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EDWIN LOUIS TASSELL, EARLY TENANT OF THE NORTHERN PART OF JAMIESON'S SPECIAL SURVEY NEAR MT. MARTHA, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

Hugh Jamieson obtained the 5120 acre special survey, between Mt Martha and Dromana,extending east to Bulldog Creek Rd, in 1841 but sold it soon after to a speculator (Hughes) who became insolvent so the property reverted to the ownership of Jamieson who also became insolvent (PAGE 144,Impressions of Australia Felix, During Four Years Residence in that ...
https://books.google.com.au/books?id=o0NCAAAAcAAJ )

Archibald, Thomas Bushby and Hugh Jamieson managed the Yerre Yerre run on the Murray for William Stawell in 1848 and later took up the run. In 1853, they renamed it MILDURA.P.6-7 in MILDURA

The SPECIAL SURVEY was split into three portions,(LIME LAND LEISURE, C.N.Hollinshed) probably by Jamieson's assignee. All three parts were eventually bought by Big Clarke who sold the northern part to John Vans Agnew Bruce. Bruce owned this portion by the first Kangerong Road Board assessment in 1864 and it was being leased by Edwin Louis Tassell; it was referred to as 1000 acres for decades. J.V.A. Bruce Snr. died in 1863 and ownership of the estate passed to his namesake son. It was referred to as the Bruce or Brokil Estate. In 1907 the southern 4000 or so acres, the Clarke Estate, was sold. I transposed the subdivision lots onto Melway and found that the MARTHA COVE WATERWAY (Tassells Creek)indicated the northern boundary. The northern boundary of the survey was Ellerina Rd.

In 1853 the northern portion was advertised as being available for lease. Leonard Wilding stated in his history of the Mornington Peninsula (serialised in the Mornington Standard of 1905*)that in the middle of January, 1851, Charles Graves and his partner Brownlee had leased the southern 4000 plus acres and that the Connells had the northern portion. It might have been the Connells who leased it in 1853 because Tassell arrived in 1859 according to Colin McLear.
* SURVEY

Leonard Wilding wrote:
The survey was occupied for some time by Jamieson Bros, and later on passed into the hands of the Bank of Australasia.


The advertisement does not state which portion of the survey was to let but helpfully confirms my transposition of the Clarke Estate because the foreshore between Ellerina Rd and Tassells Creek is close enough to 32 mm, each millimetre on Melway representing a chain (20 metres.)

TO LET. 1024 acres of Land, a portion of Jamieson's Special Survey, having a frontage of 32 chains to the Bay of Port Phillip. Apply to Allison and Knight. (P.3., Argus, 1-3-1853.)

Edwin Louis Tassell did not leave the survey by choice. He died very young but was remembered by locals, just as was Henry Dunn, by two of the creeks on the survey being named after them. The third recalls Walter Gibson's sheep washing activities.

It is several years since I requested that recognition of the former name of the MARTHA COVE WATERWAY be indicated by signs, with no result. I will now push for a history board near the lifts.

Let's honour EDWIN LOUIS TASSELL!

EventDeath Event registration number1337 Registration year1871
Personal information
Family nameTASSELL Given namesEdwin Louis SexUnknown Father's nameJames Mother's nameJane Place of birthKENT Place of death Age37

MOUNT MARTHA- tenders Invited and received up to 12th Nov, 1874 (answered on 15th), for a three years LEASE of BROKIL ESTATE (lately occupied by R. B. Riddler, Esq. , butcher,,previously late E. L. Tassell Esq.) containing 1024 acres good pastoral land, well watered and subdivided, a large portion sheepproof.
J. VANS AGNEW BRUCE, Fletcher street, Essendon. (P.3, Argus, 29-4-1874.)

Edwin's sister appears to have died in 1856.
EventDeath Event registration number2810 Registration year1856
Personal information
Family nameTASSELL Given namesEllen Anne SexUnknown Father's nameJames Mother's nameJane Place of birthKEN Place of death Age16

IT IS CERTAIN THAT THESE ARE THE DEATH RECORDS OF EDWIN'S MOTHER AND FATHER.
EventDeath Event registration number5939 Registration year1872
Personal information
Family nameTASSELL Given namesJane SexUnknown Father's nameAshbee John Mother's namePhillis Place of birthKENT Place of death Age73 Spouse's family nameTASSELL Spouse's given namesJames

EventDeath Event registration number8666 Registration year1873
Personal information
Family nameTASSELL Given namesJames SexUnknown Father's name Mother's name Place of birthKENT Place of death Age73 Spouse's family nameASHBEE Spouse's given namesJane

An inspection of all 72 TASSELL death records seem to show that Edwin and Ellen Anne were the only children of James and Jane Tassell to die in Victoria but they may have had daughters who married and thus would be listed under other surnames. James may have come out with brothers or cousins. Edwin did not seem to have married and is not named as the father in any Tassell death records. No family notices have been found on trove.

It is possible that Edwin's parents and sisters lived on the survey but they may have lived on a farm near Solomon's Ford. Edwin was definitely on the Survey at the end of 1869.

IF the HORSES left in my paddock by Daniel Lovelock be not removed in 14 days, they will be SOLD for expenses. E. Lewis Tassell, Dromana.(P.7, Argus, 23-11-1869.)

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17.
Clearing sale of Farm Stock. Implements, Dairy Utensils, Ac., at O'Brien's Paddock, Solomon's Ford, Saltwater River.
In the Estate of the late Mr. Lewis Tassel, MCULLOCH,CAMPBELL, and CO. are instructed to SELL by AUCTION, at twelve o'clock, at O'Brien's paddock, Solomon's Ford, Saltwater River, the whole of the dairy stock, &c., now
thereon, comprising 12 head well-bred cows in full milk, 30 head heifers and young stock,7 head working bullocks, 5 head bullocks fit for the butcher, Horses, drays, implements, dairy utensils, Household furniture and sundries. The whole to be sold without reserve, to close the estate. (P.27, The Australian, 11-2-1871.)

SOLOMONS FORD.
The Heritage Council of Victoria wrongly states that this was at the end of Canning St, Avondale Heights and in response to my protest about incorrect history and provision of evidence (Cut Cut Paw and Braybrook Township maps showing THE ORIGINAL FORD south of Rhonda St.and a meandering dotted line from it indicating the early settlers' track southwards, - and a dotted line indicating an extension of a township street to the river near the end of a ramp descending from the end of North Rd along the east side of O'BRIEN'S PADDOCK, CROWN ALLOTMENT 9A DOUTTA GALLA)would only state that they could not be responsible for information provided by municipalities.

The ford at the end of Canning St was not shown on these 1855 maps because it did not exist until it was later built by Michael Clancy!

To see O'BRIEN'S PADDOCK, type DOUTTA GALLA, COUNTY OF BOURKE in your search bar. Click on the SECOND result. The first road heading west north of the river is Buckley St. which for decades was known as Braybrook Road because it led to Braybrook Township which straddled the river south of Clarendon St and also to the west. It was the closest crossing place on the river for those early settlers heading SOUTH bound for Geelong and the western district. Milleara Rd. was known as North Pole Road until well into the 1900's and also provided access to the original ford, and by the end of the 1850's, via the east boundary of O'BRIEN'S PADDOCK to the new Solomon's Ford.

POSSIBLE CONNECTIONS.
Baptisms at St. Augustine's Roman Catholic Church, Keilor.
TASSELL EMILY 25.02.1858 EDWIN DALY, MARGARET 13.03.1858 KEILOR PLAINS
KEILBAPT

In all entries, the comma was misplaced, giving the impression that the mother's maiden surname was the father's second given name. It is possible that Edwin Louis Tassell had married a Margaret Daly and a daughter named Emily was born shortly before Edwin moved to the Brokil Estate. The Keilor Plains were basically the flat land formed by volcanic flows through which the Maribyrnong River and other steams created valleys and covered a huge area hyphenated as the Keilor-Werribee and Keilor-Melton Plains. O'Brien's Paddock was on this plain.

There are no Victorian BDM records of a birth, marriage, or death (of a Margaret Tassell) to confirm the above speculation. In 1858, Edwin Louis Tassell would have been about 24 years old, old enough to be a father, but Edwin, the father in the baptismal record, could also have been a younger brother or cousin of James, the father of Edwin Louis Tassell.

In journals about Jamieson's Special Survey, Heritage Walk, Dromana, and Red Hill, I have speculated that H.Tassell, the grantee of crown allotment 74A Balnarring on 7-6-(1904?) might be descended from Edwin Louis Tassell. This portion of the Red Hill Village Settlement consisted of almost 20 acres, located on the west corner of Arthurs Seat Rd and Prossors Lane Melway 190 K4) and extending 370 metres west. H.Tassell did not seem to have stayed long.

A Henry Tassell from Gisborne had bought the Continental Hotel at Woodend which was only mentioned in connection with Henry because of his purchase, it being the venue of many auctions of nearby farms and its destruction by fire. The last mentioned article is interesting given Henry's address at the time.

WOODEND, Wednesday
About half past 1 o'clock this morning a
fire broke out in the diningroom of Mrs
Keating's Commercial Hotel, which speedily
reduced to ashes the whole establishment,
a two-story weatherboard building, contain-
ing over thirty rooms. The flames spread
to the fancy goods store and adjoining
drapery establishment of Mr. C. Long, and
were only kept in check from spreading
further in High-street by the brick wall of
the Commercial Bank. Fortunately, the
night was calm, or else the stables at the
rear of Mr. Nicholson's store in Anslow
street could not have been saved. The
whole of Mrs. Keating's stock and furni-
ture was destroyed, together with a loss of
L200 in gold and notes, though this morn-
ing 34 sovereigns were recovered from the
debris. The hotel was owned by Mr. Henry
Tassell, of Sorrento
, and was insured for
L400. Mrs. Keating's stock and furniture
was insured for L300.(etc.) (P.6, Argus, 12-11-1896.)

SORRENTO, BACK BEACH PALACE, under new management. Every ACCOMMODATION for visitors; terms moderate. Henry Tassell, proprietor. (P.8, Argus, 7-3-1895.)

TASSELL.—On the 23rd inst., at Fitzroy, the wife of Henry Tassell, Sorrento, of twin* daughters.(P.1, Argus, 24-9-1895.) This is not to be taken as evidence that Henry was living at Fitzroy. It is likely that the birth took place at the recently opened St Vincent's Hospital, which being on the north side of Victoria Pde, was in Fitzroy.

In 1889, five Sisters of Charity arrived in Melbourne with the dream of establishing a hospital. The dream was realised on 6 November 1893, with the opening of a small 'cottage hospital' in converted terraces on Victoria Parade. (History of St. Vincent's Hospital.)

(*ONE OF THE TWINS.An engagement is announced of Miss Marjorie E. Tassell, twin daughter of the late Mr. H. Tassell and Mrs. Tassell,Hawksburn, and Mr. Rupert F. Bullen,youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. George Bullen, Malvern. PAGE 33, THE AUSTRALASIAN, 11-5-1918.

Record information
EventBirth Event registration number20786 Registration year1895
Personal information
Family nameTASSELL Given namesMarjorie Eileen SexFemale Father's nameHy Mother's nameSusan Sybella (Collins) Place of birthFITZROY SOUTH

SUSIE'S DEATH RECORD.
EventDeath Event registration number12966 Registration year1950
Personal information
Family nameTASSELL Given namesSusan Sibella SexFemale Father's nameCOLLINS Unknown Mother's nameSophia (Unknown) Place of birthST LEONARDS Place of deathST KILDA EAST Age89)


It is possible that Henry died in 1912 at or near Point Lonsdale. The following provides a link between the Geelong area and Woodend as well as Edwin Louis Tassell's father and Rosa Tassell's father being named James.

On the 28th inst., at St. Paul's Church, Geelong, by the Very Rev. Archdeacon Stretch, Mr. Harry K.Keen, of Woodend, to Rosa, only daughter of Mr. James Tassell, formerly of Underdown, Herne, Kent, England.
(P.4, Argus, 29-11-1859.)

Mt. Duneed is a suburb of Geelong. It is divided between the City of Greater Geelong and Surf Coast Shire local government areas. Was Rosa a sister of Edwin Louis or of Henry? No death record found for Rosa Keen.

EventDeath Event registration number11404 Registration year1912
Personal information
Family nameTASSELL Given namesHy SexUnknown Father's nameTassell Jas Mother's nameCharl Ann (Shepherd) Place of birth Place of deathMt Duneed Age61

TASSELL.—On the 9th September, 1912, at his residence, Torquay, Henry, the beloved husband of Susie* Tassell, and second son of the late James Tassell, solicitor, Faversham, Kent, England.(P.1, Argus, 10-9-1912.)

(*TASSELL—COLLINS.—On the 15th inst., at Christ Church, St. Kilda, by the Rev. T. Stanley Low, Henry, second son of Jas. Tassell, Esq., solicitor, Faversham, Kent, England, to Susie Sybil, second daughter of Mrs S. Collins-
Fitzroy-street, St. Kilda. The Telegraph, St Kilda, Prahran and South Yarra Guardian (Vic. : 1866 - 1888) Saturday 25 September 1886 p 4 Family Notices

TASSELL.—On the 21st inst., at her mother's residence, Gisborne, the wife of Henry Tassell, Belmont, Carrum , of a son. P.1, Argus, 26-8-1887.)

MIGHT AGAINST RIGHT.
TASSELL AT TOOLERN VALE
Toolern Vale is not mentioned in the article but that's where the pre-emptive right of the Greenhills run was, as detailed at great length in my DICTIONARY HISTORY OF BULLA journal. This was south of and connected by a road to Gisborne where Henry Tassell lived when he bought the hotel in Woodend. The mistreated boundary rider COULD NOT have been Henry's son or Henry himself, as the court report shows that the victim was married with several children at the time, (1872), while Henry did not marry until 1886.

H.TASSELL OF THE RED HILL VILLAGE SETTLEMENT (1904?)
This was unlikely to be Susie's husband, unless he'd suffered financial ruin but more likely H.Tassell of the Victorian Railways whose wife bore several babies during the 1890's. The railways were probably forced to retrench many employees because of the 1890's depression and massive unemployment was the reason village settlements were established by both Father Tucker and the government.

Unfortunately I have been unable to prove a connection between Edwin Louis Tassell and other Tassell families in Victoria but at least I have shed some light on the families in my two major areas of concern, the Mornington Peninsula and Melbourne's north west.

ELIZA WILLOUGHBY? WHOSE WIDOW WOULD SHE BE? (Tasmania and Victoria, Australia.)

Eliza Willoughby?
Whose widow would she be?
His claim as founder caused Fawkner's jealousy!
His identity in this article you will see.

ELIZA WILLOUGHBY

Her legacy lives in Mt. Eliza's name*;
Her tragic end a dreadful shame;
Two daughters married blokes named Collyer;
Find out more on Wikipedia.

SARAH WILLOUGHBY

One or both of the Mesdames Collier, according to a rumour
Were said to be buried at Toolern Vale; as in my Dictionary History of Bulla.
It wasn't true, there was no evidence,
But they probably both were residents.

GREENHILLS
ELIZA JNR.

*Mt Eliza was supposedly named by Captain William Hobson of the Rattlesnake after his wife but the person so honoured doesn't seem to be documented except in an account of the Rattlesnake's survey of the Bay.
225 Mount Martha and Mount Eliza were named by one of the lieutenants of the Rattlesnake, in compliment to Mrs. Lonsdale and Mrs. Batman, respectively.
226 Part of the description of H.M.S. Rattlesnake' s first visit to Port Phillip is based on the private journal
held in the National Library of Australia) kept by the ship's gunnery officer, John Henry Norcock. See HRV 1, pp. 64-77.

EUREKA! PIONEERS OF BROADMEADOWS, VIC., AUSTRALIA AND PETER MCCRACKEN'S TRAGEDY.

DIED,
Drowned at Broadmeadows, on the 18th instant,William, aged 3 years and 3 months, third son of Peter M'Cracken, of Stewarton. (P.4, Argus, 20-10-1852.)

It was nearly twenty five years ago that I discovered in Broadmeadows' rate records that my great grandfather, John Cock, started leasing Stewarton in about 1892 and that in the next year or two the name of the farm changed to Gladstone. Stewarton was section 5 in the parish of Tullamarine and consisted of 785 acres according to the parish map which records George Russell as the grantee. The oldest available ratebook was that of 1863 and Maconochie was assessed on 777 acres. This shows that Broadmeadows Rd (now called Mickleham Rd)had been made along the 8000 link frontage between the Lackenheath Drive and Forman St corners and was one chain wide,exactly accounting for the loss of 8 acres from the property.

It was a few months before my discovery about the name change that I read A.D.Pyke's THE GOLD THE BLUE,a history of the Lowther Hall school in Leslie St. in Essendon. Ealsbrae, the historic house in which the school started was built by Peter McCracken's son, Coiler (named after Peter's father in law, Coiler Robertson of La Rose.) Mr Pyke,a teacher at the school, mentioned that Peter had a farm in Moonee Ponds called Stewarton. I racked my brain for ages trying to work out where in the parish of Doutta Galla it might have been. So you can imagine my Eureka moment when I discovered that my great grandfather's farm,bounded on the east and partly on the north by THE MOONEE PONDS (named after an aborigine,which I discovered only days ago)had been Peter McCracken's farm.

Coiler McCracken had married Margaret, daughter of James Robertson. Peter's brother-in-law was James Robertson, (son of Coiler of La Rose) who had arrived as a 17 year old brewer and may have been partly responsible for the success of the McCracken brewery. Another James Robertson owned Gowrie Park at Campbellfield (north of today's Hadfield.) This was getting ridiculous!

