11). The main Madden business was supplying horses for the army in India. Their initial link with the Peninsula was probably through the Purves family at Tootgarook with James supplying heavy horses for hauling and James Jnr breeding thoroughbreds for the lighthorse brigades. If the Maddens did establish a holiday retreat east of Adams Ave., it was not far from Green Hills, near the south end of Purves Rd, where, at his uncle Peter Purves farm, Alf Hansen and others imitated the man from Snowy River.
The Lyon family was prominent in the Essendon area from early days and possibly involved on the council with the Maddens.
The Mitchell name is common in early Peninsula history, and because of the proximity of two streets named after pioneering families, I believe Mitchell St was named after one of them. James Mitchell was one of the early settlers on Jamiesons Special Survey, renting a hut from Big Clarke in 1863.As he did not have land, he was probably fishing at Safety beach or timber cutting. He was also there in 1864, but not in 1865 unless my transcription was faulty. It was probably his daughter who married John Bryan, a neighbour on the survey.. (See Brian St, map 158.) Mitchell might have moved to Rye in 1865 to work in the lime trade. George Mitchell was the postmaster at Rye by 1879. (See RYE PRIMARY SCHOOL 1667 P 60, 72 re the Mitchells.)
If the Madden land extended across Adams Ave, Mitchell St could have been named for Mitchell who ran huge flocks of sheep on Woodlands and Cumberland, which today constitute most of Woodlands Historic Park near Tullamarine Airport. He took over this land after the death of Alexander McCracken in 1915. (See Mt Martha streets such as Ailsa & Cumberland.)
Mitchell and Madden might have been connected through the Oaklands Hunt Club or perhaps marriage.


ADAMS AVE 158 G12
Captain Henry Everest Vivian Adams first landed at Dromana (which included McCrae until recent times) sometime between 1839 and 1840 on the schooner Roseanne.He received the grant for allotment 20 Wannaeue, which was bounded by Point Nepean Rd, The Avenue, Bayview Rd and Parkmore Rd. By 1865, he had purchased allotment 19, which went west to Adams Ave.
His first house was built from the timbers of his schooner, but with the help of his son, Robert, he built another house on the Wattle Rd corner (Adams Corner), which was named Hopetoun House in honour of the Governor who would stay there on his way to Sorrento. Like many farmers (even today), he had to turn his hand to many things to make a living. It is probable that he carried lime, timber and bark up the bay to Melbourne. He picked up and provided accommodation to tourists when Dromanas pier was built, had a vineyard, and produced bricks. In about 1890, when the construction of St Marks Anglican Church was being organized Henrys son, Robert, donated 10 000 bricks.
Hopetoun House later became Merlyn Lodge guest house, which was being run by Mrs S.A.Adams in 1947. R.W. Adams was running a milk bar in 1950.
Two pioneer families linked to the Adams through marriage are the McGregor and Freeman families. Keith McGregor, who took over Jimmy Williams fish run from Rosebud West to Mornington, married Mabel Adams and later sold his run to Mabels brother, Bill. Another Adams girl married a Freeman according to Ray Cairns.


PATERSON ST 158 F12
CAIRNS ST 158 F12
JETTY RD 158 F12 (3 PIERS).
BUCHER PL. 158 E12
DURHAM PL 158 E12
WANNAEUE PL. 158 E12
McDOWELL ST 158 D12
HEAD ST 158 D12

MAPS 170-171.
SHANDS RD 171 K12
WHITES RD 171 G3
WILSON RD 171 G6
BARKERS RD 171 H 12
PURVES RD 171 E1
BALDRYS RD 171 E12
GREENS RD 171 E12
CAIRN (sic) RD. 170 K1-2
McLAREN CT 170 K4
BRITISH CAR THEME 170 J2
HOVE RD 170 G 3
SHERWOOD AVE 170 G7, FENTON AVE 170 G7

WOONTON CRES& ST 170 F3,G2.
I remember seeing the name, Woonton, in a list of early Mornington residents. The 1919-20 rate records show that James W. Woonton was leasing 152 acres from Edward Wilson. This land, which had recently been vacated by Ned Edmonds, was on the south side of Browns Rd, starting 340m east of Truemans Rd and continuing 940 m towards Boneo. The Sands and McDougall directory of 1950 lists James H.Woonton as a farmer of Boneo. De Garis bought Pottons farm but must have had trouble selling it quickly enough to pay his loans and committed suicide in 1927. Soon after, the depression of the 1930 and the Second World War would have made the chance of selling blocks even less likely. Perhaps the Woontons bought the land for a song shortly after 1950. As the east end of Woonton Cres extends into Crown allotment 19, owned by the Adams family of McCrae, it is likely that they had also unsuccessfully subdivided it or sold to De Garis.

POTTON AVE 170 F3.
Crown Allotment 18 of the parish of Wannaeue is bounded by: the highway, Jetty Rd, Bayview Rd and the line of Adams Ave. It was granted to G.Warren and consisted of 152 acres (and 56 perches that rate collectors never recorded.) It seems to have been leased to a Mr Parr in 1864 but Warren was assessed in 1865. Warren might have been a friend of the Rudducks from Dandenong and the father of Fred Warren who died early leaving his widow (nee Patterson of Fingal) running a store in Dromana for a living.
By 1900, ownership had passed to Mrs Thomas Bamford. The first page of the 1879 assessments is missing from the microfiche and as no property of that size is mentioned that cannot be located elsewhere, Mrs Bamford probably already owned it. Two acres at the FJs corner of Jetty Rd housed Jack Jones store by 1900, leaving 150 acres.
The Pottons bought the land in 1906, according to Peter Wilson in his On the Road to Rosebud, and in 1910, Mrs Potton of Brunswick was assessed on the 150 acres. By 1919, the 2 acre store site had been subdivided into five lots and the buildings, on one acre were owned by Talbot and occupied by Chiltern. Mrs P.J.Potton was now living on the farm and paying rates on three of the subdivided blocks as well as the 150 acres.
S.Potton fought in WW1. In 1950, Warwick A. Potton, carpenter was listed as a Rosebud resident. See the chapter in Peters book entitled Henry Pottons Farm.


NAVIGATOR THEME 170 F 4-5

OLD CAPE SCHANCK RD 170 F6& C11
GIPPS ST 170 E1
BARRY ST 170 E1
GRASSLANDS RD 170 E 11
BROWNS RD 170 D 11

WOOD ST 170 D 1.
I will use this entry to illustrate why I do not often quote sources for my information; to do so would probably double the length of what I write.
On page 52 of On the Road to Rosebud, Peter Wilson stated that in about 1946 Mr F.E.(Joe)Wood and Mr B.P.(Barney)Rogers, seeing that Rosebud needed a new hall, formed a local citizens committee, which conducted a carnival over the 1946-7 summer on the foreshore. In Rosebud: Flower of the Peninsula, Isobel Moresby informed us that Cr Wood was one of the owners of the historic McCrae Homestead after the Burrells.
LIME LAND LEISURE has a list of Flinders Shire councillors. Forest Edmond Wood was a councillor in 1942-3 and from 1945 to 1955. Without doubt Wood St was named after Joe.
BANKSIA PL. 170 C3, CLACTON DIVIDE 170 C2, THE LINK, LEA WAY 170 D2,
First to Ninth Ave were the north-south streets of the Clacton-on- Sea Estate. This estate, named after a coastal resort in Essex, 70 miles north east of London, was put on sale in 1908 and only a few blocks were sold despite later attempts to keep it in the public eye by offering blocks as prizes in radio competitions and raffles on the steamers. By the 1980s the Eastbourne Rd end was still a largely uninhabited wasteland and the council decided to do something about it, as described in On the Road to Rosebud. Closing of most of the avenues at Eastbourne Rd, and construction of internal link roads, was probably prompted by the imminent freeway.

FIRST-NINTH AVENUES.
This entry has been prompted by a history myth passed on to me at the football on 14-5-2011. As the teller knew a bit about Rosebuds history, I was fascinated, but I thought it strange that the tale had not been in Isobel Moresbys history of 1954 or Peter Wilsons books. Jim Dryden has lived in Rosebud since 1932 and confirmed that the story was rubbish.
During WW2 there was a huge tent city to house American soldiers and in the American fashion, the major north-south tracks dividing the area were given numbers as names.
Trove decisively confirmed Jims claim that the street names existed before the war. An advertisement (at the top of the last two columns of page 2 in the Argus of 30-1-1926) refers to blocks being sold in the Clacton-on-Sea estate facing Second Avenue.

ROSE AVE 170 B1
This street and Rosebrook St were probably one street in the subdivision of the Hindhope Estate in about 1920. Traffic management measures obviously led to the one-way section being renamed by dropping the second syllable.


HOPE ST 170 B2
As this was one of the streets in the Hindhope Estate (see Rose Ave entry), I would expect that a Mr Hope was one of the partners in the firm that subdivided it, with Mr Hind being another. Raymond and Alma Guest used a similar naming stategy for the naming of the ALMARAY ESTATE at Tootgarook in the 1950s.

ABORIGINAL THEME 170 B 2-3
MAPS 168-169
ROSEBUD WEST
MARKS AVE 169 K2
R.Marks was granted allotment 13 B of Wannaeue on the west corner of Boneo Rd and the road to Portsea. This consisted of 5 acres and from about 1920 was known as Martins Corner because of a shop built on it by a man of that name. The grant for the other 123 acres of allotment 13 was issued in the name of Benjamin and Co. Marks was obviously a partner in the company because he later had sole ownership of lot 13 whose boundaries are described in the Dalgleish St entry. Marks had a lime kiln that had been built by Edward Hobson before he sold the Tootgarook Run in 1850; it was located near the corner of Marks Ave and Whitehead Grove.


DALGLEISH ST 169 K2
Alexander Cairns was one of the three Cairns brothers who settled at Boneo.
Robert came first, in 1852, with Alex and David arriving two years later. Alex had married Janet Dalgleish in Scotland. David (born 1861) and William (b. 1864) leased and then bought allotment 13 Wannaeue, consisting of 128 acres and bounded by Pt Nepean Rd, Boneo Rd, Eastbourne Rd and a line just east of Miriam St. David built the limestone house, Elanora, that is now part of the hospital and was known as Elanora Davey. Dalgleish St was named after their mothers maiden name, which was also used as a given name for a sister and a brother.

CAIN ST 169 K4
HENRY WILSON DR. K7, THAMER ST 169 K8
JENNINGS CRT 169 K7
Robert came first, in 1852, with Alex and David arriving two years later. Alex had married Janet Dalgleish in Scotland. David (born 1861) and William (b. 1864) leased and then bought allotment 13 Wannaeue, consisting of 128 acres and bounded by Pt Nepean Rd, Boneo Rd, Eastbourne Rd and a line just east of Miriam St. David built the limestone house, Elanora, that is now part of the hospital and was known as Elanora Davey. Dalgleish St was named after their mothers maiden name, which was also used as a given name for a sister and a brother.
CAPEL AVE 169 H2.
This explanation of what I believe to be the origin of this street name will be complicated and long. On 29-8-1895, Alfred Julius Kaeppel of Murrumbeena.bought 10 acres in crown allotment 33A of section A in the parish of Wannaeue. This allotment was granted to Patrick Sullivan in 1874 and consisted of 148 acres. The Sullivans, like many others in the depression of the 1890s had been unable to make mortgage payments and had lost their land to financers. Another 10 acres had been sold to Navioga Gaudevia and 6 acres to William Heron, with 78 acres being occupied by John Pigdon. The Pigdon family, at that time, owned the historic Dunhelen property between Greenvale Reservoir and Dunhelen Lane.
In 1909, the man after whom Browns Rd was named arrived and bought a huge area of rabbit and ti tree infested land at very little cost; he tranformed it into the lush pasture we see today as we drive along Browns Rd. The assessments presented for the Flinders Shire councillors approval in September 1910 show that Patrick Sullivans son, James, had regained 100 acres of 31A and Brown had 35 acres. John L.Morae, a Rosebud farmer, had 10 acres. The rate collector had accounted for all but 2 acres of the land between land now occupied by The Dunes golf course and Peninsula Hot Springs. While James Sullivan was running the Gracefield Hotel (on the site of the present Rye hotel), Antonio Albress was running the Sullivan lime kiln on the remaining 100 acres.
Kaeppel had obviously sold his 10 acres, at a low price but for far more than his purchase price. It would be fair to assume that Kaeppel was a speculator and was keen to reinvest in the same area when the time was right. He had unusual Christian names. Alfred recalls the Saxon King killed by a Norman arrow in 1066 and Julius may have been intended to show the German link to the Heiliges Romisches Reich (Holy Roman Empire). Kaeppel seems to be a German name.
Thousands of Australians changed their surnames between 1910 and 1920, one of them being the popular publican at the Junction Hotel in Tullamarine. He anglicized his German surname because of a groundwell of hatred of all things German during World War 1, and local histories of almost any area could supply similar examples. I believe that Alfred Julius changed his surname to Capel, the C less German than K would have been.
Capel Avenue is on Crown Allotment 53 Wannaeue, between Mirriam Ave and Elizabeth Ave. In 1929 James Sloss bought land and built holiday bungalows to establish Leisureland. By the end of World War 2, a demand for land had arisen, similar to that after WW1 when Ewart Paul bought 4 acres of lot 53, and Leisureland was subdivided in about 1958, creating Capel Ave. Leisureland might have been subdivided by the son of Alfred Julius Kaepell.

CHATFIELD AVE 169 J2

WOYNA AVE 169F3.
The Woyna Estate was one of many subdivision started by 1920. It was probably based only on allotment 51 Wannaeue, bounded by the beach road, Truemans Rd, a line from Broadways west end to Orchid St, and Elizabeth Ave. The street was named after the estate. Some of the earlier purchasers are discussed in my Rosebud West. One of them, E.W.White was running the Mayville Guest House in 1950. The estate was probably a project of the Tootgarook Land Company, which owned 456 acres in allotment 51 and south to Hiscocks Rd, including the site of the Chinamans Creek Nature Reserve.
WATERBIRD THEME 169 K5, F5

TRUEMANS RD 169D5
This road was referred to as the government road between Rosebud and Rye when the Stenniken grant was advertised in 1920. (See TRUEMAN entry.)

BURDETT ST 169 D4
This was obviously another subdivision of land owned by the butchering business started by Henry William Wilson. Burdett was the maiden name of his wife, Thamer, and the second given name of his son, Godfrey. Godfrey Burdett Wilson had married Ben Stennikens daughter and may have been the buyer or seller in 1920. (See Truemans Rd.)

DOIG AVE 169 D6, RONALD ST 169 C5
Poultry farmer, Henry Doig bought part of the Trueman grant in 1939, probably the 56 acres farmed by William Trueman and his son Fred. Ronald St is named after his son.
(See DOIG and TRUEMAN entries.)

