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Farms near TULLAMARINE: SPRING FARM, CUMBERLAND, PASCOE VILLA, ARUNDEL, ABERFELDIE, BIG CLARKE,(VIC., AUST.)

CORRECTION OF TEXT AND MUCH BACKGROUND INFORMATION WILL CONTINUE.

Due to faulty digitisation in trove, I often spend hours trying to find an article that I know perfectly well is there, because I have read it before. At the time I had found it by sheer chance because it was near another for which I was searching,and something caught my eye. On many occasions I have failed to rediscover the article so when I make such chance discoveries now I tend to do something about it immediately,no matter how many irons I have in the fire. It is rare to find three articles of such interest on one page of a newspaper and who knows,by the time I finish,there may be more. I found the page because of trove's irritating habit of producing results for just one, rather than all, of the words that are entered for the search. In this case the search was for: "grimes, ford,saltwater river" . I'll have to find whether Pascoe Villa was the original Young Queen Inn and locate the article about the murder charge. I'll have to find if it was Coghill selling Cumberland. Pascoe Villa may have been on the land that Smith bought on Brewster's grant (c/a 15 Doutta Galla, now Strathmore) that I think became John Murray Peck's Lebanon, so I'll have to consult Lemon's Broady history and my title information in EARLY LANDOWNERS.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 30 November 1867 p 2 Advertising.

SPRING FARM
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6.
At Twelve O'clock.
MAGNIFICENT FREEHOLD PROPERTY,
Known as Springs Farm, Adjoining the Keilor Village Reserve, Fronting the Saltwater River, the Deep Creek, and other Government Roads.
To Squatters, Graziers, Agriculturists, Capitalists, and Others.
GEMMELL, TUCKETT, and Co. have received instructions from tho Hon. John Foster Vesey Fitzgerald* (previous to that gentleman's departure for Europe) to SELL by AUCTION, at their rooms, 49 Collins street west, on Friday, December 6, at twelve o'clock,
Those two contiguous sections of land, being Nos.20 and 21 parish of Doutta Galla, containing 710 and 640 acres respectively, facing three** Government roads, and having one mile and a half frontage to the Saltwater River.
The auctioneers beg to call the special attention of parties in search of really good investments to this
valuable estate, being within an easy distance of Melbourne. The land is of the richest quality, clear of all
obstructions, and is abundantly grassed and watered by the Saltwater River. It is well worthy the attention of graziers and sheep farmers, from its close proximity to town, as grazing paddocks. The property is all securely fenced and subdivided into convenient paddocks. The improvements consist of cottage*** and sheep-yards, which with a small outlay may be made a comfortable homestead. It is approached from Melbourne by either the Keilor, the Deep Creek, or Broadmeadows roads. The Government having purchased the Essendon Railway, which is now opened for traffic, considerably enhances the value of the property. The situation of this property can scarcely be equalled for richness of soil, scenery, or easy access to the Melbourne markets, and the district is noted for its productive qualities. Coaches pass the property six times a day.
Title perfect, for particulars of which apply to Messrs. Nutt and Murphy, solicitors, William street.


* This proves the claim made in a Victoria-wide source (possibly SETTLING)that J.F.L.V.(Alphabetical) Foster had changed his name and returned home to claim an inheritance. He would have needed to transfer the titles of all his property to himself (old name to new name!)
** 1.Today's Mickleham/Broadmeadows Rd, 2.Today's Sharp Rd, 3. Fosters Rd, today's Keilor Park Drive south to Spence St.
*** Foster didn't consider it grand but the Crottys called it The Governor's House. Maurice Crotty had been leasing Spring Farm for most of the decade so far and his wife (nee McCormack)wrote a letter in 1867 stating that part of their farm had been sold. The buyer was James Sharp (Volume C folio 979, says my Melway.)




CUMBERLAND ESTATE
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6
At Twelve O'clock.
Beautiful Freehold Property,
Moonee Ponds,
CUMBERLAND ESTATE.
Handsome villa Residence and 1301 Acres of Land.
To Capitalists In Search of First-class Suburban Property.
GEMMELL, TUCKETT, and Co. have received Instructions to SELL by AUCTION, at their rooms, 40 Collins-street west, on Friday, December ?,at twelve o'clock, Cumberland Estate, on the Moonee Ponds, 12 miles from Melbourne, containing 1304a. 3r. lp., partly bounded by tho Deep Creek and Bulla roads, at Oaklands Junction, and intersected by the Moonee Ponds, which b]???????hore????? contain an abundant supply of water in the driest season. About 700 acres are well wooded. The whole is divided into three paddocks by substantial post-and-rail fencing.

The buildings, erected only six years ago, are a handsome villa residence of eight large and well
proportioned rooms, substantially built of bluestone ; a building adjoining, also of bluestone, divided into
storeroom, pantry, kitchen, laundry, and servants' room ; huts, stable, &c., of wood.There is a garden well stocked with both fruit and ornamental trees, shrubs, &c., fowlhouse, stockyard.

There are 1103 acres of the land let for twelve months for grazing purposes. This very desirable property is bounded by the beautiful estates of the late Hon. Donald Kennedy, of Dundonald, and Andrew Sutherland, Esq., of Woodlands.
Particulars as to title can bo obtained from Mr.Wyburn, solicitor, 40 Ellzabeth-street.

The reason for the timing of the sale become obvious.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 8 June 1867 p 8 Family Notices
Funeral Notices. FRIENDS are respectfully invited to attend the funeral of the late Mrs. COGHILL (relict of the late William Coghill, Esq.),to move from her late residence, Cumberland, Moonee Ponds,THIS DAY, (Saturday), at 9, and pass across the Flemington-bridge about 12 ...
.
N.B. MOONEE PONDS (earlier,Moonee Moonee Chain of Ponds) meant NEAR THE MOONEE PONDS CREEK, not the suburb.
Woodlands, and Stewarton (Gladstone Park) were also described as being at Moonee Ponds.)

William had died in 1860. His wife's name was Christian!

Excerpt from my EARLY LANDOWNERS:PARISH OF TULLAMARINE.(SEE COMMENTS-WON'T SUBMIT.)




CORRECT TEXT.


PASCOE VILLA
Sale bv Auction. ;PRELIMINARY NOTICE. To Farmers and Country Families, Residing at Pascoevale, Essendon, Flemington, Deep Creek Road, Deep Creek, Broadmeadows, &c.
From the Celebrated House of Crossleys, Finsbury Pavement, London.
PASCOE-VILLA, PASCOEVALE, About Three Miles Northward of Flemington.
Magnificent Drawingroom, Diningroom, Bedroom, and Other Beautiful Articles of Household Furniture, Pianoforte, Paintings, Engravings. Plate, Plateware, Handsome Buggy and Mare, Harness,Ploughs. Harrows, Draught horses, Dray, Water cart, Milch Cows, Dairy Utensils, Stacks of New mown hay, &c.
STUBBS, OXTOBY, and Co. have been instructed by W. Smith, Esq., to hold a sale of the whole of the above valuable property, catalogues of which, with the day of sale, will appear in a few days.
House and Premises to Let.

As the information about William Smith (earlier leasing part of "Glenroy", probably from Donald Kennedy), and his land either side of the Pascoe Vale Rd bridge, would not submit here or in comments, I put it into a new journal called WILLIAM SMITH OF GLENROY AND BOTH SIDES OF THE PASCOE VALE BRIDGE,which fortunately did submit. There is also a reference to CUMBERLAND and SPRING FARM regarding a lawyer involved in William Smith's trial.

Because so much information about WILLIAM SMITH (the 1847 trial, which affected the reputation of the hotel,the 1850 advertisement seeking to restore it and attract customers,who may have started taking the new (present) Sydney Road when the (Pascoe Vale) road bridge was swept away (pointing out that a new bridge was only about a week from completion and the Old Sydney road was linked with the new one near Somerton Inn), is in the WILLIAM SMITH journal, any findings regarding whether Pascoe Villa was the ORIGINAL Young Queen will be reported in that journal.


ARUNDEL, EDWARD WILSON'S "MODEL" FARM.
FOR SALE, the following STOCK, bred by Mr.Edward Wilson, at his Experimental Farms, at Keilor and Riddell's Creek :
1 entire Spanish ass, three years old, over 13 hands
1 do Egyptian ass, thrco years old, 13 hands
1 do French ass, two years old, 13 hands
2 puie-bred Alderney bull calves, two months old
12 pure-bred southdown rams, two and four tooth, bred from stock purchased from tho late Jonas Webb of England
Danubian and Toulouse geese, (ice?).
Silver grey or Chinchilla rabbits.
For particulars apply to
Mr. ANDERSON*, overseer, Arundel, Keilor.

*James Anderson who later farmed James Wilson's Spring Farm after managing Arundel for Wilson is discussed in my journal 1888 GEOGRAPHY WITH THE MELBOURNE HUNT.


EDWARD WILSON.
Information about Edward Wilson and his model farm can be found in my journal about him. He was an editor/co-owner of The Argus and Tullamarine pioneer. He left money in a Trust* which supported Cr Jack's establishment of a motor ambulance service on the Mornington Peninsula.

*EXTRACTS FROM WILSON'S BIOGRAPHY IN AUSTRALIAN DICTIONARY OF BIOGRAPHY.In the late 1850s Wilson travelled widely among the Australasian colonies. His travel-jottings were published as Rambles at the Antipodes (Melbourne, 1859). His sight was now beginning to fail and in 1859-60 he visited England for advice, travelled on the Continent and served on the committee of the General Association for the Australian Colonies. In 1862 he again went to England; on the homeward voyage his sight deteriorated so badly that he returned immediately, and late in 1864 he had an operation for cataract; he regained good vision in one eye, but decided to remain in England close to the best medical aid. He lived at Addiscombe near Croydon, but in 1867 bought Hayes Place, Kent, the eighteenth-century home of the Pitts. Surrounded by nephews and nieces, he dispensed endless hospitality aided by a small army of servants; the amenities included a small zoo which contained emus, kangaroos and monkeys. Colonial visitors were always welcome; he was on close terms with the Darwins, Archbishop Tait, Edward Lear and Hugh Childers; children adored him.


After several heart attacks, Wilson died peacefully on 10 January 1878. His remains were taken to Melbourne and interred on 7 July according to the rites of the Church of England. He was unmarried. In his will he made twenty-six legacies of ?100 a year to old female friends in the colonies, but the bulk of his estate was used to form the Edward Wilson Trust which since his death has distributed several million dollars to Victorian charities, especially hospitals. A bust by Thomas Woolner is in the State Library of Victoria.)


DISTRICT LICENSING BENCH.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 21 April 1852 p 4 Article
... William Boucher, Gold Diggers Retreat, Deep Creek: Edward Wilson, the Lincolnshire Arms, from Mr Wright.

The above entry from Trove is puzzling in two ways. Was the Argus Editor juggling two jobs? Why would the pub be described as being at Deep Creek,when Tulip Wright had leased his Deep Creek or Bridge Inn (where Bulla's mail was left until 1851-see PETER YOUNG in my journal JOHN THOMAS SMITH AND HIS ELECTORS) to Donohue and built the Linc on its present site, corner of Keilor and Lincoln Rd at "Essendon Crossroads"? (BULLA BULLA, I.W.Symonds, P.8, THE ANNALS OF ESSENDON, R.W.Chalmers.)

The answer to the first question is that Wilson probably needed the second job to pay off loans; see the extract (in italics) from the editor's biography. There is no proof found yet that the editor was the short term publican; the publican may have been one of the editor's nephews. Later that year Johnston* persuaded him to buy the Argus from William Kerr for ?300; Wilson had to borrow money and Johnston became joint-proprietor in 1849. The issue of 15 September 1848 was Wilson's first; from 18 June 1849 the paper became a daily. Circulation declined to about 250, but by the close of 1850 equalled the combined circulation of rivals and by late 1851 had risen to 1500. Wilson successfully met the challenge of the gold rushes. The Argus absorbed the Melbourne Daily News from 1 January 1852 and only the Herald and the Geelong Advertiser survived as competitors for the goldfield market. He brought out forty compositors from England and in mid-1852 doubled the paper's size and reduced its price from 3d. to 2d. Circulation rose from 5000 in May 1852 to almost 20,000 late in 1853, advertisements snowballed and the number of employees grew to about 140. But costs were outrageous and Wilson was almost ruined.
(*Politician and founder of the Craiglee vineyard at Sunbury.)