My second (very long) eureka moment was provided by Deidre Farfor of Malvern. I think Deidre was referred to me by the Broadmeadows Historical Society's Jim Hume but any help I managed to give her was a drop in the bucket to the help that Deidre provided to me. Genealogical details about the Gibbs and Robertsons of Campbellfield (and the Coupar link), about the family of Peter McCracken's wife (La Rose/ Trinfour),and Deidre's own Robertson family (Upper Keilor/Mar Lodge/Aberfeldie.) But most of all, countless pages of photocopies of THE MCCRACKEN LETTERS.

There were three McCracken brothers, Robert (on whose Ailsa paddock,on the north side of Kent St,Ascot Vale,the Essendon Football Club played its first seasons), Peter,and Alexander Earle McCracken,who leased William Hoffman's Butzbach (east of Hoffmans Rd and halfway to Lincoln Rd) for most of the 1850's and was at the forefront of what became the Royal Agricultural Society until his wife's ill health forced a return home.

Many of the letters were to Alexander Earle McCracken and sent from Peter's Ardmillan in the SUBURB of Moonee Ponds. However there were earlier letters, about the sorrow caused by the drowning of young William (and how the infant had walked part of the way to the school in Broadmeadows Township with his older siblings),Peter quitting Stewarton in 1855 (after nine years there) because Neil Black (the real grantee)had not got back to Peter about extending the lease,and the dairy at Kensington being unprofitable.

I recently made a comment about itellya actually being a team and Deidre was one of my first team mates!

When I was writing the McCracken entry in JOHN THOMAS SMITH AND HIS ELECTORS over two years ago, I had been reminded about the drowning when I discovered that Peter Young of Nairn in Bulla had taken the chair in 1852 at a meeting (to honour David Duncan, grantee of the central,major part of Melbourne Airport) because of a domestic tragedy in Peter McCracken's family. I don't know how but I actually found the death notice that starts this journal. As my aim that night (morning!) was to finish the Young entry, I filed it in my memory bank for the next day. I did not find the notice. In the last week,I tried again, once more without success.

Tonight, while half-watching TV, I decided I'd check family notices of the 1850's re Broadmeadows to make sure I hadn't forgotten any township pioneers. I saw this.
Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 20 October 1852 p 4 Family Notices
... MARRIED. At Melbourne, Port Phillip, by special license, on the 16th instant, by the Rev Irving Hetherington, minister of the Scots' Church, Agnes Bell to Mal- Mal colm Troubridge. DIED, Drowned at Broadmeadows, on the 18th instant, William, aged 3 years and 3 months, ... 63 words
EUREKA!

Why had McCracken, Stewarton and McCracken, Broadmeadows produced absolutely no results? ANSWER. M'Cracken! Using this spelling of the name, the contents of the letters can be confirmed on trove and correct my faulty recollection of the time of the haystack stack fire on the dairy at Kensington; the fire had occurred after Peter's move to Ardmillan. James Hyslop (Victoria and its Metropolis biography) may have been looking after the dairy at the time.

CRIMINAL SITTINGS. TUESDAY, APRIL 15. (Before his Honour the Chief Justice.)
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 16 April 1862 p 6 Article
...wis was found " Guilty" of having set fire to a haystack, the property of Mr. Peter M'Cracken, at Kensington, on the 9th March. The facts of the case were fully reported recently in our columns, in connexion with the burning of a wooden bridge across the Essendon Railway, near Kensington station.

PORT PHILLIP FARMERS' SOCIETY.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 26 June 1857 p 5 Article
...RES OF CULTIVATED LAND. We award the prize in this class to Mr. Peter M'Cracken, for his farm of Kensington, Mains, containing about 130 acres. We found this farm very well and regularly ploughed,

Poor Peter had no more luck with his fourth son.
On the 15th instant, of croup, John, aged two years and seven months, fourth son of Peter M'Cracken, of
Ardmillan, near Essendon.(P.4, Argus, 16-4-1860.)

I wondered about the location of Peter's dairy at Kensington and this curiosity led to my EARLY LANDOWNERS: PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA. I had supposed that it would have been near McCracken St but it was actually bounded by Footscray Rd,the road to Raleigh's Punt, the private Essendon Railway to the south east end of Bellair St and Swamp road (known today as Kensington Rd,Macaulay Rd, Bellair St and Dynon Rd.)Peter's lease would have ended soon after the haystack fire and as he had no desire to renew it, the Cox family started its 20 year lease from J.R.Murphy of the former dairy and the rest of the Kensington Park estate extending to Lloyd St.

(Extract from SECTION 2.)
ALLOTMENTS 17, 18, 19. (McCRACKEN?S DAIRY, THE RACECOURSE.)
This land, bounded by Macaulay Rd, Dynon Rd, and the lines of Lloyd St and Hampden Rd, was granted to John Robert Murphy at about the time he was granted a 2 acre block at the south east corner of Stubbs and Parsons St in 1949.
Allotment 17 was leased by Anah Lewis for 14 years. Allotments 18 and 19 were leased to A.E.Brodribb for 14 years but it is known that by 1855 the 132 acres comprised all or part of McCracken?s dairy. (McCracken may have been leasing the crown land west of Rankins Rd too.)
In 1855, Peter McCracken quit his lease on ?Stewarton? (Gladstone Park) and lived on the dairy while his mansion was built on ?Ardmillan? in Moonee Ponds. In 1861 a fire burnt all the haystacks and by the end of 1862, Peter was thinking of giving up the dairy because the grass was poor and it was costing more for hay than the milk was worth. Soon after, James Hyslop, who had worked for Peter since 1858, was out of a job (P.233 Victoria and Its Metropolis).
When Anah?s lease finished, and McCracken quit his dairy, the whole 198 acres was leased by cattle salesman Samuel Cox. He probably fattened cattle and sheep on it. Pigs might have been kept there too by pork butcher, William Samuel Cox. Three years later, in 1867, W.S.Cox took over the lease, and in 1872, he extended it for five years with an option of another five years. In 1871, he?d moved from Abbotsford St to ?Kensington Park?. The KENSINGTON PARK RACECOURSE commenced operation in 1874. The racecourse was situated partly on E.B.Wight?s portion of allotment 20 as shown by the map on the next page. When it closed at the end of 1882, Cox took out a lease on, and then bought, Feehan?s farm (now called Moonee Valley Racecourse).

(Maps can be emailed to M'Cracken and Cox researchers. Send me a private message.)

AFTER THAT LENGTHY DIVERSION,BACK TO BROADMEADOWS!

While I was looking for William's death notice, I noticed other area pioneers such as poor McFarlane and decided to write a journal about non-township residents.

1850's.

BRYANT. (Possibly Bryan.)
CONTRACTS ACCEPTED. Isaac Bryant, 44 pounds for eradicating thistles at Broadmeadows. (P.5,Argus,19-12-1857.)

CROWE.
John Crowe died fairly early in the district's history and although Mt Yuroke (like Mt Gellibrand) was downgraded from a mountain to a mere hill, the locals honoured his memory by calling it Crowe's Hill and this became the name of a farm on the hill. Rate collectors, obviously thinking the hill was named for big glossy black birds that made rude Graham Kennedy-like calls, invented their own version,Crow's Hill.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Monday 19 January 1857 p 8 Family Notices
... Funeral Notices. THE Friends of the late JOHN CROWE, Esq., are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of interment, this day, Monday, the 19th instant. The Funeral procession to move from his late residence, Mount Yuroke, at ten, passing Broadmeadows etc.

GAGE.
Richard Gage of Broadmeadows was granted a carrier's licence. (P.6, Argus,26-5-1859.) See my journal SOME FARMS IN BROADMEADOWS SHIRE etc.
James and Daniel Milne of Broadmeadows were also granted carrier's licences. Was Darren Milne,a pupil at Tullamarine in the 1970's, descended from one of these pioneers?

GILL.
"Greenvale" has always been associated with John McKerchar who is discussed extensively in Andrew Lemon's BROADMEADOWS: A FORGOTTEN HISTORY and GREENVALE :LINKS WITH THE PAST by Annette Davis. It was crown allotment Q of section 10,consisting of 328 acres on the north side of today's Somerton Rd,which was 748 metres west of Mickleham Rd and extended 810 metres farther west and 1.62 kilometres to the north.The property between Greenvale and Mickleham Rd,crown allotment 9P, was called Greenan and was associated with John McKerchar's brother,Donald. John and Donald McKerchar were co-grantees of both 10Q and 9P but there is no date on the parish map.(google "Yuroke,county of Bourke.)

Edwin Gill's property was most likely 10Q. Trove seems to be useless in determining when John McKerchar settled on Greenvale,so let's consult DHOTAMA. My suspicion is that John and Donald McKerchar had received their grants
by 1854 when Edwin and Greenvale were first mentioned in tandem and were jointly developing Greenan while leasing Greenvale to Edwin.

DHOTAMA, page Mc.55.
McKERCHAR, John, Broadmeadows, is a native of Perthshire, Scotland,who landed in Melbourne in January, 1840. He acted as a shepherd at Moorabool and on the Wimmera for seven years with Austin, McPherson and Taylor and was afterwards for 15 months with Dr. Drummond on the Merri Creek. Then in partnership with his brother,he opened the Crown Hotel on the corner of Queen and Lonsdale Streets,Melbourne; and conducted it for three years at the end of which time he purchased land and settled in his present home of 365* acres at Broadmeadows ...etc.

(Jan. 1840 + 7 years +15 months+ 3 years=Jan. 1851+ 3 months=April 1851 if the above description is correct.)
This would allow three years for John to erect a Greenvale homestead before Edward occupied it. Was Edwin just a lessee or perhaps a relative of the McKerchars? Was Edwin related to Dr.W.R.Gill?
*Broadmeadows rate records show that Greenvale consisted of 328 acres (10Q exactly) in 1879-80 and 300 acres in 1900 and when Alex. Millar,who renamed it "The Elms",was leasing it in 1920.


DIED.
On Sunday morning, 27th inst., in Melbourne, at the residence of D. R. Long, Esq., Arthur Edwin, the only
and beloved child of Edwin Gill, Esq., of Green Vale, near Broadmeadows, and late of Richmond.
( The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 29 August 1854 p 4 Family Notices.)

EAST BOURKE.?A meeting was held at the Broadmeadows Hotel, Broadmeadows, on Wednesday evening, Donald Kennedy, Esq., was unanimously voted into the chair, and briefly introduced Mr. Cooper to a numerous assemblage. The candidate went into the leading subjects now occupying public attention, and at the close of his address answered satisfactorily numerous questions touching the impolicy of devoting large sums of money for railways, until the roads of the colony were rendered passable; reserved to himself the right to form his own judgment
on the expediency of appointing a minister for agriculture as a separate department of Government; was in favor of local road boards.

Numerous other questions being disposed of, Edwin Gill, Esq., moved, and Donald M'Kerchar, Esq., seconded, a motion to the effect, "That Mr, Cooper is a fit and proper person to represent East Bourke in the Legislative Assembly," which was carried unanimously. A vote of thanks, passed by acclamation to the chairman terminated the meeting. (P.5, Argus, 30-8-1856.)
...........................................................
Dr.Patterson of Flemington claimed that Dr. Gill was responsible for the death of a woman and despite Dr Barker
(who was perhaps the most prominent doctor in early Melbourne and a pioneer at Cape Schanck, who fought with Maurice Meyrick of Boniyong (Boneo)in Victoria's second duel)vindicating Gill in the post-mortem report, Chandler suggested that a charge of manslaughter might be in order. Dr. Gill's complaint against Chandler gives an indication of how distance, circumstances and the inability to be in two places at once might lead to charges being laid against the most dedicated and skilled medical practitioner.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 5 January 1859 p 5 Article
INQUEST.-Yesterday, Dr. Candler held an inquest, at Broadmeadows, ... desired olfeot, was repeated on Monday. She still continued ill, and on tho 80th December Dr. Gill, of Broadmeadows, was sent for. He came and prescribed for her.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 13 January 1859 p 6 Article
... CORONERS AND THEIR PROPER FUNCTIONS. TO THE EDITOR OF THE ARGUS. GILL, beg to lay before you as ... obedient servant. W. R. GILL, Member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, Licentiate of the Victorian Medical Board. Broadmeadows, January 9.

GRANT.
MARRIED.
At St. Kilda, by the Rev. Wm. Miller, Thomas Fairbairn, Farmer, Pentland Hills, third son of Andrew Fairbairn, Primside, Roxburgshire, Scotland, to Margaret Grant, second daughter of Lachlaine Grant, Broadmeadows.
(P. , Argus, 31-10-1856.)

HACKETT.
The western boundary of Broadmeadows Township was named Hackett St. It was never made because traffic using Tullamarine's Lady of the Lake as a landmark would travel to the north west boundary of Stewarton, turn right (Forman St), and immediately veer left into Turner St taking them to Ardlie St where the 1854 timber bridge connected to the portion of the street in the parish of Will Will Rook. Near the Broadmeadows Hotel they would join travellers using the original route to Sydney (passing Pascoeville's Young Queen Inn) for the "steep pinch" up the Ardlie St hill to where it met Mickleham Rd.

From 1869, those approaching the township from the parish of Tullamarine had a new stone bridge accessed via
Fawkner St and after crossing the creek,they would turn left to climb the Ardlie St hill. From shortly after W.W.1. they would turn left at THE WAR MEMORIAL. This and the lamp lit by young Jack Hoctor were in the middle of the road. As motorised traffic became more powerful, the memorial was a hazard and caused congestion so it was moved by Major Murphy of Tullamarine to the town's old windmill site where it stands today.

Eventually, after a century,with Hughie Williamson's old Dunvegan being developed as the heart of the new Greenvale (the new school retaining the number of the former school at the north end of Section Rd, i.e. 890)and traffic increasing dramatically, Hackett St was made and with Broadmeadows Rd (from Tullamarine Junction) was renamed as Mickleham Rd.
(Sources: the late Jack Hoctor and Harry Heaps; George Lloyd's MICKLEHAM ROAD 1920-1952;
Township of Broadmeadows, Parish of Will-WIll-Rook, County ... - Slv
digital.slv.vic.gov.au/dtl_publish/simpleimages/32/1154185.html‎)

Hackett St was named after the presiding magistrate of the District Court. See STABBING AT BROADMEADOWS,
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 16 November 1855 p 5 Article.

The original route to Mickleham Rd through the township and bypassing the unmade Hackett St can be seen in the Keymap of the first edition of Melway.
www.http://melwayed1.melway.com.au/mwyedn1.htm


HENDRY.
On the 26th inst., at Lonsdale-street Congregational Church, by the Rev. Thomas Odell, Mr. Alexander Prain, of Campbellfield, to Miss Mary Hendry, of Broadmeadows. (P.4,Argus,28-3-1857.)

(John?) Hendry was the post master at Tullamarine in 1864 but the rate collector did not seem to know this until 1867. Because assessments were listed geographically,it is highly probable that the post office was on or near the site of the present 711 service station (formerly Mobil.)

Some Hendry boys later appeared in court for misbehaviour at the local pub. (I can't remember if it was the Beech Tree or the Junction,the latter on the 711 site.)Here it is.
North Melbourne Advertiser (Vic. : 1873 - 1894) Friday 5 October 1883 p 3 Article
... and Filson, J's.P.) Alexander Hendry, James Hendry Joseph Jackson were charged with using obscene language on the 30th September at Tullamarine. RIichard Glazer, licensee of the Bench Tree Hotel and Richard Craven of the Junction Hotel stated the prisoners canme to their respective houses at one ..

Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 4 July 1855 p 4 Family Notices
... special license, by the Rev. Thomas Odell, James Purvis*, of Tullamarine, to Christina Hendry, youngest daughter of Mr. James Hendry, of Perth, Scotland. ... 94 words

THE GENERAL ELECTION.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 23 April 1864 p 6 Article
... Gap - James Baring, the Gap. Tullamarine - James Hendry, postmaster. Tullamarine. Wyndham - Thom ... 459 words

*Thomas Purvis bought lots 14, 27 and 28 of John Carre Riddell's Camieston Estate (Melway 5,partsF-G 8) with frontages to the west side of Wright's/Heaps' Lane (today's Springbank St) and the now-closed continuation of Derby St. Thomas also bought about 10 acres* of today's Trade Park Industrial Estate (Melway 5 parts F-G8), very close to the Hendry residence,which would explain how James met Christina. (*Volume 30 folio 772.)



HENESSY.
Michael Paul Henessy, Victoria Hotel, Broadmeadows. Granted. (P.6, Argus, 16-4-1856.) Hennessy didn't last long. PUBLICANS' TRANSFERS. Michael Paul Hennessy, Victoria Hotel,Broadmeadows, to John Bryant : granted.
(P.6, Argus, 5-12-1856.) Bryan(t)may have pulled a swifty because he had twice been refused a licence for his Tanners/Farmers Arms.

KING.
Philip Ryan, for an aggravated assault on Police Constable King, at Broadmeadows, was sentenced to one month's imprisonment with hard labor.(P.4,Argus,28-1-1858.)

Andrew Lemon's prologue to his BROADMEADOWS: A FORGOTTEN HISTORY, set in 1857, involves a severe falling out between Constable King and his superior,Senior Constable McCarthy. Dr Weston,attending the latter's sick child, witnessed King's "You be damned and go to hell.You know as much about a horse as I do.Go and clean him yourself!"

McCARTHY. See KING.

McCONOCHIE.
On the 15th inst., at her brother's residence, Stewarton, Broadmeadows, Margaret, daughter of the late
Alexander McConochie, farmer, Buteshire, Scotland, aged 30 years.(P.5, Argus, 16-9-1858.)
Peter McCracken was on Stewarton from 1846 to 1855 and it is likely that John McConochie, who was assessed (as Maconochie) in the oldest available ratebook (of 1863) was the next tenant.