GUEST ST, ALMA ST, RUSSELL ST, RAYMOND ST, JOHN ST, VINCENT ST 169 D5-6
Hairdresser, Raymond Guest bought part of the Trueman grant in 1948, most likely the 56 acres farmed by Thomas Trueman, He died in 1925 and I believe the property passed to his wife Matilda briefly and then to a daughter of one of Thomass sisters (Mrs Libbis). I think that it was part of her husbands estate in 1945, and after she had finished her duties as executrix, she sold the land to Raymond.
Alma was Raymonds wife and the other streets are named after their sons.
WOODTHORPE AVE, FIELDING RD 169 H3.
These streets were in the Woodthorpe Estate.It may have encompassed all the land between the subdivision of Slosss Leisureland (based on Capel Ave) and Elizabeth Drive. Edward Fielding purchased about 5 acres, probably in the 1920s. After he sold the land, it was subdivided and Fielding St was made and named. Edward Fielding was an indent agent who lived in East Malvern and had an office in Flinders Lane. He imported fabric, which was used for Holland blinds and furniture. He had one son, Edward, and a daughter. His grandson, alsoTed, supplied this information.
HISCOCK RD 169 E7
MARSHALL RD 168 K4
FIELD ST 169 A 6
Samuel Field was granted crown allotment Wannaeue on 10-11-1880.Consisting of almost 106 acres, this land now houses Moonah Links and The Cups Vineyard down to the southern boundary of the latter. In 1875, Samuel was assessed on 124 acres in Wanneue. The only allotment that makes sense is 13A bounded by Pt Nepean Rd, Boneo Rd, Eastbourne Rd and the western end of Whyte St, and consisting of 123 acres and 13 perches. I would be amazed if Samuel was not engaged in producing lime, like his later neighbours, Page, White and Sullivan. When he obtained his grant, he probably quarried limestone on it to supply Patrick Sullivans kiln near the east boundary of The Dunes links, as LIME LAND LEISURE does not mention him having a kiln. Allotment 13A had a kiln near Marks Ave built by Edward Hobson and later Marks, James Ford and George Hill, so Samuel would have been able to burn his own lime. Also, the lime could be loaded, a stones throw away, onto limecraft, which were sailed in at high tide and propped up on the extensive sandbanks.
GOVERNMENT RD 168 J5
This road was the boundary between the parishes of Wannaeue and Nepean. It is shown on the parish map as running to Browns Rd. A 1954 map confirms that it was called Jennings Rd at that time. Surveyors never drew crooked lines in parish maps and many of their government roads were later deviated around sections of their course that were made impractical for wheeled transport by the terrain. Weeroona St is such a deviation.
WEEROONA ST, HYGIEA ST, OZONE ST 168 H5
These were named afterthe most famous of the Bay steamers that made the Peninsula a tourist destination before and after the 1880s when Edward Williams opened a road around Anthonys Nose. It was only after the road around the rockswas improved by Allnut in the 1920s, and cars became more common, that the steamer trade declined. Most of the passengers stayed in guest houses, some of which continued past the days of the steamers, (See ACCOMMODATION entry.) The Clemengers had tented accommodation on Parkmore for steamer passengers who would have had trouble bringing a tent, unlike motoring tourists who popularized foreshore camping.
WEIR ST 168 G5
GRACE ST 168 G4
HUNT AVE 168 G4



GOLF PDE, GOLF LANE 168 G6, McDONALD RD. 168 H7 PRENTICE AVE 168 F7
On 18-5-1869, F.McDonald received the grant for suburban allotment 2 of Rye Township consisting of just under 33 .5 acres. Its northern boundary was the beach road and it included Whitecliffs Rd and Minnimurra Rd, with its south west corner being the end of Weatherly Court (168 C5). Suburban lots 10,11 and 12 were east of Dundas St, south to about the Golf Pde corner and east to Valley Drive. W.A.Blair bought these allotments from the Crown, a total of 201 acres, as well as allotment 3 (containing the R.J.Rowley Reserve), 9 and 15 (another 105 acres) along Melbourne Rd. (Plus allotments 4,20 and 21 Nepean (376 acres) south to Browns Rd.)
Following Blairs death, it took some time to unravel his financial affairs because of his vast land holdings near Rye, between Truemans and Boneo Rds and near Main Ridge. By 1920, the Tootgarook Land Company had bought his Rosebud West land
and subdivided the Woyna Estate (including Woyna Ave.) It was probably at about that time that the McDonald family bought lots 10,11 and 12.
Ray Cairns was born in 1910 and was probably playing cricket for Boneo by 1925. He remembers playing against Rye on the grassy area near the pier where Australia Day is celebrated. Later Ryes home ground was for a while on McDonalds farm south of the cemetery. Ray also recalls playing on the golf course that Jack and Max McDonald constructed. (TALKING HISTORY WITH RAY CAIRNS by Ray Gibb.)
This course was quite big and must have been in use until about 1960 as a fellow Rye Historical Society member in his 70s remembered playing there.
Between Weir St and Government Rd were allotments 1,2 and 3 of the parish of Nepean, granted to James Purves of the Tootgarook station across Government Rd. By 1900 George Baker, who had bought the present post office site and other lots on section 7 west of Weir St, had bought 67 acres of lots 1 and 2 Nepean. George had died and his executors were assessed on the land. Allotment 3 was probably sold at the same time and later added to old McDonalds farm; McDonald Rd is on crown allotment 3, Nepean.
W.E.Prentice was the selling agent for the Rye-Lands Estate, the former Rye Golf Links, in 1954 and Max was probably running the sales office at the (then) end of Lyon St. Prentice Ave is on the former golf course. (See McDONALD entry.)

NELSON ST , NAPIER ST COLLINGWOOD ST BOWEN ST LYONS ST 168 F4
It is likely that these street names were designated when the township was surveyed. Everyone knows about Horatio Nelson, the Admiral famous for his victory in the Battle of Trafalgar. Napier was an army commander famous for the relief of Lucknow in India.
Now its your turn to supply some information. Who was Tony Shaws vice captain when Collingwood won the premiership in 1990? The reason that I asked was to make you realize that the second in command often misses out on the recognition he deserves.
Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood seemed to spend much of his career taking commands from which Nelson had just been promoted. He assumed command when Nelson was killed at Trafalgar and had a glorious career marked by his bravery. He died of cancer in 1810.
Bowen of course was involved very early in the exploration of Port Phillip Bay. It is likely that Lyons was Chief Secretary (premier) when the town was surveyed.


DUNDAS ST 168 F6
The Dundas name was associated with two areas in the 1800s to my knowledge. One family had a factory on the Swamp Rd (Dynon Rd) between Footscray (Kensington) Rd and the river. (EARLY LANDOWNERS IN THE PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA by Ray Gibb.) The other family was in South Melbourne and associated with the bakery trade. (Dundas St Sth Melb) Most Township street names honoured Chief Ministers (Premiers) and war heroes; my knowledge of the chief ministers is limited but I think that the South Melbourne baker might have been in parliament. The descendant of the Kensington Clan who was put onto me for information would have mentioned political involvement if there had been any.
Dundas St was apparently established by Rye pioneers going to the back beach and returning with plunder. On Page 32 of RYE PRIMARY SCHOOL 1667, Patricia Appleford states that Dundas St was originally called Browns Rd; this claim is confirmed by a plan in an advertisement for the Rye-Lands Estate in 1945. (See McDONALD entry.)

SINCLAIR AVE 168 E5
P.S.Sinclair was granted allotments 4, 6, 7, 8 and 12 of section 7 in Rye Township. As the name Sinclair does not appear in the index that I made for Patricia Applefords Rye Primary School 1667, I doubt that he was ever a resident of the township. Section 7 was sold in 1872, and was bounded by the beach road, Lyons St, the line of Ballabil St and Weir St. G.Baker bought lots 1, 2, 3 and 6 extending 180 metres east from Lyons St and the same distance south in Lyons St. Lots 9 and 10 were granted to G. Ellis. Lot 11, an original school site was across Lyons St from the cemetery. I have come across the names of Baker and Ellis in the history of the area. There is a Sinclair St in Somerville, probably from a subdivision in the 1920s, but the name of Sinclair does not rate one mention in Leila Shaws excellent history of the area, The Way We Were. This leads me to believe that the family was involved in land speculation from early times.
A subsequent search in rate records revealed that he had the five allotments until 1882, in which year he seems to have acquired another two lots, giving him 7 acres. His occupation was given as contractor but no address was recorded. Thereafter, his name is absent from assessments and he did not seem to have been leasing his land to anybody. He seems to have sold his land to Harry Horniman, the teacher at Rye.
A continuing connection with Rye is suggested by the burial at Rye Cemetery of
Arthur G.Sinclair in 1983 at the age of 70 and also Colin Sinclair.

MAORI ST 168 E4
WHITE CLIFFS RD 168 C4
CAIN RD 168 C4
NEVILLE DR 168 B4
Michael Cains wife was a Neville. She and Michael spent time in Gippsland and Adelaide after their marriage; the daughter born at the latter place married Hill Harry Cairns. Each of Hill Harrys three children, all boys, spent their first ten days at Grandma Nevilles place in South Melbourne before travelling by bay steamer to Dromana from where Henry drove them to Maroolaba in Fingal. Thus the Neville family of South Melbourne had links with two pioneering peninsula families and probably had quite a deal to do with ensuring that their offspring were born in near proximity to medical attention; the lack of this resulted in far too many deaths of both mother and child in those days. More details in TALKING HISTORY WITH RAY CAIRNS by Ray Gibb (available at Rye Museum.)
MICHAEL ST 168 A5
It could be said with fair certainty that this street was named after Michael Cain.
GOLF THEME 168 A5-6
FRANCIS ST 168 B9
MAPS 166-167

TYRONE AVE 167 K3
MURRAY ST 167 J4
Anne Murray, possibly the daughter of Margaret Murray, teacher at Dromana Common School from November 1869 to at least 1873, married Owen Cains first son, Joseph, who seemed to have been a resident of Dromana and, like Robert Rowley senior, made his wages there on the bay, which claimed his life in middle age. See FAMILY CONNECTIONS entry.
CANTERBURY JETTY RD 167 H7
FORD ST 167 J3
KILLARNEY ST 167 J2
PACIFIC/SHIP THEME 167 J 2-4
PEARSE RD 167 F6
REVELL ST 167 F3
(Source: Steve Watson, who is not related to the pioneering fishermen.)
This street is named after Harold Revell, who moved to the area in his retirement in 1948. When he was a young man, Harold lived in Poowong and was delivering mail on horseback for his parents who were running the post office there in 1903. Later the family moved to Port Fairy where his mother was the Mayor and Harold worked, until his retirement, as an accountant. The Watson family lived in the area and supplied Harolds daughter, Ilo Beth, with a husband and Steve was their child. Upon his retirement, Harold moved to Northcote where he served for some years as President of the V.F.A. club, Northcote, at whose ground the champion aboriginal footballer, Doug Nicholls, was the secretary and administrator; he was later knighted and became Governor of South Australia.
Steve Watson recalls rabbiting along St Johns Wood Rd during his holidays on Harolds property. Harold bought a 1948 M.G. saloon at about the time he settled in Blairgowrie. Its registration number was PF1948 and Harold used to say that PF stood for Port Fairy. He had a mongrel dog called Tiger that would move into the drivers seat as soon as Harold got out of the car. He was a regular at the Rye and Koonya hotels and Dorothy Houghton, who ran the latter, claimed that the dog used to drive him home.

WILSON RD, GODFREY ST 167 F2, COUTTS CT 167 D2 BENJAMIN PDE 167 E2
The first butchers in Dromana were the McLear brothers. They soon decided to concentrate on other occupations; John took up fishing and George carted timber to Peter Pidotas boat at Sheepwash Creeks mouth (for the construction of piers around the bay) and horse breeding.
Henry William Wilson, a former bullocky, decided to fill the void and did his early slaughtering on the McLear farm Maryfield until he bought a 45 acre block (the Dromana Aerial Landing Ground of 1927 pictured on page 172 of DREAMTIME OF DROMANA). Henry then opened a shop in Sorrento on the advice of George Coppin and probably put Edward Williams out of business, forcing his relocation from his Browns Rd farm just east of Truemans Rd to Eastbourne (Village Glen site). When his son Godfrey took over, the business boomed and much land was needed for grazing. Land was bought at Safety Beach (Coutts St etc) and all over to service their many shops and a more central slaughteryard was established near Dr Blairs Blairgowrie. Godfreys sons, Henry William Burdett Coutts Wilson and Benjamin Godfrey John Ralph Wilson must have hated forms that required them to write their names in full!
The abbatoir land was subdivided when a new one was established in Shergolds Lane at Dromana. The above names plus Thamer and Burdett (from Henrys wife) are indications of subdivisions of former Wilson land.

FAWKNER AVE 167 D2
John Fawkner and his parents and William Buckley could justly claim to be the first permanent settlers of Victoria. It was not the Fawkners fault that the lazy David Collins relocated them from Sullivans Bay to Hobart instead of finding the Freshwater (Yarra) River that Grimes had already explored. Johns father, a silversmith, had been transported for stealing and his mother Hannah (nee Pascoe) did a sterling job bringing up the 12 year old boy among the dregs of humanity to be a literate, hard-working man. On his mothers death, John became John Pascoe Fawkner as a token of respect. I was delighted to have Hannah Pascoe Drive in Gowenbrae named in her honour. Another claim that J.P.Fawkner could make is that he was light years ahead of the government in establishing Closer Settlement. He did it circa 1850 and the government did not finally get it right until the Act of 1904. Fawkners father leased his sons Belle Vue at Pascoeville for a while; this farm featured oak trees, one of which survives, prompting a later owner, flour miller Hutchinson, to rename it Oak Park. The strange thing is that Fawkner never lived in Fawkner, his square mile grant, west of the cemetery was called Box Forest and has been renamed after Cr Rupert Hadfield.

McFARLAN AVE 167 D2
Take a drive to the Sorrento Footy Ground and read the history board about David McFarlan. While youre there have a look at the Sorrento tramway station on the hill above the pier and its terrific history boards and the museum at the Melbourne Rd roundabout. The Op Shop at the roundabout is worth a look too.
LIME LAND LEISURE has much detail about this pioneer as does Jennifer Nixons FAMILY, CONNECTIONS ETC on page 92.

DANA AVE 167 D5
Captain Dana headed the native police. There were many paddocks for grazing their horses, such as Churchill National Park at the end of Police Rd near Dandenong. There was a plan to build a fence From White Cliff to the back beach to protect grazing for police horses and it was opposed by James Ford and James Purves who wanted to continue fattening their bullocks west of that line. It was found that many who signed their petition actually wanted the fence. (See ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD.)
BLAIRGOWRIE AVE 167 D1
STRINGER RD 167 C1.


MAPS 156 AND 157.
FAMILY, CONNECTIONS, SORRENTO and PORTSEA is a history of this area.

Written by Jennifer Nixon and published in 2003, this book details the Skelton family and other families connected by marriage as well as general history. It lacks an index but I have produced one, which indicates people mentioned but only listing page numbers of first and major coverage.
Not all streets listed below are in Sorrento and Portsea and not all streets (possibly) named after those in my index are listed below but there seem to be many streets this side of Frankston whose names may be linked to those mentioned in Jennifers book. My index can be found at the start of the FAMILY CONNECTIONS entry.
As Jennifers book is available for borrowing, each street name is followed only by its Melway reference, and the page(s) on which that family is mentioned in Jennifers history. (P=PORTSEA, S=SORRENTO, BG= BLAIRGOWRIE, R=RYE.) There could be more details later (or earlier) regarding some of the street names.
SKELTON PL S 157 B8 - THROUGHOUT
TAYTON PL S 157A7 - P iii
CLARK CR S 157 C9 - 8, 11, 12-25
NEWTON AV S 157 B8 -8, 11,42-8, 92 (Formerly Cain St-page 49.)
WHITES WAY S 156 K7 -8
WATTS RD S 157 B7 -11, 29-36,56
MORCE AV S 157 A7 -11, 37-8,83, 122
DARK PDE S 157 B9 -11,69-70,76-9,92
KEATING AV S 157 D12 -12, 16-17
LEONARD CRES S 157 A6 -12
MORGAN ST S 157 B7 -12, 19-23
HUGHES RD S 157 F 12 -25,109
EVANS ST R 168 A8 -29
SULLIVAN ST S 156 K9 -90
FARNSWORTH AV P 156 B 4 &5 -42,79-80
KNIGHT BG 167 F4 -42
COKER CR P 156 D2 -49,52-3
FIELD ST R 168 J5 -50
HILL ST S 157 C9 -56
ERLANDSEN S 157 D9 -56
SPUNNER CT S 156 K7 -75
LENTELL AV S 157 A5 -81-2
STRINGER RD BG 157 G 12 -86-9
GRACE ST R 168 G4 -90 This could be named after William Grace or Grace Sullivan.
RUSSELL CR S 157 B 10 -92
McFARLAN ST BG 157 G12 -92
CROAD ST S 156 J6 -76
WILLIAMSON ST TOOTGAROOK 169 A5 -112
KEMP RD P 156 K4 -125
WATSON RD S 157 A9 92
WILSON RD BG 167 F2 -94-5








HUGHES RD 157 F12
COLLINS PDE 157 E10
CALCUTTA ST 157 E10
KINNEIL ST 157 D9
ERLANDSEN AV 157 D9
HILL ST, CLARK CRES, CORSAIR GROVE , WEBSTER ST, RUSSELL CRES 157 C10
WILLIAM BUCKLEY WAY 157 C12
KING ST 157 B11
BOWEN RD 157 B9
DARK PDE 157 B9
HISKENS 157 B8
COPPIN RD 157 A9
CONSTITUTION HILL RD157 B8
HAYES AVE 157 B8
KERFERD RD, DARLING RD 157 A8
SKELTON PL. 157 B8, WATTS RD 157 B7.
WHITES WAY 156 K7, SPUNNER CT. 156 K7.
SULLIVAN ST 156 K9.
CROAD ST 156 J6
DURHAM PL. 156 H8.
STONECUTTERS RD 156 H6
LIMEBURNERS WAY 156 H4.
DUFFY ST 156 H5
CAMPBELL RD 156 H5
WATTLE GR. 156 G 3,5.
FRANKLIN RD 156 F5
WEIR CT 156 F3
BLAIR CT & RD. 156 E3.
FARNSWORTH AV. 156 E4
LATROBE AVE 156 E5
LATHAM DR. 156 D5.
BASS RD 156 C5.
WEEROONA AVE 156 D2
MAPS 251 AND 252.
Somebody wanted to seize a (Caesar) chance to display knowledge of Roman history. Okay, I hear you; one more pun and Im history! 251 J5.