Deep Creek Road, or THE GREAT ROAD TO THE DIGGINGS might have been a better way of describing the location of the Linc. The term Essendon Crossroads seemed to be mainly used by the Oaklands Hunt after 1888. The popular route was through Deep Creek (Bulla) until Brees' bridge was built as part of the construction of the road to Mount Alexander (Castlemaine) in 1854. Edward Wilson must have heard a whisper about this huge project, to take a chance on running this hotel. I'm not sure whether he had bought Arundel by 1852 but the facts will emerge when I discuss the ownership of Arundel (courtesy of K.B.Keeley's architectural thesis circa 1960 and 1989 owner (Tony?) Cockram.)

My purpose here is to discuss Arundel, granted to Bunbury (possibly acting as a dummy for the next owner who called it Glengyle), Bunbury's right arm, Bertram's Ford and Closer Settlement etc.
Arundel was section 1 of the parish of Tullamarine with a river frontage from just north of the bend in Melway 4 E9 to where Arundel Creek flows into the Maribryrnong at 14 J2 ACCORDING TO J.NOONE'S PARISH MAP OF THE PARISH DRAWN IN 1888. His map obviously satified his superiors, but 125 years later Mr Noone has been found out. If you extend Sharps Rd,the boundary between Tullamarine and Doutta Galla,east to the river,it meets the river at the point where its course changes from south to south east in the top half of 14 J.2,the line just touching the north end of the quarry in 14 K2. This is exactly where Noone had the southern boundary of the parish touching the river.

The creek is shown flowing in the right directions and crosses Grants Lane at exactly the right spot(bottom right corner of 4 G5)but it shows none of the creek's twists and turns, or the fork of the creek that crosses McNabs Rd and flows through Fawkner's lots 63,64, 65 and 66 before heading through the Mansfields' lots straddling Panton Rd (as shown on Melway.) Noone approximated the creek, drawing the general course but hitting the river at the wrong spot (with the creek, not the extension of Sharps Rd.)

I started my description of Arundel's boundaries again, gave some details about the grantee and Tony Cockram's information about the owners of Arundel/Arundel farm but it would not submit, so look in comments for that and much trove information including Donald McDonald's terrific article.(Donald grew up in Keilor.)

THE ARUNDEL CLOSER SETTLEMENT.

CLOSER SETTLEMENT
ARUNDEL ESTATE ACQUIRED.
As forecasted in "The Argus" yesterday,the Land Purchase and Management Board were(sic) successful in their negotiations with the agent for the purchase of 11,000 acres of land near Keilor, known as the Arundel Estate. This property in reality consists of three estates, the Overnewton, the Annandale and the Arundel Estate. The nearest part of the estate is only about 11 miles from Melbourne. The St. Albans, Sydenham and Deer Park railway stations adjoin it. (P.16, Argus, 27-5-1905.)
The article mentions excellent roads but fails to point out that the only access to Keilor for those on Arundel and the east part of Annandale was by means of Bertram's ford which was to take two lives not long after. The whole area was probably bought from the Estate of William Taylor who had obtained permission from the shire of Keilor to dam the creek that flows through Taylors Lakes. (I wonder if I can find that article!)

ACCESS TO ARUNDEL (FORDS AND BRIDGES.)
The road leading from Keilor to Arundel has had several names. By 1865, the Keilor council was calling it Bertram's road (P.4, Argus, 24-5-1865.) Bertram's ford seems to be first mentioned in 1866 (P.4, Argus, 30-1-1866.) The ramp leading to the ford from the Arundel side was still clearly visible circa 1989*.
BORRELL RD.
When the Calder freeway was built, a new link with the old highway and Green Gully was built. The south end of Arundel became a dead end and was named Borrell Rd.because emergency vehicles may have gone to the wrong side of the freeway,wasting precious time if both parts of the road had the same name. Jose Borrell, a Spaniard, came to Keilor after the 1916 flood and bought the Cahill's Gumm's Corner farm, after staying with relatives near Garden St, Essendon,by the Moonee Ponds Creek. As the farm had a gully running through it,he levelled the land with a horse and scoop, giving it the appearance of a gigantic dry dam, and it did become a dam during the 1974 flood. Jose switched to vegetable growing. He extended the Cahills' old house but only that original section,heritage-listed I presume, remains beside the bike track. Joe Borrell, his son, had retired by about 1990 when he provided me with the above information as well as letting me photocopy many of his photos*. Ironically Joe's new home behind the council offices was on the old market garden of another Spaniard,Jack Vert, indicated by Barcelona Ave and Vert St. Also in the Spanish Armarda (on wheels) was the Cuartero family.
(*These photocopies,very grainy, must be in the B volume of my DICTIONARY HISTORY OF TULLAMARINE AND MILES AROUND. If any members of the Borrell family have Joe's album(s),could they please contact the Keilor Historical Society so these priceless photos can be scanned, if this hasn't been already done.

(*PARDON THE INTERRUPTION.I'M GOING TO CONTACT THE BRIMBANK COUNCIL HERITAGE PLANNING OFFICER TO SEE IF THE FORD IS IN THEIR HERITAGE STUDY. Email sent 26 minutes after midnight. Reply received 9:04 a.m.
9:04 AM (6 hours ago) Good Morning Mr xxx
Thank you for taking the time to contact Brimbank City Council.
I have forwarded your request on to the Coordinator Strategic Planning and you will be responded to promptly.)

CLOSER SETTLEMENT.
---------------------#------------------------------
ARUNDEL ESTATE.
MINISTERIAL INSPECTION.
The construction of a bridge over the Saltwater River, which was to provide communication between the Arundel Estate and the township of Keilor, was in progress when the floods of last September came and washed away a considerable portion of the structure.After experiencing considerable difficulty,the Keilor Shire Council let
another contract, and this has now been satisfactorily settled to tin pr?-il i.uiiu etc.
(P.18, Argus,14-7-1907.)

BERTRAM'S FORD SERVED FOR ANOTHER YEAR, AND MISS ROWE'S NEWS BROUGHT MANY A TEAR.

DEATH AT BERTRAM'S FORD.(Yours Truly, 1989.)
They were leading a horse that they'd sold to McRae
Who lived near St Albans, over Keilor way;
Will Mansfield was driving, his son sitting near;
Stephen Hill,leading the horse, sat in the rear.

Will Mansfield and Stephen were mates at the school,
Spent their free time together as a general rule,
So Will's dad let him come on the trip o'er the river;
But his wife wasn't happy and spoke with a quiver.

With a look at the sky and the storm clouds that loomed
She pleaded, "Bill, don't go now or you'll all be doomed!"
But he reassured her as they clambered on board,
"I've been through deeper water than you get at Bertram's Ford."

Halfway there the sun vanished- came a curious silence-
Then the sky opened up with murderous violence;
The clouds, basalt black,turned day into night
As the three reached Arundel and turned to the right.

"Young Hilly, don't wind that rein round your arm;"
His friend's father said, "'twill bring you to harm!"
Then they ceased their descent, to the right they curved;
The roar of river the horses un-nerved.

But Bill urged them on and into the current;
Soon a horse lost its footing, so swift was the torrent
And the jinker was swept like a leaf in a gale;
Mansfield grabbed for his son who had started to wail.

By lightning above, the ghoulish scene shown,
The three from the overturned jinker were thrown.
Sounds of whinnies and screaming and, "Where are you son?"
And the Grim Reaper's harvest had already begun.

While the Mansfield lad to the murky depths sank
The towed horse's reins dragged his mate to the bank.
The father, now desperate, with a weakening yelp
Gasped, "Stevie, please Stevie, go and get help!"

At first, due to shock, comprehension he lacked
But his friend's father's plea soon made him react;
He mounted and thundered away up the slope,
And Bill dived again; he'd ne'er give up hope.

With the last of his strength, Mansfield surfaced again:
That would have been it- for lesser men.
But for Bill Mansfield, that would not suffice;
His son was worth any sacrifice.

By the time that help came it was far too late;
The son and the father had shared the same fate.
Miss Rowe and her pupils on the morrow
Would share the grieving widow's sorrow.


With William Mansfield and his son,William, was Steven Hill of "Danby Farm" (Melway 5 B3 approximately) and I believe these Mansfields were on the triangular 80 acres of section 15, Tullamarine (the Payne pig farm called "Scone" when acquired for the jetport c 1960)now occupied by the airport terminal buildings and north of Melrose Dr/Grants Lane. This land was owned by John Mansfield (memorial 106 595.)
The building of the Arundel bridge in 1906, to improve access to grantees on the Arundel Closer Settlement had started but, partly built, it was swept away by a torrent, ruining the contractor. A new contractor was found and the bridge was built not long after the Mansfield drowning. Stephen Hill escaped because he disobeyed instructions but if my memory serves me correctly, he was killed in world war 1. The McRaes* were involved in the formation of the Oaklands Hunt while on Glenara and were related by marriage to the Mansfields. (*As I pointed out to Brimbank Council in my email re Bertram's ford, McCrae Boulevard at Green Gully (which I had a hand in naming)has the wrong spelling;not my fault.)

The story behind the poem was told to me in 1988-9 by Wally Mansfield, Colin Williams and Gordon Connor, all independently of each other. Somehow, I gained the impression that the father, William John Mansfield was known as John but I have changed his name in the poem to Bill, just in case that wasn't the case. He was the only surviving son of John Mansfield who owned the airport terminal area.

Miss Rowe, the teacher at S.S.2163 (on the north corner of the present Melrose Dr and Link Rd)married Frank Wright who had Strathconnan, if I remember correctly, and was followed by Mr Rogers who (possibly) was the teacher when all the pupils disappeared to the Bone Mill at the end of Wright St one lunchtime and certainly was in 1908 when Colin Williams' head was split open in a playground accident. In 1909, Alec Rasmussen arrived, Saint Alec as I call him.

There are two things in the poem that I am not going to change at the moment. The newspaper article mentioned below states that the lad leading the horse was Phillip Hill but I'm not sure that Phillip wasn't his father. If his name was Phillip, why was S.Hill a pallbearer for the son's coffin? Call the second thing poetic licence if you like. When I was writing the poem, I had The Ballad of The Drover (Fifth Book, i.e. Grade 5 Reader)in mind. The article said that there was no particular flood at the time but I love the bit about the inky black sky turning day into night etc.
N.B.The biggest floods in the Maribyrnong Valley occurred in 1906,1916 (after which the Borrells moved into Gumm's Corner) and 1974 (when the Borrells had to salvage their crop in a rowboat as in the photo.)

FATHER AND SON DROWNED.
A Victorian Tragedy. Melbourne, Monday.
William Mansfield, a farmer, of Keilor with his son, William, aged 7, and a lad named Phillip Hill, were
driving over a deep creek to-day when the vehicle was swept away by the floodwaters. Mansfield and his son
were both drowned, but the boy Hill managed to reach the bank. (P.1,Barrier Miner,16-10-1906.)

N.B. The tragedy was reported far and wide, probably received by editors in the form of a telegram. Kyneton's paper stated that Hill was rescued when an onlooker threw a rope to him. The paper at Parramatta got it right.

"Hill was seated in the back of tho buggy, leading a horse. When the buggy overturned the led horse swam steadily to shore, dragging after him Hill, who had clung to the rope."



CLOSER SETTLEMENT
ARUNDEL ESTATE.
Application for the 22 blocks on the Arundel Estate offered by the Lands Purchase and Management Board for closer settlement have closed. Every block has been applied for, and the special land board, on December 6, will have to decide between the claims of several persons in some cases, and in one case there are no fewer than eight applications. (P.4, Argus, 23-11-1905.)

CLOSER SETTLEMENT. ARUNDEL ESTATE. ALL THE BLOCKS SELECTED
As a result of the special land board, held at the Lands office yesterday, the whole of the Arundel and Annandale portions of the Overnewton Estate were allotted to settlers under the provisions of the Closer
Settlement Act, and not one half of the applicants for the blocks could be supplied. The land offered is about 1100 acres situated on the "?Itu itir Huei ibiint .i mili' from Kulan'. etc.(P.5, Argus, 7-12-1905.)
The article, legible on the actual page, lists the successful applicants. I know for a fact that some of them were not granted, and probably not assessed on, their blocks. Alf Cock, my great Uncle, was not allocated lot 10 ("Glenview")but received the grant (in 1913 if I remember.) Alf's brother, Fred (my maternal grand father) had probably moved to Bunyip by this time, and Alf had probably met the Woods family of Longwarry (the next town)during a visit. Woods may have been Wood or visa versa. (IT WAS!)