McFARLANE.
Death and funeral notices for the six year old son and 21 year old daughter are the only results for the family or the property, Strathoer. Can you find two reasons that the following letter was not one of the results?
THE CENSUS.
To the Editor of the Argus,
Sir,-I think it my duty to inform the public, through the medium of your journal, that no census-paper has ever been left with me or my adjoining neighbour, and I have no doubt that many are in the same position.
I am, dear Sir, yours, etc.,JUSTICE. - Strathore, near Broadmeadows, 4th May, 1857. (P.5, Argus, 5-5-1857.)

THE Friends of Mr. WALTER MACFARLANE, of Strathoer, near Broadmeadows, are respectfully invited to Follow
the Remains of his late Daughter to the place of interment in the New Cemetery. The funeral to move from Bignell's Family Hotel, Cardigan-street, North Melbourne, this day, Monday, the 29th inst., at eleven o'clock.
JOHN SLEIGHT, undertaker, 71 Collins-street east ._126 (P.8,Argus, 29-9-1856.)

DIED.
On the 17th inst., at St. Kilda, of congestion of the brain, Dugald, eldest son of Walter Macfarlane, of
Strathoer, near Broadmeadows, aged six years and one month.(P.4, Argus,18-10-1856.)

Although Strathoer ,being described as "near Broadmeadows" was most likely a farm, a member of the clan (with scribbly initials)received the grant for a crown allotment at the top of Fawkner St. (See township map.)

MACKINTOSH.
NEW INSOLVENTS.
William Mackintosh, of Broadmeadows, clerk. Cause of insolvency-The pressure of a creditor who has caused the insolvent to be arrested. Liabilities, ?122 ; assets, ?6 ; deficiency, ?117. Mr. Laing, Official Assignee.
(P.6, Argus, 29-10-1859.)

MILNE. See GAGE.

MITCHELL.
William Mitchell, charged with fighting at Broadmeadows, was fined 10s., and 10S. costs.
(P.1s,Argus, 25-11-1858.) William was probably related to Peter Mitchell who received grants for many blocks in roadmeadows Township. See my journal SOME FARMS IN THE SHIRE OF BROADMEADOWS etc.

PRAIN. See HENDRY.

PURVIS. See HENDRY.

SHANKLAND.
STONEMASONS.-TENDERS WANTED, for BUILDING a stone OUT-HOUSE, Apply Robert Shankland, Euroke, Broadmeadows.
(P.7,Argus, 8-10-1859.)

Yuroke was often rendered as Euroke. Robert's farm, Waltham,will be discussed in my journal, SOME FARMS IN THE SHIRE OF BROADMEADOWS. I don't think it was a stone dunny! Robert's 1888 biography in VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS claimed that in 1852 he built the original portion of Dean's Hotel at Moonee Ponds (today's Moonee Ponds Tavern on the south corner of Dean St near the racecourse.) My EARLY LANDOWNERS: PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA
(not a journal)contains title information about his purchase of the hotel's site.

THORPE.
BRILLIANT.
THIS powerful cart stallion will stand the season at Mr. Samuel Thorpe's farm, near Broadmeadows, on the Moonee Ponds, ten miles from Melbourne. This horse gained the prize at the Midland Agricultural show in Van Diemen's Land, as the best stallion in the Island. Brilliant was got by that celebrated imported horse Lincoln, out of an imported Lincolnshire mare, is now rising five years old, and allowed to be the best cart horse ever imported to this colony.(P.1, Argus, 6-11-1850.)


FRIDAY, 8th FEBRUARY.
To Farmers, Stockbreeders, Carriers, and Others. Important Sale of Stock and Farm Produce.
LILBURNE, ANSLOW, and Co. will sell by auction, in consequence of the expiration of the Lease, on the farm of Samuel Thorpe, Esq., at Broadmeadows, formerly known as M'Nall's farm, ten miles from town, on Friday, 8th February, at twelve o'clock sharp,
All the produce, consisting of 3 stacks hay, horses, cattle, poultry, implements, &c, as under :
200 tons hay, in 3 stacks 100 bushels wheat 100 do barley 1 entire draught horse by Blythe, warranted 9 first-class draught horses 15 well-bred milch cows 8 young cattle 1 winnowing machine Ploughs Harrows Carts Bullock-dray Roller, together with the whole of his farming implements, not enumerated. (P.2, Argus,31-1-1856.)

I have found no mention of McCall prior to 1850 but 10 miles is a clue to the location of Thorpe's farm. Due to the yield of hay, I would presume that the farm was part of the Glenroy Estate. Samuel might also have been leasing part of Riddell and Hamilton's Camieston Estate. (See the Camieston Estate journal re its location.)

WESTON.
J.Weston Esq. had been appointed public vaccinator for Broadmeadows.(P.4,Argus,31-10-1857.) See KING.

PIONEERS IN COMMENT 1.
MCPHAIL, ROBERTSON, YOUNG,COGHILL,OSWALD, RIDDELL,HAMILTON,DUNCAN,WILLIAMSON,SLOAN, CROWE, ANNAND,MCDONALD, MCVEA.

PIONEERS IN COMMENT 2.
BRYAN,CAMERON,DICK,KILBURN, MCPHEE, COUSER,MCCRACKEN,BELLAIR,MCPHAIL,TAYLOR.

3 comment(s), latest 3 years, 10 months ago

FAIRFAX COLLECTION OF GLASS PLATE NEGATIVES , AUST. (PART 2, PAGE 5- 8.)

FAIRFAX COLLECTION OF GLASS PLATE NEGATIVES.

I came across these in the National Library of Australia newsletter. You can access them by googling the words above (in upper case.) There are 20 photos per page and I have only included photos of people here. From first impressions the photos mainly concern N.S.W. (*Unless another place is specified in the summary,it can probably be assumed that the person was in N.S.W.and to save the time spent repeatedly typing N.S.W., I will not do so even if it is specified.)

IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE:
KILLONIS, HARTY, WALL, KELLY, KATER, KING, JAMES, HARVEY, O'BRIEN(X2), MESSENGER, GOODSIN?, STANLEY, FERRIER, LETHERSLEY, HAMMOND, MOONEY, MALONEY, FAIRFAX, WEARNE, BROMLEY, WHITFIELD, WOOD, FOX, JACKSON, HATFIELD, DENISON, WALDOCK,(27)

P. 5.
American wrestler, John Killonis 1927; Conductor, Sir Hamilton Harty, 1934; Cricketer, Tim Wall, 1933; Archbishop Michael Kelly, 1920; Sir Norman Kater, 1932; Rugby Union player, Syd King, 1930; Rosemary James with dog, Cobbity, 1936; Frank Harvey 1936; Athlete, F.W.O'Brien, 1931.
P.6.
Fisherman,Charlie Messenger, 1930; Mrs Agnes(Goodsin?)on ship, 1925; Miss Preston Stanley 1933; Aust. golfer, J.Ferrier, 1934;Tennis player, Lethersley, 1930; Rev. Canon R.B.Hammond 1929.
P.7.
Senator P.F.Mooney 1931; Dr William Robert Maloney 1930; Mr and Mrs W.Fairfax 1928, Sprinter, Eileen Wearne (x2), 1932; Victorian cricketer, Mr Bromley, 1933; Cricketer, E.P.Whitfield, 1933; Prof.G.L.Wood 1933.
P.8.
Mr Fox and man 1925; Cricketer, Archie Jackson, 1933; Athlete, F.W.O'Brien again, 1931; Writer, William Hatfield in Darwin, 1931; Sir Hugh Denison, 1920; Dr Arthur John Waldock,Canberra,1944.


TO BE CONTINUED IN PART 3.

FAIRFAX COLLECTION OF GLASS PLATE NEGATIVES , AUST. (PART 3, PAGES 9-200.)

Because,in order not to exceed the capacity of the surnames list,I have been covering four pages per journal, I will need about 500 journals to detail all the people appearing in the photographs. Therefore I have decided to conduct an experiment. The first person, not already mentioned, to appear on page 9 is Sir Isaac Isaacs.

If I do a search for him on trove there are 183 760 results, and as anyone who has used trove a lot would know, a lot of them are about Sir something else, Isaac someone else etc. The summaries of these results may not indicate whether there is a photo with the article. There are some photos on the right of the newspaper articles but not many and the Fairfax Collection is not mentioned. However it is unlikely that any photos would be found there for some of the people recorded in the Fairfax Collection.

What if we do a trove search for "Fairfax, Isaacs"? A bit better, with one photo at least implied in the summaries of the first 20 results. The information regarding photos and data sets to the right of the articles does not mention the Fairfax Collection. The aim of the experiment is to find not only the Fairfax collection but all the photos of Sir Isaac Isaacs within it (to avoid the necessity to scroll through all 3994 photos to find them.)

Now we try "Fairfax, negatives, Sir Isaac Isaacs". Only 79 results, one photo and no mention of the collection.

Now "Fairfax collection of glass plate negatives, Sir Isaac Isaacs". Absolutely useless.
The same search terms in the pictures, photos, objects category rather than digitised newspapers and more. No!
The same search terms on google. No.
A search for FAIRFAX COLLECTION OF GLASS PLATE NEGATIVES on google. Plenty of results but the aim of finding all the photos of a nominated person in the Fairfax collection has not been achieved.

It is great that the N.L.A. has digitised the collection but to save family historians having to scroll through 3994 photos to find the photo they seek (or to find if there is one there at all) more needs to be done. That was the aim of my journals about the collection. Have they helped? Let's try Mr Bromley.

First result on trove under pictures etc.:
Victorian cricketer Mr Bromley, 1933
Fairfax Corporation
[ Photograph : 1933 ]

Let's try a search for Doug Nichols (No 171 on page 9) in the same way.
Fourth result but others as well:


Photograph of Doug Nicholls
[ Object, Photograph ]
View online
At National Museum
Photograph of Doug Nicholls

Lois Briggs
Herald and Weekly Times
[ Photograph : 4 images : 1961 ]
Keywords: Briggs, Lois.; Models (Persons) - Victoria.; Aboriginal Australians.
... and Mrs Selwyn Briggs, shows her diploma to her uncle, Pastor Doug Nicholls, right, and Mrs Nicholls, left ...



Indigenous Victorian Australian Rules footballer Doug Nicholls, 15 August 1931
Fairfax Corporation
[ Photograph : 1931 ]
View online
At National Library

Now I'll try Thomas Dunbabin (No.3981 on page 200.)


Thomas Dunbabin at his desk speaking on the telephone, New South Wales, ca. 1915
Fairfax Corporation
[ Photograph : 1900-1930 ] This was No.3981.


Miss B. [Beatrice] Beedham (later Mrs Thomas Dunbabin), Tasmanian Exhibition, 1894-5, Season Ticket Holder - Warick Street
[ Photograph ]

Thomas Dunbabin with W.R. Sudgrove, Captain Green and an unidentified man on the deck of a ship, New South Wales, ca. 1915
Fairfax Corporation

Now I'm pretending to be a family historian and I haven't a clue whether the collection contains a photo of this person. THOMAS SMITH.(I just made the name up.)


Thomas Smith
Duryea, Townsend, 1823-1888, photographer
[ Photograph : 1870 ]
Keywords: Smith, Thomas
... Thomas Smith, Bank Manager at Gawler ...

Unidentified
[ Photograph : 2 images : 1895-9402 ]
Keywords: Smith, Thomas (Portraits); portraits; beards
... Mr Thomas Smith posing in his Masonic regalia

It works. I don't need to do another 498 journals.

FAIRFAX COLLECTION OF GLASS PLATE NEGATIVES , AUST. (PART 1: PAGES 1- 4.)

I came across these in the National Library of Australia newsletter. You can access them by googling the title of this journal. There are 20 photos per page and I have only included photos of people here. From first impressions the photos mainly concern N.S.W. (*Unless another place is specified in the summary,it can probably be assumed that the person was in N.S.W.and to save the time spent repeatedly typing N.S.W., I will not do so even if it is specified.)

IN ORDER OF APPEARANCE:
FISHWICK, WRIGHT, O'GRADY, BULT, BREAKSPEAR, SHELTON, BEEBY, KITSON, HURWOOD, DE HAVILAND, HAYWOOD, EASTBURN, INDIGENOUS, RYAN, GARRAN, MOLLISON, SHEAVES, FALK, KELLY, TOBIN, MARES, POYNTER, GRIFFITH, DAVY, THOMPSON, BAUKHAUST, O'SHEA, BRANDT.


P.1.
Herbert H.Fishwick; Archbishop John Charles Wright of Sydney 1930; Sir James O'Grady Gov of Tas.
P.2.
Miss Frances Bult N.S.W. 1934; Breakspear at tennis N.S.W. 1931; Jockey Shelton * 1934; Judge Beeby 1927.
P.3.
Mrs Roland Kitson 1932; Cricketer, Alexander Hurwood, bowling, Queensland, 1927; Miss Gladys de Haviland, 1929;
Charles Haywood, radio announcer, 1932; Jockey, W.Eastburn, 1934; Indigenous sailor 1932; Olympic swimmer, Noel Ryan, 1930; Sir Robert Garran 1932; Jim Mollison's plane, Mascot, 1931; Distance runner, Jack Sheaves, 1932;
Cricketer,Norman Falk, batting, 1934.
P.4.
B.Kelly (no given name) 1932 (cricketer?); Aust. cricketer, B.J.Tobin,1933; Mrs Mares, 1931; Sir Hugh Poynter, 1931; Rev.Dr.Edward Griffith,1928; Swimmer, Edna Davy, 1928; F.C.Thompson batting in Queensland,1927; Pianist, Wilhelm Baukhaust, 1926, Jockey O'Shea, 1934; Rev. David Flett Brandt, 1927.


TO BE CONTINUED. (P.5 ETC. IN PART 2 OF THE JOURNAL.)

FAMILY CONNECTIONS ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

FAMILY CONNECTIONS.
My apologies that many family connections have not been detailed but thanks to Janilye, I may now have time to finish this work. Some family connections from Moorooduc parish will be included in future journals.
EXTRACT FROM THE UNFINISHED PENINSULA DICTIONARY HISTORY.
The purpose of this entry, as with all of my efforts, is to give family historians some real detail to include in their published works. Here I have listed family connections that have been included in many of our local histories, several of which are not available for borrowing. In some cases, I have included possible links with my former area of research-Tullamarine and miles around.
All map co-ordinates given for properties are from Melway directories.

By strange coincidence, someone had earlier decided on family connections being an interesting topic. Jennifer Nixon?s book was published in 2003 and is entitled: FAMILY CONNECTIONS, SORRENTO and PORTSEA. As this book is available for loan, I will not give its details. Here are the families and people mentioned (with page numbers as it has no index; but only for first or major mentions).
Skelton (throughout), Redman iii, 37-8, Miss Tayton iii, Miss Gunn (tchr) iv, Clark 8,11 12-25, Newton 8,11, 42-8, 92 Craig 9 11,67 Page 8, White 8, Quinnan 8, Mitchell 8, Hobson 8, Bennett 10,11,26, 71 Watts 11,29-36, 56 Morce 11,37-8, 83,122 Schlipalius 83-5, Heywood 11,49-50 Dark 11, 69-70, 76-9 92 Keating 12, 16-17 Leonard 12, Willis 12, Coulston 12, Clarke 12, Morgan 12,19-23 McIntosh 12 Mackinnon 22, 117 Reeves (policeman) 118 Mr Holman(Tchr) 22, Hughes 25, 109 (Robertson26, Aitken26 ? Waratah Bay),Wheeler 29, Pike 29,103, Myers 29, Evans 29, Guy 29, Cain 29,56, 71-5 Reardon 29, Dillon 30, Tramar (Tchr)31, 126, teachers in 1890?s- Kemp, Sullivan, Daniels, Ford 36 90 Trentwith 37, Johnson 37,40-1, Holyhead 37, Price37, Ford 39,Mahood 41, Eltringham 42, Farnsworth 42,79-80 Knight 42, Watson 42,48 56,90,91-30 Gillett 42, King 42, Kentish 42, Dahl 42, Cottier 49, 75 Coker 49,52-3 Webb 49, Grayland 49, Bawden 49, Taylor 49, Jean Field 50, Boxey Williams 56, Jennings 56,75 Rowley 56, Hill 56, Hutchins 56, Erlandsen 56, Skillen 56, Tom Fox 56, Fritch 56, McKeown 56, Wong market gardens 56, Oscar Worth 56, Sapiano 61, shopkeepers 61-2, Norman Hall 75, Bevin 75, Spunner 75 Cairns 75, Johnston80-1, Lentell 81-2, Stringer 86-9, Sullivan90, Kenyon 90, Cannon 90, Grace 90, Murray 90, McGrath 90 Russell 92 McFarlan 92, Riley 52,Wilson 92-3 Mr Todgate ?Canterbury Jetty 96 Police fence petitioners of 1859 97-100 George Heaton 104, cab men who met the boats 106, Bensilium 108-9,120 Crawford 109, Yuille (Not the weird variations regarding Canvas Town in LIME LAND LEISURE) 109 Wooster 109-110, Popple 110, Croad 76, Goss 111, Allen 111-2 Williamson 112 Miss Burke (tchr) 111 Reddish 113 operators of the Baths 114 Kerr 115 Darbyshire 121-2, Robiliard 122
First pupils at 1090 Sorrento(in 1871) 124 Josiah Hiskens (tchr) 124, teachers123-9 Kemp 125 Wilson 94-5

SOURCE LIME LAND LEISURE
ADAMS-HOPCRAFT
Robert Henry Adams, son of Captain Henry Everest Adams, married Mary Jane Hopcraft. Mary?s family was farming at Melway 190 C8 (Wannaeue parish ) and on 178 acres between the start of Tucks Rd and Stony Creek in the parish of Balnarring. In December 1877, Robert applied for a licence for land, which was described as allotment 69 of section A, parish of Balnarring but was actually part A of allotment 69, granted to M.Byrne not too long afterwards. This was between Mornington-Flinders Rd and Tucks Rd and between John Hopcraft?s Wannaeue land and William Hopcraft?s Balnarring land.
Aha you say, that?s how Robert met his future wife. That, however, must remain a mystery because they were married in 1873. What is known is why Robert wanted to move away from Adams Corner. Mary might have been a Methodist; certainly she had a strong dislike of some of Captain Adams? seafaring ways, especially his love for the produce of his Vivyan Vineyard and his desire for youngsters to share his enjoyment. The family legend has it that she refused to live in the same house as the Captain.
For more details, see ADAMS CORNER by Ray Gibb at Dromana Museum.
CAIN-HUGHES
Owen Cain?s son Tom, of ?Rosslyn? married M.Hughes.
CAIN-MURRAY
Owen Cain?s first son, Joseph (who drowned in 1889 at the age of about 47) married Ann Murray. Murray St is on Owen Cain?s Tyrone Estate. In 1864, Joseph Cain received the grant for allotment 1 of section 14 in the Township of Dromana. This was all the land fronting Pt Nepean Rd between Heales St and Verdon St with the exception of the 7/11 site, which was purchased by Joseph?s good friend George McLear.
Ann Murray may have been the daughter of Mrs Margaret Murray who was the teacher at Dromana Common School from November 1869 until at least 1873.
I have no evidence that Joseph lived in Dromana except that he was the owner and occupier of town allotments in 1865 and 1879 and was a good friend of George McLear. It is possible that Joseph was a fisherman or working for Peter Pidota with Robert Rowley, who was a resident of Dromana by 1861. John McLear, brother of Joseph?s mate George was one of Dromana?s fishermen and it is possible that Joseph worked with him. Joseph?s drowning in 1889 was more likely as a result of his occupation than any recreational pursuit.
CAIN-HUGHES
Joseph Cain?s daughter, Julia, married James, the son of William Hughes. Hughes was engaged in limeburning. It is obvious that after Joseph?s death, Ann moved back to Rye to live with his parents near Canterbury Jetty Rd, which is not that far from Hughes Rd on whose west side Johanna T.Hughes had been granted 25 acres between Pt Nepean Rd and Labuan St in 1875.