BOAGS ROCKS 252 A11.
It looks as if the interests of the Boag family extended beyond the guest house at Dromana.

LIMESTONE RD 252 A 3.
Limestone Rd was the southern boundary of the parish of Wannaeue, which continued West to the eastern boundary of The Dunes Golf Course (which indicates the boundary between Wannaeue and the parish of Nepean.)
Patrick Sullivan had a lime kiln between The Dunes and Foam Rd. On his death, its operation was taken over by his son, James, but it was managed by Antonio Albress (who had land across Browns Rd from the Moonah Links frontage.) Albress obviously pronounced his name with an accent because oldtimers thought it was Albas. (Hollinshead thought he was Tony Salvas!) It was at Sullivans kiln that William Webster was nearly burnt to death. He either was having a snooze inside when it was lit or fell in while loading it from the top.
North of Sullivan, across Browns Rd, was W. A.Blair (the daddy of them all), and Nathan Page, and to the east were Page, George White, Sam Field, Jenner and Spunner, all having received grants in Wannaeue. Earlier they operated under special licences. It is likely that limestone was easy to obtain here, but it would have been difficult to transport it to the bay from where it was taken by limecraft to Melbourne. If you want an idea what roads were like, try riding a bike on Old Cape Schanck Road south of Browns Rd!

MAP 253
MAXWELLS RD 253 A6.
PATTERSON RD 253 D10


TYABB and SOMERVILLE.
On page 278 of THE WAY WE WERE, Leila Shaw listed 33 streets whose names recall the areas heritage.
To that list, I add the following:
BLACKS CAMP RD 148 D2 This probably led to the lagoon where the bank teller and George Gomm carried out the required quarterly testing of the banks pistols as related on page 202. The Bunerung obviously camped at this lagoon as they traveled between the two bays.
CRAIG AVE 148 G11 William Craig received the Crown Grant of allotment 27 in the parish of Tyabb. This was between Bungower Rd and Watsons Creek as shown in Leilas map on page 6 (about 149 G2-3 in Melway). The family is mentioned several times in the book.
APPLEWOOD RISE 148 H3 Apples were probably the main crop of the famed orchards in the district.
FRUITGROWERS RESERVE 148 E1 Purchased from Henry Gomm, this 6 acre site was the venue of what was described as the biggest show of its type in the Southern Hemisphere. The Somerville Fruitgrowers and Horticulturists Association conducted this show in about March every year from 1895 to 1939, when the war caused its demise. It attracted such crowds that a special train traveled from Melbourne. From 1940, Ghymkhanas were held to raise funds for the Red Cross (averaging 250 pounds, a huge sum in those days) until a bushfire destroyed the pavilion in 1944.
FIRTH RD 147 J1 Although officially residents of Moorooduc, this family was much involved in the affairs of Somerville.
UNTHANKS BUSHLAND RESERVE 107 B12. See page 100 and throughout the book.
ORCHARD CT 107 H12 Although farmers engaged in subsistence farming in regard to dairy, poultry, vegetables and so on, the prevailing land use of the area was orchards and tree nurseries.
BARBER RESERVE 107 G12 See page 281 for one mention of these early pioneers.
TWO BAYS RD 106 B7 See page 99 about the Two Bays Nursery and Orchard Companys 400 acre property at the corner of Jones and Bungower Rds.

2 comment(s), latest 2 years, 7 months ago

HISTORICAL HOWLERS in the area north west of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Histories about the area near Tullamarine have featured several howlers because of: vague locality names in the early days, municipal historians confining their research to their own municipality's rate books, and time limits preventing the development of a vast network of family historians/ descendants to check assumptions.
The description Moonee Moonee Chain of ponds, shortened to Moonee Moonee Ponds and later to Moonee Ponds meant anywhere near the whole length of the Moonee Ponds Creek, not the present suburb of Moonee Ponds.
In "The Stopover that Stayed", a history of ESSENDON by Grant Aldous, a terrific description was given of a farm in the Shire of BROADMEADOWS, John Cochrane's "Glenroy Farm" at "Moonee Ponds. This farm was of course at Glenroy, nowhere near the suburb of Moonee Ponds.
In "The Gold The Blue", A.D.Pyke's wonderful history of Lowther Hall at Essendon, Pyke mentioned Peter McCracken farming "Stewarton" at Moonee Ponds. It was only when researching Broadmeadows Shire rates that I discovered that John Cock moved onto "Stewarton" in 1892 and, that soon after, it was renamed as "Gladstone". This farm was section 5 in the parish of Tullamarine, the northern 777 acres of the present suburb of Gladstone Park.It was bought from the Crown on Niel Black's behalf by George Russell. Black, after whom a street in Broadmeadows Township (Westmeadows) was named, represented a syndicate which included Stewart and Gladstone; the syndicate's land in the Western District was also called Stewarton. Gladstone was a cousin of the British Prime Minister.
In "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History", Andrew Lemon stated that McIntosh had left the district because his name had disappeared from the Broadmeadows Shire ratebooks.That worthy pioneer had merely moved a stone's throw to the west into the Shire of Bulla. Andrew Lemon made another wrong assumption ; he thought that the James Robertson who settled at Gowrie Park (north of J.P.Fawkner's Box Forest, now known as Hadfield after Cr Rupert Hadfield) was a Keilor farmer. Poor Andrew did not have the help of the wonderful Deidre Farfor as I did! The three different James Robertson families and their properties will be the subject of another journal.
Here's an assumption of mine. If I'm wrong, perhaps somebody will let me know. Joseph Raleigh established Raleigh's Punt at Maribyrnong in 1850. ("Maribyrnong:Action in Tranquility".)A few years earlier, he was recorded at living at Mona Vale. I have a feeling that Mona Vale was Westmeadows. When Broadmeadows Township's Church of England was built in 1850, it doubled as a school but as an early (1969?) Westmeadows State School history stated, school was earlier conducted on Mr Raleigh's property and of course the township's main east-west street was called Raleigh St.

HISTORY DISAPPEARS TODAY IN ROSEBUD, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

Today, Thursday, 1-12-2011, the huge pine trees were cut down at 858 Pt Nepean Rd, Rosebud. Who planted them is unclear, but it was possibly George Fountain, who at one time owned number 858 and 854. The pines were planted on both blocks and George, a plumber who was the last Mayor of the Borough of North Melbourne before it merged with the City of Melbourne, called his holiday residence "The Pines".
The house at number 858, possibly built by William John Ferrier (subject of another journal), the nationally famous hero of the La Bella tragedy at Warrnambool in 1905, was probably occupied by George until a newer house was built on number 854. Ferrier's block was then sold to the Archers, who were keen recreational fishermen.
I took a mobile phone photo of the two pines, from which most of the branches had been lopped. Hopefully MUZZA OF McCRAE took a photo of these two very old trees with their clothes on and will be able to post it with his other great photos of historical interest.

HISTORY NOTES (1), MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.

While looking for specific information, I often make a note of something else that may be of value, but looking for these asides can take hours, often without result. Such miscellaneous notes will be entered here (in alphabetical order) in future. Surnames of people mentioned within other articles will be in bold type for ease of location.

BALDRY.
John Baldry's obituary (in my journal THE SHIRE OF FLINDERS) mentions his involvement in the area from the 1860's. The first Flinders Road Board assessment of 8-6-1869 confirms this claim. John had 145 acres and buildings in the parish of Flinders. The assessment of 30-9-1899 shows that John still had this 145 acre property and William Baldry had 60 acres.

John Cairns, son of Alex Cairns (original Boneo pioneer with brothers Robert and David) married Emma Baldry.
(THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO by Peter Wilson.)

SWEETAPPLE.
I recall mentioning in another journal (WATSON AND STIRLING OF SORRENTO AND PORTSEA) that I had seen this surname mentioned while researching rates near Red Hill. Sweetapple had been running the Portsea hotel and I mentioned that I had considered a corny joke about the name (especially since Thomas Appleyard of Sorrento had land near Red Hill) but I reconsidered, not because it was corny (I never let that worry me) but because both seemed to be more likely graziers than orchardists.

Well, I found the assessment again, while looking for Shand.
In the assessment of 30-9-1899, William Henry Sweetapple was leasing 224 acres (58a and 59a Bittern) from Charles Kerr and 308 acres in the parish of Balnarring from Journeaux .
The Bittern land was at Melway 162 H 4-7 with a frontage to Balnarring Rd, a 58a frontage to Hunts Rd of 750 metres and a 59a frontage to Myers Rd of 366 metres. The Balnarring land was crown allotment 15 of 308 acres 1 rood and 34 perches, situated 1082 metres west along Myers Rd (Melway 161 K 8-9 to 162 B 8-9.) The subdivision of this land, with One Chain Rd providing access and settlers such as parliamentarian, James Fenton , and racing identity, Jack Hayes is detailed in THE GOLDEN PLAIN OF TUBBARUBBAREL.

NO RUGGED LANDSCAPE by Mary Karney.
VANSUYLEN P. 197. They built the first Balnarring store on the southern tip of the triangular piece of land.(I presume the south eastern tip of Warrawee, Melway 193 D5, is meant.) They built a kiln and made the district's first fired bricks. (This explains why the carpenter chose to hide the stolen watch between bricks.) Paul built Warrawee, later called the Tower Hotel, as an inn in 1860. Warrawee is the aboriginal term for "pleasant Place".The Vansuylens ran the post office 1868-81 (after which Johnson ran it in Dromana-Bittern Rd as described in the 1902 article about Bittern.) As well as liquor, the Vansuylens sold hardware.

TONKIN P. 196. Captain Tonkin died 12-7-1908. His son Bry (short for Bryan, also his father's name) married Mary Smith. The book contains information about the Smiths. The hill on Tonkin's grants (at about Melway 191 H8) was called Tonkin's Hill.

MORRIS P. 193.Morris (Robert, son in law of Edward Jones of Spring Farm and Penbank at Moorooduc)built Pembroke on Fook's selection in the 1900's and the house was still standing. (Robert had lived on Penbank on the south side of Tyabb Rd earlier, possibly where Penbank School is now located. Robert came from Pembroke in Wales and it is possible that Pembroke Rd in Somerville was named because the orchard that was later the Bullens' had been owned by his wife's sister, Mrs Unthank. SOURCES-David Shepherd, Trove, Murray Gomm.)

DOWNWARD P.193. Herb Downward's nickname was "Poley".

ALBERTO p.192 had KENT ORCHARD in 1899. Jack (Peter) SHAND and the HUNTLEY family ran the orchard from 1900 and lived in the house after "Hillside" was burnt down in about 1905.

MAIRSP.192. Dave Mairs was shire president in 1882. His children included Dave (David T., the crack shot who married a Huntley girl), Minnie, Ethel and Vi.

BUCKLEY p. 191. Louise HUNTLEY married David Buckley. Hillside was leased to Joseph McILROY in September, 1892 (as mentioned in an extract from Joseph's diary in Sheila Skidmore's THE RED HILL)at a rent of 108 pounds p.a.

STANLEYP.195. E.Stanley arrived in 1861. His sons Bob, Joe and Bill were given the task of minding some cattle. They stuck to their task so well that J.BUCKLEY led a search party of 20 men to find them. The boys were returned home from the Mt Martha area by Teddy Quinn . This story is told in full in THE MEN WHO BLAZED THE TRACK. Bob Stanley married a Byrne girl and their children were Vincent, born 11-5-1896, and Vera.

(The Quinns and the Whites, ancestors of Shirley Bourne, the female drover, were pioneers of the parish of Moorooduc, the Quinns living on the north west corner of Tyabb and Three Chain (Moorooduc) Rd and the Whites at the east end of White's Rd, which was renamed Range Rd during W.W.2 when soldiers marched along it to the rifle range on the other side of the White/Bourne property.)

SHAND P.195. Old Mr Shand who had the sawmill at Red Hill (Main Ridge)died on 18-7-1901. Hw was a Methodist lay preacher.His sons, Alex and John (Peter) were close friends of the Oswins.Peter married Mary Huntley on 28-7-1900. He was a clever man who could do anything from mending clocks to suturing wounds.

GOTTLIEBSON P.190. The western extension of Myers Rd was called Gottliebson's Lane. (See FRITSCH.)

FRITSCHP.190. Came from Germany in 1850 and lived at Nhill, Nunawading and Cranbourne before moving to the peninsula. August, an architect designed many of the early Melbourne buildings. Charles and Andrew settled(and received grants) in Kangerong. The children (of which?) included Emily, Lily, Charlotte, and Edward (Teddy.) Two of the girls married Gottliebson brothers and Teddy married Louise WARNECKE. The Warnecke family was from Hanover but had migrated to England. They came to Australia in 1855 and tried the Ballarat and Dunolly diggings. They came to Balnarring in 1908 and built "Fairview" on lots 19 and 20, originally Rogers'. (Melway 162 F-H 12 south to 192 F-H 2,top half. They must have added Reidy's grant to the west, judging by the very German Tannenbaum Ave.)

OSWIN P.190.Willie Oswin was called Grampas by the family.P.1.Mary Oswin, sister of John, married Lawrence WADESON (who with John Holmes was granted the 208 acres on the north and west side of Red Hill Rd between Vines of Red Hill, inclusive, and the south boundary of the Kangerong Nature Conservation Reserve.The southern 104 acres became the Huntleys' Hillside Orchard; John Huntley Snr may have had a lease from the Crown for the whole 208 acres before rate records started.)
John Oswin was known as DADAS according to a caption under a photo of John -page number not recorded.

SULLIVAN.
Extract from my PENINSULA DICTIONARY HISTORY.
SULLIVAN
Refer to the ample information about this family in THOSE COURAGEOUS HARDY WOMEN and Patricia Applefords RYE PRIMARY SCHOOL Pages 7,27-8,31,33-6,40-2,54,68,117-121,125,134, 137,139,141-4,151,159.
Also see the FAMILY CONNECTIONS entry.
Dennis Sullivan, or perhaps one of his sons, produced an object of amazement to the rapidly expanding settlement on the Yarra. I quote from Robin Annears excellent Bearbrass:Imagining Early Melbourne.
A twenty one inch (53cm) long cucumber sounds fairly unremarkable to us who are accustomed to gangly cucumbers of the continental variety; but one such specimen created a sensation when exhibited at the Bearbrass market in 1842 by a gardener named Sullivan from Merri Creek. It was, marvelled the Patriot the next day, raised without a particle of manure.
Another Peninsula pioneer was having similar success in the growing of vegetables. Melbournes first postmaster, Ben Baxter, who had ceased that occupation, grew a turnip that was two feet in circumference. As the price of vegetables was astronomical at this time, Dennis and Ben were probably able to build up enough capital to launch their pioneering enterprises. It seems that another peninsular pioneer was involved in growing vegetables in Melbourne even earlier. In 1836, two men were charged with stealing onions from the garden of publican, George Smith. If it had not been for the money that George Smith made from selling his grog and probably vegetables as well, Owen Cains daughter, Sarah Ann might have died at the tender age of four. Lost for several days soon after the Cain family arrived on the peninsula, the near-dead girl was taken to George Smiths Wooloowoolooboolook homestead where Georges wife nursed her back to health. Thanks for the pre- peninsula details, Robin!
Another history of the early years of the Port Phillip District reveals more about the Sullivans before their move to The Heads. It is entitled MEN AND WOMEN OF PORT PHILLIP and ironically written by Martin Sullivan. While Dennis was growing vegetables at Merri Creek, his wife Honora was probably working as a domestic servant for one of the respectable inhabitants of Newtown (Fitzroy). Newtown and The Brickfields (South Melbourne) were outside the limits of Melbourne and working class immigrants could squat to reduce costs. Unfortunately the brickfields settlement was the resort of a drunken, bloodthirsty, thieving crew according to Garryowen and Newtown was little better. A writer to the Port Phillip Herald might have been referring to Honoras employer when he sympathized with the respectable portion of the inhabitants who had to suffer the debauchery and immorality of the place.
Honora was probably happy with her employer and no doubt he was happy with her work. Honora was one of Elizabeth McMeekins COURAGEOUS HARDY WOMEN and was about 50 at this time while Dennis was six years older. Perhaps shrewd was another adjective that Elizabeth might have employed to describe Honora.
She had agreed to serve for three months at the rate of 17 pounds per annum, but she failed to arrive for work, later informing her employer that she had another situation and could get higher wages. She was brought before the Court of Petty Sessions on 27-10-1840 for having contravened the Masters and Servants Act. A female could be jailed for three months and forfeit wages for many offences including absenting herself from the service of the person to whom she shall be so engaged. But that was before a new act was published on 20-10-1840, one week before her court appearance.
This Act forbade the imprisonment of any female servant for any offence committed under the Act. It also became harsher to prevent the type of job swapping that Honora had committed, with servants liable to a three month gaol term and masters liable to a fine of between 5 and 20 pounds for employing somebody already engaged. Was Honora the first to find the loophole in the new act?