Jean, younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Cock, of Glenview, Tullamarine,to Kenneth C., son of the late Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Wood, of Minyip.(P.5, Argus, 7-6-1938.)

COUNTRY.Vlit,.r? V I Lil Min ami I report having sold,on behalf of Mr.G.E.Woods, his farm at Overnewton, Tullamarine, containing 114 acres,to Mr Alfred Cock, of Broadmeadows.(P.5, Argus, 17-10-1912.)

My hunch was right: Woods was Wood!
OBITUARY
Mrs. Charlotte Wood. The death occurred of Mrs. Charlotte Wood, of 'Inverness,' Barellan,at Heidelberg House, Melbourne, on Saturday, December 30.She was born at Birchip, Victoria, 64 years ago, and was a daughter of
the late Hugo Campbell, of Birchip. In 1 9M clip mnrrierf Mi* A .T.Wood and the young- couple lived in
Kupanyup and Melbourne for a few years before moving to Stawell to reside in 1905, where Mr. Wood was
manager of the Wimmera flour mill. During their 21 yeses' residence in that town, Mr. and Mrs. Wood both
played an active part. in the public life of the town. Mr. Wood was on the Borough Council for many yeare
and Mayor for several terms. He was also actively associated with the Stave}) Athletic Club in the running
of the famous Stawell Gift.In 1926 Mre. Wood came to Barellan with her husband, who had purchased the property known as 'Inverness,' at North Moombooldooi. Mrs. Wood was an active supporter of the C.W.A. Association Tfor some years, until ill-health compelled her to relinquish hei activities. Mr. Wood returned to Stawell in 1934 to take over the management of the Wimmera flour mill, at the request of the owners, but in August, 1934, he
died in the Stawell Hospital after a short illness. Mrs. Wood continued to reside on 'Inverness,' until increasing ill-health recently compelled ' her to seek medical attention in Melbourne.Her funeral took place on Tuesday,2nd January, at the Pleasant Creek cemetery Stawell, where the remains were laid to rest beside her husband. (Pardon,non correction of text.)

Sons and daughters of deceased are Messrs. A. Wood (Narandera), G.Wood (Longwarry, Victoria), and
Mesdames A. McCarron (Canowindra),G.Pomroy (Melbourne), A. Warrener (Sydney) and E. Abbott (Barellan.)
Surviving sisters are Mrs. A. Fletcher (Birchip) and Miss S. Campbell(Melbourne).
(P.2, Narandera Argus and Riverina Advertiser, 16-1-1945.)(Pardon,non correction of text.)
Was the move of the Gibb family to Bunyip influenced by the Wood family?

CLOSER SETTLEMENT PIONEERS (TULLAMARINE).
Google TULLAMARINE, COUNTY OF BOURKE to obtain maps showing that portion of the Arundel Closer Settlement.
The first two maps show Arundel and section 2 (Annandale) in their entirety but the third:
digital.slv.vic.gov.au/dtl_publish/simpleimages/30/1258115.html‎ shows the closer settlement blocks. Be warned that not all blocks name the original owners. Also,lots 7 and 8 are shown as one block,Butcher Thomas's "Tullamar" (1943 rates.)

A vital link in my becoming a local historian was Gordon Henwood, who handled the cleaning at Gladstone Park Primary School while I was teaching there. I was his mate, as with Paul Agar at Strathmore North, because I always made sure that my classroom* was clean and the furniture arranged to allow good access for the broom or vacuum, and that I was there late because my free time earlier had been used to take lunchtime gym, soccer practice (2nd in V.P.S.S.A. championship one year) and basketball (one boy set a record of 300 not out at one-bounce lay ups-staggering), recorder group and teaching C.P.R. to every child from Grade 2 up during my time release.

If I remember correctly, Gordon's mother was John Duncan McFarlane's daughter and Gordon had grown up on lot 12 (or perhaps lot 17 at the other end of Browns Rd.) I showed him the Tullamarine/Will Will Rook map (now at the Hume Global Learning Centre) that was produced by Broadmeadows Shire to sort out Stanley Korman's holdings, and given to me by the Broady rates officer (to keep me occupied while I could not access the Strongroom during the 1988 elections.)I pointed to A.Cock on the map and told Gordon that I'd found nothing about him at the Tullamarine Library, and since the Tullamarine history there consisted of one and a half foolscap pages, I had resolved to write a history. "You should speak to John Fenton;" he said, "he lives there."

John denied that he was a pioneer and wrote a list of contacts, which rapidly snowballed. And that's how my head became, very rapidly, crammed with history.


Extract from TULLAMARINE:BEFORE THE JETPORT.(1998) with some additions.
*=Not part of the closer settlement.
ANNANDALE AND ARUNDEL RDS (to MCNabs Rd.)
LEFT.Nash (Tom,then Arthur) 188+ 165 acres*, Glenview (Alf Cock, John Fenton's Dunnawalla)139 acres-part of Leslie Banks- + 115 acres, O'Donnell and then Frewen's lot 11, 32 acres,Arundel Farm (details given above.)

RIGHT. Bill Parr's Annandale, 165 acres*,Geraghty's Paddock ( Fox's FARM NAME???)121 acres, Closer settlement lots 7 and 8 (MaherA.Williamson on 8?)200 acres, Lot 6 (later, maybe still in 2013, Frewen), Elm Grove (Wallace) 71 acres, Arundel Farm creek frontage,lots 3 and 4, 113 acres.

McNABS RD.
WEST. Turner's (William Turner in 1861,McNab) 124 acres, Two Fox blocks, 128 acres -end of Closer Settlement.



ARUNDEL ESTATE. CLOSER SETTLEMENT HOLDING. Estate of EUPHEMIA BARR. Deceased.
Tenders are hereby invited by John Milburn and James Wallace, as Trustees for the purchase of Allotment 16,
Section One, Parish of Tullamarine, County of Bourke, containing 7 acres and 28 perches or thereabouts, on
which is erected a double-fronted four roomed weatherboard house, with front and back verandahs and outbuildings,consisting of dairy, man's room, buggy shed, stable (one-stalled) and fowl house. Amongst the improvements are an underground tank and a galvanised iron tank (300 gallons) connected with kitchen.
The property formed part of the Arundel Estate, and is situated one mile from the Keilor township, and
fronts the Saltwater River. Closer Settlement requirements etc.
(P.3, Essendon Gazette and Keilor,Bulla and Broadmesadows Reporter,.)

Robert Brown,member of a very old Keilor family*,took over the crown lease of lot 16, at the end of Brown's Rd, and gained his grant in 1928. John Milburn, was not a Closer Settlement resident. He lived directly over the river near Milburn Rd.The Wallaces are longtime residents of the closer settlement and Don** of Elm Grove was heavily involved with the market gardeners' state body. **FIND ARTICLE.
*FIND ARTICLE ABOUT THIS.




ABERFELDIE, BIG CLARKE
PRIME FAT STOCK-DALMAHOY CAMPBELL and Co will have for SALE, at the Market yards, Flemington, on Wednesday, December 4, (selections only!)
........
SOO do do, for Mr W J T Clarke--SEE COMMENT OF 27-10-2013.

14 comment(s), latest 3 years, 4 months ago

FIERY END FOR THE OLD NORTH POLE INN, WEST CORNER OF KEILOR AND NORTH POLE ROADS, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA. (& JAMES LAVERTY.)

THERE GOES ANOTHER THEORY!
I thought Michael Fox might have died in the old North Pole Hotel. I was told his residence was on the corner of Milleara Rd. and I am annoyed at myself for not having asked which corner.However he died in 1918 and the old hotel had been destroyed by fire in 1891.(See end of journal.)

FOX.— The Friends of the late Mr. MICHAEL FOX are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of internment, in the Keilor Cemetery. The funeral is appointed to move from his residence. North Pole-road Keilor, THIS DAY(Thursday), 5th inst., at 2.30 p.m.(P.10, The Age,5-9-1918.)



LIST OF CLAIMANTS.
The following persons claim to have their names inserted in the Electoral List for
the Electoral District of the County of Bourke, in the Police District of Bourke. ......
Laverty, James, freehold, Steel's Ponds, Parish Doutta Galla.
(LIST OF CLAIMANTS.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 1 May 1849 p 4)

FIFTY POUNDS Reward.-The above reward will
be given to any person or persons, who
will give such information as will lead to the con-
viction of the party or parties, who, on the 7th
inst, stabbed James Laverty's horses, of the North
Pole, Keilor Road. JAMES LAVERTY, North
Pole, near Keilor. (P.8, Argus, 11-12-1854.)

TO Let Sixty Acres of Land, at Springfield. For
further particulars apply to James Laverty,
North Pole, near Keilor.(P.7, Argus, 10-2-1855.)

TO LET, a furnished PUBLICHOUSE, near
Keilor. Apply James Laverty, North Pole.(P.8, Argus, 7-9-1858.)

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1.
Important Sale of Green Crops and Farm.
JAMBS WATSON is instructed by Mr.
James Laverty to SELL by AUCTION, on the
ground, on Tuesday, November 1, at one o'clock,
50 acres growing crop (oats), at the North Pole,
beyond Flemington, 30 do, at Steel's Ponds, do.
After which,the farm, consisting of 50 acres of rich-
land, at steel's Ponds,Will be Sold Without Reserve.
(P.2, Argus, 26-10-1859.)

THURSDAY 10th MARCH.
To Speculators, Persons Seeking Investments, Etc.
Valuable Freehold Property, Situated on the Mount
Alexander Road, and Known as the
NORTH POLE HOTEL.
☞For Positive Unreserved Sale.
SYMONS and PERRY will sell by auction at
their rooms, Collins street, on Thursday 10th March,
12 o'clock,
A very valuable property, situated about eight miles
from Melbourne, on the main Melbourne and Mount Alexander Road,
And at the junction of the Geelong road, known as
the NORTH POLE HOTEL.
Containing eleven rooms, with good bar, kitchen, wash-
house, storeroom, stabling for nine horses, hay-shed gig
house, etc, also n large water tank 12 ft. x 12 ft., with a
constant supply of water at all seasons.
Together with
10 acres of land of the best quality, and in n good and
improving locality. The house is at present under lease
for a short time to a highly respectable tenant*, at a mo-
derate rent, and is now doing a first rate business, which
could easily be increased.
Terms liberal, at sale.
The House will, for the convenience of purchasers, be
sold either with the 10 acres, or with 1 acre, as may be
desired.
Title first rate, and will be guaranteed.
For further information application to be made at the
rooms of the Auctioneers.
For positive and unreserved sale. (P.3, Mount Alexander Mail, 9-3-1859.)

There was another advertisement which described the property as the NOBLE ESTATE OF SPRINGVALE, named neighbouring landowners such as Patrick Phelan and called North Pole road the Essendon road. It was found with a SPRINGVALE, KEILOR search.James Laverty was NOT the grantee of crown allotment 18C, Doutta Galla but had bought the undivided grant from (Joseph Hall? CHECK.)

From page 94 of my EARLY LANDOWNERS: PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA.
I originally thought that the North Pole Inn was on the corner of Hoffman’s Rd because of the attached farm being described as 183 acres and the neighbours (Phelan, Hoffman) mentioned in an advertisement of 1859. It was described as being at the corner of the Essendon Rd and I took this to be Hoffmans Rd. Hoffman’s farm was immediately east and Phelan’s only 800 metres west. But two things worried me. Firstly, the frontage to both the Keilor and Essendon Rds was stated to be about 3000 feet while 17D has an eastern boundary of only about 700 feet. Secondly, why would North Pole Farm (18D) be 1½ miles west of North Pole Road?

From c/a 18D titles information on a later page.
Keilor’s 1868 rates show that John Corcoran had 183 acres. The extra 2 acres resulted from a mistake perpetuated since at least 1859, when 18D and the North Pole Inn was advertised for sale. It was probably Corcoran who renamed Spring Vale as North Pole Farm.
On 6-6-1850, Joseph Hall sold 18 D to James Laverty for the remarkably low price of L198/16/6 (M 845). About four years later Springfield, only 5/6 the size of 18D, sold for 7000 pounds (15 593). Why?
The gold rush had started. Also Brees Bridge, built in 1854, made the Keilor route more popular than the Bulla one for diggers bound for Mt Macedon, and attracted those headed to Ballarat who would previously have used Raleigh’s Punt (Maribyrnong). The bridge allowed Cobb and J.M.Peck’s newly established coachline a secure crossing and farms along this road had a ready market for their hay and other produce. For example, David Milburn, Victoria’s first irrigator of Grange Farm west of the river, was called Basket Davie by the diggers.
Hall was not to know what the future would hold and he probably needed cash after buying Purnell’s grant (22B) at Tullamarine for 200 pounds on 5-3-1849 (6 112). With the addition of 22D, granted on 17-7-1866, this became South Wait.
Laverty mortgaged 18D to Hall (M 846 and M847) and on 9-8-1852, 18D as well as lot 6 of section 12 were reconveyed from Hall to Laverty for L152 plus L50 (Q 632).