CAIN-COOPER
Ada Cain, daughter of Joseph Cain and Ann (Murray) married Austin Cooper. As Joseph Cain had probably drowned by this time, Ann and her children were probably living in or near Tyrone. No mention of the Coopers appears in the rate records I have transcribed but one of my earliest works, an index for RYE PRIMARY SCHOOL BY Patricia Appleford (available at Rye Museum) reveals that the Cooper family is mentioned on pages 31, 34, 39, 40 and 53. BIRDIES AND BOGIES a history of the Rosebud Country Club reveals that one of the three sites considered for its establishment in about 1960 was a 146 acre farm with a house opposite Glen Lee in Boneo Rd owned by the Coopers.
CAIN-WATTS
Another of Joseph and Ann Cain?s daughters, Margaret, married John Francis Watts, one of whose claims to fame was as an enthusiastic driver of Coppin?s steam tram, which conveyed tourists from the Sorrento Jetty to the Ocean Amphitheatre.
CAIN- FORD
Owen Cain?s most prominent son, John, was a successful businessman and involved in civic affairs as the correspondent to the Board of Advice (responsible for provision of education between Dromana and the Heads) and as a councillor. John married Julia Ford, daughter of James Ford, a pioneer near Portsea. John must have spent a lot of time on the road travelling between his hotel at Portsea and his land at Rye and along Boneo Rd as well as the 130 acre allotment 21A of Wannaeue on the east side of Main Ridge Rd.

CAIN-JENNINGS
Michael Cain was a son of Joseph and Ann Cain. His son, Jack, married a Jennings girl.

CAIN-HILL
Owen Bigelow Cain, son of Michael Cain and Mary (Neville), married Ethel Hill. The Hill family is mentioned on pages 7,26-7,33-4,39,40,42,44,48,51,71,119,120,122, 144-151 and 157-8 of Patricia Appleford?s RYE PRIMARY SCHOOL.

THE BONEO CONNECTION-CASES ONE TO THREE!
CAIN-CAIRNS
Mary Agnes Cain, daughter of Michael and Mary (Neville), who was born during her parents? brief residency in Adelaide, married Henry (Hill Harry) Cairns, son of the original Boneo pioneer, Robert. It is possible that Michael lived for a time at John Cain?s Boneo Rd property before moving to Nepean Parish and Harry and Mary Agnes were schoolmates at the Boneo School.


CAIN-WILLIAMS
Allice Cain, daughter of Owen Bigelow Cain and Ethel (Hill), married J.Williams. It is possible that Owen was managing allotment 4 Wannaeue for John Cain, living in the old house, which still stands just south of Bunnings. As in the case of the previous entry, it is possible that Allice and the mysterious J.Williams attended the Boneo school together. It is probable that J.Williams was a descendant of Edward Williams who received grants on both sides of Browns Rd just east of Truemans Rd. Williams earned renown as an almost superhuman harvester while earning the money to buy his land and carted the old Dromana (McCrae) lighthouse to the summit of Arthurs Seat. Later, Edward leased and bought the better part of S.S.Crispo?s grants in Rosebud West and built Eastbourne, which still stands at 17 William Crescent.
Edward Williams had arrived in 1855 aboard a ship that was to conduct a survey of Port Phillip Bay. The ship?s company was invited to enjoy the hospitality of the Burrells at the Arthurs Seat homestead and Edward met Mary Campbell, who had come to Australia with Robert Cairns and his family and found employment with the Burrells. Much has been said in THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO and other histories of Jimmy the Squid Williams and Ned Williams (actually known as Ted according to Ray Cairns) who were both batchelors and dying a day apart (unmarried) were buried on the same day. Could it be that James Campbell Williams was not a bachelor or had a brother called John or James. Perhaps the brother had moved away from the area and thus missed out on becoming an identity.
CAIN-EDMONDS
Nora Cain, daughter of Owen Bigelow and Ethel (Hill) married Phil Edmonds. The Edmonds family farmed Edward Williams? land near Truemans Rd and later took over Alex Cairns? grant between John Cain?s allotment 4 and Boneo Rd.
CAIN-ROWLEY
Annie, daughter of Owen Bigelow and Ethel, married Robert Rowley. The information supplied by a Rowley informant differs in detail. Robert Rowley was born in 1876 and married Amie Margaret Cain.



CAIN-HILL
Ellen, daughter of Owen Bigelow and Ethel, married George Hill, who managed John Cain?s limekilns when John took over the Nepean Hotel (over the road from the Portsea hotel.)

SOURCE-THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO
CAIRNS-DRYSDALE
This entry concerns not two Peninsula families but pioneers on either side of the bay. Robert Cairns had married Mary Drysdale in Scotland and they traveled with Mary?s parents to Australia. Arriving in 1852, Robert and Mary settled at Boneo soon after, while Mary?s parents made their home on the western coast near the present town of Drysdale. Robert had intended to farm but found limeburning more lucrative. He had no trouble persuading his brothers, David and Alexander to join him a couple of years later.
CAIRNS-RUSSELL
John, the son of Robert and Mary, married Mary Russell. There were two men by the name of Russell involved in early peninsula history. Andrew Russell was a land speculator from the Essendon area who received a grant of land on the eastern side of Collins Rd in Dromana. Edward Russell had a lime station in Nepean parish in 1865. A map in LIME LAND LEISURE shows that this was on the western side of Dundas St just south of Owarra St. By 1879, Edward Russell was leasing 100 acres from the Crown in the parish of Wannaeue and he received the grant to this 103 acre property on the western side of the Truemans Rd tip site on 3-11-1880.
Edward was an old shipmate of John Watts but was not part of John?s desertion near Dromana. He probably wished he had been as he walked for two days to the Tootgarook Run to work for James Purves. He then worked as a limeburner for the Sullivans and drove cattle to the goldfields for the Skeltons. Edward Russell built his lime kiln in 1854 and probably operated it until Blair was granted the 163 acre allotment 19 of Nepean Parish on 19-6-1867.Hollinshed says that he then purchased 104 acres nearby, but we can assume that he started leasing it from the Crown at about that time.
We can assume that Mary Russell was the daughter of Edward Russell and his wife Mary (Stuart). Edward had met his future wife when he sought medical attention at the Quarantine Station where she was a nurse.
As you will see, this was not the only connection between the Cairns and Russell families. They were not exactly neighbours but the eastern boundary of Edwards land was only a mile and a half from the western boundary of Alexander Cairns? grant. Perhaps the Russell children went to the Boneo school.
CAIRNS-PATTERSON
Mary, the daughter of Robert and Mary, married William Patterson, the son of James Patterson. Robert had moved in the 1870?s to a new farm near Pattersons Rd in Fingal, which was surrounded by land granted to members of the Patterson family. William had married Christina, daughter of David Cairns but she died in 1877,five weeks after their third child was born. William later married Mary in 1880. The only child from William?s second marriage, William, married Ruby, the daughter of Rosebud Ted Cairns and Elizabeth (Bucher).
CAIRNS-WILSON
Janet, the daughter of Robert and Mary, married Robert Wilson. It is presumed that Robert was a grandson of Henry William Wilson and son of Henry John Wilson. Under Godfrey Wilson?s expansion of the family butchering business, land was bought at Boneo. Robert might also have been related to a George Wilson near Flinders.
CAIRNS-THOMPSON
David Cairns, brother of Robert, was married in Scotland to Janet Thompson. It is possible that relatives of Janet settled near Boneo. John and Percy Thompson had Wannaeue land in 1900, possibly near the Truemans and Browns Rd intersection. However John Thompson might have been the son of Widow Kettle (etc) near The Heads.
CAIRNS-RUSSELL
James, son of David and Janet, married Johanna (Hannah) Russell. (Russell details above.)
James Thompson Cairns supplemented the income from his farm (known as Alva Hill) by being Rabbit Inspector for the whole of the peninsula.
CAIRNS-RUSSELL
David, son of David and Janet, married Elizabeth Russell. (Russell details above.) David was known as Blacks Camp Davey. He purchased 52 acres near the Cape Schanck turn off in 1888 and according to place name records Cairns Bay was named after him; his nephew, Ray gives interesting insight into the naming of this bay (Melway 260 G12) in TALKING HISTORY WITH RAY CAIRNS by Ray Gibb. David broke his neck and was paralysed when he fell from a cart in 1897. He and Elizabeth ran a guest house at Flinders.
CAIRNS-RUSSELL
Christopher, son of David and Janet, married Margaret Russell. (Russell details above.)
In 1900, Chris was assessed on 140 acres, 32 d (and another illegible letter which I decided after five minutes of squinting might be r) and 9. Allotment 9 makes no sense whatever as Edward Connop seemed to have been farming that whole allotment as well as most of Edward Williams? land near the Browns/Truemans Rd intersection.
It appears that Chris was farming allotments 32d and 32 f , west of the north south section of the Government Road, parts of which are now known as Eastbourne Rd, Hove Rd and Seamists Dr. He must have been leasing it from the Crown because it was granted to J.A.Bayford on 16-2-1905. This land, between the Rosebud Public Park and Recreation Reserve and Seamists Dr, consists of 140.002 acres and is indicated by Melway 171 A-C3.
Chris was not assessed on Wannaeue land in 1900 or 1920. He and Margaret might have had to move away from the area to make a living but it is possible that he was in partnership with Edward Russell on farms in the parishes of Nepean or Fingal whose rate records I have not transcribed. Edward Russell had been granted allotment 4 of section C Fingal, (on the eastern side of Rogers Rd), consisting of 80 acres and indicated by Melway 253 J-K 6. This land was only 400 metres north of land bought by John and Robert Cairns on the other side of Rogers Rd. Most of the children of David and Janet Cairns were buried at Dromana but Chris and James Thompson, both married to Russell girls, were buried at Rye.
Postscript.
Speculation is fine if there is no way of confirming it but I knew that confirmation could be obtained by consulting the microfiche of rate records at Rosebud Library. The first thing confirmed was my opinion of the illegibility and inaccuracy of many entries. I do have sympathy for the rate collectors however. At the turn of the century, many landholders had abandoned their properties due to the depression of the 1890?s and subdivisions in Flinders and Nepean shires had led to an explosion in the number of properties assessed.
At the start of this entry, I mentioned the vague description of the 140 acres that Chris was farming in 1900. By 1909, John Airey Bayford, a teacher of Balnarring, had occupied his grant, which was described as 140 acres 32a 9Wa exactly the same wrong description as used for Christopher Cairns? land. Incidentally, I believe Bayford was a descendant of Captain Airey, a pioneer in the Bulla area (177 C2) or George Airey, a pioneer near Airey?s Inlet (511 D10).
Chris was assessed on this 140 acres (and 15 acres on allotment 2, the original grant to Robert, David and Alex Cairns) and had the former until at least 1903-4. By 1909, he was farming lot 3 of Barkers and was still farming there in 1912. The rate collector failed to mention whether it was in Wannaeue or Fingal. The map on page 62 of LIME LAND LEISURE shows that J.Barker sold Fingal land to James and R. Cairns, so I presume that block 3 was in Wannaeue on the pre-emptive right bounded by Browns, Grasslands, Limestone and Boneo Rds.
So it seems that Chris was not helping Edward Russell on the 80 acres that he owned near Rogers Rd. Edward did not have a farm in Nepean parish, but he did own one lot and a building at Sorrento.
He also owned lots 4 and 5 of section 12 at Dromana. These lots had been granted to R.D.Quinan on 30-3-1864 and each had a 20 metre frontage to Codrington and Verdon Streets, starting 40 metres from Hodgkinson St. In the 1909-10 assessments, Edward Russell?s name has been crossed out and replaced with that of Mrs C Cairns. The following years?s records show that Mrs C.Cairns was assessed on lots 4 and 5 of 12 Dromana, apparently now the owner. Forgetting to follow up the 88 acres on Barker?s, I thought that since Edward Russell might have died, his daughter Margaret could have inherited the 80 acres on Rogers Rd as well.
In 1909-10 Edward Russell had been assessed on the 80 acres, 4c Fingal but in the next assessment this land had disappeared from the face of the earth; perhaps Edward had died and the rate collector did not know whom to assess.
It appears that Chris and Margaret became Dromana residents. Their children are listed in THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO but I did not record them. However, I think that Doug was their son and he married a descendant of the pioneering Griffith family of Dromana. (See Griffith- Cairns entry.)
CAIRNS-SYMONDS
Robert Cairns, son of David and Janet, married Annie Symonds. The Symonds family seems to have been based at Flinders; Isabella, James and John Symonds were assessed on property there in 1895. S.P.Symonds was leasing a block from Allison in Dromana in 1897. Robert became known as Back Road Bob because he lived on that part of Cape Schanck Rd that was renamed Bayview Rd. Bob owned one of the drags that met the bay steamers at Dromana Pier. His sons, Davey and George drove passengers to Rosebud and picnic parties to the Cape Schanck lighthouse.
CAIRNS-PATTERSON
Christina, daughter of David and Janet, married William Patterson. They had four children: James (B.1871), Janet (Mrs Warren, whose artistic husband Fred died young so she relied on her Dromana shop for a livelihood for decades), Sarah (Mrs Bucher: Arthur Ernest and D.R. Bucher were both farmers near Boneo in 1910), and Win (Mrs Haddow: the Haddows lived at the north corner of Pattersons Rd) (253 D8-9). In 1877, five weeks after Win (actually Christina) was born, her mother died. William married Christina?s cousin (Mary, daughter of Robert Cairns and Mary (Drysdale) in 1880. Just to cement the Patterson-Cairns connection, William the only child from the second marriage married Ruby, daughter of Rosebud Ted Cairns.
(See The Cairns Family of Boneo.)


CAIRNS-McLEAR
Janet, daughter of David and Janet, married John McLear a professional fisherman of Dromana. They lived in a house that was demolished for the building of the drive-through bottle shop at the Dromana Hotel. As they were hardly neighbours, I would presume that they met at a dance or through a mutual friend, perhaps one of the Rudduck boys who farmed at Boneo.
CAIRNS-HADDOW
Henry, son of David and Janet, married Margaret Haddow. Henry was known as Rabbity or Carrier Harry because he conducted a daily service conveying passengers, fish and rabbits from Cape Schanck to the Mornington railhead. (Robert?s son, Henry, was known as Hill Harry.) On what looks like 5-7-1863, A.Haddow had received the grant of allotment 9 in the parish of Fingal. This 141 acre block was bounded by Cape Schanck Rd, Patterson Rd and Grasslands Rd (Melway 253 D8-9). Carrier Harrier probably inherited this block On page 33 of MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN, Hector Hanson mentions that he worked for Bill Haddow down Flinders way digging spuds and milking cows. Taking a short cut through the bull paddock he was forced to take refuge in a tree with the mean jersey bull pawing the ground at its base. Hec?s frantic whistles alerted George Haddow who came on a horse to rescue him.
CAIRNS-BUCHER
Edward, son of David and Janet, married Elizabeth Bucher. By 1910, Arthur Ernest Bucher and D.R.Bucher were farming Wannaeue land near and at Boneo.
The former had 30b of 50 acres, which by coincidence is adjacent to 50 acres granted to E.Cairns on 13-2-1923. Mt Arthur Ave. separated the two properties, which fronted the south side of Waterfall Gully Rd and extended from (almost) Bayview Ave. to Goolgowie St (Melway 170 H7.)
D.R.Bucher had Tweeddale?s grant of 187 acres bounded by Old Cape Schanck Rd, Grasslands Rd and Browns Rd. (170 E10) To the west of this triangular allotment, at the corner of Browns and Boneo Rd was allotment 2 granted to Robert, David and Alexander Cairns. (170 B11)
It is possible that the Buchers had been in the Boneo area earlier; I did not record assessments in the parish of Fingal. Edward was known as Rosebud Ted . His land on Waterfall Gully Rd might have earned him this title but I suspect that it was more likely because of his residence near the beach and his ownership of eight blocks on crown allotment 17 between Jetty Rd and the line of Norm Clarke Walk. His land was probably near McDowell St. In 1910, Edward and Elizabeth were both listed as contractors and Edward was also assessed on the 50 acres for which he received the grant and another 60 acres. As Mrs Cairns was assessed on ?2 acres and building, Rosebud, Edward and Elizabeth were on the foreshore area known as the village of Rosebud; land on the south of Pt Nepean Rd was designated Wannaeue.
CAIRNS-BALDRY
John, son of Alexander Cairns and Janet (Dalgleish), married Emme Baldry. The Baldry family had settled in the Main Ridge area by 1900 and luckily I recorded that Albert Baldry was assessed in that year on 450 acres in Fingal. John Baldry had 161 acres in Wannaeue (Melway 254 E5.) Albert Baldry?s land was probably near the south end of Greens Rd.
John Dalgleish Cairns was not assessed in the 1900 rates, at that stage being about 48 years old, having been born in 1852. This leads me to believe that he might have been traveling far and wide to seek work during the depression or was working on the Baldry farm or perhaps with his cousin James Thompson Cairns (the Shire?s rabbit inspector who happened to have the 80 acre triangle bounded by Greens, Baldrys and Limestone Roads.)
Ten years later, John Dalgleish Cairns was assessed on 163 acres (3 of 29a) and 150 acres (15ab). Mrs J.D.Cairns was assessed on 161 acres in Wannaeue. Approximations for the first two parcels of land are: Melway 190 C3 and 171 B-C11. I believe that the third was a total of 159 acres 6 roods and 47 perches (160.3.7) granted to the aforementioned rabbit inspector (254 E2, and the part of Greens Bush north of Limestone Rd.) J.D.Cairns received the grant for allotment 17 Wannaeue of 175 acres on 30-6-1916. (170 G10.) This land had frontages to Jetty, Grasslands and Browns Rds.