FAMILY CONNECTIONS. (A lot of speculation but you never know.)
SULLIVAN-ONEIL
John, son of Dennis and Honora, married Hannah ONeil. I offer two speculative suggestions about how they met.
1.John, like many Peninsula pioneers, might have tried his luck at Bendigo or Ballarat. On the way to either, he would have passed through Keilor where Brees bridge of 1854 enabled a more direct route than the older ones through Maribyrnong (Raleighs Punt) and Bulla. William ONeill owned Horseshoe Bend and like Basket Davey Milburn, Victorias first official irrigator, he probably sold his produce at the roadside.
It is likely that the Sullivans already knew ONeil. They may even have arrived at the five year old settlement on the same ship. ONeil, one of Melbournes early policemen, might have brought Honora before the court of Petty sessions for an offence against the Masters and Servants act on 27-11-1842. Like all citizens of Melbourne, he would have marveled at the gigantic cucumber grown by the Sullivans near Merri Creek in 1843 before they moved to The Heads. Most workers squatted in rough shelters at The Brickfields (South Melbourne) or Newtown (Fitzroy) as they could not afford to buy or rent on the surveyed town, and the Sullivans were probably near Newtown. (See sources and more detail in the SULLIVAN entry.)
The baptism of three Sullivan children at St Augustines Keilor between mid 1854 and early 1862 lends weight to my theory that John might have gone to the goldfields with some cousins who came out later for that purpose; one of the children was named Timothy. Their parents were working in the area, one at Jacksons Creek (perhaps for the Reddans) and another at Keilor Plains (almost certainly for Taylor, Robertson or Big Clarke). That peninsula pioneers would seek employment at thriving Keilor after an unsuccessful stint at the diggings, is shown by the presence of Edwin Daly Tassell (probably the son of Edwin Louis Tassell a pioneer of the Safety Beach area) whose daughter was christened at the temporary St Augustines in 1858.
2.A map on page 6 of Leila Shaws THE WAY WE WERE shows that J. Sullivan and J.ONeill were pioneers of the Somerville area. Their grants were, respectively, at Melway 149 J3 and 148 J6. Somerville became the home of plant nurseries and orchards with those of the Brunnings family (which started this business in St Kilda) gaining international fame. These facts lead me to the following fantasy.
Trudging dejectedly back from the diggings, the emaciated John Sullivan hears a familiar voice calling his name. William ONeil offers him a job after hearing of Johns woes. While tending ONeils apricot orchard, John meets Hannah. They and a relative, whose name is rendered with a double L by some official, move to Somerville to continue their orcharding occupation. (Apricots were the main crop of Keilor and Peter Anderson kept growing them at Horseshoe Bend after the Spaniards such as Borrell and Vert switched the emphasis to growing cauliflowers and tomatoes.)
Whether J.Sullivan was our John is not yet known, but if so, he would not have been the only Southern Peninsula identity to receive grants in the area; Henry Gomm, guardian of the Rosebud jetty bought allotment 48 at 148 E8.
See THOSE COURAGEOUS HARDY WOMEN regarding the fate of John and Hannahs children. This probably explains the Clark-Clark marriage!

SULLIVAN-GRACE
Patrick, son of Dennis married Ellen, daughter of William Grace. Ellens father was an early grantee of 249 acres fronting the west end of Boundary Rd at Dromana and bounded by Caldwell Rd, Pindara Rd and the eastern end of streets such as Beverley St and Cloud St. On his farm Gracefield he planted vineyards and orchards. Patrick named his hotel at Rye after the farm, which is recalled by Gracefield Ave at 159 H9.
During the late1860s, Williams vineyards were wiped out by a disease that spread through most wine-growing areas. It is likely that he leased the farm to the Counsells. He probably bought allotment 6 of section 3 in the township of Rye at about this time. The half acre block ran from the Esplanade (a name given for Pt Nepean Rd in Dromana, Rosebud and Rye townships) to Nelson St and was just a little nearer to Dundas St than Napier St. As can be seen in Melway 168 F4, this is almost the exact location of the Rye Hotel, which was built on the site of Patricks Gracefield Hotel in 1927 by the Hunts.
It is possible that the two families had met before William moved his family to Rye. While most of the Sullivan grants were near the south end of Weeroona Rd (and used to extract limestone for the kiln there, which was managed by Antonio Albress after Patricks death), Catherine Sullivan was granted allotments 15 a and b Wannaeue (152 acres) fronting the north side of Browns Rd and extending east from the Kinwendy Rd corner 767 metres (halfway) to the Purves Rd corner. Catherine was one of earliest landowners in Wannaeue, receiving her grant on 31-10-1858. No doubt she was self sufficient but if she needed to buy anything Dromana was the destination. It already had Holdens store near the Carrigg St corner and Richard Watkins Dromana Hotel and possibly the Arthurs Seat hotel near Foote St and soon the McLears would open their butchers shop.
To get there in the 1860s, she would climb Purves Rd and then take Bryans Cutting down through the town common, just west of the Gracefield boundary. No doubt she would drop in for a cuppa and a chat with Williams wife.
The naming of Grace St in Rye could be given a dual justification; it could be named after William Grace or it might honour Grace Sullivan, a much- loved teacher who tragically died young, apparently from the Spanish Flu.

SULLIVAN-KENYON
Timothy (known as Ted), son of Dennis married a Kenyon girl.
She was almost certainly the daughter of Richard Kenyon and his wife, who was Robert Rowleys mother. (See THOSE COURAGEOUS HARDY WOMEN.) Timothy was probably about 20 when the Sullivans arrived at the Heads in late 1843 and started limeburning alongside the Kenyons who might have arrived in 1939 to produce lime for John Pascoe Fawkner. I believe that they married a few years later, went to the goldfields with Timothys brother John and spent some time market gardening near Keilor where a child was born. That might be why nobody remembered the name of Timothys wife. (See SULLIVAN ONEIL.)

SULLIVAN-ONEIL
John, son of Dennis and Honora, married Hannah ONeil. I offer two speculative suggestions about how they met.
1.John, like many Peninsula pioneers, might have tried his luck at Bendigo or Ballarat. On the way to either, he would have passed through Keilor where Brees bridge of 1854 enabled a more direct route than the older ones through Maribyrnong (Raleighs Punt) and Bulla. William ONeill owned Horseshoe Bend and like Basket Davey Milburn, Victorias first official irrigator, he probably sold his produce at the roadside.
It is likely that the Sullivans already knew ONeil. They may even have arrived at the five year old settlement on the same ship. ONeil, one of Melbournes early policemen, might have brought Honora before the court of Petty sessions for an offence against the Masters and Servants act on 27-11-1842. Like all citizens of Melbourne, he would have marveled at the gigantic cucumber grown by the Sullivans near Merri Creek in 1843 before they moved to The Heads.
The baptism of three Sullivan children at St Augustines Keilor between mid 1854 and early 1862 lends weight to my theory that John might have gone to the goldfields with some cousins who came out later for that purpose; one of the children was named Timothy. Their parents were working in the area, one at Jacksons Creek (perhaps for the Reddans) and another at Keilor Plains (almost certainly for Taylor, Robertson or Big Clarke). That peninsula pioneers would seek employment at thriving Keilor after an unsuccessful stint at the diggings, is shown by the presence of Edwin Daly Tassell (probably the son of Edwin Louis Tassell a pioneer of the Safety Beach area) whose daughter was christened at the temporary St Augustines in 1858.
2.A map on page 6 of Leila Shaws THE WAY WE WERE shows that J. Sullivan and J.ONeill were pioneers of the Somerville area. Their grants were, respectively, at Melway 149 J3 and 148 J6. Somerville became the home of plant nurseries and orchards with those of the Brunnings family (which started this business in St Kilda) gaining international fame. These facts lead me to the following fantasy.
Trudging dejectedly back from the diggings, the emaciated John Sullivan hears a familiar voice calling his name. William ONeil offers him a job after hearing of Johns woes. While tending ONeils apricot orchard, John meets Hannah. They and a relative, whose name is rendered with a double L by some official, move to Somerville to continue their orcharding occupation. (Apricots were the main crop of Keilor and Peter Anderson kept growing them at Horseshoe Bend after the Spaniards such as Borrell and Vert switched the emphasis to growing cauliflowers and tomatoes.)

See THOSE COURAGEOUS HARDY WOMEN regarding the fate of John and Hannahs children. This probably explains the Clark-Clark marriage!

SULLIVAN-GRACE
Patrick, son of Dennis married Ellen, daughter of William Grace. Ellens father was an early grantee of 249 acres fronting the west end of Boundary Rd at Dromana and bounded by Caldwell Rd, Pindara Rd and the eastern end of streets such as Beverley St and Cloud St. On his farm Gracefield he planted vineyards and orchards. Patrick named his hotel at Rye after the farm, which is recalled by Gracefield Ave at 159 H9.
During the late1860s, Williams vineyards were wiped out by a disease that spread through most wine-growing areas. It is likely that he leased the farm to the Counsells. He probably bought allotment 6 of section 3 in the township of Rye at about this time. The half acre block ran from the Esplanade (a name given for Pt Nepean Rd in Dromana, Rosebud and Rye townships) to Nelson St and was just a little nearer to Dundas St than Napier St. As can be seen in Melway 168 F4, this is almost the exact location of the Rye Hotel, which was built on the site of Patricks Gracefield Hotel in 1927 by the Hunts.
It is possible that the two families had met before William moved his family to Rye. While most of the Sullivan grants were near the south end of Weeroona Rd (and used to extract limestone for the kiln there, which was managed by Antonio Albress after Patricks death), Catherine Sullivan was granted allotments 15 a and b Wannaeue (152 acres) fronting the north side of Browns Rd and extending east from the Kinwendy Rd corner 767 metres (halfway) to the Purves Rd corner. Catherine was one of earliest landowners in Wannaeue, receiving her grant on 31-10-1858. No doubt she was self sufficient but if she needed to buy anything Dromana was the destination. It already had Holdens store near the Carrigg St corner and Richard Watkins Dromana Hotel and possibly the Arthurs Seat hotel near Foote St and soon the McLears would open their butchers shop.
To get there in the 1860s, she would climb Purves Rd and then take Bryans Cutting down through the town common, just west of the Gracefield boundary. No doubt she would drop in for a cuppa and a chat with Williams wife.
The naming of Grace St in Rye could be given a dual justification; it could be named after William Grace or it might honour Grace Sullivan, a much- loved teacher who tragically died young, apparently from the Spanish Flu.


The Quarantine Station.
When the gold rush started, captains would have been tempted to fit in more passengers and neglect checks. In crowded conditions, it only needed one carrier to infect numerous other passengers, and with the arrival of the first fever ship in 1852, a quarantine station was set up very quickly on the site occupied by the Sullivans since 1843. Dennis Sullivan was compensated for his house and was allowed to take away lime that he had quarried. His son, Patrick, moved the family to the Rye area.

The Sullivan grants.
Wannaeue.
35, 173 acres, P.Sullivan, Melway 168 H-J11-12, 251H-J1,adjoining The Dunes.
33A, 148 acres, P.Sullivan, 251 J 2-3, K3. DO THE REST.

Nepean.
Nepean Land.
Patrick Sullivan's lime kiln is apparently well preserved on The Dunes golf course. Patrick was granted crown allotments 22 (159 acres), 27 (120.8 acres)and 28 (almost 37 acres) which included all of the land occupied by The Dunes and extended south to the National Park at St Andrews Beach; the boundaries of 28 were the Ocean Park, Sandy Rd and the western end of Iona St. DO THE REST.

DAWES
I learn that Mr. Dawes, of Dromana, who was so seriously injured in the frightful coach accident that occurred near Frankston eight days ago, is still lying in a precarious condition, very little hopes being entertained of his re covering. "Dick," the driver of the vehicle, who was also a good deal knocked about,but who escaped with less dangerous injuries, how ever, is in a fair way to convalescence. It is rumored in the neighborhood that in any case an action will be brought against the proprietors of the coach either by the principal sufferer or his friends, as there can be very little doubt that the accident was brought about by the weakness of the brake. Mr. Evarard's coolness and presence of mind in keeping his seat on the box and pulling up the horses in time to save the lives and limbs of the other passengers, who, like himself, stuck to the coach through the whole of its perilous career, have called forth great admiration, and should fairly entitle him to a free pass on Messrs. Robertson and Co.'s stages for the rest of his life.
(P.2, Bendigo Advertiser, 27-8-1877.) Also see MORNINGTON PENINSULA HISTORY NOTES (2)re SCURFIELD.

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HISTORY NOTES (2), MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.

ADAMS James Smith Adams, Mornington butcher and councillor, who had much land on the east side of the peninsula, was killed in an accident.
(P.2, Mornington Standard, 14-11-1895.)

McKAY James McKay, a fisherman at Rosebud near Dromana and popularly known as "Dingy Jemmy", set off in his boat (described in great detail)for Sorrento on the 7th, was seen at Rye with others in the boat, and was believed to have had a watery grave by the 20th. (P.5, column 4, Argus, 20-2-1874.)

WATKIN, SCURFIELD,DAWES, ASSENDER,STORY, MURPHY, GIBSON, BROWN, CARRIGG, STELLA .
All of these names are connected by my efforts to find if Joseph Story, assessed as a hotelkeeper at Dromana in 1875, but not owning one, actually had been granted a licence.

Richard Watkin built the beautiful Dromana Hotel in about 1857 (WRONG; SEE THE DROMANA HOTEL JOURNAL) and its photo appeared in Spencer Jackson's huge advertisement 70 years later; the photo was probably used because a snap of the pub at that time would not have attracted tourists or land purchasers for Spencer's Foreshore and Panoramic Estates; the transition to what we now see would not have been attractive. The present owner, Ray Stella, showed me internal brickwork that survived Lou Carrigg's modernisation.
WATKINBANNER.On the 20th inst., at Mornington, by the Rev. Mr. Abrahams, Henry Watkin, only son of Richard Watkin, of the Dromana Hotel, to Sarah Anne Banner, the adopted daughter of Charles Barnett, Esq. Home papers please copy. (P.4, Argus, 24-6-1872.)

CHARLES BARNETT.
Charles Barnett was granted crown allotment 13 of section 1, Kangerong, a triangular block bounded by Palmerston Ave,Jetty Rd and Boundary Rd. It consisted of about thirty six and a half acres but when Charles was first assessed on it in 1865, it was described as being 34 acres with a 6 roomed house on it.

By 1879, Charles Barnett, gentleman, was assessed only on three town lots, having apparently sold the 34 acres; George Robert Dawes, mariner, who was assessed on 34 acres, Kangerong having possibly bought it.As the town lots were not granted to Charles, it is not possible to specify their locations.

BARNETT.On the 23rd inst., at his residence, Dromana, Charles Barnett, of Tottenham, Middlesex,England, aged 72, after long and painful illness.
Home papers please copy. (P.1, Argus, 28-4-1884.)



William Dixon Scurfield* bought five crown allotments between Permien and Foote Streets, each half acre having a frontage to both streets, starting forty metres from the esplanade, and I believe the Scurfield hotel was on one or both of the half acre blocks fronting the Esplanade (beach road.) The original post office in Dromana, on the west corner of Foote St, was run by Mr Dawes, and later was a home called "Carnarvon". This corner block was purchased by Scurfield and A.Walker on 10-5-1858 and I had a suspicion that Dawes had built Carnarvon there after the hotel, now called the Arthurs Seat Hotel,burnt down in the 1997-8 summer. However, as the last entry in HISTORY NOTES (1)shows, Dawes was alive and kicking(just) at Dromana at least two decades previously.
(*Scurfield was an original purchaser of land in Broadmeadows Township,which is now called Westmeadows. The Scurfield Hotel was the first pub in Dromana and was operated by Richard Watkin before he established the Dromana Hotel in 1862.)

Watkin owned the Dromana Hotel for ages. It was far more substantial than Scurfield's and was the venue for council meetings. The most sensational event at Scurfield's involved a young man being immensely touched by a priest from Mornington, if you get my Derryn Hinch type drift.The last assessment I've seen of Scurfield re the hotel was on 2-9-1871, the 1872 and 1873 assessments having been left off the microfiche. By 1874, George Assender was the publican and he remained for some time. Joseph Story was described as a hotelkeeper in 1875 so he was probably leasing one of the hotels without paying the rates; he paid rates on 30 acres and six town lots.

The Wainwrights took over Scurfield's Hotel in the mid to late 1880's but Catherine's husband died and she married blacksmith, William Allison, who became the licensee briefly before returning to his trade.