Measuring the appropriate boundaries of 18 D, I found that they were about 2640 feet each, close enough to the stated frontages. Then I recalled that John Corcoran’s farm had been wrongly described as 183 acres (instead of 180 acres 3 roods) in the 1868 ratebook.
Apart from the name, acreage and frontage was there any other connection between the inn and farm? Yes. James Laverty bought 18D from the grantee in 1850, and when he failed to sell the inn and noble (but heavily mortgaged) estate of Spring Vale in 1859, John Laverty and Robert Linay took over the hotel in 1860. John was charged with abandoning the hotel on 4-3-1863. James Laverty had mortgaged the farm (and lot D of section 12) several times and about this time John Catto gained ownership. He sold it to Corcoran on 6-12-1864.
Although title memorials concerning 18D made no mention of the inn, the above pieces of evidence, and the one following, make it almost certain that the North Pole Inn was at the western corner of Keilor and Milleara Rds.


TUESDAY, JULY 5.
For Absolute Sale.
The North Pole Publichouse,
Producing £150 per Annum, with the Noble Estate of
Spring Vale along with it.
Keilor-road.
MR. STUBBS is instructed to call the atten-
tion of moneyed men, farmers, and others to
the absolute SALE of the above property, at Bear's
Auction and Exchange Rooms, 66 Queen-street, Mel-
bourne, on Tuesday, July 5, at twelve o'clock
precisely.
N.B.-Of any property ever offered about the
neighborhood of Essendon, for the Keilor-road, per-
haps there never was any over yet presented such a
prospect of realising a fortune, sooner or later, than
the one now advertised for public competition. Capi-
tal can never be better laid out than in what is
already returnable in good rental like this, indepen-
dent of the village pabilities of the property for
future subdivision and profit.
It is situate at the corner of the Keilor and Essendon
roads, having about 3,000 feet frontage to the
former, and about the same to the latter, more or less.
The whole well enclosed, and comprising 183 acres, in
two separate paddocks.
The soil rich, the country undulating, the scenery
magnificent, the approach by great Keilor-road.
Nearest neighbors-P. Phelan, Esq., M.L.A.
Hoffman, Esq., and other gentlemen.
Terms liberal.
Title, Grant from the Crown.(P.2, Argus, 1-7-1859.)

*Probably Robert Linay.
THE friends of Mr. ROBERT LINAY, of the
North Pole Hotel, Keilor-road, are respectfully
invited to follow the remains of his daughter Janet
Jane to the place of interment, Melbourne Cemetery.
The funeral will leave his residence at 12 o'clock noon
this day (Wednesday), March 7. (P.8, Argus, 7-8-1860.)


The description of "Springvale" as consisting of 183 acres, is a problem because 18D on the west corner of North Pole (Milleara) Road, consisting of 180 acres 3 roods, was granted to Joseph Hall and 18C on the east corner of North Pole Road, granted to D.T.Kilburn, consisted of 163 acres 3 roods and 183 could have been an incorrect rendering of either. Either allotment would have had a frontage to the (Essendon or Geelong) road of 42 chains, south to a point indicated by the Clarks Rd. corner. The frontage to the Essendon road given is ABOUT 3000 feet which is 1000 yards and 45.45 chains so the frontage to North Pole Rd was actually 42 x 22 x3, 924 yards or 2772 feet.

To work out whether "Springvale" was on the east or west corner of North Pole Road we need to take into account the Doutta Galla map, [Parish maps of Victoria]. Doutta Galla, County of Bourke [cartographic ...
digital.slv.vic.gov.au/dtl_publish/compleximages/46/2442850.html ;
titles information; understanding of the farms on the north side of Keilor Rd, and reference to the farms described as being almost and exactly opposite the North Pole Hotel.

Titles information (above) shows that James Laverty definitely purchased c/a 18D on the west corner of North Pole Road and lost it to John Catto at about the time that James Laverty moved to New Zealand.

There is no mention of James Laverty regarding ownership of c/a 18C on the east side of North Pole Road.

TITLE INFORMATION CONCERNING 18C.
On 6-11-1852, D.T.Kilburn conveyed his grant to John Pinney Bear for L2968/11/7 (Y 149).
Bear leased most of 18C to John Wilson on 31-7-1855 at a rent of 500 pounds p.a. Bear had, or was intending to, sell blocks on the Keilor Rd frontage. The northern boundary of the leased land followed “various inclinations” (probably parallel with Keilor Rd and its bends) between the electric B.B.Q. and a point just north of the Woorite Pl. roundabout (29 794). Bear mortgaged 18C and land near Lancefield to Taylor, Fisken and Davis on 30-3-1871 (209 349).
On 15-5-1888 Bear contracted to sell 18C and 18D to G.W.Taylor for 34 350 pounds (347 14).
No doubt Taylor paid partly with credit notes but Bear would have pocketed some cash as well as regaining ownership when the bust ruined Taylor. Michael Fox probably bought 18 C and North Pole Farm soon afterwards (See 18D).


FARMS ON THE NORTH SIDE OF KEILOR ROAD were, from Treadwell St:
to the Grange Rd/Bowes Ave midline, "Niddrie" (17B);
to the line of Olive Grove, Patrick Phelan's "Spring Park" (17A);
to the Roberts Rd corner, James Kavanagh's "Springfield" (18B)bought by William Connor for his sister in 1863.
and to Collinson St, 18A, subdivided into small farms in the mid 1850's.

William Connor's sister was Patrick Phelan's wife, Ellen. When Patrick was tossed off Spring Park, he and Ellen moved onto "Springfield" and of course it was described as Phelans, when the 25 acres exactly opposite the North Pole Hotel and almost adjoining Phelans was advertised for sale by mortgagees. The 25 acre farm probably fronted the west side of Terror St in c/a 18A which is due north of 18D. This description had me believing it was part of "Springfield" (18B): "A very compact little farm, comprising about 25 acres of the best portion of the well-known Springfield Estate." A bit of background. In the 1840's the area just east of Keilor was called Springs but as Tullamarine was also called Springs, confusion resulted, so the Keilor road area was renamed (after Owen Connor's grant) as Springfield. Estate implied a subdivision and the locality was Springfield.

The farm, almost opposite the North Pole Inn, said to be "portion of A, Section 18, Doutta Galla, and comprising
about 152 ACRES 2 ROODS" was bigger than the whole of 18A, which consisted only of 132 acres 3 roods 20 perches.
"Springfield" (18B)consisted of 151 acres 0 roods 20 perches and was almost certainly the farm being described.


James Laverty, late publican, Keilor-road.
Causes of insolvency—Depression in business and
pressure of creditors. Debts, L2,364 11s; assets,
L12,610; surplus, L245 9s. . E. Courtney, Official Assignee.
(P.2, Geelong Advertiser, 29-2-1860.)

THIS DAY.
Sale of
Household Furniture and Farming Stock.
At the
North Pole Hotel, Near Keilor.
ROW, KIRK, and Co. have received instructions
from Mr. James Laverty, who is leaving for
New Zealand, to SELL by AUCTION, at the North
Pole Hotel, on Saturday, 14th lnst.,
6 saddle and harness horses
6 bullocks, dray, and tackle
4 cows, in full milk
4 springers
Ploughs, harrows, drays, &c.
Also
A quantity of household furniture
Pigs and poultry.
Sale at one o'clock.(P.3, Argus, 14-2-1863.)

LOCATION, LOCATION!!!!!
MONDAY, APRIL 20.
Springfield, on the Keilor-road, about a mile and a
half beyond Harper's Essendon Hotel.
Positive Sale of a snug little Farm, of about 25 Acres,
with Homestead.
To Farmers, Carriers, Storekeepers, Restaurant-
keepers, and Small Capitalists.
By Order of the Mortgagee.
G. WALSTAB has received instructions to
SELL at AUCTION, in his rooms, 85 Collins-
street west, on Monday, April 20, at one o'clock in the
afternoon,
A very compact little farm, comprising about 25
acres of the best portion of the well-known
Springfield Estate, situated about 7½ miles from
Melbourne, on the main road to Castlemaine, to
which road It has a valuable frontage of 11
chains, exactly opposite to the North Pole Inn,
and nearly adjoining Mr. Phelan's property.

The land is of excellent quality, the greater portion
being of a rich loamy soil, all cleared, ready for the
plough, and surrounded by a capital post and three-
railed fence.
The homestead consists of a well-built weather-
boarded cottage, about 60 feet in length, with veran-
dah along the entire front. There is also a store
facing the main-road, detached stabling for six horses,
and a barn.ETC. (P.2, Argus, 27-4-1861.)

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20.
At Twelve O'clock.
152 ACRES 2 ROODS, FARMHOUSE,
KEILOR.
C. J. and T. HAM have received instructions from
R. G. Johnson, Esq., as agent for the owner, to
SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, at their rooms, 45 Swan-
ston-street, on Thursday, 29th September, at twelve
o'clock,
All that fine block of land, being part of Portion
A, Section 18, Doutta Galla, and comprising
about 152 ACRES 2 ROODS,on the land being erected a
WEATHERBOARD BUILDING,containing 10 rooms, with
seven-stall stable,cartshed, piggeries, underground
tank, &c., in the occupation of Mr. J. Foley.
The land is subdivided in four paddocks, is under
cultivation, and is well situated, being almost oppo-
site the old North Pole Inn
.(P.3, Argus, 17-9-1881.)


FIRE AT NORTH ESSENDON.
A fire occurred on Saturday evening at 9.30
o'clock in a wooden tenement situated on the
Keilor-road, near Spring Hill. The building,
which was a large wooden structure, consisted of
10 rooms, and was formerly known as The North
Pole Hotel, and used as such in the olden days.
Owing to the inflammable nature of the struc-
ture it was completely demolished before even
the occupants had time to remove the furniture,
a piano and harmonium being the only articles
of value saved from destruction. The place was
occupied by Mr. J. Lobb and family, and at the
time of the outbreak some of the occupants
were asleep. No cause can be assigned for the
origin of the fire. The building is believed to be
uninsured, and the loss to the tenant is esti-
mated at £120, and to owner of the house about
twice that sum. The local fire brigades
turned out promptly, but arrived too late to
save any portion of the buildings.
(P.6, The Age, 7-9-1891.)

More information about James Laverty (associated with Connor and Phelan, Spirit merchants, the Harvest Home Hotel at Moonee Ponds and the 50 acre farm on Main's Estate on Rosehill Rd) is available if requested.

2 comment(s), latest 2 weeks, 2 days ago

FIVE DIFFERENT WILSON FAMILIES NEAR MORNINGTON AND ARTHURS SEAT, VIC., AUST.

THE FIVE DIFFERENT FAMILIESWERE:
1.A Wilson family in Mornington from which one parent of Charles Bowman Wilson came.
2. Descendants of BONNIE WILLIAM OF DUNDEE, one of which, a "Tuerong Station" Wilson, was a parent of Charles Bowman Wilson.
3.Descendants of Sarah Wilson as detailed in Petronella Wilson's GIVING DESTINY A HAND.
4.Descendants of butcher turned bullocky turned butcher,Henry William Wilson, and Thamer (nee Burdett, both of whom are buried in Dromana Cemetery) as documented in A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA and LIME LAND LEISURE.
5.Descendants of G.M.Wilson who fought in the Boer War, married Jane,the daughter of Charles Graves Snr,(pioneer on Jamieson's Special Survey, Shoreham storekeeper and owner of "Woodlands" in the parish of Flinders.)


Re 1. I don't document families in places with historical societies but Val Wilson might have details on her excellent Mornington Cemetery website. I can't recall whether this family provided Charlie's mother or father.

Re 2. From Val Wilson's website.
John Bowman Wilson
www.morningtoncemetery.com/.../Wilson.../Wilson-John-Bowman.shtml


John Bowman Wilson,John Bowman Wilson, William Sorell Wilson (photos.)

John Bowman Wilson was born in Tasmania on the 10th of October, 1830, and arrived in Victoria in 1857 with his wife Agnes and family, to try his luck on the Castlemaine goldfields.