CHAPMAN-SHEEHAN. (page 77, Dreamtime of Dromana.)
George Chapman married Elisabeth Bain in 1865. I have a theory that Elisabeth was the daughter of the chap that built a flour mill on Lochton (177 A-E 4) in 1856 and that George had gone there when he arrived in 1857. Cay, (Fred) Chapman and Kaye had sold their grants (3 G-H 1-6) in about 1853 and it is likely that Fred was leasing Lockton when his haystack was destroyed by fire in 1856.
George came to Dromana in 1862 and after working as a bullocky (until his team was killed by a disease) and a carrier, he bought Sea Winds on Arthurs Seat in 1876.
George?s first son, John, married Edith Sheehan from Red Hill. John, born in 1866, took Edith to Western Australia in the gold rush of the 1890?s. John and his brother set up a successful water condensing business in Kalgoorlie. Thomas returned to Red Hill after a few years to become an orchardist but John stayed and died in Bunbury during a typhoid epidemic in 1901. Edith returned to the Sheehan home in Red Hill with her little daughter.

SOURCE: LIME LAND LEISURE
CLARK-SKELTON See ?Family, Connections, Sorrento and Portsea by Jennifer Nixon.



* MEANS REFER TO ?Family, Connections, Sorrento and Portsea?.
*CLARK-CLARK
William, son of John Boswell Clark and Mary Ann, married Maggie Clark. Was Maggie one of John Sullivan?s children? ?Those Courageous Hardy Women? probably answers this question.
*CLARK-KEATING
Annie, daughter of John Boswell Clark and Mary Ann, married William Keating.

*COTTIER-DARK
William, son of (James?) married Lillian Dark. William Cottier (senior) rented land in the Safety Beach area and started the Rye Hotel on the Dromana hospital site, between Spencer Ave and the highway bend (Melway 159 K 5) in 1859. Later he obtained grants for land between Collins Rd and just west of Lombardy St but soon sold to Walter Gibson and moved to Rye, and with John Campbell started the Rye Hotel east of Napier St. William Snr might well have had a brother named James (who was the father of a William) James? name has not been seen on a Kangerong parish map or in Kangerong rate assessments. If James had a son named William, so did William Snr, because the grantee of crown allotment 1 of section 6 in Rye Township was named as W.Collier Jr.
This allotment had a frontage of 100 metres to Collingwood St and 80 metres to Napier St. The rest of section 6 was occupied by the cemetery and State School, the latter having expanded into William Jnr?s grant. A map on page 60 of LIME LAND LEISURE shows that William Jnr?s grant was later occupied by Sullivan, Mrs Myers and facing the cemetery, Maxwell?s wine saloon. Interestingly, Tom Bennett and Edward Russell are shown as occupying the western end of the cemetery site; perhaps they had a lime kiln there when the township was surveyed.
The William who married Lillian was supposed to have been the son of James and born at Dromana in 1864. Hollinshed gives details of Cottier farms near Rye.
COTTIER-O?BRIEN
Jock, son of James, married Madge O?Brien.
COTTIER-DELLAR
James, son of Jock, married Emily Dellar.
CRICHTON-SHAND
Hughie married a Shand girl and their daughter, Catherine, was killed in a carriage accident. Was this the Catherine Crichton of Glen Lee whose grave is prominent at the Dromana cemetery?
The main Crichton property was Glenlee fronting the west side of Boneo Rd from Browns Rd to Limestone Rd. In 1900, John Crichton was assessed on this land. Alexander Crichton was assessed on 678 acres that had been granted to J.Lovie and included most of the land bounded by Hiscock Rd, Truemans Rd, Browns Rd and an eastern boundary indicated by the end of Henry Wilson Dr. This land was not very close to Shands Rd at Main Ridge but a third parcel was. Catherine Crichton was assessed on 344 acres described as being 8a, 9ab Wannaeue. The rate collector was almost right; the land actually consisted of 10b, 9b and 8a (344 acres 0 roods and 37 perches.) This property is almost bisected today by Valleyview Lane (254 H 1-4), and was only 520 metres from the south west boundary of Alexander Shand?s 105 acres (which was adjacent to 352 acres owned by the Shands across Shands Rd.) This was another example of romance between neighbours before Reg Grundy thought of his series!
*CROAD-SPUNNER
William Joseph Spunner married Adelaide Maud, daughter of John Spunner. Under the Spunner entry in LIME LAND LEISURE, the Spunner girl?s name was given as Madeline Maud.

DARK-ROGERS
Edwin Dark married Ann Rogers, possibly before moving to the peninsula. There are many references to the family in Patricia Appleford?s ?Rye Primary School?; the Rye Historical Society has an index for the book that I produced, which will give you the relevant pages. Edwin farmed Hughes land. This could have been Johanna T.Hughes? grants of 25 acres fronting the western side of St Johns Wood Rd from the beach road to Whitehead St or land on Hughes Rd bought from somebody like Red Hill?s McRavey.
All Darks following are Ann and Edward?s children.

DARK-WHITE
Nellie Dark married George White. George and other people who contributed to the community*, such as the Sullivans, Cains, Stennikens, Bakers and McDonalds managed to buy a bit of Rye Township thankfully. Most of the land was gobbled up by Blair and Monahan. The McDonalds later bought some of Blair?s land south of the cemetery and built a private golf course (discussed in RAY CAIRNS TALKS HISTORY), which is recalled by Golf Pde and Golf Lane. (* I am unsure whether Peter S.Sinclair should be classified as a pioneer or a speculator. See Sinclair under Historic Street Name Origins.)
George bought allotments 7 and 8, now that highway frontage between the 1927 portion of the Rye hotel and Dundas St, extending halfway to Nelson St. on 10-6-1865 (if my reading of microscopic printing is correct.) It was probably from here that he carried on his business as a carrier.
In 1879, George was leasing 103 acres from the Crown. This had to be 38A of the parish of Wannaeue (Melway 169 B9-11) west of the Truemans Rd tip. George was dispossessed when this was granted to Edward Russell on 3-11-1880.Edward was an early limeburner who earned himself a long walk from Melbourne because he did not desert his ship when several of his fellow crew members (John Watts, Tom Bennett, John Dillon) rowed ashore, supposedly in a bath tub, near Dromana.
George responded by obtaining the grant for 34B on 2-7-1884. Consisting of 105.65 acres it fronted the present Spring Lane and is indicated by Melway 168 K12. By 1900, W.White had a 36 acre portion and another, un-named White was also assessed on 36 acres. The remaining 33 acres may have been forfeited because of the 1890?s depression. George had probably bought The Williams? butcher shop at the corner of George St and Hotham Rd by this stage and converted it into a residence. In 1910 an un-named White was still occupying 36 acres but had just sold it to somebody from Elsrernwick. James Patrick Sullivan had 30 acres and the remainder (39 acres) might have been owned by Capt. David Jones, who would have kept the title deeds in his locker!
George does not seem to have been related to two other White families living in the area. Robert White rented a hut from the Cairns brothers near 170 C11 in 1864 and his family established itself at 171G4. E.W.White had land in the Woyna Estate (See Woyna Ave) by 1920 and was running the Mayville Guest House in 1950.
George White?s occupation as a carrier would have led to his acquaintance with families over a wide area, so whether Edwin Dark was farming at St Johns Wood Rd or Hughes Rd, that is possibly how he met Nellie. A map on page 56 of LIME LAND LEISURE shows that George White had a lime kiln at 157 D12, just west of Hughes Rd so this could have been another reason for their acquaintance.

DARK-SKELTON
Ann Dark married James Skelton. See pages 11, 69-70, 76-9 and 92 of Jennifer Nixon?s FAMILY, CONNECTIONS, SORRENTO AND PORTSEA.

DARK-COTTIER
See COTTIER-DARK. See pages 49 and 75 of Jennifer Nixon?s book re Cottiers. The author of LIME LAND LEISURE seems to have been confused about the Cottier family tree. He constantly refers to James Cottier receiving grants at Dromana; it is William Cottier?s name that appears on parish maps and in early rate records.

DARK-BROWN
Edwin Dark married Jessie Brown. Nobody by the name of Brown was assessed in Nepean parish in 1865, the only year for which I transcribed assessments there. However there was a Charles Brown assessed on 20 acres and a hut on 20 acres in Kangerong parish near Dromana in 1865. In 1879, Charles, Henry and Henry A.Brown owned five of the eight allotments in section 3 of Dromana Township, bounded by Codrington, Foote, and McArthur Streets. As Hollinshed does not give dates, Edwin could have married a girl from this family or a daughter of Jim Brown who resuscitated rabbit and ti tree infested land early in the 1900?s. I believe this family might have moved west as I have noticed but not recorded the surname, probably in Nepean Parish, which I thought strange because of the later arrival of the Rye area?s saviour, who in 1910 had 1459 acres in Wannaeue and Nepean parishes. Strangely he was supposedly known as Jim Brown when his name was recorded in rate records as John H.Little Brown. The third given name indicates that he might have had a connection through marriage to the Purves family of Tootgarook and ?Green Hills? on Purves Rd.




DARK-WATSON
Walter Dark married Rose Watson. Rose was most likely from the family that fished at Weeroona Bay for almost a century from the early 1860?s. See extensive detail about the Watsons on page 42 of LIME LAND LEISURE.

Before Coppin?s town e?er saw a funnel
Men fished the Sorrento Channel;
At Portsea, Jack Inglis, before the Watsons, led the way;
When they came, he left for Queennscliff across the bay.

Henry and John came in ?60, Alex in ?62.
Sons of a Banff fisherman, who left the diggings for a trade they knew
And set up at Pt. Franklin to start their piscatorial labour;
Dennis McGrath?s cottage housed their only neighbour.

Near The Sisters, Scott, Holley,Watts and Stonner the Dane
Caught boatloads of fish time and time again
With the help of a lookout and signals for detail:
Not getting them to markets fresh the reason they?d fail.

John Watson who?d used a lookout in the first place
Moved in 1873 to the group?s West Sister base.
Hutchins came in the 80?s, Erlandsen at decade?s end.
For near a century Watsons plied the trade they kenned.

(Verses 1-4 of Early Fishermen by Ray Gibb, August 2010.)

DARK-HUDSON
Charles Dark son of Edwin and Ann (Rogers) married Grace Hudson.

DARK-JOHNSTON
Frances, daughter of Edwin and Ann, married Charles Henry Johnston, a builder at Sorrento.

DOWNWARD-EDWARDS
Henry Edward Downward, son of Edward Downward Jnr married Eileen Edwards of a pioneering Red Hill family. Both families lived in the parish of Balnarring, which is east of Bulldog Creek Rd, where the Downwards secured early grants, and east/south of Red Hill-Arthurs Seat Rd to Mornington-Flinders Rd. As I did not record assessments in Balnarring, I cannot give details of their land holdings but the two families probably lived within a mile of eachother. William Edwards? entry in Victoria and Its Metropolis (1888) stated that he owned 300 pounds worth of property in the area so he might have been the original member of the family near Dromana.
In August, 1878, William Edwards, a farmer of Dromana, mortgaged allotment 86 of crown allotment 18, Wannaeue, to Henry Everest Adams (whose farm was between The Avenue and Adams Avenue) to secure a loan of 128 pounds and 9 shillings, which was to be repaid with interest on 30-6-1880.(ADAM?S CORNER by Ray Gibb.)
Allotment 86 would have consisted of 2 acres and contained FJ?s site at the corner of Jetty Rd, Rosebud. The nett annual value of the land would have been not much more than two pounds so there must have been a building on it even more grand than Richard Watkin?s 12 roomed brick Dromana Hotel. Edwards? 1888 entry stated that he owned the popular Schnapper Point Hotel on the Dromana Rd. As the rates show only two hotels in Dromana, this hotel (which Edwards probably lost in the depression of the 1890?s) might have been the building that Jack Jones used as a store in 1900 but was burnt down before Isobel Moresby could see it. She knew only of a little lolly shop.
I believe that William Edwards? father also ran a Schnapper Point Hotel in Mornington (directory); surely if the Dromana resident?s hotel was in Mornington, he would have so described its location. In 1910 and until Lou Carrigg bought the Dromana Hotel just before WW1, George S.Edwards owned and ran it. Due to the shared occupation of publican, I presume a family link with the Mornington publican and Dromana farmer, William. Richard George Edwards, a grazier of Dromana, was possibly George?s father.
Ken, Norm and Don Edwards played football for Dromana after WW2.Alf Hanson was apparently referring to a member of this Red Hill family when he related an incident that happened outside the Red Hill dance during a break. Jack Wright and Alf were outside with two wrestlers, Billy Misky and Sideboard Edwards.

ERLANDSEN-SWAN
Erland Erlandsen married Edith Alice Swan. Erland deserted his ship with $1 in his pocket, presumably about 1890 when he started fishing at the Western Sister. He bought Stonner?s 4.5 acres oposit the Sorrento camping ground in about 1915-6. His son, Tally ran the baths and took out fishing parties. (LLL pages 42 and 118.)
David Swan was a limeburner and manager/agent for Melbourne lime merchant W.A.Blair. On 30-7-1877, David Swan received the Grant for allotment 67, Nepean, of 35 acres, bounded by Mission St and John Bertram Drive.

FARNSWORTH-FORD John Farnsworth married Ann Elizabeth Ford, daughter of James Sandle Ford. John was a builder who first came to the area to build the Sorrento Hotel and later built the Nepean Hotel (across the road from the Portsea Hotel) for James Sandle Ford.
FIRTH-HARVEY.(and Harvey-Adams)
This marriage took place in 1733 but could account for the two families settling fairly close together well over a century later. Their grandsons (Firth) came to Moorooduc in 1857 and Balnarring about 1880. James Firth received a 379(?) acre grant at the nw corner of Myers and Byrnes Rds and T.Harvey received a 19 acre grant in the Red Hill Closer Settlement, just west of Sheehans Corner (Melway 19190 J4.) By 1910 the Harveys had 357 acres near Whites Rd off Purves Rd as well as their land in Balnarring parish. Mary Helen Adams, daughter of Robert Adams of Rosebud, married Ernest Lester Harvey in 1907.
FIRTH-BENTON
James Firth married Ellen Benton in about 1884.
Both families owned land in the parish of Balnarring, James as specified in the previous entry. J.G.Benton received grants totaling 207 acres on the nw side of Warrawee Rd, Balnarring. The Firths and Bentons would have been neighbours earlier in Moorooduc.
(Probably near 147 J1 and 147 A9.)

FIRTH-GILLIGAN John Firth married Kate Gilligan. I know that this is drawing a long bow, but I believe that the Firths like most immigrants in the 1850?s would have tried their luck at the diggings. Many pioneers already on the peninsula did so. I believe that John Sullivan tried his luck in 1854 and John Firth slightly earlier. It was in 1854 that Samuel Brees (after whom Brees Rd in East Keilor is named) built the first decent bridge over the river at Keilor. Before that, those headed to Ballarat used Raleigh?s Punt at Maribyrnong and diggers en route to Forest Creek or Sandhurst (Castlemaine and Bendigo) traveled through Bulla. Kate?s family was probably working for Dennis Brannigan on ?St Johns? (384 G4) and may just have been selling vegetables outside Tulip Wright?s inn to tourists waiting to cross that former Chief Constable?s rudimentary bridge. Not having seen any mention of the name Gilligan in the many histories I have read about the peninsula, I feel entitled to hazard a guess about how John and Kate met.

FORD-SULLIVAN James Sandle Ford married Hannah, daughter of Dennis and Honora Sullivan. Dennis was the grower of the huge cucumber that amazed Melbourne in 1843 just before they left for the Heads, so it was probably Hannah who grew the vegetables that Ford sold to ships entering the bay and later, the Quarantine Station.