The rate collector assessed Lawrence Murphy on both Hotels in 1897-8. The nett annual value of the Arthurs Seat Hotel was 70 pounds in 1897 but only 20 (amended to 10) pounds in 1898. I think you can guess why! I couldn't understand why a publican would want to compete with himself. A former coach proprietor, Lawrence was a model citizen, the prime mover in getting a Catholic Church for Dromana, before moving to Rennison's (The Royal) on the Esplanade at Mornington where he died. I felt guilty about suspecting Lawrence of Arson around.

Then, when I finally found the article about the fire (which started internally, not sweeping down the hill as Spencer Jackson put it in 1927), I found that the licensee was Charles Brown. The rate collector obviously did not read the Mornington Standard.

The licence for the Arthurs Seat Hotel was transferred from Lawrence Murphy to Charles Brown and the licence for the Dromana Hotel was transferred from T.Gibson to L.Murphy. (P.3, Mornington Standard, 3-12-1896.) T.Gibson was probably Tom Gibson, the brother of Walter Gibson of Glenholm; Tom died on 20-9-1900 at the age of 64. (P. 82 A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.)

The foundation stone at the front of the Dromana Hotel is visible to any passer-by on the footpath. The inscription gives the date and states that it was laid by Mrs Lou Carrigg. Funny how a married woman had to use her husband's given name as well as changing her surname! Her name was probably Ellen.

The Dromana Hotel Licence was transferred from Ellen C.Carrigg (executrix of L.Carrigg) to Ellen C.Carrigg. (P.2, Argus, 30-9-1941.)

DARLEY of Flinders.
At this stage I have no explanation why Mrs J.Darley (Sarah Elizabeth) would be the mother of children with the name of Martin. Were they children of Thomas Ormiston Martin? John Saville Darley and Sarah Elizabeth (nee Bear)apparently called their property "The Rest" and this passed to Thomas Holland from Clifton Hill, who seems to have moved to Flinders in 1908. William Edwin and Jane Darley called their property "Hiawatha".

MARRIED.On the 19th March, at Brighton, by the Rev. E. Greenwood, Congregational Minister, George, eldest son of Mr. George Falkingham, of Sandhurst, to Miss Mary Ann Martin, eldest daughter of Mrs. J.Darley, of Flinders, and grand-daughter of Mrs. J. Bear, of Bay-street, Brighton.

On the 19th March, at Brighton, by the Rev. E. Greenwood, Congregational Minister, Thomas, second son of Mr. G. Falkingham, of Sandhurst, to Miss Ruth Martin, youngest daughter of Mrs. J. Darley, of Flinders, and grand-daughter of Mrs. J. Bear, of Bay-street, Brighton.(P.2, Bendigo Advertiser, 23-3-1872.)


DARLEY. -On the 24th March, at Flinders, John Saville Darley, the beloved husband of Sarah Elizabeth Darley, aged 62 years. (P.1, Argus, 26-3-1901.)

FALKINGHAM.--On the 11th July, at Woolton, South-terrace, Clifton Hill, Florence Eleanor Falkingham, beloved second eldest daughter of Ruth and the late Thomas Falkingham, sister of Mrs. T. Holland, Clifton Hill, and Mrs, J.H.Squires, Sydney,granddaughter of Mrs. S.E.Darley, Flinders. (P. 9, Argus, 12-7-1902.)

FALKINGHAM. On the 11th inst., at 3 Marlton-crescent, St. Kilda, suddenly, Mary Ann, the dearly beloved wife of Rev. George Falkingham, granddaughter of the late Mrs. Mary Ann Bear, of Brighton, daughter of Mrs. John S. Darley, of Flinders, sister of Mrs. Thomas Falkingham, of North Fitzroy, Mr. Robert B. Martin, of Parkville, and Mr. Henry A. Martin, of Flinders, aged 43 years. "The memory of the just is blessed."
(P.1, Argus, 18-8-1894.)

DARLEY.--On the 10th August, at Flinders, Jane,dearly beloved wife of William Darley, loved mother of Florence, Annie, Katie, William, Fadille?, and Lionel, aged 57 years.(P.1, Argus,16-8-1929.)

MRS. R. FALKINGHAM and FAMILY desire to return their sincere THANKS to the Residents of Flinders and District Members of Agricultural Society, Cable Staff, and Mechanics' Institute, for Letters of Condolences, Telegrams, Floral Offerings and Proffered Services, to assist them during illness of the late Mrs S. E. Darley.
(P.2, Mornington Standard, 21-3-1908.)

DARLEY.-On the 18th February, at the Rest,Flinders, Mrs. S. E. Darley, relict of the late J. S. Darley, and daughter of the late Mrs. H. A. Bear, Brighton, loved mother of Mrs. Ruth Falkingham, aged 70 years.
(P.1, Argus, 20-2-1908.)

DARLEY -On the 31st March (passed peacefully away) at his residence, Hiawatha, Flinders, William Edwin husband of the late Jane and dearly loved father of Florence, Annie (Mrs Kay), Kattie, William, Saville and Lionel, aged 76 years. (P.8, Argus, 2-4-1938.)

HOLLAND.-Presumed lost at sea. July. 1942. Harry Darley, civilian internee, Rabaul, beloved husband of Winnie, loving father of Fred and Betty, 18 Simpson st.. East Melbourne.

HOLLAND.-Presumed lost at sea. Julv, 1942 Harry Darley, civilian Internee, Rabaul, much loved eldest son of Mrs. T. and the late Thomas Holland. The Rest. Flinders, grandson of Mrs. Ruth Falkingham.

HOLLAND.-Presumed lost at sea. July, 1942 Harry Darley, civilian internee, Rabaul, the beloved brother of Tas. Trav. Bert. Cliff, and Tan, Rena (Mrs. George Smith Flinders), Flo (Mrs. B. G. Feely. Glen Iris). Clarice (Mrs. T. W. Hosking. Shoreham), and Alma.
(P.16, Argus, 5-11-1945.)


O'DONNELL-DARLEY.- Marie Patricia, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. O'Donnell, Clifton, Willaura, to Saville Darley, Currie, King Island, second son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Darley, Hiawatha, Flinders.

WHITE'S HILL ROAD.
WISEMAN'S DEVIATION AND WHITE'S HILL ROAD.
(Email to toolaroo.)
Wiseman's Deviation is the name given to the south end of White Hill Rd, the former south end being Sheehans Rd. I believe that White Hill Rd was actually called WHITE'S HILL RD by those who used it regularly; in A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, Colin McLear called it the Red Hill road.

I had always thought it strange that a place near Red Hill was called WHITE HILL, and thought it was absolutely stupid that the original centre (school, post office, township blocks) of RED HILL was on a WHITE hill.

You can read the full article on page 5 of the Mornington Standard of 29-7-1905 but here's the mention of White's Rd , which was most likely named after Robert White (formerly of crown allotment 18 Wannaeue and later of Crib Point.)

MEETING AT BALNARRING. : A meeting of the East Riding rate payers of the shire of Flinders and Kangerong, convened by Crs Davies and Buckley, was held on Wednesday evening to consider the advisability of buying land and constructing a deviation at White's hill.- A majority of the ratepayers put in an appearance. Cr Shand moved that Cr Davies take the chair.-Cr Davies objected and moved that Mr Buckley take the chair, which was carried unanimously. The Chairman, in opening the meeting, said the ratepayers had been called together to consider the proposed deviation. As the proposed work was at the extreme end of the riding, many of them might not at first be in favor of spending so much money, but when they considered the state of the existing road, and the amount it would cost to effectively repair it, and also the distance those using the road were from the station, and that they would be content with buying the land and fencing it, and not doing much more for 12 months, he thought it was an expedient thing, and that they should strain a point and construct the devia tion. (Applause.) He then called on CrDavies to give his views. Cr Davies said that, in conjunction with Cr Buckley, he had called the meeting. When the new engineer (Mr M'Kenzie) was appointed he was instructed to take the levels. He did so, and reported favorably. Then the councillors of the east and centre ridings, accompanied by the engineer,visited the place and inspected it, and as far as the proposed deviation was concerned, from what he could see, it would be a good road. He considered it would cost at least 100,and he did not think they were justified in spending it. The old road had cost them more than 100 already. The best way would be to repair it, doing a little every year, according to what money they had. .Mr Buckley said that the old road would cost so much to effectively repair that they would not save much. He would like to have the deviation, but thought it should be subsidised by the centre riding. Cr Shand said there was a lot of talk about the centre riding using the road, but, as a matter of fact, only the two M'lroys and Smith used the road; Cr Davies said there were other roads that required deviations, and if they did that one they would have to do others. Mr Gibson (to Cr Davies) : Which do you think would be the best road- the old one or the deviation ? Cr Davies: If the old road was not repaired the deviation would be the best. Mr M'Kenzie said it seemed rather strange for him to be addressing a meeting like the present, but he thought that the ratepayers should know how the matter stood. He had taken the levels, and found the gradient of the old road was 1 in 9. That was far too steep and consequently caused the maintenance of the road to be a difficult matter. He might tell them that, under his certificate, he was not allowed by Government to pass a road with the grade steeper than 1 in 11, and,if they metalled the old road, if he stuck strictly to the law, he could not pass it. The grade in the deviation would be about 1 in 20, and there could be no comparison between the roads. He could assure them that the work would not cost more than 100. and, seeing that the metalling of the old road would cost nearly as much, and provide a much inferior road, he would strongly advise the deviation. Mr Gunn:-What would you do with the storm waters? Mr M'Kenzie: Allow them to take their natural course. Mr Gunn : -Into Mr Jones' land? Mr M'Kenzie : Yes, if that is the natural course. Mr Hurley: You say that the land and forming will cost 90. "' Mr M'Kenzie : The whole cost will be less than 100. Cr Shand : As there is so much talk of money, I will guarantee that the users will clear the road, and, if required, form it. - Mr Stanley said he had been against the deviation, as he thought it would cost too much, but he had had a look at the road, and it was in a fearful condition, and as the engineer stated the cost would not be more than 100, and as those who used the road were offering to help, he thought that they should do like, Mr Bent and help those who helped themselves, and make the deviation. Mr M'Kenzie could assure them the cost would not be more than he had stated, and there was 25 in hand which was placed on the estimates for that hill, and which any ratepayer could compel them to spend there, and adding that to the 15 placed on the estimates last year and not spent, made a total of 40 available for the work. and would not leave a great deal to be provided. Cr Buckley. was concerned in the convening of the meeting. He thought that as the money was to be spent at one end of the riding, and largely for the benefit of the next riding,that they had a right to be consulted and would like to see them give a straight out vote on the subject. According to the survey. the deviation when formed would make a real good road and he was in favor of it if the centre riding would provide half the cost of the land and fencing. The east riding was in a rather bad position, as it had to spend three quarters of its rates in making roads for other ridings. There was Cr Nowlan always agitating for a little more metal on the coach road, and Cr Shaw and Shand agitating for the road in question. He thought that perhaps at the next council meeting these gentlemen would place 25 or so for the deviation and if so he considered they should make it as they might never have the chance of obtaining the land again. When the road to Dromana was made through the centre riding, this riding had to subsidise it. (My text corrections end here.) Theni there was 25 in band that year and 15 from last. Cr Davies said this 25 was not put on for White's hill but for the whole road. 't Cr.Buckley:iThnioa money.wa " on the estiiaiites speciatly for lj Mr Parrell said two cou rr ie flatly, contradicting e:iih bt. F.e: ? haps Mr M'Kenz'e could idifori"'hep ? which was righti. '! Mr M'Ksnzte' said the nmoney ? jib put on for Whites'. Hill. Mr Oswin, send;' said when he? was in the` council "he moved that th, Dunn's Creek. bridge hbe raised, arid obtained 14 " from the east riding towards it. That was all the isubsidis= ing that the east riding had doiie:' :Mr Morris said 'the Cyclonie -feding could be: erected, posts and all, for 36 a mile; so that the 40 chains riquired could not cost 25. Cr Ose in said that, owing to so many, s.eake a and interjectors; Itt was difficult to know what. to aay" and what" to leave out.:: :He'would like to poltit out that Cr Davies'couild iot 'logieilly be against the' deviation, :?as hi i: iily reason seemed to be that those w'ho used :it: aiere :mostly: ri'eidentis -:- f. another' riding. ' It' :seemed r'ath"er absurd on Cr Davies' part to advance this reason, seeing ,hat, largely 'thro'gh OCi Davies' agency, 120 per''annumr for the' last 8 years hli'd 'ben eperit on the coach road, notwithstanding that the maijority of the people using it were Fliiders'" residents. He (the speaker) admitted that the coach road should be properly maintained, but thougbht that. 'sometimes.it got a little more than its share. ' On' entering the council, he 'made a pledge- that: he " would' con scientiouisly carry out his dutiei to the best of his ability, and, 'as a straight main he intended to do so. He thought his colleagues were in rather' a curioui fix; as they bad been appointed :a' a committee to inspect the deviationp and, instead of reporting to' the council, they had called a meeting of ratepayers to n'struct them in their duties; but, still, he thought they were sincere in their action. Last year they allotted 15 for metal for -the- hill, but as the contract price was high, they thought there might be a ring amongst' the contractors, and .declined to let the work. That year there was 25 ayaii able, but they agreed"'not to spend the money until they had settled about the deviation, and in the coming estimates 20 would hbe a fair thing, making a total of 60, so .the ratepayers could see for themselves that the deviation would not cost so much, afterall. They all knew that when he gave a pledge he stuck to it. He pledged. has word that if the deviation was constructed it would be done : without robbing any other, portion of the riding of any money it was jus'lv entitled to. He considered that Crs Davies', and Brick ley, instead of asking the. ratepayers to advise them, should have 'formed a, ,opinion: otheir own> anna iven. the Cr.Buckley had been in favor of -t every time it was brought. up, if 'the centre riding would sub'idise it. SCr Oswin: Yes,' you are in favor of it with a condition. . Mr. Van Suylen was the only tenderer for t.,e metal on -Whites' Hill and his price was'4s 61-a v ry' fair one-and t:here was no nrng. Cr.Oswin did not say 'that there was, buint that therm might have been.' Cr Shand : Here is Cr.Davies with' 300 acres, of land; and paying 30s rates, and he (the speaker) -was paying 12. :He had a metal road 'from his place.to the station, and he obj-eted to them having a li tie metal.. ' " The Chairman : Please do. not make any personal 'remarks.:: 'Mr"Farrell said they had ,heard:: the' views of councillors and thni engineer, and all those for and again-t it, and he thoughththe best th;ings. would be to leave itin Ihe.hands of .he conncil' as tIhey could be sure= hey ` would consider Ie ,,ist er judicially and give all fair r,.iment. He w,'uld move to that Sffrct. Or Davies:. Oh..I.; on't think. that' is rieht at all. I am against it and think that this meeting is.. ... Mr Farrell :I bee to point out to Mr Davies that he, is one. o` the oenncillors into whose hands we leave SMr James seconded the motion., Mr Oswin sen, supported the motion. Ee thotuht the.' councillors "should manage the business of thd'.- council; and accept the resoonsiblity. If they.did wrone I:ey cohld find them out at election tite "The nio ion wa carrited bi. 2i otes

BARNES.
Plenty of sources state that Barnes was about the only gold miner to make much money at the Tubbarubba diggings. The following gives his initials and the duration of his mining lease.

APPLICATION FOR A MINING LEASE OF PRIVATE PROPERTY. In pursance of the Act of Parliament 54 Victoria, No. 1120, it is hereby notified that after the expiration of one month from the date hereof it is intended to grant the lease undermentioned, subject to such excisions, modifications, and reservations as may be necessary. CASTLEMAINE DISTRICT. 81, ST. ANDREW'S DIVISION. No. 3067. To expire on 3rd October,1910, W. W. Barnes, 25a. Or. 31p., Bull Dog Creek, parish of Kangerong. H. FOSTER, Minister of Mines. Office of Mines. Melbourne, 20th June, 1896.(P.2, Mornington Standard, 25-6-1896.)

HILLIS
HILLIS.
See the end of the RINGROSE entry in my journal DICTIONARY HISTORY OF RED HILL(rates information and comments.)

Extract from Dromana, Rosebud and Miles Around on Trove.
GOODBYE OLD FRIENDS. (Mornington Standard 19-9-1895 page 2.) A large crowd attended the funeral of Mr Hillis, an old resident of Red Hill. Mr C.Roberts of Main Creek, another old resident, also died recently.
William Hillis whose surname was often written as Hillas, had Summer Hill at Main Creek north of Wilsons Rd and land adjacent to Henry Dunns Four Winds on the top of White Hill near the McIlroys Rd corner. (The Butcher, the Baker, The.) Roberts Rd follows the track used by the Shands to transport timber from their saw mill to Red Hill. (Keith Holmes.)