John was also accompanied by his brother William Sorell Wilson and his family, who were on their way to manage ‘Truganina’, a property in Derrimut, Victoria.

By 1863, the family had moved to the Mornington Peninsula where, in 1869, John and William purchased ‘Tuerong’. John certainly did not have much luck farming because he became insolvent in 1880 and sold ‘Tuerong’ back to his brother and his own son, Edwin.

The property is now largely subdivided into extensive vineyards, notably Red Hill Estate, Dromana Estate, Tuerong Estate and others. The freeway to Rosebud now passes through where the original property stood.

John Bowman died on the 13th of February, 1893, aged 62 and Agnes died a year later, aged 61. They are buried together in the Mornington cemetery.

With the exception of little Agnes Eliza Wilson, who is buried in the Castlemaine cemetery (died at age 2½ yrs), all of John Bowman and Agnes Eliza’s eleven children grew up and married and had their families, so that the Wilson family is today still well represented by the Victorian descendants of William Hartley Wilson and his wife Margaret (nee Bowman) - John and William's parents.

John’s ninth child, Chas, is also buried in Mornington Cemetery. John's grandson, Charles Bowman Wilson, who was born on 10 November 1903, became the Shire President of Mornington, and the C.B. Wilson Reserve on Wilsons Road in Mornington is named after him.

See much more in:
Stories 2 | Bonnie William - Bonnie William from Dundee
bonniewilliam.com/stories-2/
... Hastings farms of William Sorell Wilson & Family · Tuerong, Murder, Mystery, ... the Bonnie William clan to bring to our attention stories and documents about ...

Re 3. See my journals about Sarah (including how she led me to Henry Tuck),George Young and the Connells of Moorooduc as Petronella's book may not be borrowed. Names: LAURISSEN JOHNSON CHANGED TO JOHNSTONE, GOMM, CONNELL ETC.

Re 4. See sources quoted or google WILSON THAMER BURDETT GODFREY STENNIKEN to find a few of my journals about the family, and WILSON TOWNSEND MOUTH TO MOUTH for an extraordinary tale about the saving of a Wilson lad.

Re 5. Former councillor David Jarman started it all off when he suggested that I contact Peter Hemphill about the BACK TO RED HILL, adding that Peter was a "(grandson of Jerve Wilson) orchardist who served in the Boer war." Peter didn't know of any relationship to Sarah Wilson's descendants and Jean Rotherham told me to check with Bev Laurissen who was quite sure there wasn't one. I thought that Boer War records might give details about the soldier's parents but I couldn't find his service record.

That was when janilye came to the rescue.

And this is what I wrote to Peter.

Peter,
Your grandfather may not have been a descendant of Sarah Wilson, pioneer on Jamieson's Special Survey, but your grandmother was the daughter of Charles Graves, who with a partner named Brown-Lee (according to a heritage study) leased the whole survey in 1851 when Henry Dunn's lease expired.

Charles was a hawker who travelled to Melbourne to buy goods that he would sell all over the peninsula, including the Cairns family's "Little Scotland" on the north east corner of Browns and Boneo Rds. His partner in the hawking business was Mary McLear whose husband had been killed near the Plenty River at the end of 1849; she arrived on the survey shortly after Charles Graves. Young George McLear helped by taking a change of horse to Frankston when Charles was coming back from Melbourne and his brother Bill accompanied Charles on one amusing visit to Little Scotland.(Pages 99,.34-5 A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.)

Charles bought and fenced the property at Dromana which became the McLear family's "Maryfield" before becoming a storekeeper at Shoreham and a landholder in the parish of Flinders. As soon as I saw janilye's statement that your grandfather married Jane Graves, I knew who would be her father. Two death notices for Jane's brother prove that it was Charles Graves senior, the former hawker.

by janilye on 2015-01-25 16:18:36
Good heavens all this chasing your tails when you should have asked me!!
His name was Gervaise Maison Wilson and his service number was 508.
You'll find him on the Nominal Roll page 248.
All information is held at the Australian War Memorial which is now all online or a phone-call away.
Happy Australia Day.
by janilye on 2015-01-25 16:28:37
NAME: Gervaise Mason Wilson
BIRTH YEAR: abt 1880
AGE: 85
DEATH PLACE: Dromana, Victoria
FATHER'S NAME: Alfred
MOTHER'S NAME: Flora Hunt
REGISTRATION YEAR: 1965
REGISTRATION PLACE: Victoria
REGISTRATION NUMBER: 20045
SPOUSE: Christian Jane Graves married 1908

by janilye on 2015-01-25 16:50:32
I see he was listed in the electoral rolls as Gervase Mason, however on his enlistment into the 3rd. Contingent the spelling of his name was Gervaise Maison.
Private Wilson was invalided back to Australia om 2 May 1901
Off to War.

by itellya on 2015-01-25 17:46:46
Thanks janilye, you're a marvel!


GRAVES.- On the 19th September, 1929, at Corowa (N.S.W ), Charles, son of the late Charles and Jane Graves, brother of T.J. Graves, Mrs J Symonds (Flinders), and Mrs G M Wilson (Red Hill), formerly of Flinders and Mornington.
GRAVES.-On the 19th September at Barina, Corowa, Charles, beloved brother of Isabella (Mrs Symonds), Thomas, and Jane (Mrs Wilson), aged 58 years, late of Flinders, Victoria.
(P.1, Argus, 20-9-1929.)


Extract from my journal:
RED HILL NEAR DROMANA (VIC., AUST.) POST 1940 and proposed BACK TO RED HILL.
GRAVES' (c/a 15, section A,Flinders,s/w corner Punty Lane and Tucks Rd. Only 190 acres. Melway 255 J5, H6, fronting the north west side of Punty Lane with the western boundary being from the creek in the exact centre of G6 to a point almost opposite 425 Tucks Rd.In 1900, Charles Graves Snr and Jnr were assessed on 374 acres, Flinders. I cannot establish where the other 184 acres were. )

A little farther along the road toward the coast we come to "Woodlands," a property of nearly 400 acres, belonging to Mr Graves, a very old resident of the district. Besides having a large orchard and garden, the
owner of "Woodlands" goes in largely for poultry farming. Mr Graves also conducts one of the oldest storekeeping businesses in the southern part of the Mornington Peninsula. The property is in good order and crops of any sort should grow well in the rich chocolate soil.
(P.2, Mornington Standard,20-9-1902.AROUND FLINDERS.)
See A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA re Charles Graves and his business partnership with Mary McLear before moving to Shoreham.

2 comment(s), latest 1 year, 5 months ago

FOOTY NEAR TULLAMARINE, VIC., AUST. AND BULLA, OAKLANDS AND BROADMEADOWS RESIDENTS 1915.

Most pioneers worked from dawn to dusk but Saturday was THE BIG DAY. They would work on Saturday morning (as even the V.F.L. players did and Jock McHale, famed Collingwood coach and a foreman at Carlton and United Breweries, once kept an opposition player late at work before a Grand Final involving his team and the Maggies.)
Saturday was the day for footy and feasting. The second activity occurred at the local dances. Not one man would dare admit that the only reason most of them attended the dances was to scoff down the entries in the COMPETITION! Every family had to bring a plate and while no wife or mother would admit it, there was a fair dinkum competition to surpass the culinary skills of all the other women.

Most footballers did pre-career training. Because of their workload and the lack of lighting, most bush footballers would have relied on their experience at State School up to Grade 8 (Merit Certificate.) The old cliche of four laps of the cricket pitch probably summed up any training that was done.

NEAR TULLAMARINE.
TULLAMARINE had a team in the late 1920's, according to Harry Heaps, who was a nuggety rover in the words of one of his team mates. In 1929 the Tullamarine school played the Keilor school at Keilor as a curtain raiser to the men's match.(Sunshine Advocate, 16-8-1929, page 7.) In the school match, all of Keilor's best players could equally well have been claimed as descendants of Tullamarine pioneers, the Fox, Wallace and Brown families living on the Tulla side of the Arundel bridge and David MilburnMcHALE, FOX, WALLACE, BROWN, DALLEY having leased "Fairfield" (400 acres north of Sharps Rd and west of Broadmeadows Rd) in 1868. The best of the Tullamarine boys were Dalley (Springbank or Mansfield's Triangle), Crotty (Broomfield), Reddan (Hillside), Parr (The Elms or Annandale).

In the men's game, one of Keilor's best was Graco, whose family had previously lived at Broadmeadows Township before the accident and was probably the grandfather of Essendon and Doutta Stars' Alan Graco. Tulla's best were Furphy (water cart family and relative of Bill Parr), Kelly, Reddan and Free. This was a competition match.
Tullamarine was playing against Coburg Amateurs, Campbellfield, Braybrook, Richmond United, Prestige, Keilor and Sth Brunswick. (Sunshine Advocate 19-7-1929, page 7.) The next year, these teams comprised the North Division of the Junior League with Sth Brunswick replaced by Moreland Amateurs and Richmond City in the South Division. Tullamarine's uniform was black and gold; were these colours later adopted by Broadmeadows and passed on to Westmeadows (the tigers)? Tullamarine probably did not have a team earlier because it lacked a ground. Then at the suggestion of Alec Rasmussen (foundation secretary of the Tullamarine Progress Association for 30 years until 1954 and much - loved teacher)the T.P.A. bought 6 acres that had belonged to drover, Noah Holland. (The reserve grew by another acre in recent decades when Handlon's block on the north west was added.)The Association donated this to council in late 1929. In 1931, most of the players must have gone to Broadmeadows.

The Keilor Football Club wikipedia states that the first match in Keilor was against a junior Essendon club in 1894. It goes on to say that Keilor was a founding member of the Keilor and Broadmeadows Association and won three premierships before joining the Essendon District Football League in 1930. Unless Keilor had two teams, it seems that the Keilor and Broadmeadows Football Association only lasted a few years, with 1928 probably its last season.

Broadmeadows and Bulla had a very old rivalry, playing annual games for many years from before 1893. The game in 1895 was typically rough according to the Bulla correspondent and a Bulla fellow, who had gone to West Australia for the gold rush, wrote home asking how many had been killed and how many injured. (Grace was listed as one of Broadmeadows' best players in this game but the name should be Graco; the accident had not yet happened.) Incidentally this chap was working with a Mr Burnside who was probably James Burnside of Deer Park. Bulla also played matches against Sunbury Seniors and Sunbury Juniors in 1894 and played the Sunbury F.C. in 1903 and 1905 (on the Asylum ground. In 1904 they played a game against the Melbourne and Metropolitan Board of Works Employees Football Club. Apparently player numbers were not great but in 1906 interest seemed to have revived and the black and reds planned to join the Gisborne District Association.

The Essendon Gazette and Keilor, Bulla and Broadmeadows Reporter described the opening annual meeting of a new club at the Inverness Hotel on page 2 of its 22-5-1915 issue. I stated earlier that footy seemed to galvanise communities in times of depression as a way to brighten life a bit and W.W.1 was every bit as depressing as the financial hardships of the 1890's and 1930's. This was the Oaklands, Broadmeadows and Bulla Football Club which played at the Oaklands ground opposite the Inverness Hotel. This hotel was at the north end of the north-south runway in Melbourne Airport and the ground would have been across Bulla Rd on the hotel's 58 acres (Melway 177 G 11 approximately.)