GIBSON-McLEAR
Adam, son of Walter, married Mary Ann the daughter of Mary Ann McLear, who was a widow, when she arrived in the Dromana area. For full details, see Dreamtime of Dromana by Colin McLear.
Mary Ann settled on Jamiesons Special Survey, the eastern part of which is now Safety Beach, between Dunns and Sheepwash Creek near the present southbound off ramp. She grew crops on her rented property, the Willow, handling her workers firmly to ensure that they performed properly but she never had to worry about Edward Williams when it came to harvesting. She was in partnership with hawker, Charles Graves, and later acquired a farm that he had bought and had the Rhymers fence, where she established ?Maryfield?.
Walter landed his livestock and belongings at Safety Beach (probably at the mouth of Sheepwash Creek where Peter Pidota used to load timber and other cargo on his ?Little Angelina?*) and before long rented a farm just north of Walter St, previously occupied by William Cottier, who opened the Rye Hotel in Dromana in 1859**. Dunns Creek used to flow into Sheepwash Creek but Walter straightened the last mile of it. Sheepwash Creek acquired its name because Walter used it to wash his sheep before shearing. Walter?s farm was adjacent to The Willow. **LIME LAND LEISURE
Mary Ann purchased Maryfield from Graves on 31-1-1860 and a few years later Walter Gibson bought Cottier?s grant 400 metres to the west of Maryfield, on the west side of the present Collins Rd; Cottier moved to White Cliff and with John Campbell established the Rye Hotel on the east side of Napier St, which led to White Cliff?s new name of Rye. (The present Rye hotel occupies the site of Patrick Sullivan?s Gracefield Hotel, demolished and replaced by the Hunts in 1927.) So the two families remained neighbours. Walter continued building a house (a stone?s throw east of the present Ponderosa Place) that Cottier had started, and named it Glenholme. Walter had also bought Cottier?s other grant, west to about Tulip St and added land on the survey in the early 1900?s to give him a total of over 1000 acres.
*Rosebud:Flower of the Peninsula? by Ray Gibb, a summary of Isobel Moresby?s history.

GIBSON-CHAPMAN
Isabella, daughter of Walter Gibson and Margaret, married Henry George Chapman who owned the land that is now Dromana?s footy ground and sold it to council at a very low cost when the former racecourse and footy ground behind Lou Carrigg?s Dromana Hotel
Became Spencer Jackson?s Foreshore Estate in about 1927. Henry George Chapman was the brother of Nelson Rudduck?s wife and had probably moved to Dromana at about the same time that his sister did. Their parents received land grants at the southern end of Tullamarine Island (Melway 3 G-H 1-6) but moved to Springvale after a fire destroyed their haystack in 1856, probably on Lochton*. Henry George Chapman had his smithy at the corner of Pier and Gibson St and it is likely that Isabella took a short cut through the paddocks of Glenholme when she was sent to do some shopping and so met the blacksmith.
(*See CHAPMAN-SHEEHAN.)

JENNINGS-HADDOW, JENNINGS-TUCK.
Ann, daughter of Cecil Jennings, married T.Haddow. When I first came to this entry, I thought, ?I?ll be struggling to show how the two families connected!? The Haddows were associated with the Westernport side of the Peninsula and the closest the two families came in land ownership were Melway 253 D8 (A.Haddow- crown allotment Fingal) and 168 F-G 10 (Jennings- crown allotments 20 and 21 Nepean, ?Kariah? then ?Milangil?).
However Linda Bernt, a Jennings descendant, wrote an informative article about her family, which appeared on page 20 of the Southern Peninsula News in the 13-7-2010 issue. During the 1890?s depression, which resulted in the loss of land near Drysdale, George Jennings and his adult sons (Ern,Cec. and Bernard) moved between Flinders, Cranbourne and Camperdown before settling on Kariah in 1914. The family connection obviously occurred before 1914 at Flinders. Another family connection took place. Cecil met Catherine Tuck and by 1914 they had nine children so the Jennings family must have been at Flinders soon after 1900 if not before. For more details of the Haddow family, see CAIRNS-HADDOW.

JENNINGS-BRIGHT Lesley Jennings married ? Bright. THIS IS ANOTHER GENEALOGICAL ERROR IN "LIME LAND LEISURE". NOT HAVING TROVE ETC. AT HIS DISPOSAL, CHARLES HOLLINSHED HAD TO RELY ON WHAT HE WAS TOLD BY FAMILY MEMBERS. IT WAS ACTUALLY JENNINGS-BLIGHT. DETAILS ARE SUPPLIED IN COMMENT 1 OF MY JOURNAL " THE JENNINGS OF DRYSDALE, FLINDERS ETC."

THOMPSON-WIDOW KETTLE
MERCER- WIDOW KETTLE/THOMPSON
Please read the complicated details in LIME LAND LEISURE. Kettle was a limeburner and the widow of a relative came to stay with him. She later married twice and some of her descendants married Portugese settlers who had worked at Kettle?s kiln.

MERCER-HILL
Elizabeth Mercer, the widow?s daughter married George Hill. One of their sons was presumably the George Hill who married Ellen Cain (see CAIN-HILL).
THOMPSON-HOLLEY
Jack Thompson (a.k.a. Kettle) married Anne, daughter of Paddy Holley, fisherman.
(See DARK-WATSON entry re Holley.)

THOMPSON-HOLLEY
Jack, son of the above, married Maggie, daughter of Paddy Holley.

THOMPSON-BENNETT
Ezekiel Thompson married Ann, daughter of Tom Bennett, who had deserted from the JamesMcBean near Dromana in 1856 with John Watts and John Dillon. He was an early limeburner, operating in Nepan parish, with his own lime station (kiln) by 1865. Ezekiel Thompson probably followed the same occupation and may have been working for Bennett when he met Ann. The map of the parish of Wannaeue available on the internet shows E. Thompson as the owner of allotment 28B of 55 acres on the north west corner of Truemans Rd and Limestone Rd. This map was drawn in 1887 and N.Graham seems to have been the original grantee.

McGRATH-SULLIVAN
Richard McGrath married Margaret, daughter of Dennis Sullivan.
(See THOSE COURAGEOUS HARDY WOMEN for much detail.)



McGRATH-CALDWELL
John, son of the above, married _. Caldwell. How the two met is hard to imagine. E.Caldwell received the grant for allotment 4 in section 3 Kangerong, south of Boundary Rd (Melway 159, J 9-12) and consisting of almost 297.5 acres. Caldwell Rd, west of the neighbouring Gracefield, is named after him. Robert Caldwell bought 172 acres between Sheehans Rd and the end of Holmes Rd in Red Hill. W.Caldwell also received the grant for 167 acres bisected by Shergolds Lane (160 G 6-9.) Grants were also issued to family members in the parish of Tyabb near Somerville. (See THE WAY WE WERE by Leila Shaw.)
My two guesses about how the families became acquainted are:
1. The Caldwells seem to have been well off to be able to buy multiple grants and could have finished up living at Portsea or Sorrento. The argument against this is that McGrath family descendants could not tell Hollinshed the bride?s Christian name.
2. Like Robert Rowley, John McGrath might have moved away from home for a seafaring life, perhaps fishing at Hastings. If he did so, he would not have been far from the Caldwell grants in the parish of Tyabb.The argument against this is that the Caldwell grants are marked Colwell on Leila Shaw?s map (although the name is spelt properly elsewhere in her book.)

McKEOWN-TOWNSEND
James McKeown married Catherine Townsend. The Hillas (Hillis), McKeown and Townsend families came to Dromana from Koroit. Mary the sister of James came with her husband (William Hillis) in 1855 and he acquired grants near Whites Rd off Purves Rd. James came in 1862 and bought 200 acres south of the Red Hill footy ground. He married Catherine Townsend in 1863 and brought her to Red Hill.John Townsend (1840-1918), who was probably Catherine?s brother, occupied 3 town lots and a hut in Dromana by 1865, and for many years ran a store in George McLear?s old butchers shop.
James sold his RedHill property to the Sheehans in 1889 and, moving to Dromana, continued the orchard started by William Grace on Gracefield, later building a guest house named Aringa on the corner of Clarendon and Foote Sts.(See Dreamtime of Dromana P. 86-8 for their children.)

McKEOWN-SHAW
Maud, daughter of the above, married Archie Shaw, son of Ben Shaw, former traveling draper, who started a guest house in 1880.
(See Dreamtime of Dromana P.88 about their children and guest house.)

MOAT-TRUEMAN
Charles, son of William Moat, married Sarah, daughter of James Trueman. I suspect that the two families became acquainted through Ben Stenniken, Trueman?s northern neighbour on the west side of Truemans Rd. Stenniken often passed Moats Corner on the way to another property he farmed (151 A 12). Charles was farming at Moat?s Corner in 1900 but by 1910 was in Rye.
(See DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, and RYE PRIMARY SCHOOL 1667, Pages 27,35,47,52,54,55,61.)


MOAT-CAMPBELL
William, son of Charles, who had moved to Rye, married Ada Campbell.
It is likely that Ada was a descendant of John Campbell who built the original Rye Hotel on crown allotments 6 and / or 7 of section 1 in the township of Rye. These allotments lay between points 60 metres east of Napier St and 100 metres west of Lyons St. He was in partnership with William Cottier who contributed the hotel licence and name, transferred from the hotel that he had operated at Dromana in 1859 (LLL). Campbell was also responsible for an early portion of the Rye Pier. Details of this Campbell family?s involvement in Rye can be found on pages 20-22, 28, 31-2, 34-5, 40, 51 and 120 of Patricia Appleford?s ?Rye Primary School 1667?.
Because it involved a family concerned with my previous area of research, Tullamarine and miles around, the following is etched in my mind and I think the reference was in Rosalind Peatey?s ?Pine Trees and Box Thorns?. Edward Campbell, who served as Lord Mayor of Melbourne, spent many holidays in Rosebud and often went out fishing with Jack Peatey on his huge coutta boat. Edward bought the block on the eastern side of the access road to the Rosebud Jetty, which is to be developed to include apartments and a caf?. (Plan of Early Rosebud by unknown pioneer included in my ?Early Rosebud?).
When the late Donald Kennedy?s huge estate north of Broadmeadows Township (Westmeadows) was sold off before 1920, Edward Campbell bought two of the farms, keeping Springbank (6 A-B 4-5). Willowbank, south to Kenny St, now Alanbrae, and including streets that I had named after farms and pioneers (Chandos, Willowbank, Corrigan, Lloyd, Chadwick, Mitchell, Lockhart, Gilmore and Mitchell) became his son, Keith?s property. The family was heavily involved in the Oakland Hunt Club.
What makes this second alternative very likely is that Jack Peaty and Charles Moat had grown up as neighbours and worked together at Bernard Eaton?s gold mine not far east of their properties; these were on Bittern Rd with the Moats on the west corner of Harrisons Rd and the Peateys on the east corner. In 1878, Jack?s parents (George and Susan) realized that their battle to farm successfully on their 100 acre property (which was too wet) was futile and with a loan from Nelson Rudduck bought a 2 acre block on the north corner of Jetty Rd and McDowell St, which they occupied in 1888. Jack bought a village (foreshore) block east of Peateys Creek (Murray-Anderson Rd) in 1894.
Dances were an important part of life in any country towns and which ones you attended on the peninsula depended on where you lived. Hec Hanson, who lived at Alpine Chalet on Tucks Rd, attended dances at Red Hill and Main Ridge. Those on the eastern coast would alternate between Rye, Rosebud and Dromana. Both groups would go to dances at Boneo (on the present C.F.A. site.) Jack Peatey played the concertina at the Rosebud Dance and after a day of fishing with him, it is not too hard to picture Edward Campbell taking Keith and his other children to the dance; nor, if Ada was his daughter, to imagine Jack introducing Ada to his former neighbour, Charlie Moat and his son William.
N.B. Neil Campbell (after whom Campbellfield was named) and Edward might have been related. Campbell St in Westmeadows would have been named after one of them.



PATTERSON-STENNIKEN
Ralph, son of the original James Patterson, married Rachel Stenniken.The Stennikens had land in Truemans Rd and further west in the parish of Nepean as well as renting near the western end of Jamiesons?s Special Survey. The Pattersons could have been on the survey in 1865 when James Patterson was assessed on a two-roomed house in Kangerong.
By the 1870?s the Pattersons had moved to Fingal and selected land for which they received grants in the next decade. Ralph Patterson?s grant, consisting of nearly 245 acres, was at the south west corner of Pattersons Rd and Grasslands Rd. 260 metres south of Pattersons Rd and across Grasslands Rd was the 142 acre grant of Mary Jane Stenniken, granted in 1904, but probably selected much earlier; she was probably a widow and women would not have had the opportunity to make money as fencers, sawyers etc that the men did.
The proximity of the farms would seem to explain the family connection but an earlier meeting probably took place when the Patterson lads, all good horsemen, worked for horse breeders, the Purves, at Tootgarook, often driving horses to Melbourne to be sold at Kirks Bazaar. The Stenniken grant (169 C4) was between Truemans Rd and the Tootgarook square mile pre-emptive right.
(See STENNIKEN-CLEMENGER entry re Dromana and Safety Beach.)

PATTERSON-ELLIS (Patterson-Lucas, Patterson-Cairns).
James, son of William and Christina (Cairns) and grandson of the original James Patterson of Fingal, married Mary Ellis. Two of their sons, Alex and Ross, established Patterson motors on the Safeway site near Rosebud Primary School. The business later moved to the corner of Adams Ave and is now Wignall Ford. Alex married May Lucas and Ross married Ivy Cairns, daughter of Rosebud Ted Cairns.James later ran a guest house called Antrim in Main St, Sorrento.(THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO Peter Wilson.)
I am aware of three possible locations where Mary Ellis could have been living when she met James Patterson. In MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN Hec Hanson mentions Smith Ellis?s property on the Flinders Road, just below Barkers Rd in about 1920. A ride through Green?s Bush would make William Patterson? farm about 3.5 miles from that of Smith Ellis.
The other two properties were in Rosebud, also in 1920. Henry Ellis owned ?land and buildings, Rosebud? and H. B. Ellis ?lot 25a C/A 19, Wannaeue?. Due to two of James? sons being involved in Rosebud, Mary Ellis probably grew up at one of these properties so I will detail their locations. Rosebud meant only Rosebud Village on the foreshore. No crown allotment was given so it is fortunate that an unknown pioneer drew a plan of early Rosebud, which is in my book of that name, and shows the land owned by Harry Ellis.
This is how to find the block. Find ?Parkmore?, built in 1896, on the western corner of Parkmore Rd. Cross Pt Nepean Rd and take the nearest access track to the beach. Walk towards the jetty until you come to a drain. Harry Ellis would have called this Eeling Creek, and it was the eastern boundary of his block, which extended west for 20 metres.
H.B.Ellis may have been Harry or a relative. The subdivision plan that helps me to describe the location of this land is in my ?Adams? Corner?. The blocks were about 20 metres by 100 metres with section A fronting Pt Nepean Rd and section B fronting Rosemore Rd. Lot 25 in section A, labeled H.E. Ellis, had a frontage between points 80 and 100 metres east from Adams Avenue and extended south halfway to Rosemore Rd.
How did James Patterson meet Mary Ellis? Was he on his way to visit his brother Ralph in McCulloch St, Dromana when he saw Mary on his left just before the ?white bridge? (Eeling Creek)? Or did he ride to Rosebud with his relative Jack Stenniken to meet Jack?s girl, Ivy Clemenger of Parkmore, who introduced James to her friend and neighbour, Mary Ellis.

PATTERSON-CAIRNS
William Patterson, son of the original James Patterson, married Christina, daughter of the original David Cairns, who bore four children and died in 1877 soon after the last was born. He then married Margaret, daughter of the original Robert Cairns. See the two CAIRNS-PATTERSON entries near the start.

PATTERSON-CAIRNS
William, son of William Patterson and Margaret (Cairns) married Ruby, daughter of Rosebud Ted Cairns and Elizabeth (Bucher).
Rosebud Ted (1865-1943), the last child of the original David Cairns, did not need a nickname because Robert and Alex did not name any of their boys ?Edward?. He probably acquired his nickname between 1900 when he had 20 acres on ?Little Scotland? (Melway 170 B10) and 1910 when he was working as a contractor in Rosebud and owned two village (foreshore) blocks, six lots on Woolcott?s subdivision between Jetty Rd and the line of Norm Clarke Walk. He was also assessed on 60 acres and 50 acres in the parish of Wannaeue. The Buchers were early residents of Rosebud Village, explaining the meeting of Ted and Elizabeth. In 1910, the only Patterson assessed outside Fingal was Ralph, in Dromana.
William and Ruby could have met at a dance but I believe that their acquaintance developed near Boneo. In 1910 D.R.Bucher had 187 acres south of the curve in Browns Rd just west of where it meets Jetty Rd. Rosebud Ted received the grant for 57 acres in 1911; this triangular allotment was bounded by: Eastbourne Rd, Bayview-Old Cape Schanck Rd and Jetty Rd. In 1923, Ted received the grant for almost 50 acres between Waterfall Gully Rd and Greenhill Rd. Rosebud Ted might have had land at Fingal too, which supposedly led to the naming of Cairns Bay after his father. (See the true story in my TALKING HISTORY WITH RAY CAIRNS!)
The Patterson and Cairns families had been friends, neighbours and relatives for decades so the later movement of Rosebud Ted south towards Fingal might have only been incidental to the meeting of William and Ruby.

PATTERSON-PATTERSON
Ross, son of James married Ivy Patterson. Unless my notes from Lime Land Leisure are wrong, MrHollinshed?s informant made a mistake. Ross married Ivy Cairns, daughter of Rosebud Ted. (THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO Peter Wilson.)