I had thought that Hill was the nickname of William Hillis, in whose name grants in the parish of Wannaeue were issued but the following genealogical information shows that William James Hillis was the first child of Hill Hillis. Hill was the brother-in-law of James McKeown and was probably the reason that McKeown moved from Warrnambool to Red Hill. Hill seems to have selected 50 or 54 acres of land that was granted to James McKeown (see rate information below.

HILL HILLIS
Hillis, Hill b. 1817 d. 1895 Dromana Victoria Gender: Male
(Parents: Father: Hillis, Frank Mother: Collins, Margaret)
Spouse: McKeown, Sarah b. 1822 d. 1900 Dromana Victoria Gender: Female
(Parents:Father: McKeown, William Mother: Collings, Mary Ann )
Children: Hillis, William James; Hillis, Mary Ann; Hillis, Sarah Jane; Hillis, Odessa (b. 1864 Victoria
Gender: Female); Hillis, Hadassah


Hillis, Frank Spouse: Collins, Margaret Children:Hillis, Hill

McIlroy, Joseph Marriage: 1877
Spouse: Hillis, Sarah Jane b. 1857 Belfast d. 1898 Dromana Victoria
Parents:Father: Hillis, Hill Mother: McKeown, Sarah


Davey,
Spouse: Hillis, Mary Ann b. 1846 d. 1920 Malvern Melbourne
Parents: Father: Hillis, Hill Mother: McKeown, Sarah


White, Robert
Marriage: 1899
Spouse: Hillis, Hadassah b. 1864 d. 1927 Prahran Melbourne
Parents:Father: Hillis, Hill Mother: McKeown, Sarah

SOURCE:LUGTON FAMILY AND CONNECTIONS.) Thank you Tony Lugton!

Colin McLear throws more light on the Hillis-McKeown connection
but the name of Hill Hillis's wife will need to be checked.On page 86 of A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA,
Colin stated:
James McKeown migrated to New Zealand in 1853 and then to Warrnambool in 1856. His sister, Mary,had married
Hill Hillis in Ireland in 1846 and migrated to Red Hill in 1855 and taken up farming.


The following were found in a search for the death notice of Hill Hillis's wife/widow.
HILLIS- WISEMAN.---On the 1st November, at tho Presbyterian Church, Dandenong, by the Rev. H. A. Buntine,
George P. third son of W. J. Hillis, Trafalgar, to Ethel D., only daughter of the late James Wiseman, Ascot Vale,
and sister of T.B . Wiseman, Bass.(P.59, Leader, Melbourne, 8-12-1917.)

HILLISWISEMAN. Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Hillis announce with pleasure the 25th anniversary of their marriage,
celebrated on November 1, 1917. (Present address, 3 Hastings street, Burwood.)
(Although there seems to be no connection to the Red Hill area, I am extremely confident that there is!)

HORSE TALK (ABOUT MELBOURNE'S NORTH WEST AND THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.)

Jackson's Hill (from Dalkeith,near the turn off to Mornington) to The Briars, is named after Phyllis Jackson (nee Vale)and her husband, Herbert A.Jackson. She was a noted equestrian and brought out an international expert to improve the training of horses and riders. (See the lengthy article, with pictures, in The Argus of 23-9-1954.) Her trainer Bill Bull, no slouch himself, was amazed at the improvement. One of her employees, Sue Knight, was placed in the Garryowen in 1950. Phyllis also owned racehorses and Helion came 2nd in the 1954 Melbourne Cup behind the great Rising Fast.

An early race meeting on the Peninsula was the Schnapper Point Handicap of 3-2-1868, conducted on Rennison's land at Moorooduc 152 D-E 7. Rennison ran the hotel on the Esplanade now called the Royal . He apparently had a hotel at Mordialloc when the Mornington Football Club drowning tragedy occurred.

Alfred Jones was born in London and went to Canada with his family at the age of 10 in 1832. Coming to Australia he had fair success at the diggings and then supplied Melbourne with firewood, loaded onto the LIVERPOOL which was anchored a mile offshore at Canadian Bay. After renting at Baxter's Flat for five years, he established the Almond Bush Stud east of Jones Rd at Somerville. Two of his horses were Lord Somerville and Lady Somerville, the latter travelling all the way to Kensington Park to race. Hodgins Rd is named after one of his two fellow Canadian partners in the firewood business. Canadian Bay Rd was formerly called Boundary Rd.
(The above three items are from my THE FEMALE DROVER: A HISTORY OF MOOROODUC.)

The retirement village for famous racehorses is at historic Woodlands, near the north east corner of Melbourne Airport. This is fitting because it was the venue for frantic riding from its earliest days, as described by Rolf Boldrewood,author of "Robbery Under Arms". The property was owned briefly by C.B.Fisher who has been dubbed the "father of the Australian Turf". Woodlands was also associated with the Oaklands Hunt with the kennels being situated there for some time.

Fisher owned the famous Maribyrnong Stud but lost that and Woodlands, which passed to Tommy Bent's ownership. Much of the stud was later occupied by the cordite factory; Bent had Chifley Drive built at Government expense for his subdivision! Fisher Pde (behind Flemington Racecourse), Charles St and Hurtle St (named after Charles Fisher's older brother who established the stud) are streets in Ascot Vale West.

Peter McCracken left Stewarton (the northern part of Gladstone Park)in 1855 and moved to a dairy farm on part of J.R.Murphy's Kensington Park until his Ardmillan mansion was built. His presence is recalled by McCracken St. The following comes from my EARLY LANDOWNERS: PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA.
ALLOTMENTS 17, 18, 19. (McCRACKENS DAIRY, THE RACECOURSE.)
This land, bounded by Macaulay Rd, Dynon Rd, and the lines of Lloyd St and Hampden Rd, was granted to John Robert Murphy at about the time he was granted a 2 acre block at the south east corner of Stubbs and Parsons St in 1949.
Allotment 17 was leased by Anah Lewis for 14 years. Allotments 18 and 19 were leased to A.E.Brodribb for 14 years but it is known that by 1855 the 132 acres comprised all or part of McCrackens dairy. (McCracken may have been leasing the crown land west of Rankins Rd too.)
In 1855, Peter McCracken quit his lease on Stewarton (Gladstone Park) and lived on the dairy while his mansion was built on Ardmillan in Moonee Ponds. In 1861 a fire burnt all the haystacks and by the end of 1862, Peter was thinking of giving up the dairy because the grass was poor and it was costing more for hay than the milk was worth. Soon after, James Hyslop, who had worked for Peter since 1858, was out of a job (P.233 Victoria and Its Metropolis).
When Anahs lease finished, and McCracken quit his dairy, the whole 198 acres was leased by cattle salesman Samuel Cox. He probably fattened cattle and sheep on it. Pigs might have been kept there too by pork butcher, William Samuel Cox. Three years later, in 1867, W.S.Cox took over the lease, and in 1872, he extended it for five years with an option of another five years. In 1871, hed moved from Abbotsford St to Kensington Park. The KENSINGTON PARK RACECOURSE commenced operation in 1874. When it closed at the end of 1882, Cox took out a lease on, and then bought, Feehans farm (now called Moonee Valley Racecourse).

Unlike most football clubs, whose players were firstly cricketers, the Essendon club was formed by the horse-riding fraternity. One of its players actually rode a horse to victory at Moonee Valley before donning the black and red.

Brothers John and Jim Gilligan were killed in the 1930's, within a few years of each other, in accidents involving horses. John, a married dare-devil, had become part of Bulla and Tullamarine folklore by riding his horse up the stairs of the Inverness Hotel. He was riding home in the dark and did not notice that the top rail of a fence had been replaced. Jim was a sensible bachelor and politely refused the offer of a joy flight from a daring young man, who had landed nearby, but died at St Vincents Hospital on 15-8-1938 as a result of an accident during the trip home in his jinker, when his house stumbled . John's second given name was Lawrence which might indicate that his mother was a daughter of John Lawrence, an early resident on Machell's subdivision between Mickleham Rd and Section Rd at Greenvale.John died suddenly on Dec. 2nd at the age of 47.His wife and their children are detailed in the death notice. (The Argus, 4-12-1936, page 1.)See more about the Gilligans in the REDDAN journal.

Alister Clark was the President of the Moonee Valley Racing Club from its formation until his death. Owner of Glenara, venue for many Oakland Hunt Club functions, he was a famed rose breeder (with the assistance of William Peers who left when he won a lottery) and great jockey, Darby Munro, said that he appreciated Alister's roses more than the loot when he'd won the Alister Clark Stakes. The club had been formed at J.B.McArthur's Hosie's Hotel; McArthur remained Alister's Vice President until his death and hosted the Oakland Hunt at "Arundel". Needless to say there was a strong association between the M.V.R.C. and the Oaklands Hunt.

John Wren, star of the original "Underbelly" (and even worse, financial backer of the Collingwood Football Club!) ran the Ascot Racecourse on the area east of the Showgrounds that became a Housing Commission estate with streets named after war heroes such as Weary Dunlop. As with most country race meetings (such as at Tullamarine) the horses that raced were referred to as ponies.

James Purves and his son James Liddle Purves bred horses at Tootgarook Station and James had also done so at Chinton Station near Mt Macedon. It is more likely that the day to day running of their stud was undertaken by James Purves' brother, Peter (the mason)until his death in 1860 and later his sons at Tootgarook and Green Hills on Purves Rd (south of Chapman's Sea Winds.)

The Maddens became the owners of the former Flemington estate of Hugh Glass and supplied horses to the Army in India. Travancore (the property's new, and present, name) and most of the street names recall the involvement with the sub-continent. The Maddens were probably also involved at Mornington and at Bangalore St in Kensington.

Farmers were often involved in horse breeding, especially of draught horses, which were the tractors of the day. Rajah, famed on the Indian Turf, stood at both Randall's "Hindhope" (the Rosebud Plaza site) and Brady's "Mt Evergreen" on Purves Rd.

Edward Gomm of Somerville was another to offer the services of his stallions. Billy Gomm used the telephones of the Lands Department, in which he held a very senior position, to become the biggest S.P. bookie in Melbourne. When he was sprung taking bets in their Somerville Hotel, he was banned from entering the building so his brother (and fellow legend of the Somerville Football Club) had to save the day. Billy was usually well dressed, but when he returned to "Glenhoya", he dressed like a hick and once drank at a Mornington race meeting with Sir Reg Ansett while wearing a shoe and a gumboot because he couldn't find the other shoe.

3 comment(s), latest 2 years, 7 months ago

HOW DID SARAH WILSON LEAD ME TO HENRY TUCK? SHOREHAM & FLINDERS, VIC., AUST.

A few short weeks ago, all I knew about Sarah Wilson was that she and her sons,George and Robert, lived on Jamieson's Special Survey before the Kangerong Road Board's first assessment of 1864,and that the three of them were honoured on the DROMANA PIONEER PATHWAY and all of them signed a petition in 1861 requesting that Quinan's school be chosen instead of Nicholson's to become the Dromana Common School.

It was during my attempt to discover information about the Simpsons of Red Hill that I made contact with Margaret Connell (nee Simpson) through the assistance of Keith Holmes and was shown Connell genealogy compiled by Dot Watt (nee Connell.) Marg. and Dot told me to read Petronella Wilson's GIVING DESTINY A HAND.

Having read this book, I kept part of the Mornington News 2013 Anzac Edition because it related to a fascinating name change mentioned in the book. It was an article about Christie Johnstone who happened to be the grandson of Henry Tuck Junior, the fantastic bush poet, whose works are available from the Dromana Historical Society museum, and no doubt most local historical societies.

In A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, Colin McLear gave details of all the children of councillor John Calvin Griffith of Dromana and Mary. Mary Who?

Having all the details of Christie Johnstone's descent from Oliver and Sarah Wilson, I entered "Henry Tuck, obituary" and got what seemed at first hand to be a useless response. But it wasn't, despite the journalist's usual error of rendering Griffith as Griffiths. Mary must have been Mary Dowling!

OBITUARY. DEATH OF MRS. C. DOWLING, By the death of Mrs Catherine Dowling, as mentioned in our last issue, another very old resident of the Mornington Peninsula has been removed from our midst. Mrs Dowling had reached the ripe old age of 86 years at the time of death. Although she was not suffering from any painful illness, she had been gradually failing under the pressure of her advanced years for some considerable time, and her death was not unexpected. She was possessed of an exceedingly kindly, warm hearted disposition, and very many old residents of the district, as well as the younger generation, will remember her as a true friend who had always a kindly word, and was ready to do a kindly action for anyone with whom she came into contact. The deceased lady was born in County Wicklow, Ireland, and reached Melbourne with her husband-who predeceased her by some nineteen years-in the ship " Marco Pauls " on Christmas Day, 1852. She was thus a colonist of nearly 59 years. After spending eight years, in other parts of Victoria, the Dowlings came to Stony Creek, now known as Shoreham, in the year 1860, and they were the first settlers to actually reside on their own holding in this locality, which was a portion of Tuck's Old Manton's Creek run. The country was, at the time of their acquiring the land, in a very rough state, and Mrs Dowling had many interesting incidents of hardships to relate. Her quaint sense of quiet humor always made these reminiscences pleasant to listen to. Their first homestead, a slab erection on the banks of the Creek, was totally destroyed by the collapse of a giant gum tree one very stormy night. In this instance Mr and Mrs Dowling had a very narrow escape from death. A large fork of the tree came down on each side of the bed upon which they were sleeping. Upon another occasion Mr Dowling, when some little distance away from the homestead, was forced by the ferocity of the dingoes to take refuge and spend the night up in the branches of a tree. Of Mrs Dowling's family three daughters and one son, all of whom are well known throughout the Peninsula, are surviving. These are Mrs J. C. Griffiths of Dromana; Mr* Joseph Stanley. of Balnarring; Mrs West, and Mr Christy Dowling, who was living at "The Glen" with his mother at the time of her death. The recent demise of one daughter, Mrs Henry Tuck, of Flinders, is sadly re- membered by her friends, as is also that of another daughter, Mrs J. West. A son, Mr Thomas Dowling, died some years ago, and another son expired in infancy. The remains of the deceased lady were interred in the Flinders general cemetery, when a very large number of people attended the funeral to show their last respects.
(P.3, Mornington Standard, 5-8-1911.)

My journal FAMILY CONNECTION ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA is now dwarfed by the information available in my other journals. No doubt a Tuck family history has been written so I don't intend to write one. One of my aims in family connections was to explain geographically how the two families became acquainted; usually, apart from during war time and, to a much lesser degree during the 1890's depression when many peninsula lads headed west in search of gold, the families were at least near-neighbours. Robert Rowley and Christine Edwards caused me months of wasted time until I found the neighbourly connection had been at Longford, Tasmania before Robert joined Henry Cadby Wells in a lime-burning venture near Sorrento, circa 1841.

How then would the Jennings family of Rye be related to the Tucks? Before settling at Rye in 1914, George Dodd and Hannah (Wiffen)had spent time farming at Flinders, Cranbourne and Camperdown. Their son,Cecil, married Catherine Tuck. (JENNINGS:A PIONEERING RYE FAMILY by Linda Berndt,P.20, Southern Peninsula News, 13-7-2010.)

CHRISTIE JOHNSTONE'S DESCENT FROM OLIVER AND SARAH WILSON.
Olver Wilson, a staunch Presbyterian, (1791-1851) and Sarah Spence (1811-1870) married in 1832. Their third child, Matilda (1837-1878) was born in Lifford,Ireland.With her parents and siblings, George (1833-1905)and Jane (1834-1863), Matilda came to Australia aboard the Argyle, landing at William's Town on 13-4-1841. Robert (1843-1894)was probably born in the Flinders Lane house. Oliver had become established as a shoemaker but after his death in 1851, rents rose dramatically because of the gold rush and George suggested a move to Jamieson's Special Survey (the Safety Beach area, east to Bulldog Creek Rd.)

On 18-4-1855, a double wedding was celebrated in Sarah's house on the Survey. Matilda married William Johnson(1832-1875) and her sister Jane, married George Young. When Jane died six days after the birth of her fifth child, Sarah (b.12-8-1863), the baby was brought up as one of Matilda's family.

William and Matilda had eight children of their own:
William (1855-1905) who never married;
Matilda(Tilly,1858-1936) who never married;
William Henry (1860-1860);
Robert Henry (1863-1936)who married Catherine Tuck in 1915, their children being William Henry, Christopher James, Margaret and Mary. N.B. THE CHRISTIE JOHNSTONE ARTICLE CALLS HIM ALBERT HENRY!
Rebecca Sarah (1866-1922) who never married;
Mary Jane (1869-?);
Sarah (1871-1927)who married W.G.J.Coulter in 1903, their children being Ruby and William George;
Charles Oliver (1875-1963) who never married.