I will use this journal to tell you a bit about some of those who attended the meeting.All locations are from Melway. Unfortunately I know nothing of the President, Dr Brown. The vice-presidents were Alex McCracken Jnr (North Park, 28 J1, and Cumberland, 178 C12)and H.H.Daniel (Narbonne, 177 K4).The patrons were Alex McCracken (V.F.L. President from its formation, almost until his death shortly after this meeting); Alister Clark (Glenara, bounded by Deep Creek, Bulla Rd, the Inverness and roughly Perimeter Road just north of the east-west runway; famous rose breeder and soon to become chairman of the Moonee Valley Racing Club), W.D.Peter (not Peters as in the paper, who at various times owned properties such as Chandos , bounded by the south east end of Freight Rd, Derby St, Wright St, Moonee Ponds Creek and Mickleham Rd, and Overpostle, 3 G-K east to Deep Ck and south to Jacksons Ck); D.Brannigan (probably still "St John's Hill" accessed via St John's Rd, 384 G-J5 and 800 metres approximately to the north;member of a famed equestrian family); Maurice Quinlan (see the Quinlan journal); and A.F.Ozanne M.H.R. (I've only seen this name once in the area, as grantee, with James McConnell, of the land bisected by Puckle St, Moonee Ponds); Alec. Forbes (descendant of a pioneer 6 miles from Melbourne near Broadmeadows in 1850?); H.C.Gibb (Husband? of Eleanor Gibb who ran the Inverness Hotel and later the Essendon Hotel, now the Grand, south of Woodland Park as seen in "The Stopover That Stayed"); Islip; Fitzgerald, Robert Ralston; Archie Campbell; Keith McNeill (all Oaklands); Thomas Kingshott (Broadmeadows 6 A6), M.Hoctor (Broad St? Broadmeadows where Jack Hoctor was born but possibly on a farm such as Rocklaw ); John Lane (Gowrie Park, west of the terminal building to McNabs Rd and used as a landing field in early days; about 4 Lane boys fought in W.W.1); John and James Gilligan (whose deaths are related in the Horse journal and properties in the Reddan journal);Lawlor, Hartney (both Bulla); Phillip Hill (Danby Farm 5B3); Semmell (Essendon), Walsh (Broadmeadows), Jock West (descendant of one of two pioneering blacksmithing brothers just south of the Bulla/ Keilor Rd junction at North Essendon whose biographies appear in "Victoria and its Metropolis"); Frank Wright (Strathconnan, as for Chandos but not quite as far north as the Western Ave ,or Lockhart's, corner.)

2 comment(s), latest 5 years, 6 months ago

FOOTY ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST. (SEAFORD'S SAND PIT!)

Most pioneers worked from dawn to dusk but Saturday was THE BIG DAY. They would work on Saturday morning (as even the V.F.L. players did and Jock McHale, famed Collingwood coach and a foreman at Carlton and United Breweries, once kept an opposition player late at work before a Grand Final involving his team and the Maggies.)
Saturday was the day for footy and feasting. The second activity occurred at the local dances. Not one man would dare admit that the only reason most of them attended the dances was to scoff down the entries in the COMPETITION! Every family had to bring a plate and while no wife or mother would admit it, there was a fair dinkum competition to surpass the culinary skills of all the other women.

Most footballers did pre-career training. Because of their workload and the lack of lighting, most bush footballers would have relied on their experience at State School up to Grade 8 (Merit Certificate.) The old cliche of four laps of the cricket pitch probably summed up any training that was done.

In the days that shops traded every day but Sunday until late, when Rosebud was playing at home (on the Village Green opposite the later hotel, where Doug Bachli practised his golf), all the shops would shut and the whole community would flock to watch the Buds. No doubt, most teams had similar support from their communities.

There was desperation for a game of footy. The Mornington Peninsula Football League would probably be surprised to find out that Moorooduc, Balnarring and Tuerong once had teams, mainly between 1890 and 1910 and in the 1930's, both eras of depression where footy could relieve misery. The team at Somerville was called "Railways" for a while. The smaller places competed in a second tier competition called the Peninsula District Association. Flinders once had a team and won this competition's premiership in 1906, the year it was formed by Paddy Gomm of the Somerville family (Murray Gomm.)The senior body was called the Mornington Peninsula Football Association .

The Wongs of the market garden by Chinamans Creek on David Cairn's Elenora at Rosebud West were stars for Rosebud. One of the boys was very impressive when he trained at Sandringham in the 1930's, probably on his way home from the Vic. Market. Colin McLear has much history, including photos, of the Dromana team in his "A Dreamtime of Dromana".

The Mornington Football Club drowning tragedy is well documented but what has never been mentioned is that one of Laurie Wilson's ancestors was spared because he had to work on that day to clear up a backlog of deliveries from his boss's cutting cart. (See Laurie's website BONNIE WILLIAM OF DUNDEE re the Wilsons of Tuerong etc.)

Because of low populations (such as in some country leagues today), it was necessary for neighbouring areas to band together or for clubs to find recruits from outside their area. In complaints about games found in newspapers, the cause was more often about these imports (such as Somerville's Gomms) rather than unfair play. Sorrento was lucky to have a source of players to supplement the locals because of its popularity as a resort, but some of the locals weren't bad, such as Stringer, whose namesake was best on ground in Sorrento's premiership last year. Incidentally, the cricket and footy results on the peninsula read like a local history, but this does not apply near Tullamarine.

SNAPSHOTS.
THE PENINSULA.
Balnarring F.C. appears in the papers between 1904 and 1938. The club obviously became Red Hill but not in 1937 when a Red Hill-Balnarring District F.C. was proposed. (Mornington and Somerville Standard 9-4-1937 page 8.)Balnarring had earlier combined with Flinders to form a team for the 1890 season (Mornington Standard, 25-4-1891, page 3.)
Baxter was fielding a team on a mud heap by 1938 and in 1944 a junior team from Baxter and Somerville played a game against the Frankston scouts. They merged as Pearcedale-Baxter before the 1948 season but had already played under that name in 1947.
Flinders (from which the Crib Point club was formed if I remember previous research correctly)had a combined team in 1891 with Balnarring,as stated earlier. The naval base would have provided a supply of players but probably denied many locals a game. The annual meeting of the Peninsula District Football Association was reported on page 7 of the Frankston and Somerville Standard on 12-4-1930. It was attended by delegates from Langwarrin, Frankston, Mornington, Red Hill, Seaford, Tyabb, Naval Depot, Flinders, Dromana and Rosebud. Flinders applied to enter a team and Moorooduc was not entering a team for the season. It was resolved that the body not amalgamate with the M.P.F.A.
A check on Red Hill confirmed that the club had already existed before 1937 and that the idea of the combined club was to form A and B teams but it was given permission to withdraw both teams in May 1937 with the area being added to the Dromana-Rosebud recruiting area.
THE FOLLOWING IMAGE OF A JUNIOR TEAM FROM FRANKSTON WAS TAKEN AFTER THE SCOUT JAMBOUREE FOR WHICH THE GRANDSTAND WAS BUILT. IT WAS SUPPLIED BY STEVE JOHNSON, A DESCENDANT OF HENRY CADBY WELLS.


13 comment(s), latest 1 year, 10 months ago

FOR JUDITH DURHAM OF "THE SEEKERS" FAME - YOUR MATERNAL ANCESTRY.

THE MYSTERIOUS PATERNAL GREAT GRANDFATHER OF JUDITH MAVIS COCK AND HER SISTER.
When I was talking to Ken Bucher today and mentioned that Susan Peatey was the midwife at the birth of Rose Bucher at Rosebud in 1867, he said that Nurse Durham was the midwife at the birth of another member of the Bucher family.
THIS REMARK REMINDED ME OF THE CONFUSED ANCESTRY ON JUDITH DURHAM'S WEBSITE AND I RESOLVED TO PRODUCE SOME CLARITY.

Emily King and her sister Elizabeth both married Greek fishermen.

EventMarriage Event registration number3393 Registration year1882
Personal information
Family nameKING Given namesEmily SexFemale Spouse's family namePANWTEO Spouse's given namesDimitri Antoni.

EventMarriage Event registration number1453 Registration year1872
Personal information
Family nameKING Given namesElizabeth SexFemale Spouse's family nameTELO Spouse's given namesFote

It was through Emily and Elizabeth that the early Rosebud map drawn by George Fountain's daughter(s) makes the following comment about the Rosebud Fishing Village block on the west side of Durham Place (c/a 20) granted to Fort Lacco on 16-10-1872, in the year of his marriage to Elizabeth:
"DURHAM RELATED TO LACCOS."

HAS itellya GONE COMPLETELY MAD? No, the registrars were completely mad. How could they possibly write Fort (or Forti) Lacco as Fote Telo? Can I find Fort's death record?

EventDeath Event registration number4813 Registration year1915
Personal information
Family nameLACCO Given namesFort SexUnknown Father's nameLacco Jno Mother's nameMary (Comeo) Place of birth Place of deathDromana Age72

And Elizabeth's?
EventDeath Event registration number16170 Registration year1934
Personal information
Family nameLACCO Given namesElizth SexUnknown Father's nameKing Jno Mother's nameUnknown (Unknown) Place of birth Place of deathDromana Age79

And Elizabeth Lacco's death notice inserted by her sister, Emily?
LACCO.—On the 6th August, passed peacefully
away at Rosebud, Elizabeth, wife of the
late Fort Lacco, beloved mother of Mary, John
(deceased), Christie (deceased), Annie, Emily,
Mitchell, Margaret, grandmother of Bobby,
Lucy, Edna, Kenneth, Harold, Alick, George,
and Gwen, great-grandmother of Douglas aged
[?] years, a colonist of 77 years. —At rest.

LACCO.—On the 6th August, passed peace-
Fix this textfully away, at Rosebud, Elizabeth Lacco, dearly
loved sister of Emily, Ellen, Clara and the
late William King. —Peace, perfect peace.
(P.1, Argus, 7-8-1934.)
The second notice, concentrating on the King family was probably inserted by Emily.

And Emily's death record?
EventDeath Event registration number6672 Registration year1950
Personal information
Family nameDURHAM Given namesEmily Trin SexFemale Father's nameKING William Elijah Mother's nameElizabeth (Lane) Place of birthPORT MELBOURNE Place of deathPARKVILLE Age88

There was no death notice for Emily, just a funeral notice which mentioned that the funeral would leave from an address in Mount Alexander Rd, Essendon. There is no doubt that this was the residence of Emily's grand daughter (Hazel) who had given birth to Judith Mavis Cock in 1943 while her D.F.C. winning husband was serving abroad. Emily would probably have been living with her son, Antonio if he had not died in March 1950.

DURHAM.—On March 11 (suddenly) Tony, loving husband of Jessie, son of Emily Durham, late of Rosebud.—Sadly missed.
DURHAM. — Tony, loving father of Hazel, father-in-law of Bill, loving grandfather of Beverley and Judith.—Sadly missed.(P.10, Argus, 14-3-1950.)

And now for my million dollar bet. In Tony's death record his mother's name should be Emily (King) but I bet that his father's surname will not be PANWTEO.
EventDeath Event registration number2869 Registration year1950
Personal information
Family nameDURHAM Given namesAnthony Demetria SexMale Father's nameDURHAM Demetria Panucca Mother's nameEmily (King) Place of birthROSEBUD Place of deathESSENDON Age67

It's a fair bet that Anthony (and his mother, Emily) had both been living with Hazel and William Alexander Cock in Mt. Alexander Rd, Essendon in 1950. His father's name was not DURHAM. HIS GIVEN NAME OBVIOUSLY CAME FROM EMILY'S FIRST HUSBAND, WHOM EMILY MARRIED IN 1882. Anthony would seem to have been born in about 1883.

Mr Durham, Emily's second husband and Tony's STEPFATHER, did not have Greek given names at all! Tony was only about 4 when his father (died?*) and Emily married again.

EventMarriage Event registration number5814 Registration year1887
Personal information
Family nameDURHAM Given namesFrancis William SexMale Spouse's family namePUNWETO Spouse's given namesEmily


DURHAM—PUNWETO - On the 23rd November, by licence. at St. Mark's Church, Fitzroy, by the Rev. J.,F.Stretch, LL.B., Francis William Durham, to Emily Punweto, both of Clarendon-street, South Melbourne.(P.1, The Age, 28-11-1887.)
I found no death record in Victoria for Punweto in any year or a birth record for Anthony Punweto.

THIS IS ANTHONY'S MARRIAGE RECORD.
EventMarriage Event registration number5222 Registration year1908
Personal information
Family nameDURHAM Given namesAnty Demetra SexUnknown Spouse's family nameSMITH Spouse's given namesJessie.

THE MARRIAGE RECORD OF ANTHONY'S DAUGHTER, HAZEL.
EventMarriage Event registration number15797 Registration year1938
Personal information
Family nameDURHAM Given namesJessie Hazel SexUnknown Spouse's family nameCOCK Spouse's given namesWilliam Alexander.

HOW JUDITH MAVIS COCK BECAME JUDITH DURHAM OF "THE SEEKERS"
When Judith started singing with Frank Trainor's band, she adopted the maiden name of her mother Hazel, nee Durham, as her stage name. There is much more precise detail on her website regarding her career, but not regarding her ancestry because of all the inconsistency in birth, death and marriage records.

Rosebud is proud to be associated with THREE female vocalists who enabled The Seekers to perform great music over the years but it was Judith who shot the group to fame in the 1960's.