ROWLEY-EDWARDS
Robert Rowley (38) married Christina Edwards (22) in 1859. The reason that I had not been able to demonstrate a connection between the two families on the Peninsula is that Christina did not live there until they were married.
Robert did not come to the peninsula with his mother and his stepfather, Richard Kenyon. He visited them in 1839 when he was 17 but there is no indication that he stayed. He was obviously staying and perhaps working with friends in Tasmania.
The first record I have of Robert?s involvement on the peninsula concerns a lime burning venture with Henry Cadby Wells for the first half of the 1840?s which obviously fizzled out because the demand for lime in Melbourne slackened for a while because of the bust of 1843. In 1846, the Frankston pioneer returned to his trade as a bootmaker in Richmond.
In 1849, Robert and Henry started crayfishing in a boat that the latter had bought. The venture was a huge success but lasted just long enough for Wells to build the first limestone house in Sorrento; it became known as Clark?s Cottage. Desiring to return home for a while they anchored the boat in Westernport Bay. Sadly the huge tidal variation caused irreparable damage to the boat when it was holed by the anchor.
In the next record seen, Robert was living in Dromana. On 9-3-1861, along with 22 other residents (including William Cottier and John Campbell, both later of Rye), Robert signed a petition that is shown on page 132 of ?Dreamtime of Dromana?. By this time Robert was married and he and Christina must have lived for some time in a slab hut near the corner of Carrigg St for that knowledge to become etched in McLear folklore. Robert was working for Peter Pidota, loading timber from Arthurs Seat at Sheepwash Creek. An examination of rate records revealed that Robert was not assessed on his Truemans Rd land until 1867 so he was probably at Dromana until then.
A descendant of Robert (Ron Doig) told me that Robert made many visits to Tasmania. Perhaps these took place between 1846 and 1849 and between about 1851 and 1861. Henry Wells referred to Robert as an old shipmate, so they may have been crewmen on a vessel trading between Melbourne and Tasmania. This occupation would have made frequent visits possible.
And one of Robert?s destinations on these trips would have been Longford where Christina lived.

ROWLEY-ANDREW
William Rowley married Susan Andrew. Like Michael Cain, William tried his luck in Gippsland. He owned farms at Harkaway and met Susan Andrew there.
ROWLEY-COLLIER (COTTIER?)
Frank, son of Robert snr married Annie Collier.

ROWLEY-CAIN
Robert Rowley (born 1876) married Amie? Margaret Cain.
This should be Annie; see CAIN-ROWLEY.
They were probably schoolmates at Rye State School.
ROWLEY-SHAW
Wilfred, son of William, and grandson of Robert snr, married married Emma Shaw.
Emma was not the daughter of Ben Shaw of Dromana. After WW1, Wilfred went to a soldier settlement farm in the Mallee near Barwarp and it was here that he met Emma.
RUDDUCK-CHAPMAN
See A Dreamtime of Dromana Pages 58 to 66.

RUSSELL-NURSE STUART
Edward Russell married Mary Seaton Stuart.
Edward Russell was a pretty tough cookie. Deciding not to desert at Dromana, he had no choice when his ship berthed. It, like countless other vessels, was going nowhere. So he walked for two days to join his shipmates, limeburning at the heads. He was no sook but on one occasion, he sought medical attention for an injury at the Quarantine Station. He was attended by Nurse Stuart, who became his wife.



RUSSELL-WATSON
Alex, son of Edward, married a daughter of John Watson. Edward had a lime kiln on the west side of Dundas Street and before Blair obtained land grants to become the new owner of many kilns, Edward would have loaded his lime onto limecraft in the bay. No doubt he would have met John Watson in this way. John was a fisherman who started fishing near Weeroona Bay in about 1860 but moved his base to the Western Sister in 1873. If his lookout spotted a school heading east, John would follow it and sail near the limecraft. Perhaps Edward tried a bit of fishing himself when the demand for lime slackened. Edward Russell?s landholdings are discussed elsewhere.

In case you have forgotten, all entries in family connections so far have come from LIME LAND LEISURE except for those in which the first family named was CAIRNS. In some cases, details of marriage partners given by the two families differ, and this has been pointed out. The following four entries can be compared with CAIRNS-RUSSELL entries taken from Peter Wilson?s THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO. I place more trust in Peter Wilson?s details given in brackets below.
My understanding of Lime Land Leisure is that the four Russell girls following were the daughters of Edward Russell Jnr, son of Edward and Mary.
RUSSELL-CAIRNS
Juliana Russell married James Cairns. (Johanna, called Hannah, and James)
Hannah Russell married David Cairns. (Elizabeth Russell and David)
Mary Russell married Jack Cairns. (Mary and John)
Margaret Russell married Christie Cairns. (Margaret and Christopher)
. (The grooms were all sons of the original David Cairns.)



FOR ALL SKELTON CONNECTIONS, READ ?FAMILY, CONNECTIONS, SORRENTO and PORTSEA? BY JENNIFER NIXON. Any comments that I make will add to Jennifer?s extensive detail. Jennifer?s book enabled me to find the origins of many street names near Sorrento.
SKELTON-WATTS
Jane Skelton married John Watts.
For some reason, I gained the impression from Jennifer Nixon?s account that they married a handful of years after their first meeting. The following was inspired by the account in ?Those Courageous Hardy Women? whose author justified the legend that John first saw Jane when she was six. The sort of leg-pulling that is perpetrated by the pioneers at The Heads in this excerpt from my ?Canterbury Tales? was very common according to Leila Shaw in ?The Way We Were?.
PENINSULA TATTLER
WE DIG THE DIRT ABOUT THE PIONEERS.
BODY SNATCHERS NABBED.
THE HEADS 13-5-1846. Ray Gibb
Do you remember the case of body snatchers robbing graves in London for medical students to cut up in the search for knowledge? The peelers finally stopped this ghastly practice there but it appears that it has re-emerged in the Port Phillip District.
Recently a ship had entered the heads at dusk and the captain decided to anchor and replenish his supply of drinking water, knowing that the Yarra Yarra was already polluted by slaughteryards and tanneries. At dawn, he sent the bosun with a small crew to obtain fresh water.
Landing at what sailors call Shelly Beach, the men noticed smoke and were fearful of being attacked by native savages but the bosun, hearing the sound of metal on rock, reassured them that they would find white men over the brow. Then he saw them. They were digging in the ground but stopped to wave when they saw the sailors.
Bosun Thatcher introduced himself and his men and found that the men were called Skelton, Sullivan, Rowley and Ford, the last of whom was Dennis Sullivan?s son-in-law. ?Who?s that woman over there?? asked Watt, one of the sailors. ?That?s my mother,? replied young Rowley, adding, ?She?s Mrs Kenyon now.?
Remembering his mission, the bosun noticed a small lagoon behind the woman and directed his men to proceed in that direction with their leather buckets. He glanced back as he heard the diggers chuckling and whispering something about new chums. As he strolled off, he wondered what the men were digging.
Arriving at the waterhole, Thatcher saw his men coming back after emptying the first bucket loads into the barrel sitting in the boat. Something seemed strange about young Watts? back; he looked like a hunchback. As Watts came closer, the bosun realized what was causing his changed appearance.
?Hello gel, what?s your name?? he asked. ?My nameth Jane Thkelton and I?m Thix,? replied the pretty lass whose elocution was somewhat hampered by the evacuation of baby teeth. ?Don?t hinder Mr Watts little leech; he?s got work to do.? Watts said, ?She?s no problem and besides she?s funny. When I asked her what Mrs Kenyon was doing, she said, ?killin.? ? ?Mmmm, killing what, I wonder? Well get on with it Watts.?
As Watts and the others filled the barrel to the top and prepared to leave, Thatcher?s curiosity got the better of him and he asked Jane, ?What are the men digging for?? ?Bodieth Thir.? Within minutes, Thatcher had the diggers under arrest and in the brig. Strangely they all wore smirks.

LIMESTONE. Our female reporter, Gay Ribb.
White Cliff 14-6-1846.It appears that the small community at The Heads uses humour in order to overcome isolation. Apparently the killin? or kiln is a sort of fireplace where they burn limestone, which is composed of the bodies of sea creatures.

Ironically, the inspiration for this story came when I was writing that the motivation for W.A.Blair?s purchase of vast holdings was less to do with the land than what lay under it. At that stage, I used the two- syllable rendition of kiln to produce the misunderstanding that led to the fictitious arrest, but in the last week, I came across Jennifer Nixon?s book, in which this pronunciation of kiln is confirmed as being common. I wonder if one day the pick-a- back will be confirmed too! I believe the year of the article should be 1854, not 1846, as John deserted his ship in 1856, two years after meeting Jane.

SKELTON-CLARK (See Clark- Skelton) and much detail in THOSE COURAGEOUS HARDY WOMEN and FAMILY, CONNECTIONS, SORRENTO AND PORTSEA.
SKELTON-DARK.
James, son of Edward Snr married Ann Dark.
SPUNNER-STRINGER
Margaret Sarah (born 1859), daughter of John Spunner, married George Henry Stringer in 1882. Their marriage was brief because George died on 27-1-1887 at only 28. Margaret?s widowhood lasted over 60 years until she died on 15-8-1947. Details in bold type are from Rye Cemetery records, which are on the internet.
The Stringer family was obviously in the area well before David McFarlan arrived in Sorrento in 1900 and involved Walter Stringer in his store that later became Stringers?.
John Spunner built a home called Hill Holme at Sorrento and was obviously living there by 1882. (I have not recorded rate records for Nepean Parish.)
Hollinshed wrongly stated that John had received a grant at Melway 253 CD 1-3 in 1867 and run a dairy farm until he sold the 164 acres in the land boom, giving the impression that the farm was sold before the house was built. Having strained my eyes trying to read dates on parish maps, I understand how easy it is to make such mistakes.
Allotment 29 Wannaeue was granted to John Spunner on 2-5-1887. John had not settled on allotment 29 by 1879 and I believe that John Adolphus Jenner (who on 18-4-1877 had been granted lot 32, between lot 29 and Springs Lane) was leasing lot 29 as well.
The question is: what did Margaret do as a widow to support herself for 60 years? Did she run a shop for decades like Jane Warren (Patterson) did at Dromana after her artistic husband Fred died young.


STENNIKEN-SHERLOCK
Benjamin (1815-1897) married Mary Ann, daughter of Samuel Sherlock.
Mary Ann was the sister of the Sam Sherlock who was much involved in the southern peninsula as a lad and later became a pioneer of the area north of the Osborne Township which the locals called Green Island. This name is perpetuated by Green Island Av (145 E6). Ben and Mary Ann (and Mary Jane, probably their daughter) were buried at Rye Cemetery; their details are on the cemetery microfiche at Rosebud Library.
Sam Sherlock worked for the Barkers at Boneo and at The Briars for Balcombe. After his marriage, he carried the mail on horseback from Rye and Hastings to Cheltenham.
( Osborne Primary School Centenary 1873-1973 by Leslie Moorhead.)
Perhaps it was en route to Cheltenham that he spotted the Green Island land. According to LIME LAND LEISURE, Sam Sherlock was a co-grantee of the Stenniken land (at 14) but it was probably Mary Ann?s father.


STENNIKEN-PRINCE
Benjamin Henry, son of Jack and grandson of Benjamin Jnr, married Dorothy, daughter of Harry Prince. Ray Cairns told me that Harry Prince bought some of his father?s land near Maroolaba and that it came into Ben?s ownership after the death of Harry Prince.
(See TALKING HISTORY WITH RAY CAIRNS by Ray Gibb.)
Ray Cairns? father, Hill Harry, inherited Maroolaba from his father, the original Rodert Cairns, who settled in Boneo in 1852. Robert Cairns and the Pattersons moved to Fingal, near Pattersons Rd at about the same time in the 1870?s. Rather than repeat information contained in the PATTERSON-STENNIKEN entry, I will simply state that Maroolaba (part of which was bought by Harry Prince) was 260 metres from Mary Jane Stenniken?s grant. The Prince family could have earlier lived near Truemans Rd, but, if not, Fingal provides an explanation as to how the two families connected.



STENNIKEN-WILSON
Maria, daughter of Benjamin Stenniken Snr married Godfrey Burdett, son of Henry William Wilson. Benjamin Stenniken was based inTruemans Rd but also leased land on the western portion of Jamieson?s Special Survey near Pickings Lane. Family members could have resided there to manage the property for Ben. Maria certainly resided there in the summer. Big Clarke had bought the survey and the northern part was given to Bruce, his son-in-law. (Colin McLear?s version is more likely than Hollinshed?s.) Maria used to work at Bruce?s house during ?the season?.
One more piece of information is contained in the final verse of one of my first pieces, a poem called ALONG THE BACK TRACK, which can be found in my CANTERBURY TALES and describes a trip made by drapery hawker, Charles Graves, and young Godfrey Wilson in about 1860. They have traveled from The Willow (Safety Beach area) to the corner of Weeroona and Browns Rds, Godfrey having been reassured by Graves that the smoke came from kilns, not a bushfire.
As they turned back to Kangerong,
A well-known man came riding strong,
With five year old Maria, running late.
Godfrey married Maria in 1878.


STENNIKEN-CLEMENGER (See PATTERSON- STENNIKEN.)
Jack Stenniken married Lily Clemenger.
By 1910, Mary Ann Stenniken (most likely the owner of the Fingal land) was living in Dromana and assessed on crown allotment 6 of section 17. This block with frontages to McCulloch St and Heales St and halfway between the school corner and the freeway was leased from Patterson. Ralph Patterson had probably just leased it to her (because of the position of Mary Ann?s assessment). His wife?s entry is next and her property (1 lot and buildings, McCulloch St) was probably next door. As lot 6 had no buildings, it is likely that Mary Ann was staying with Ralph and her daughter, Rachel. Ralph Godfrey Patterson (whose second given name recalls the marriage of 1878 in the previous entry) was leasing 287 acres (lots 18 and 19) from Clarke on the Survey and was probably Rachel?s husband and Mary Ann?s son in law. His move to Dromana probably followed the sale of his Fingal grant to one of the Cairns family. (His 244 acres may have been the bulk of the 260 acres that Harry Cairns sold to Harry Prince.)
Robert Adams sold crown allotment 19 of Wannaeue (between Parkmore Rd and Adams Ave) to William Tetley in about April 1889. Subdivision plan 3513 shows that the Clemengers bought lots 1-5 of section B, fronting Parkmore and Rosemore Rds. Albert Holloway built Parkmore in 1896, probably on lots 1-5 of section A, fronting Pt Nepean Rd. The Clemengers bought this historic house in 1908, after it was occupied for some time by Mr and Mrs Fair. The Clemengers introduced tented accommodation. Jack Stenniken was born in 1893 and died in 1970.
(Adams Corner and Rosebud Flower of the Peninsula by Ray Gibb.)
Jack might have met Lily at a dance at the Mechanics Institute dances at Dromana, Rosebud or Rye or perhaps at the Boneo hall on the CFA site. Another possibility is that he worked for Ralph on the Survey or met Lily on the way from Truemans Rd to visit Mary Ann Stenniken in Dromana.


SULLIVAN-O?NEIL
John, son of Dennis and Honora, married Hannah O?Neil. I offer two speculative suggestions about how they met.
1.John, like many Peninsula pioneers, might have tried his luck at Bendigo or Ballarat. On the way to either, he would have passed through Keilor where Brees? bridge of 1854 enabled a more direct route than the older ones through Maribyrnong (Raleigh?s Punt) and Bulla. William O?Neill owned Horseshoe Bend and like Basket Davey Milburn, Victoria?s first official irrigator, he probably sold his produce at the roadside.
It is likely that the Sullivans already knew O?Neil. They may even have arrived at the five year old settlement on the same ship. O?Neil, one of Melbourne?s early policemen, might have brought Honora before the court of Petty sessions for an offence against the Masters and Servants act on 27-11-1842. Like all citizens of Melbourne, he would have marveled at the gigantic cucumber grown by the Sullivans near Merri Creek in 1843 before they moved to The Heads. Most workers squatted in rough shelters at The Brickfields (South Melbourne) or Newtown (Fitzroy) as they could not afford to buy or rent on the surveyed town, and the Sullivans were probably near Newtown. (See sources and more detail in the SULLIVAN entry.)
The baptism of three Sullivan children at St Augustine?s Keilor between mid 1854 and early 1862 lends weight to my theory that John might have gone to the goldfields with some cousins who came out later for that purpose; one of the children was named Timothy. Their parents were working in the area, one at Jacksons Creek (perhaps for the Reddans) and another at Keilor Plains (almost certainly for Taylor, Robertson or Big Clarke). That peninsula pioneers would seek employment at thriving Keilor after an unsuccessful stint at the diggings, is shown by the presence of Edwin Daly Tassell (probably the son of Edwin Louis Tassell a pioneer of the Safety Beach area) whose daughter was christened at the temporary St Augustines in 1858.
2.A map on page 6 of Leila Shaw?s THE WAY WE WERE shows that J. Sullivan and J.O?Neill were pioneers of the Somerville area. Their grants were, respectively, at Melway 149 J3 and 148 J6. Somerville became the home of plant nurseries and orchards with those of the Brunnings family (which started this business in St Kilda) gaining international fame. These facts lead me to the following fantasy.
Trudging dejectedly back from the diggings, the emaciated John Sullivan hears a familiar voice calling his name. William O?Neil offers him a job after hearing of John?s woes. While tending O?Neil?s apricot orchard, John meets Hannah. They and a relative, whose name is rendered with a double L by some official, move to Somerville to continue their orcharding occupation. (Apricots were the main crop of Keilor and Peter Anderson kept growing them at Horseshoe Bend after the Spaniards such as Borrell and Vert switched the emphasis to growing cauliflowers and tomatoes.)
Whether J.Sullivan was our John is not yet known, but if so, he would not have been the only Southern Peninsula identity to receive grants in the area; Henry Gomm, guardian of the Rosebud jetty bought allotment 48 at 148 E8.
See THOSE COURAGEOUS HARDY WOMEN regarding the fate of John and Hannah?s children. This probably explains the Clark-Clark marriage!