JOHNSON BECOMES JOHNSTONE.
The first-born, Billy acted as head of the family when his own father died ten weeks after the birth of Charles Oliver.The family had been living on a 5 acre portion of 67A* Balnarring. Billy kept on receiving demands for payment of bills but they were not his debts. A member of another Johnson family was responsible for them,possibly the family which lived near Warrawee (Vansuylen's grant.) This so annoyed Billy that he changed the family name to Johnstone by deed poll.
*It seems that this is a mistake and that that the 5 acre block was on 67B. i.e.The 20-10-1913 assessment records that Christopher Oliver Johnstone, Red Hill farmer, was rated on 5 acres and buildings, part crown allotment 67B,Balnarring.

TO BE CONTINUED 67A LOCATION , 20 WANNAEUE.-SEE COMMENT 1.
Crown allotment 67A in the parish of Balnarring is between Shoreham Rd and Stony Creek with its north east corner being exactly opposite the Oceanview Ave corner. It is roughly indicated by Melway 190 J11. In the 1860's William Johnson and Matilda settled on 5 acres of it with the Wilsons. Petronella Wilson stated that 67A was granted to Robert Wilson in 1871 but the parish map indicates that 67A and 67B were both granted to Edward Gray.

INQUESTS.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 29 September 1874 p 7 Article
... INQUESTS. Mr Candler held an inquest on the 25th inst, at Dromana. on the body of Edward Gray, aged 60 years, a farmer at Balnarring. On the 24th inst. the deceased and his son were burning trees, to clear a paddock, and i the son hearing a tree fall near the deceased I went up and found the ..

The farmers south and east of Arthurs Seat/Red Hill roads were not in the Kangerong Road District and their first assessment by the Flinders Road Board was on 13-6-1869. Ratepayers were listed geographically and the following excerpt starts in Tucks Rd near Shands Rd. Thomas Bullock 59 acres (west side where almost 97 acres were granted to F.Bullock in 1875), Hamilton Allen 115 acres(east side where 115 acres 2 roods and 30 perches were granted to A.Allan), George Young 16 acres, William Johnson 5 acres, George Wilson 32 acres,Edward Gray house and 53 acres, William Bayne 2059 acres (76AB of 208 acres between 67A and McConnell's 75AB, plus 630 acres granted across Shoreham Rd and obviously a lot leased.)

By 7-6-1870 George Young had gone, probably to Moorooduc on Andrew White's grants south of Vineyard Lane and on the west side of three chain (Old Moorooduc)road.After Jane (Wilson) had died in 1863, George had married the orphaned Janet White of "Mt Martha" in 1866 and through her George had probably come into ownership of the property or part of it. His address was certainly three chain road.

In 1870, George Wilson had 48 acres having occupied Young's 16 acres. William Johnson was not assessed on his 5 acres and may have been in Moorooduc; at about that time a William Johnson was considered ineligible to be on the electoral roll for the Mornington Division because he had sold his freehold land in the parish of Moorooduc. If this was so,George Wilson should have been assessed on the whole 53 acres of 67B but such logic usually escaped rate collectors who were too busy to worry about such details.



OH NO! MORE CONFUSION.PARISH OF WANNAEUE.
When I read the amusing tale of George and Ollie Johnstone in Hec Hanson's MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN, I assumed that George was related to the grantee of 20C Wannaeue but he wasn't! I have written a separate journal about George and Ollie.

Billy and his uncle George (Wilson)obtained a lease from the Crown in 1882 for crown allotment 20B (of section B)in the parish of Wannaeue. This consisted of 191 acres according to GIVING DESTINY A HAND but an 1872 Wannaeue map gives its area as 172 acres 2 roods and 2 perches. A later map shows that 20B was later split into 20B of 34 acres (granted to John Shand in 1905)and 20C of 130 acres (granted to W.Johnstone on 19-7-1902.) The reason for the splitting of the original 20B and the apparent loss of 8 acres was Roberts Rd, separating 20B on the west side from 20C, which was bounded by Shands, Roberts and Mornington-Flinders Rds.

Alexander Shand, who died during his son,John's term as President of the Shire of Flinders and Kangerong, had established an early steam sawmill beside Main Creek,which had the most constant supply of water in the area and William Johnson/Johnstone must have raised no objections to Alexander's waggons taking a short cut through his selection on the way to Red Hill. Eventually the shire declared his track a shire road.

My transcriptions of rate records only provide a snapshot of occupancy and of course the 1879 assessment does not mention William Johnson, George Wilson or any landholding of 172 (or 191) acres in the parish of Wannaeue.
This part of the parish, with Flinders, Red Hill (west of Red Hill Rd) and Dromana, was in the Central Riding.

1900.William Johnstone, 126 acres, c/a 20C,Wannaeue.
1910. R.H.Johnston,Shoreham farmer,80 acres, 20C, Wannaeue. Joseph Smith,farmer,Red Hill,50 acres,part 20c, Wannaeue.
1919 (the last assessment on microfiche)Robert Henry Johnstone (Billy's son and Christie Johnstone's father),38 acres and buildings,part c/a 20C, Wannaeue. Mrs Mary Cleave,Red Hill,24 acres and buildings,part 20C, Wannaeue. No other identified parts of 20C were assessed.


R. H. Johnstone, Red Hill, offering to purchase wood on Cape Schanck fronting his property, and calling at- tention to culvert near Dumbleton's as it is dangerous.- Tenders to be called for timber, and culvert to be at-tended to.(P.2, Mornington Standard, 6-6-1914.)

In referring to the timber/property on Cape Schanck, Robert Henry Johnstone was almost certainly discussing 20C Wannaeue. The above excerpt from a report of a Shire of Flinders and Kangerong meeting is the only article linking Johnstone and Cape Schanck and the only mention of Dumbleton in the area. It illustrated how vague locality names were in those days. The Johnsons were living on their 5 acre block on 67B, which was described (above)as being in Shoreham in one instance and and at Red Hill in another. None of the roads had names! How could Robert Henry say "the wood near Shand's Rd?" I can assure you that the following tender was for Limestone Road but very few people would know it.

No. 7-Metal, Main creek to Black's camp. (Black's Camp was on Boneo Rd halfway between Browns and Limestone Rds but there was another Black's Camp near the corner of Boneo and Long Point Road where the second Boneo (or Blacks'Camp) school was situated. Therefore Black's Camp described the general area.)

AND NOW FOR CHRISTIE JOHNSTONE'S STORY.
Christie Johnstone's story was in a Mornington News special Anzac Edition 2013, which also has an article about three Tuck boys. There was also a Southern Peninsula News Anzac Edition with exactly the same content. As I have had trouble finding this special edition online, and readers might too, I will reproduce Christie's story verbatim. There are three photos with the article (young Christie in uniform,the derelict 1877 Mantonville homestead and Christie outside his farm gate.) If family members would like copies of these, send me a private message.My comments are in brackets.

CHRISTIE CARRIES ON TUCK TRADITION by Peter McCullough.
Christie was born on 17 February 1920 at Main Ridge. His parents were Albert* Henry and Catherine Johnstone, and he had a brother,William Henry,and a sister. (His father was Robert Henry Johnstone.) His father was born in Dromana and the Johnstone family lived in Red Hill (i.e. 5 acres of 67B Balnarring.)"They were bushmen-splitting timber and that sort of thing." His father worked in Gippsland in his younger days, later moved to Main Ridge where his parents* had an orchard and grew strawberries. (Robert Henry was born in 1863,his father, William Johnson, died in 1875 and his mother, Matilda,nee Wilson,died in 1898. The orchard would have been on the 5 acres at RedHill/ Stony Creek/Shoreham and as his father died in 1875, it would have been more accurate to say that Robert's family had the orchard,with Robert's brother , William (1855-1905), who changed the family name to Johnstone, and was granted 20C Wannaeue, running the small farm with the assistance of his youngest brother, Charles Oliver (1875-1963.) C/A 20C would probably have been used for cattle grazing and getting wood for timber or firewood. Robert Henry must have returned shortly after his brother, William, died in 1905 and settled on 20C Wannaeue; he was assessed on the property in 1910, and probably earlier.)

Christie's mother, Catherine, was the eldest daughter of Henry Tuck Junior and the family moved to Flinders in 1924 to look after her father, who was almost 80 and to help him run the farm. His wife, Margaret had died in 1910. (The obituary of Mrs C.Dowling in 1911 -sixth paragraph of this journal- reveals that Henry had married Margaret Dowling.)

Christie went to school in Flinders, starting the same day as Eric Lucas who died just recently. It was a two mile walk to school and in those days he could walk to school and home again without seeing a car. He had more rides in a horse-and-buggy than he ever got in a motor car. As soon as Christie turned 14 he left school to work on the farm.

"Mantonville" was a dairy farm of 150 acres and all the milking was done by hand in those days. The family only milked about 20 cows as that was all they could handle.After the war, with machines, they were milking 50 cows. Kinross Dairies would collect the milk and take it to Edithvale. Christie milked cows for about 50 years and never took a holiday for 25 years. With a milk contract he had to be there every day. About 30 years ago he went out of the dairy business and has been running beef cattle ever since. However only 80 acres are left out of the original holding.

After Christie left school he did a lot of other work as well as milking cows twice a day: fence contracting, ploughing, wood cutting, and splitting posts. Just before he joined up in 1941 he worked at the Flinders Golf course for 12 months but he never hit a golf ball;"Working there five-and-a-half days a week,I reckon I saw enough of the golf course! Besides,I was still milking cows before and after work."

(I wonder if Christie knew the magnificent golfer in the surgical boot was related to him. Jane Darley,nee Wilson, was the daughter of George Wilson and niece of Matilda Johnson, nee Wilson.

William Edward Darley (born Jamieson's Special Survey, 1859-1938) and Jane's children were:
1. Florence Mary (1892-1943), spinster.
2. Annie Maude (1894-1967) who in 1937 married Joseph James Kay but had no children.
3. Kate Evelyn (1896-1981.) No issue. There may have been marriage detail which I neglected to record in my rush.
4. William George (1899-1971) bachelor.
5.Saville Maude (1910-1987)who in 1944 married Patricia Marie O'Donnell and had five daughters.
6. Lionel Edward (1913-1987)who in 1943 married Faye Chitts and had one daughter.

William George Darley,the fourth child and oldest son of Willam Edward and Jane (Wilson) was an outstanding golfer. He had a physical disability. When I googled "Darley, Flinders, Golf", I did find confirmation of this. He had to wear surgical boots as a result of being gored by a wild boar when he was seven.

Flinders Golf Champ Dies; 72 . - Google News
news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1300&dat=19710825&id...
Flinders golf champ dies; 72 . Bill Darley, of Flinders, one of Victoria's best known golfers died in his sleep early yesterday,aged 72. He played his last round of ...

There should be a spate of "aces" down Flinders way in the next few weeks. The club recently staged an exhibition match between Eric Lucas and Bill Darley against Ken Lucas, and Heidelberg professional Al Whykes.
Bill gave the gallery a perfect demonstration of how to hole out in one. He did the trick at the 15th-and what a reception he received! Of course, it was no trouble for Bill and Eric, to go on then and win the match 2 and 1. (P.14, The Argus, 12-1-1954.)

What a coincidence that Christie's lifelong friend, Eric Lucas, was Bill's partner in that contest!)

NEXT PAR WON'T SUBMIT- PASTED ONTO JOHNSON-JOHNSTONE FILE
Farmers were classed as an "essential trade" and were barred
TO BE CONTINUED IN COMMENTS BOX.

5 comment(s), latest 1 year ago

HOW GLENGYLE, KEILOR (SECTION 1,TULLAMARINE) BECAME ARUNDEL, "TURNER'S" AND ELLENGOWAN. (VIC., AUST.)

DEDICATED TO THE BROWN FAMILY, EARLY PIONEERS OF KEILOR.

FROM jOE27.
I have recently purchased Christine Laskowski's book "Steel's Crk.etc" and was interested in mention of Thomas Bertram and Ellangowan. I have been endeavouring to identify :Glenlyle" and Ellangowan since as the name of my neighbour's property in Brown's Rd, is "Ellangowan". They are of the opinion it was named after the school their mother attended in S.Aust, which it could be. Perhaps it is a mere coincidence
A piece I have read on Arundel farm states that Colin Campbell* was the owner following
Capt. Richard Bunbury. Christine states that Thomas and wife Anna McLean Campbell arrived in 1849 and stayed for a while with his brother-in-law, Colin Campbell at "Glenlyle" before purchasing nearby property "Ellangowan." I am pleased that you have given me much information.I now have to find out who owned it before Thomas**.
Re Lawrence Kelly and wife Margaret. In another journal re North Pole Road you wonder if Margaret Kelly (nee Fox) was a sister of Michael Fox who also lived on North Pole Road. This surprised me as Mrs. Margaret Fox who came to Aust. with son Michael was the greatgrandmother of my late husband, Joe Brown. His grandmother, Bridget Brown, was Bridget Fox who arrived about 1850. Looking up Death Cert, of Margaret who died in 1881, she did have a daughter Margaret but she is noted as deceased on certificate. Reference to Lawrence and Margaret Kelly in "Dead Men do tell tales" states they were married in County Tyrone. She died at Violet Town in 1903 while staying with her daughter.
I thoroughly enjoyed reading your journals on Keilor and Tullamarine. Thank you.
Regards,______.


*K. B.Keeley believed that Richard Hanmer Bunbury who had property near the Merri Creek and was the Chief of Water Police at Williamstown (where street names honour him,as well as one at Gladstone Park) was a dummy bidder for Campbell who bought section 1 from him not long after the grant was issued. Bunbury was a naval officer who had lost his right arm in battle and had learned to paint beautifully with his left hand; high praise in the journal of the artistic Georgiana McCrae who came to Australia on the same ship.
**Alex Guthrie owned Ellangowan before Thomas Bertram.

SECTION 1,PARISH OF TULLAMARINE: GLENGYLE BECOMES ARUNDEL AND ELLENGOWAN.
GLENGYLE CHRONOLOGY ON TROVE.
THE CAMPBELLFIELD ANNUAL SHINTY MATCH.In accordance with what may now, speaking relatively, be styled pristine usage, the Campbellfield Annual Shinty Match came off
on New Year's Day, on a field adjoining Messrs. Barber and Lowe's flour mill, on the Merri Merri Creek.(Melway 7 J-K 9.) The public anticipations had been this time
excited even beyond the customary pitch by the extensive preparations which were being made, but they were not doomed to disappointment, for, as far as human agency could operate, the "gathering of the clans" on this occasion far excelled anything of the kind ever before witnessed south of the line. The day was overpoweringly hot, and consequently as ill suited as any day possibly could be for shinty playing, but notwithstanding, the amateurs of the game turned out,and nothing daunted set to work at a game, which even in the frosts and snows of Old Scotland forces the perspiration from the brow, the players exhibiting in their ranks a set of as stalwart chiefs as ever responded to the call of the Maccallum More, or joined in the slogan of Lochiel or Glengarry. At about one o'clock the players set to work, and manfully contested the game till nearly four o clock, when exhausted nature and the ample provision made by the Stewards for recruiting the inner man, alike combined to dictate the propriety
of a " drawn game." The sports finished, the company adjourned to Messrs Barber and Lowe's mill, whlch the proprietors had kindly placed at the disposal of the Stewards, where an ample cold collation, provided by Mr. Yewers, the confectioner in Elizabeth street, awaited their attention, and was done ample justice to under the admirable
presidency of Colin Campbell, Esq. of Glengyle. etc. (P.2,Argus,3-1-1850.)

On the 14th instant, at seven o'clock, a.m., at the residence of Thomas Bertram, Esq., Glengyle, near Keilor, Elizabeth, second daughter of the late Murdoch Campbell, Esq., of Callis, Coll, Argyleshire, Scotland. (P.4,Argus,15-4-1854.)

MONDAY, 2nd JULY. |
Sale of Farming Stock in an Insolvent Estate, by
order of tho Official Assignee.
Upper Glengyle Farm, near Keilor.
A BLISS and CO. have received instructions from the Official Assignee to sell by public auction, on the premises known as the Upper Glengyle Farm, about one mile from
Keilor, on Monday, 2nd July, at twelve o'clock precisely. Without Reserve.
The whole of the farming stock and agricultural implements belonging to the estate of Roderick Mackenzie*, consisting of Powerful draught horses (etc.) (The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 28 June 1855 p 3 Advertising.)

(* Roderick McKenzie was the grantee of crown allotment A of section 15 in the parish of Will Will Rook, consisting of 304 acres 3 roods and 27 perches. Indicated by Melway 6 K4 and 7 B5 it is bounded by Railway Crescent, Barry Rd, roughly King St and roughly Phillip St. The assignee had probably sequestered his grant, so he was most likely leasing Upper Glengyle; no sale of the Keilor property was mentioned.)