SUMMARY OF JUDITH DURHAM'S MATERNAL ANCESTRY.
1882. Her great grandmother, Emily, nee King, marries Dimitri Antoni Panwteo (Panweto or Punweto).
C.1883. Their son Tony is born. No documentation found of the father's death or a divorce.
1887. Emily Panweto or Punweto, nee King, remarries to Francis William Durham who becomes Tony's stepfather.
1908. Judith's grandfather marries Jessie Smith.
1913. Judith's mother, Hazel, is born.
EventBirth Event registration number21375 Registration year1913
Personal information
Family nameDURHAM Given namesJessie Hazel SexFemale Father's nameAnthony Demetra Mother's nameJessie Amelia (Smith) Place of birthELSTERNWICK
1938. Judith's mother, Hazel marries William Alexander Cock.
1943. Judith is born.

FORDS AT (TODAY’S) AVONDALE HEIGHTS, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA, CIRCA 1850.

There were two fords in the Avondale Heights area by the time Braybrook Township, south of Clarendon St and straddling the river, had been partly surveyed. The one south of Rhonda St, which stopped Grimes progress up the saltwater river by boat in 1803, may have been a natural accumulation of rocks which the first settlers, maybe hundreds of years before, or even earlier, had utilised to build a fish trap. it was undoubtedly the ford used by Alexander Thompson in January 1837 when he headed to the Geelong area. Naturally this ford appears on the Braybrook Township map with the meandering track created by Andrew, George Russell and others bound for Geelong and the Western District. Later a ford was built at the end of North Road and this was called Solomons Ford. Before it could be accessed from the south, Duke Street had to be formed and probably metalled so that wheeled vehicles would not have to negotiate obstructions such as detailed below. This ford is also shown on the Braybrook Township map. The Solomons had held early runs at both locations so it was historically accurate to describe each of these fords as Solomon\'s Ford.

The original Solomons Ford might have been replaced because it it didn\'t allow enough room for a gradual descent and ascent or because the route was required for a township and surveyors loved their grids which may have been prevented by bullock drivers meandering through the area to avoid bogs, rocky outcrops, trees and so on.

Google SOLOMON\'S FORD and you will find countless references to Solomon\'s Ford being at the west end of Canning Street, (Melway 27 B8.) This was built by Michael Clancy after he\'d arrived in the area in about 1856. If it had existed in the 1850\'s, Canning Street would have continued west to the river but as the Braybrook Township map shows, it did not. How can professional historians get it so wrong?

EXTRACT FROM : PASTORAL PIONEERS ALEXANDER THOMSON (No. 100)
The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 16 November 1935 p 4 Article
Copy http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/141765375 into your search bar.
GUIDED BY BUCKLEY
In January 1837, he left his house in
Melbourne for his Geelong station. Guided
by Buckley, the wild white man, he walked
along the route of Collins street, up the
Flagstaff Hill, by the track which was to
be called Buckley street, Essendon, to Solo-
mon\\\'s Ford over the Saltwater River, or
Maribyrnong as it now is, and across the
plains to Geelong. Thus Thomson\'s track
became the Geelong road, and the route
has not been changed since. In Geelong
Dr. Thomson built Kardinia, which he
said was the native term for sunrise, and
became the founder of the Geelong town-
ship.

1803.
Thursday, 3rd.—At six o\'clock the captain, Mr. Grimes, self, and five seamen went in the boat up the Great River; at between two and three miles it divided into two; *(27) we took the left hand stream at half-past eight o\\\'clock. The land became high, where we landed and went on a hill. The soil a reddish loam from ten to fifteen inches deep. Saw a large lagoon at a distance. \"Went over the hill to a large swamp. *(28) Soil black, eighteen inches, with blue clay at bottom. No trees for many miles. Came to the boat and proceeded on; passed two dingles; no water; came to a third where we found some water, where we dined and proceeded on. Opposite this the land is stony soil, stiff blue clay, and no trees only some straggling oaks by the side of the river. We went up the river till we came to rocks;*(29) could not get the boat over; crossed it at a place the natives had made for catching fish. It was still salt though a great fall ; went about two miles on the hills which are level at top and full of stones, the land very bad, and very few trees, and appeared so to the mountains, which appeared clothed with timber. On our return back came to the river a little higher up and found it excellent fresh water, where it divided and appeared deep enough for a boat. Just as we got to the boat it began to thunder and rain. Stopped a little time and came back till we could procure wood to make a fire, and it being sunset stopped the night.
Flemings Journal - Melbourne\'s Living Museum of the West
https://www.livingmuseum.org.au/down…/Flemings%20Journal.pdf

The above passage does not say that the ROCKS were at the location where the saltwater ended as stated repeatedly in many articles written about Charles Grimes’ exploration of the river and supposedly based on the journal. The salt water does end near the west end of Canning Street, Avondale Heights but the map (link below) shows that the so-called Solomon’s Ford at Melway 27 B8 did not exist in the 1850’s. EVERY HERITAGE STUDY STATES THAT THIS ROCK FORD IS SOLOMON’S FORD!

I believe the rocks which stopped Grimes’ progress up the river by boat had been dislodged by the erosion of the volcanic plain as the valley deepened and that they were used by the woiwurrung as the basis of the fish trap. If their fish trap was not near the rocks, I believe that this would have been mentioned. Mention of the river dividing is mystifying and could only refer to the junction with Taylors Creek near the Kealba Wetlands at Melway 14 H9, far more than two miles upstream; even a beeline across the clifftop would only reach the Albion-Jacana railway bridge.

To avoid confusion, I will call the three fords near Avondale Heights, Grimes’ Rocks (south of Rhonda St.), Clancy’s ford (at 27 B8) and the second Solomon’s ford (at 27 C6.)

JUST COINCIDENCE?
One of the first to use the 1836 Solomons Ford would have been John Aitken who then headed west to the Kororoit Creek, following the stream north and then continuing towards Mount Aitken blazing a track that was said to have become the Calder Highway. Was it coincidence that his grant, section 8 of the parish of Doutta Galla adjoined Braybrook Township at today’s Glenside Drive just 60 chains (1.2 km) from Grimes Rocks.

Alexander Thompson would have crossed at the same ford in January 1837 helping to create the zig zag track on the Cut Cut Paw side of the river heading south from the ford (shown on the map) to what became the Geelong road.

THE MAP. Google BRAYBROOK TOWNSHIP, REID, 1855.


There were usually two features in regard to townships declared in 1850. They were on well-used routes so there would be passing trade and they straddled streams so there would be a supply of water. Because these streams were used as parish boundaries, these townships occupied part of each parish. Braybrook Township had a natural ford to unite the Doutta Galla and Cut Cut Paw parts. At Broadmeadows Township (now Westmeadows) the parts in the parishes of Will Will Rook and Tullamarine were linked by the Ardlie St ford which explains why there is an Ardlie St either side of the Moonee Ponds Creek. Keilor had a bridge by the late 1840’s but it and its approaches were often washed away.

It is not a coincidence that the southbound roads in North Braybrook Township (as it became known after Lynch’s punt and bridge near Flemington Racecourse and Brees’ 1854 bridge at Keilor removed the passing trade) funnelled to the ford south of Rhonda St. If Clancy’s ford had been the 1803 ford, Canning Street would have continued west to provide access.

It was no exaggeration to say the new pound (as shown on the map) was near Solomon’s Ford. It was only 400 metres from Grimes’ Rocks. It was 1400 metres from the second Solomon’s ford at North Rd. In 1850 there was NO Clancy’s ford!

THE POUND IS RELOCATED TO BRAYBROOK NEAR SOLOMONS FORD.
PUBLIC POUND.
NOTICE is hereby given that, the Public Pound at Footscray, in the County of Bourke, will be removed from its present site to Braybrook, near Solomon\'s Ford in the said County, and that the same shall be henceforth called the Braybrook Pound.
By order of the Bench of Magistrates, ROBERT CADDEN, Clerk Petty Sessions, County Bourke. Police Office, Melbourne, March 27th, 1849.

A ROAD FROM MOUNT ALEXANDER TO SOLOMON\'S FORD.
NEW ROAD A. new road is described in the Government Gazette from Mount Alexander to Solomon’s Ford. The new road will commence where the present road terminates, at the eastern boundary of section No. 12, Parish of Doutta Galla ; thence running westerly 27 chains, and passing through the properties of Messrs, Miller and McKlusky and Mr. Dugald McPhail; thence running north 81 deg., west 3 chains 25 links ; thence running north 73 deg., west 12 chains 50 links, and passing through the property of Mr.Dugald McPhail thence running south 80 deg.,West 25- chains ; and thence running south 74 deg., west 15 chains,-through the property of Mrs, Catherine Sinclair, to its junction with the present road, commencing at the dividing line between sections 11 and 12. The quantity of land required to be taken for the proposed new line of road is eight acres one rood and four perches, and the estimated cost of effecting the said work is two thousand two hundred and eighty pounds (£2280). (P.10, The Banner, 7-3-1854.)

The eastern boundary of section 12, Doutta Galla was Hoffman’s Rd and the south east corner is meant (ie. Braybrook road, now Buckley St west.) From there it was 44 chains west to Steeles or Rose Creek so the road probably went west for 27 chains taking a slice of section 8 (the Aitken estate) and Dugald McPhail’s Rosehill, w.n.w for 65 metres to a ford, w.n.w another 250 metres to near Surrey Court, w.s.w. 500 metres through the 114 acre Sinclair farm back to the line of Buckley St at the Rachelle St. corner (the boundary between J.P,Fawkner’s c/a 11A and Main’s Estate.) North Road and the half mile of Buckley St east of North Pole (Milleara Rd) had already been constructed by the looks of it.

A Doutta Galla map showing this section of road and the ford at Steeles or Rose Creek mentioned, as well as the sold-out, complete North Braybrook Township and later Solomons ford at the end of North Rd can be viewed if you copy http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-232488068/view into your search bar.The part outlined in this map would have been prepared as evidence in an insolvency meeting and shows C.B.Fisher\'s landholdings.

CLANCY’S FORD.
The reason Clancy’s ford is not shown on the Braybrook Township map is that Michael Clancy built it some time after his arrival in about 1856. He and his daughter never called it Solomon’s ford!

KEILOR COUNCIL
Independent (Footscray, Vic. : 1883 - 1922) Saturday 9 July 1910 p 1 Article
(The Braybrook shire had sent either a cheque or bill) for part cost of repairing Clancy\'s Ford and pointing out that it was an excellent piece of work and likely to require little maintenance in future. Cr Dodd thought the culvert had been put in higher than the old one and that the water at Solomon\'s Ford had thereby been raised and made less useful.

The Dodds and Delaheys would have known which ford was the right Solomon\'s Ford. What Cr. Dodd meant (badly paraphrased by the reporter) is that if the water dammed up too much at Clancy\'s ford, Solomon\'s ford upstream would be covered with water, making the ford less useful, not the water.

FROM MY PREVIOUS JOURNAL ABOUT SOLOMON\'S FORD.
*BRAYBROOK NORTH TOWNSHIP.
Michael Clancy’s evidence at an inquiry into closed roads in 1879 reveals that he had about 35 acres joining Mr.Porter and Mr. Fitzgerald’s properties and had arrived there in about 1856. Clancy and Munro, his neighbour in the township, were prevented from watering their cattle at the river by Derham, who also tore down 28 chains of Clancy’s 30 chain rock wall and threw the stones into his victim’s crops. Derham had Clancy’s lease of the river reserve cancelled. Harry Peck says that Derham, of fair complexion, as husky as a lumberjack, kept the pub at Braybrook and hunted others off hundreds of acres of land where he grazed about 200 horses for the Indian horse trade. Thomas B. Derham lived in Trinifour sometime after 1886 between the occupancies of W.G.Tulloch and E. Henderson.


The late Mrs. Whelan was born at Braybrook where her father was a farmer. She had lived at Williamson\'s Road, Maribyrnong, for seventy years. In the early days her mother was afraid of the blacks who were hostile. Mrs. Whelan remembered when the blacks used to hold corroborees at the spot where Moonee Ponds town hall now stands. Her father, the late Mr. Clancy, first built the ford over the Maribyrnong River known as Clancy\'s Ford. The late Mrs Whelan had eleven children, twenty-five grandchildren and thirty-two great grand-children.The funeral took place to Footscray Cemetery on Monday. (P.2, Sunshine Advocate, 24-10-1952.)

6 comment(s), latest 3 weeks, 6 days ago

FOSTER, SHARP AND CROTTY OF TULLAMARINE, VIC., AUST.

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FRANK STONE AND THE NAME/ EARLY HISTORY OF FRANKSTON, VICTORIA AUSTRALIA.

The Wells family is thought of in association with Frankston but many people would be unaware that Henry Cadby Wells was a much earlier pioneer near the Heads. All the details are on the web in THE WELLS STORY. His daughter, later Mrs Kelly, probably pipped the Skelton child for the honour of being the first white child born near the Heads.
I had seen references to Frank Stone before I came across this website in which Frank Stone's hotel is mentioned. The Frankston wikipedia states that Frank Stone may not have even existed. Perhaps the first fishermen to make their base at the south end of Long Island did not exist either because their names also did not appear in documents or newspapers!
Wells and his young, pregnant wife walked all the way from Melbourne to join Robert Rowley in a limeburning venture near the Heads two or three years before Dennis and Honora Sullivan arrived in 1843. Robert Rowley married Christina Edwards in 1859 but there was no mention of this in Victoria; she was from Longford in Tasmania! The lime burning did not last long because the depression, reaching crisis point in 1843, reduced demand for mortar in Melbourne. However, Henry teamed up with Robert again in 1849 to crayfish in Westernport and built Clark's Cottage two decades before Sorrento Village was declared at the suggestion of Sidney Smith Crispo of the Coastal Survey.
Frank Stone was obviously part of the Wells family legend. With such a proud pioneering history, why would the family feel the need to invent a pioneer: Frank Stone? Family legends do contain errors, such as the belief that Captain Henry Everest Adams of Rosebud was the legitimate son of Lord Vivian.However there would be no reason to invent Frank Stone.
Frank Liardet, Charles Franks,( murdered in 1836, not 1856 as in one website), and General Franks have been advanced as possible origins of Frankston's name. And I believe that one of these three was honoured in the official naming of the settlement circa 1853! Why am I discussing Frank Stone then?
Bendigo was officially named Sandhurst but the diggers insisted on the name that they used, and Bendigo it became. Frankston means Franks' Town and with a slight change to the pronunciation at the end could be said as Frankstone. Perhaps the pioneers such as the McCombs, who may not have known Stone, but would have been given the goss. about the area's pioneer from the Wells family, decided that it wasn't worth kicking up a fuss because they could just pronounce it their way.
While researching "The Mysterious Henry Gomm", I found a notice that a Henry Gomm had placed about finding a boat that had been washed ashore at Red Bluff (Argus 29-9-1864 page 1 column 5.) I thought this was Convict Henry or his son but I now suspect that it was Somerville Henry. In the same column was a notice about a purse that had been lost between Brighton and Tyabb, and I believe that it was also placed by Henry Gomm, who first lived (temporarily) near Somerville in 1861 and moved Margaret and family there in 1867. The un-named owner of the purse said that a reward could be claimed at Frankstone Hotel. Passing through, he must have heard stories about the early publican or heard the pronunciation of the hotel's name.
Why was it that so many editors or typesetters used Frankstone instead of Frankston for the village and parish, even in announcements of Crown land sales? One would have thought they would have been working from written information provided by Government departments and surely the clerk who prepared such would have had the official spelling of names to refer to. The newspapers are littered with references to Frankstone during its first "official" decade, in the report of the Moorabbin market gardeners' picnic in 1882 (perhaps Somerville Henry taught them the historic pronunciation), and even as late as the 1930's.In the case of Queensland papers, the spelling could have been caused by confusion with their own Frankstone, but why would the name be written so often with an e by Victorian newspapers?
Why is there so little mention of Frank Stone? There is a possibility that Thomas Stone and his brother (Frank?) went to the diggings (before 1853)and that descendants finished up as pioneers of the mountainous area near Sylvan.
Strangely, there was a FRANKSTON HOTEL at Snapper (sic) Point in 1856. Samuel Packham was granted a licence for the Frankston hotel at Frankston and Thomas P.Stone for the Bush Inn at Prahran.(Argus 16-4-1856, page 6.) Stone was the chap, at the diggings with his brother, who wrote from Geelong complaining about the gold escort. There are two possible reasons for William Edwards' hotel at Mornington being called the Frankston. Firstly, Frank Stone might have opened the hotel that probably later became the Schnapper Point and the Royal (Rennison, William Edwards, Lawrence Murphy etc). Did Frank Stone start this hotel after a successful stint at the diggings and then take on the Bush Inn with Thomas Stone? The second possibility is that another licence had been transported to a new location.
It is unlikely that this was the case with John Boswell Clark's Mornington Hotel at Sorrento; "Lugger" Clark had skippered limecraft and probably just liked the name.If I remember correctly, there had been a Mornington Hotel near Wolfdene but it became a private school. It is certain in the case of Collier and John Campbell's Rye Hotel at Tootgarook/White Cliff; this had been opened in Dromana in 1859 and the licence was continued in the latter area, thus giving it the present name. William Edward's biography in Victoria and Its Metropolis is as baffling as that of Somerville's Henry Gomm. It stated that he was, in 1888, running the Schnapper Point Hotel in Dromana. This shows that he had probably transported a licence from Mornington. (The hotel was probably on the FJ's site at the corner of Jetty Rd, Rosebud; that being the only reason that a 2 acre block, lot 86 of crown allotment 18,Wannaeue, would be regarded as sufficient security for a loan from Captain Adams of about 200 pounds. It was definitely not in Dromana, where the Dromana and Arthurs Seat were the only hotels.)William Edwards had run other Hotels before 1888 and he-or more likely his father- may have had the Frankston and transported the licence. But if this was the case, how come the Frankston Hotel was still operating under that name in Frankston?
I present a new theory, that the suburb's name is a merger of the original Frank Stone and the official Frankston. It would be really ironic if the government had decided to name the town Frankstone and a clerk had thought the e was a mistake and dropped it. To restore historic integrity, if that actually happened, the e could be taken from McCombe St in Rosebud and placed on the end of Frankston, thus honouring John McComb of Seaford, who bought "Hindhope" from the Riggs,and Frank Stone, the pioneer of Frankston!

POSTSCRIPT. steve74, a descendant of Henry Cadby Wells has sent me some great material about the naming of Frankston and the Wells family. As I do not write history if it already exists (and is accessible), I will not repeat all of Steve's information; I await a journal from Steve about the extended Wells family.
C.Evelyn Liardet wrote a letter to the editor of The Argus refuting a claim in the Victorian Historical Magazine (March 1916, vol.5, No.1) by A.W.Greig that Frankston was named after Frank Liardet, and stating that his grandfather and uncle had told him that the town was named after Charles Franks. He enclosed a reply from the Lands and Survey Department regarding Frankston's name. Frankston was so-named almost a year before a Liardet application for land was made on 20-1-1855.Charles Wedge had a run adjoining Franks' near "Mt Cotteril"
but later had a run which included the site of Frankston and may have suggested that the village be named after his unfortunate neighbour of circa 1836.
A source I discovered while searching for other information stated that Frank Stone was the young son of the early publican so the aforementioned Thomas Stone (publican at Prahran in 1856) may have been the publican at Frankston and father of young Frank. Frank Liardet squatted near Frankston in 1843 without a licence and publican Stone may have also been operating without a licence, which would explain the lack of records. Knowing Steve 74's determination, I am hoping that he will soon come across documentary proof of Stone in Frankston.

The attached image, supplied by Steven Johnson, is of a Frankston football team, probably taken before W.W.2. Was this the original uniform of the Frankston club? It is not in colour but could explain the name of the Frankston Bombers F.C. I could not introduce a footy photo into this Frankston journal without trying to trace the origin of organised footy in Frankston.
The Frankston juveniles (State School?) had issued a challenge to the juveniles at the Point (Mornington) in 1880 but no reply had been received. (South Bourke and Mornington Journal 1-9-1880, page 2.)
The earliest report of organised matches found so far was in 1887. Frankston beat Mornington 4 goals to nil. Frankston's best players were Sadler, Kelso , O'Grady, Bentick, Westaway and Clark. (SB&MS, 22-6-1887, P.2.)
As mentioned in the FOOTY ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA journal, complaints about opponents importing players were frequent. Frankston F.C. secretary, J.C.Sadleir accused Mornington of having no less than seven Melburnians in his letter which appeared on page 3 of the Mornington Standard of 5-10-1889. This date had obviously been some time after the game had been played. A team representing the Essendon District was named to play Frankston at Frankston. It is of interest that a member of the Essendon team was names Saddlier and was probably related to the Frankston secretary.(North Melbourne Advertiser, 2-6-1888 page 3.) In view of Janilye's comment of 13-3-2012, this surname appears to have been Sadlier.

As I scanned "Football, Frankston" on trove decade by decade, I couldn't help gawking at Frankston items unconnected to footy.

JOHN CARR, FRANKSTON PIONEER.
John Carr had a problem that I have rarely seen mentioned on trove but was part of the reason that Hugh Glass of Flemington (and a grantee at Rosebud) ended his life with an overdose. The problem was scab in sheep. On page 7 of the Argus of 15-9-1866, John Carr gave notice that his run, being a part of Mt Eliza, situate at Frankston, was affected by scab. This land was most likely in the parish of Frankston, that is north of Eramosa-Canadian Bay Rds. No doubt this run occupied most of the 3000 acres later proposed as the site for a new Melbourne cemetery.

Almost four years later, John Carr, was on another run, this time in the parish of Lang Warren and his sheep had again been affected by scab. (Argus, 17-8-1870, page 3.) On page 8 of the Argus on 12-4-1878, Carr's farm of 320 acres near the township at Frankston was offered for sale at 3 pounds per acre. Oh well, I thought, early squatter buys pre-emptive right and then leaves! Not finding much more on trove, I tried a straight google search. The Potts Family website soon convinced me that the Carr family was significant in Frankston's history.

This family was very religious and musical. It was also related to the Allchin family of Mornington. If I remember correctly, the Allchins lived at one of Mornington's historic houses, Sutton Grange, and were involved in the Mornington Football Club drowning tragedy. John Carr senior preached in Frankston as early as 1855 and was personally responsible for the building of the first Wesleyan Church in 1860.He used to travel on horseback to take services at Mentone, Cheltenham and Brighton. (It is likely that on many occasions he continued on to Melbourne to preach or lecture at the Temperance Hall or Gospel Hall- see the Argus 8-11-1873, page 1; 31-10-1874 page 1; 11-5-1875 page 8. The Chairman for John's lecture in 1873, entitled "Advance Victoria", was John Nimmo, who was prominent in politics and the temperance movement (Australian Dictionary of Biography.)

John Carr's great great grand daughter, Deborah Mary Collins was baptised in the Frankston Methodist Church in 1959. The Potts family history pages have much more information such as John's early land purchase, the musical expertise, and his daughter's near-death in a dam. It is claimed that Kars St was named after John Carr and was mis-spelt. No pioneer or prominent figure seems to have been named Kars, and it is possible that there is a link with the city and province of Kars in Turkey, besieged by the Russians in the Crimean War. Kars St was originally called Young St and the name was changed by the council without any consultation, according to an old Frankston resident in "Fishing, Sand and Village Days", a pre-1950 oral history.

Carr children were among the first pupils at the school started in 1855. John first lived on the foreshore near the hotel sites and then on Skye road in a house built of brown stone and bricks. John Carr used to produce lime from shells that he gathered at the foot of Oliver's Hill.(Frankston and Somerville Standard 22-2-1930, p.6, History of Frankston.)

YOCKINS.
(Argus, 25-3-1865 page 8.) FRANKSTON. A house and garden, fine situation, close to the jetty, Bay Frontage; also 9 acres of land near the above. Apply to Mr Yockins, Frankston.
The first three stores in Frankston were those of Mr Staples, Mrs Yockins and Mrs Spriggs. (Last source in Carr, 1930.)
Sarah, wife of Thomas C.J.Yockins and mother of Thomas C.Yockins of Yambuck, died on 20-1-1880 at Frankston, aged 66. (Illustrated Australian News, 16-2-1880, page 30.)
Mr H.C.Tocknell had been appointed registrar of births and deaths during the absence on leave of Mr.T.C.J.Yockins (South Bourke and Mornington Journal 28-7-1880 page 2.)
A writer wondered who would serve on the bench at the newly established Court of Petty Sessions in Frankston, pointing out that the nearest J.P., Captain Baxter, lived five miles away. Apparently there was a requisition, bearing a huge number of signatures, requesting the appointment of Messrs Cattanach and Yockins as local justices.Both men were highly respected in the town. (South Bourke and Mornington Standard 3-5-1882, page 3.)


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