By the end of 1861, the part of section 1 near the present Arundel farm, which had probably been called Upper Glengyle, had been renamed Arundel but the horseshoe bend near Bertram's Ford, accessed by Browns Rd on the river flat (which later produced Thomas Bertram's renowned crops) was still called Glengyle by the Guthries, who were soon to moved to Togarf south of Emu Creek in the shire of Bulla.

As shall be seen, Alex Guthrie obviously ownedthis part of the Glengyle Estate, which he had occupied since 1851 (when his lease on the future Meadowbank/Gowrie Park at Campbellfield was terminated due to its purchase by Alexander Gibb and the so-called Keilor farmer* James Robertson.)

*Andrew Lemon's mistake of which Moreland City Council has been made aware.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 6 January 1863 p 2 Advertising
... Guthrie, Esq , to SELL by AUCTION, on the farm, Glengyle, one mile from Keilor, on Thursday, .. (i.e. a clearing sale.)

FRIDAY, MARCH 20.
Splendid Agricultural Property,
Within Eight Miles of Town.
DALMAHOY CAMPBELL and Co. are instructed
by Alex. Guthrie, Esq., to SELL by PUBLIC
AUCTION, at Morton's Hotel, on Friday, 20th March,
at two o'clock.
Unless previously disposed of,
Part of the Glengyle Estate, Keilor, about eight
milos from town, being Lots 8 and 9, containing
161a. 3r. 38p.
The soil is first-class, and it has a large frontage to
tho Deep Creek, which contains an abundant supply
of fresh water all the year round.
It adjoins tho property of Edward Wilson, Esq.,
substantially fenced, and subdivided Into lots, 107
acres being under cultivation, and bearing luxuriant
crops.
The improvements comprise comfortable dwelling
house, with stable, &c. ; also two hay-yards, and stock-
yard, all in good working order: a compact garden,
containing a number of vines, fruit trees, etc.
Intending purchasers are Invited to inspect the pro-
perty before the day of sale, which they will find not
to be surpassed.
Title unexceptionable.
Terms etc. (P.3, Argus,1863.)

It will be interesting to see how close the total acreage of Browns Rd Arundel Closer Settlement blocks comes to 162 acres or if it's closer to Thomas Bertam's 170 acres. I just realised that, having inserted the above, I've let the cat out of the bag re the author of the following advertisement.

WILL stand this season, at Arundel* (late Glen-gyle), Keilor, the imported Poltou Ass LA JOIE. This animal is very powerful, and of the breed celebrated for the production of the splendid mules used for artillery and other draught purposes in the south of France.

The Imported Egyptian Ass,MEHEMET.
MEHAMET is pure white, of the Hadji breed, from the neighbourhood of Mecca, famed for their spirit and endurance, and combines great energy with perfect temper.The mule in all countries of similar climate to this is a more serviceable animal than the horse. It enjoys almost entire immunity from disease. It thrives where the horse starves, and lives nearly twice as long. It is often larger than either parent.
Also, Will Stand at the same place, the Pure-bred Imported Alderney Bull, MERLIN.(P.8, Argus,14-12-1861.)
(* The person who wrote this advertisement didn't bother posting it;he took it to work. He most likely didn't pay for the advertisement. He knew a lot about exotic animals and as a stalwart of the acclimatisation movement, grew experimental crops as well as breeding chinchilla rabbits and having a virtual zoo on Arundel. His legacy allowed Cr Jack of Flinders Shire to obtain the Mornington Peninsula's first motorised ambulance. Getting warm? He was also the owner of The Argus and had retired as editor because of his failing eyesight which eventually forced him to return to England where he mixed in intellectual circles with such as Charles Darwin. A bachelor,he left most of his estate for charitable purposes in the Edward Wilson Trust. So if you ever visit the Dromana Museum (like tomorrow,26 January, when I'm on duty)you can tell the volunteers what the plaque on the outside wall (Shire President, Cr Jack, 1928) has got to do with ambulances and Arundel.

FOR SALE, Ellengowan, one mile from Keilor,the property of Thos. Bertram, Esq., consisting of 170 acres, HOUSE, containing six rooms, with detached kitchen, store and servant's rooms, stabling, and other out-offices; orchard and vinery of four
acres, in tho highest state of cultivation. The land has a frontage of one mile and a half to the Keilor or Maribyrnong River*, and is the finest agricultural land
in the neighbourhood. From its proximity to the Melbourne markets, it is rarely that an opportunity occurs for securing so eligible and remunerative an investment.
For further particulars apply to JAMES TURNER**,831 Little Collins-street east ; or, to Mr. BERTRAM, Ellengowan.(P.8, Argus,2-6-1866.)

N.B.Thomas Bertram must have been leasing the homestead block in 1854 and then bought Guthrie's Browns Rd area circa 1863.
* You need a piece of string 12 centimetres long to check the river frontage on the Browns Rd area on Melway. Come on,don't let me do all the work!
** James Turner had probably bought the horseshoe bend accessed by the east-west section of McNabs Rd, on which he was assessed in Keilor's 1868 ratebook. Known as "Turner's",it was bought by the McNabs when the Overnewton Estate was sold off;they also bought the Oakbank Rd area across the river in the parish of Maribyrnong.

Tony Cockram,the owner of Arundel Farm in about 1989 gave me a copy of K.B.Keeley's Architectural Thesis on Arundel circa 1960. The Hume library system should have a copy of it and Moonee Valley might.

WHEN WAS BERTRAM'S FORD FIRST MENTIONED?
Arundel Rd, part of which is blocked off by the freeway and has been renamed after Jose Borrell who replaced the Cahills on Gumms Corner in 1916,was known as Bertram's road in 1865. Keilor Rd was still called Mt Alexander Rd in the early 1900's.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 24 May 1865 p 7 Advertising
... for WORKS on tho Mount Alexander and Bertram's Road, Keilor.

Although no mention was made of Bertram's ford in 1865 (or earlier),its construction was possibly part of the above works because early in 1866,maintenance was required. This is an extract from the report of the fortnightly Keilor Road Board meeting.

The clerk was instructed to write to the Bulla District Board, requesting their cooperation in the
construction of Grant's road, the boundary between the two districts. The engineers were instructed to examine Bertrams Ford, on the road from Keilor to the Arundel farm, with a view to having it and the approaches
put in proper repair. (P.5, column 2,Argus,30-1-1866.)

IAN KENDALL'S SCOTTISH PLACE NAMES IN MELBOURNE.

EMAIL TO IAN KENDALL.
I found your website when I was looking for something else. You've put a lot of work into it; well done!
I mainly looked at Melbourne's north west, whose history I have been researching since 1988 and the Mornington Peninsula (since August 2010) and have only commented on these. I have not worried about street names, although I might mention some in the following.

I agree completely with your origins for Arthurs Seat, Baxter, Calder Park, Campbellfield, Craigieburn (the Robbie Burns was another hotel near the Craigie Burns,shown on a survey map), Dallas, Deer Park, Flemington, Keilor (which I've seen as Keillor in some sources), Kealba, Kingston (see Graham Whitehead's City of Kingston website) McCrae, Meadow Heights, Moreland (which was leased by Michael Loeman for about 14 years before he moved onto Glenloeman on Loemans Rd near Bulla, with the result that the Moreland Rd bridge was known as Loeman's bridge), Newmarket, Rosanna, Red Hill (one of the roads leading to it is White Hill Rd) and Westgarth.

I have listed other suburbs where I doubt some of the sources or additional information might be useful.
WATSONIA. I have seen sources that attribute the name to James Watson, which seems reasonable, given the proximity to Rosanna. While on that area, Janefield owes its name to John Brock who was an early squatter near Bulla until Big Clarke got his special survey and, I think, was a Scot.

WESTMEADOWS.It was originally known as Broadmeadows Township before the railway went through Campbellfield circa 1872, giving that locality the name of East Broadmeadows; when the "East" was dropped the Township was called West Meadows. Westmeadows now includes former farmland near the township such as Kia Ora, Willowbank (many of whose street names were my suggestions) and Wattle Glen.

ABERFELDIE. James Robertson 2 of Upper Keilor is the correct origin. The source proposing a link with a Napier Estate might be correct; Thomas Napier (of Rosebank in Strathmore) might have called a squatting run by this name and his son Theodore (of Magdala in Strathmore) might have been involved in the subdivision of the West Essendon grants (originally known as Spring Hill) and suggested the name of the house for the estate. Strathmore and streets named after Rosebank and Magdala owe their origins to the Napiers. I believe a Napier was involved in the relief of Lucknow and Magdala was also involved with his exploits in India.
As far as I know, Aberfeldie has everything to do with James Robertson and nothing to do with the Napiers. If another Scottish family was involved with naming the estate, it would be far more likely to be the McCrackens, related by marriage.The reference to a Napier estate might have also resulted from confusion between Aberfeldie and Glenbervie; Grant Aldous probably described the origin of the latter name in "The Stopover That Stayed".
(By the way, there were three James Robertson families in the area: 1.Upper Keilor/Mar Lodge/ Aberfeldie; 2.La Rose/ Trinifour and 3.Gowrie Park at Campbellfield. See itellya's journal about the Robertsons on FAMILY TREE CIRCLES.)

BLAIRGOWRIE. Dr John Blair's Blairgowrie House was built by an Irish pioneer and politician named O'Grady who named it Villa Maria. When he bought the house, Blair renamed it Blairgowrie. When the estate was subdivided, it was called the Blairgowrie Estate but was described as being at Sorrento. (See page 1, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 28-3-1923.) It was not until about 1940 when the Cain family's "Tyrone" east of Canterbury Rd was subdivided that Blairgowrie appeared in the newspapers to describe a locality. Incidentally a gowrie website states that Blairgowrie means "field of goats".

BROADMEADOWS. The earliest reference to the Broadmeadows Hotel on trove was in 1855. Just about the only reference to Broadmeadows in 1850, (apart from the proclamation of a township at Broadmeadows, poor attendances at St Pauls and the calling of tenders for its manse) was a much repeated advertisement about a stallion standing at stud at Samuel Thorpe's farm. In November, 1851, Mrs Brodie, formerly of Moonee Ponds (the vast Brodie squatting run, not the suburb, but possibly Harpsdale or Dunhelen) opened a store in the township. A meeting was called by about 5 Scots about the need for a crossing at the foot of Cameron's estate at THE BROADMEADOWS. In 1852, Machell's estate AT BROADMEADOWS (actually the land bounded by Section Rd, Somerton Rd, Mickleham Rd and Swain St at Melway 178 H7-11) was advertised for sale.

The above demonstrates that BROADMEADOWS described a district which consisted of the parish of Will Will Rook, and even den Machell's grant in the parish of Yuroke, and that the hotel was named because of the district, not the other way around.

An article about Kilmore by "The Vagabond" described the 6000 acres of hay at Broadmeadows and said it was an English name. The first large area of wheat in the colony was grown at Campbellfield by John GRANT who was leasing land from the CAMPBELLS. Nearby were the CAMERONS and KENNEDYS on Glenroy,Ruthvenfield, Stoney Fields and Dundonald, the GIBBS and ROBERTSONS on Meadowbank and Gowrie Park, the McKERCHARS on Greenan and Greenvale, and they were the pioneers, SCOTS, who would have coined the apt name for the district. The place was so full of Scots that the trustees of Will Will Rook Cemetery apparently did not feel a need to have sections for denominations other than Presbyterian and John Kingshott was appointed to the school committee so it would not consist entirely of Presbyterians.Do you think that Broadmeadows was coined by Englishmen? I don't!

BURNSIDE. This suburb was named after James Burnside, a pioneer near Deer Park and a grantee in in the parish of Maribyrnong. His son's obituary was on page 1 of the 15-1-1943 issue of the Sunshine advocate; the son may have married a descendant of James Robertson of Upper Keilor.

GLADSTONE PARK. The name derives from the northern 777 acres of Gladstone Park (and the Gladstone Gardens Estate north of Lackenheath Drive on the west side of the freeway.) This was section 5 of the parish of Tullamarine, consisting of 785 acres, 8 acres probably having been lost in the making of today's Mickleham Rd. The parish map records George Russell as the grantee but he bought it for fellow Western District squatter, Niel Black. Black was agent for the firm of Stewart, Black, Gladstone etc back home. Section 5 was called "Stewarton", the same name as another of the firm's farms in the Western District. Black probably wanted section 5 as a holding paddock but it was leased 1846-1855 by Peter McCracken, who moved to his dairy farm on J.R.Murphy's Kensington Park and then to Ardmillan at Moonee Ponds.

Gladstone, a cousin of Disraeli's foe, came into ownership of Section 5 and the farm's name became Gladstone a year after John Cock succeeded John Kerr as the tenant in about 1892. The Gladstones had sold it to G.W.Taylor for 74 575 pounds in mid 1888 but regained it when Taylor could not complete payments in the bust that followed the boom, as Cannon would put it. The Gladstone family owned the property until the 1920's.

GOWANBRAE. This farm was originally named Camp Hill, a name that applied during the tenure of Eyre Evans Kenny, Brown, Lonie, Gilligan, Williamson etc. When Scott, presumably a Scot, bought the farm in the 1930's, he renamed it Gowanbrae. Malvern Ave owes its name to Sir Bruce Small who owned the property and wanted to produce his famous Malvern Star bicycles there but could not get a railway siding on the Albion-Jacana line.

GOWRIE.
Alexander Gibb leased section 5 Will Will Rook for some time and then it was purchased in two halves, each of 320 acres, in 1848. Gibb called the northern half "Meadow Bank" and James Robertson called his half Gowrie Park. Both, of course, were Scots.
Incidentally, most of Melbourne Airport's operational area (except for the Terminal building on Payne's pig farm,"Scone") are on another Gowrie Park, which is today recalled by Gowrie Park Drive at Melway 5 C5.

GREENVALE.
Even if this name was a simple description of the landscape, it was coined by a Scot, John McKerchar, for his farm name (which was renamed "The Elms" by a later owner.) Swain St, off Mickleham Rd, indicated the boundary between Dundanald and Machell's early subdivision but also indicates the boundary between the parishes of Will Will Rook and Yuroke to the north. The name of McKerchar's farm came to describe the part of Yuroke near Somerton Rd and the present school on Hughie Williamson's old "Dunvegan" carries the same number as the one started by John McKerchar on the Section Rd corner!

NIDDRIE. This was the name of Henry Brown Stevenson's farm. See his death notice on page 1 of The Argus of 5-7-1893. The Morgans kept the name when they bought it in (1906?) and owned it for many years. The farm was bounded by the Orange Gr/Bowes Ave midline, the King/Fraser St midline, Nomad-Treadwell Rd and Keilor Rd.

Hadfield should be called Fawkner, but the grantee's named travelled to a nearby area and in the same way, the name of the Stevenson/ Morgan farm travelled south of Keilor Rd. It is possible that Niddrie was named by the grantee, Thomas Napier of Rosebank.

ROXBURGH PARK.
The association with Brunton is correct; he probably did not find the Cameron name of Stoney Field (as in the rate records) very appealing. It was not known as Ruthvenfield; this Cameron property is today bisected by Blair St, east of the railway line.

ST KILDA. I have read that the suburb was named after a yacht owned by the family of Big Clarke; this was one of the theories.I had a pleasure craft in mind but a working yacht makes sense because W.J.T. had little time for pleasure and other pursuits that didn't make money (except the girlies!)

STRATHMORE. See Bruce Barber's Strathmore website. There could be a connection with the Queen Mother but I have seen no mention of this. I quote from page 165 of "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History". "It was not until 1943 that the (North Essendon and South Broadmeadows) Progress Association submitted "Strathmore" (a Scottish name associated with the Napier family) to the Broadmeadows Shire Council." No source is given but I suspect that Andrew Lemon had seen the correspondence. I don't think the progress association would have been aware of any connection between the name and the Queen Mother.

BELL.
It must be 20 years since I read Richard Broome's "Between Two Creeks" the history of Coburg. But I distinctly remember Bell Manor!

FINGAL.
Fingal is a parish south of Limestone Rd and south of the parishes of Wannaeue and Nepean, which are separated by Government-Weeroona Rd. Most parish names have aboriginal origins so Fingal and Nepean are unusual. Parish names would have been decided by surveyors or the Lands Department, whose boss was James Grant, presumably a Scot, at the time Fingal was surveyed.Fingal is Irish for foreign tribe according to wikipedia, and if my recollection is correct the Scots were from Ireland, making them a foreign tribe.

MERLYNSTON. I'm sure Richard Broome discussed the name's origin.

OLIVERS HILL. This was originally known as Old Man Davey's Hill.

ITELLYA HAS RETIRED.

After ten attempts to post a comment on the DICTIONARY HISTORY OF BULLA journal (second prize essay on the history of Bulla),itellya has retired. The essay has been posted on Ray Gibb's Facebook page. It is quoted almost verbatim in I.W.Symonds' BULLA BULLA.

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