SULLIVAN-GRACE
Patrick, son of Dennis married Ellen, daughter of William Grace. Ellen?s father was an early grantee of 249 acres fronting the west end of Boundary Rd at Dromana and bounded by Caldwell Rd, Pindara Rd and the eastern end of streets such as Beverley St and Cloud St. On his farm ?Gracefield? he planted vineyards and orchards. Patrick named his hotel at Rye after the farm, which is recalled by Gracefield Ave at 159 H9.
During the late1860?s, William?s vineyards were wiped out by a disease that spread through most wine-growing areas. It is likely that he leased the farm to the Counsells. He probably bought allotment 6 of section 3 in the township of Rye at about this time. The half acre block ran from the Esplanade (a name given for Pt Nepean Rd in Dromana, Rosebud and Rye townships) to Nelson St and was just a little nearer to Dundas St than Napier St. As can be seen in Melway 168 F4, this is almost the exact location of the Rye Hotel, which was built on the site of Patrick?s Gracefield Hotel in 1927 by the Hunts.
It is possible that the two families had met before William moved his family to Rye. While most of the Sullivan grants were near the south end of Weeroona Rd (and used to extract limestone for the kiln there, which was managed by Antonio Albress after Patrick?s death), Catherine Sullivan was granted allotments 15 a and b Wannaeue (152 acres) fronting the north side of Browns Rd and extending east from the Kinwendy Rd corner 767 metres (halfway) to the Purves Rd corner. Catherine was one of earliest landowners in Wannaeue, receiving her grant on 31-10-1858. No doubt she was self sufficient but if she needed to buy anything Dromana was the destination. It already had Holden?s store near the Carrigg St corner and Richard Watkin?s Dromana Hotel and possibly the Arthurs Seat hotel near Foote St and soon the McLears would open their butchers shop.
To get there in the 1860?s, she would climb Purves Rd and then take Bryan?s Cutting down through the town common, just west of the Gracefield boundary. No doubt she would drop in for a cuppa and a chat with William?s wife.
The naming of Grace St in Rye could be given a dual justification; it could be named after William Grace or it might honour Grace Sullivan, a much- loved teacher who tragically died young, apparently from the Spanish Flu.

SULLIVAN-KENYON
Timothy (known as Ted), son of Dennis married a Kenyon girl.
She was almost certainly the daughter of Richard Kenyon and his wife, who was Robert Rowley?s mother. (See TCHW.) Timothy was probably about 20 when the Sullivans arrived at the Heads in late 1843 and started limeburning alongside the Kenyons who might have arrived in 1939 to produce lime for John Pascoe Fawkner. I believe that they married a few years later, went to the goldfields with Timothy?s brother John and spent some time market gardening near Keilor where a child was born. That might be why nobody remembered the name of Timothy?s wife. (See SULLIVAN ?O?NEIL.)

TRUEMAN-WILLIAMS
In Lime Land Leisure, it is stated that Gladys and Bertha were daughters of William Trueman and that Gladys Trueman married a Mr Williams of Chinamans Creek. Neither statement is correct. Gladys and Bertha were the only children of Thomas Trueman and Gladys married Andrew Seator in 1932.

WATTS-BAKER
Irene Ann, the daughter of John Francis Watts (son of John Watts and Janse Skelton) married H.Baker. As I have not recorded rates for Nepean parish, I am unaware if members of the Baker family moved west from the original base in Rye Township, but it is likely that Rye residents would have been involved with the social life of Sorrento, such as the picture thratre and dances.
The Watts family is much mentioned in THOSE COURAGEOUS HARDY WOMEN and FAMILY, CONNECTIONS, SORRENTO and PORTSEA and was largely involved in the story of Sorrento, where their house stands near the museum.
George Baker received the grants for crown allotments for 1,2,3 and 6 of section 7 in the township of Rye in 1872. Lot 1 contained the present post office site and his frontages extended 180 metres east and 180 metres south from the corner. He must have died before 1900 when his executors were assessed on 67 acres in lots 1 and 2 of the parish of Nepean, between Weir St and Government Rd. The Baker family is mentioned on pages 29, 36, 47-8, 51-2, 54, 109 and 119 of Rye Primary School 1667. One of the teachers at the school was named Baker. (P.57)
The husband of Irene Ann Watts might have moved to the Rosebud area with several other members of the Baker family. The Sands and McDougall directory reveals that H.Baker was a fruiterer there in 1950. Also listed were farmers, Alec O. Baker and Leslie E.Baker as well as William C.Baker.
On page 86 of ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD, Peter Wilson states that Harry Baker received an ankle wound in WW1 that caused a limp; he threw his right leg forward as he walked. If I remember correctly, he visited Rosebud School in disguise on the last schoolday of 1939, Santa?s first* ever visit. Unfortunately everyone recognized the limp at once but, of course, did not let on that they recognized Harry. (*It was probably not much earlier that Coca Cola popularized Santa?s role in Christmas festivities.)
His house was at 9-11 Rosebud Pde and he rented a shop in the Broadway Theatre building where he sold greengroceries. His buying trips to the Victoria Market and his Saturday rounds were done in his Dodge ute.
WATTS-BROWN
Margaret Jean, another daughter of John Francis Watts, married R.Brown.
The notes that I made from Lime Land Leisure were mainly focused on Rosebud but I believe there was mention that J.F.Watts was the Ranger for Ocean Park and constructed the numbered lifesaving tracks, which still exist. In this role, he would have often come into contact with John H.Little Brown, who by 1910 had 616 acres in Wannaeue parish and 853 acres west of Weeroona Rd, along Browns Rd. The story of how he transformed rabbit and ti tree infested wasteland into rich pasture is told on page 36 of LIME LAND LEISURE, where he is referred to as Jim.
R.Brown was probably the son of Rye?s saviour, to whom the last verse of my poem Lime was dedicated. (Relying on Hollinshed, I called him Jim.)
Land held by owners who were absent,
Smothered by ti tree growing rampant,
With rabbit burrows everywhere:
Restored by Jim Brown?s visionary flair.
In 1919-20, James Brown was assessed on crown allotments 1,2 and 3 of section 5 and buildings in Rye township. These allotments had a frontage to Nelson St of 60 metres from a point 40 metres from Lyons St to, probably, the present RSL land.
By that year, John H.L.Brown no longer appeared in Wannaeue rates. The land had obviously been improved and sold to such as L.McInnes (care of Jennings and McInnes, Bourke St, Melbourne) 243 acres, part crown allotments 34, 35 and (73?) between The Dunes and Moonah Links.
The two families are mentioned in RYE PRIMARY SCHOOL 1667 as follows.
WATTS. 28-9, 31, 34, 40, 115. BROWN. 28, 35, 36, 39, 53-4, (teacher 25).
The man who married Margaret Jean Watts was most likely Reginald G.Brown or Robin A.Brown, both of whom were listed as Rye residents in Sands and McDougall?s directory of 1950.

WILSON-BURDETT
Henry William Wilson married Thamer Burdett.
This marriage took place in England. Henry was the son of a London butcher. In 1843, Henry was running the Beauvoir Arms Hotel in in Kingsland Rd, London. Henry, Thamer and their four children left London on 22-1-1853 aboard the Emigrant and after a remarkably fast voyage, which obviously stopped them getting into the doldrums (in both ways), they reached Port Phillip on 23 April. (Dreamtime of Dromana page 43.) This source and Lime Land Leisure contain much business and genealogical detail about Henry?s descendants.
It is possible that some of Thamer?s family came with them and any Burdett family historian should inspect the Emigrant passenger list for that voyage. Henry established an abbatoir at Sandridge (Port Melbourne) and lived in Emerald Hill, where it is possible that he came into contact with Isaac White and Captain Henry Everest Adams, pioneers of Rosebud, and that Captain Adams gave Henry Wilson an idea.
It is likely that Thamer was related, however distantly, to Sir Francis Burdett and his daughter, Angela Burdett. Sir Francis, a Baronet, had married Sophia, daughter of Thomas Coutts, a wealthy banker who founded Coutts and Co.
Now if Henry had chatted to Captain Adams, the old sea dog would have bragged about being the son of Lord Vivian (which led to the name of his vineyard, Vivyan, with spelling altered in case his real father had an agent in Singapore- and given names of many in the Adams line). Wilson would have thought, ?Well, my wife is related to the wealthiest woman in England and one of the greatest social reformers and philanthropists in the world; why not flaunt that fact?? He was speaking of Angela, the first Baroness Burdett- Coutts and that is how the Wilsons and Stennikens used Coutts as a given name and Coutts St in Safety Beach got its name. See Historic Origins of Street names entry and the sources named above. (Details about Angela Burdett -Coutts from Wikipedia.)
The Burdett Quarry, on 101 hectares at 160 Potts Rd, Langwarrin, was probably established by relatives of Thamer. Burdett St in Frankston?s The Pines Estate would have been named after the quarry family, which must have been in the area fairly early (since they shared this honour with the pioneering Brunnings family of Somerville); if it had been one of the many subdivision of Wilson land there would have been another street named Thamer, Wilson, Godfrey, Benjamin etc nearby. See next entry re Coutts.

WILSON-McDOWELL
Benjamin Godfrey John Ralph Wilson (son of Godfrey Burdett Wilson and grandson of Henry William and Thamer) married Dorothy McDowell. Ben?s first given name came from his maternal grandfather Ben Stenniken. His brothers had Henry, William, Samuel, James, Burdett, Coutts and Stenniken as given names.
Allotment 17, Wannaeue, on the west side of Jetty Rd, which extended to Spray St and Eastbourne Rd, was subdivided in the 1870?s by the Woolcotts of Melbourne. George and Susan Peatey purchased 2 acres on which they grew vegetables, which they sold along with poultry, eggs etc. Their cottage burnt down in 1912 by which time their son had established a similar business on the east side of Peatey?s Creek (Murray-Anderson Rd) on a Rosebud Village (foreshore) block. Another early purchaser from the Woolcotts was the Education Department but that block was not as big as the present school site.
By 1900 the only other blocks sold were owned by George Chapman from Dromana (4), Charles James (3 acres), Marshall (William? 7 acres), postmaster John Roberts whose daughter established the Post Office Store, now a caf? of that name (4 and house) and Furmbisher (2.5 acres). The commercial bank now owned 84 acres of Woolcott?s land. As crown allotment 17 consisted of 129.5 acres, Mrs Phillips and Frederick Taylor probably had three more blocks too.
By 1910, Henry Bucher had 4 lots, Annie Eliza Cairns 4, Rosebud Ted Cairns 6, Alf Hanson (of Alpine Chalet in Tucks Rd ) 6, blacksmith, Hy Geo Chapman 2, the Coburns of Springbank 4, Fallow 1, Maconochie 4, Back Road Bob Cairns 2 near state school, Marshall (Moonee Ponds R.E.Agent) 7, Susan Peatey 2, Mrs J.Spensley 4 and Vale , probably the politician after whom Vale St in Mornington was named had the 84 acres forfeited by Woolcott.
By 1920, Mrs Mary Butler had a house on lot 49 and her rate notice was to be sent to Mrs McDowell of Rosebud. Robert McDowell had lots 77, 79 and part of lot 75 and buildings. These were across McDowell St from the Presbyterian Church, which became the site of Woolworths. Ernest Rudduck?s store was being run by L.C.Leech. Houses had been built by the Cairns family, Mrs Helena Salina Mitchell of Essendon, and Joseph Maconochie of Richmond. One house had disappeared and Alf and John Peatey were assessed on the block only.
McDowell Street changed little for years. The McDowells? neighbours were Don Miller and his caravan park opposite the school, Rosebud Ted opposite Pattersons Garage, then Ivy Patterson, Harry Nichols and the SEC on the Rosebud Avenue Ave corner.
SOURCES: A Dreamtime of Dromana by Colin McLear, Kangerong and Flinders rate records, Wannaeue parish map, Pine Trees and Box Thorns by Rosalind Peatey, The Cairns Family of Boneo by Peter Wilson, On the Road to Rosebud by Peter Wilson, Map of early Rosebud incorporated in ?Early Rosebud? by Ray Gibb.
WILSON-RUDDUCK
Samuel James Stenniken (son of Godfrey Wilson and Maria, nee Stenniken) married Ruby Bery Rudduck, daughter of Nelson Rudduck and Jane Sophia, nee Chapman.
After Nelson died in 1935, Sam and Ruby moved into Piawola, the fine double storey house next to the Uniting Church in Dromana that Nelson built in 1894. The connection between the families goes back to the arrival in Dromana of Nelson and Jane from Dandenong in 1871 or early 1872. By 1867 Henry William Wilson had given up his occupation as a bullocky to become a butcher, grazing and slaughtering on 45 acres that was known as the Dromana Aerial Landing Ground by 1927*, and selling his meat from a shop whose location is described in two different ways by Colin McLear. (Main St or McCulloch St?) Henry retired in 1877 at 57 and Godfrey took charge of the company, expanding into Sorrento and building a brick shop and home** in Gibson St, Dromana. (*New abbatoirs had been established at Melway 167 F2, and operated until 1955, where Coutts Crt, Godfrey St, Benjamin Pde and Wilson Rd now stand. **Godfrey named the home Beauvoir after a hotel that his father had run in London in 1843.)
Sam was born in 1886 and died in 1949. On his father?s death in 1919, Sam and his brother, Ben, took over the Dromana portion of the empire Godfrey had built up and also expanded their retail into McCrae and Rosebud where older brother Henry had built shops. They relocated their shop to Main St in 1934.



SOURCE:MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN by Hector Hanson.
PURVES-QUINAN
James Purves was born on 29-9-1835 at Newcastle on Tyne and died on 6-11-1913 at Rosebud. In 1862, he married Emily Caroline Quinan, who was born on 16-3-1844 at Broken River (Benalla) and died on 4-8-1910 at Rosebud.
James was born only seven months after his father, Peter (born 1802 Berwick upon Tweed) married his sweetheart, Ann Scott, and Ann died a month after the birth. Leaving James with an aunt (Mrs Russell), Peter, a mason, sought to ease his grief by joining his architect brother, James, building bridges in Tasmania. At about 16, James set off for Australia on the Thomas Lowry, wanting to get to know his father. Arriving in 1852, he joined Peter and Uncle James at Tootgarook Station. Young James had eight years to pursue his aim before Peter died in March 1860.
Two years later James married Emily. It is likely that Emily was the daughter of Robert Dublin Quinan and Emma. These two had established a private school in Dromana on 12-11-1860 and on 1-6-1861, it was chosen over Daniel Nicholson?s private school to become the National School. The Quinans lived at a boarding house on Boag?s dairy near the junction of Seacombe St and Palmerstone Ave. Boag had been a supporter of Quinlan?s school being chosen. It may surprise Rye historians that Robert Rowley, William Cottier and John Campbell supported Quinan?s application. The last two were in White Cliff within a few years and built the Rye Hotel, which led to a new name for the limeburning settlement.
The year 1865 should have been a happy one for James and Emily. Their first child, James, had been born in 1863 and registered at Pt Nepean (probably by an official at the Quarantine Station) and in 1865 their second child, George Liddle, was born and registered at the same place. However 1865 was probably one of immense sadness for the new parents and for Richard Watkin, owner of the Dromana Hotel.
Teachers? salaries were alarmingly low, perhaps causing the poor quality of many teachers at the time. Robert Quinan was however, efficient and carried out his duties in a satisfactory manner and was regarded as a gentleman of the highest character, as Rowley?s and 22 other Dromana residents? testimony declared. Needing to supplement his income, Robert did book-keeping for the Kangerong and Flinders Shire. Finding that the books did not balance, he tried to borrow the missing five pounds from Watkins without explaining why he needed it. Unaware of the teacher?s desperation, Watkin said that he had no money to spare. As described in great detail by Colin McLear, Quinan was so shamed by his inability to balance the books that he committed suicide on 22-1-1865.
(Quinan information from A Dreamtime of Dromana.)
Crown allotments 4 and 5 of section 12 at Dromana had been granted to R.D.Quinan on 30-3-1864 and each had a 20 metre frontage to Codrington and Verdon Streets, starting 40 metres from Hodgkinson St.
Jim Purves (1863-1927) never married and George Liddle Purves (1865-1892) probably died unmarried at about 27 years of age. Other offspring of James and Emily who are not mentioned in following entries are:
Emily (1867 Tootgarook-1947 WA), Lily (1870 Toot. ?1938, never married)
Robert (1872 Toot. ?1937, married Emma Mason), Walter (1875 Toot. ?1935, m.1904 to Leila F.Cotton) and Ernest (1885 Dromana ?1886). Walter and Leila?s son, Arthur, spent time in the Mt Beauty area during WW2 in charge of an air force building supplying clothing. Jim, Robert and Walter all fought in the Boer War and later Robert and Walter worked for the Richmond Brewery, breaking in horses to haul the wagons loaded with beer barrels. One of James and Emily?s sons appears to have had a son named Peter, who was in the 6th Division in WW2 with Reg Sheehan and Stan White of Red Hill.
Of the nine children who survived childhood, three clearly married in the area. George may have been involved in the firm of W.J. Purves of 268 Swanston St Melbourne, which supplied seeds for fruit and vegetables by post prepaid.W.J.Purves might have been his cousin, a son of Uncle James, and brother of James Liddle Purves, a barrister and politician. (Chandeliers and Billy Tea by Peter Cuffley.)
The birth place of Ernest shows that James was on Purves Rd by 1885 and that not all crown allotments shown as being granted to James Purves may have been granted to Uncle James of Tootgarook. All grants issued in the name of James Purves are detailed in my PURVES entry. However I will detail here the properties discussed by Hec Hanson in Memoirs of a Larrikin.
Jim Purves (1863-1927) bred ponies at his property on Purves Rd, just down from Arthurs Seat.This was Crown Allotment 28C, section B, Wannaeue, consisting of 102 acres and granted on 22-3-1909 to J.Purves. (Melway 171 E-F 6).
Peter Purves (1880-1940), son of James and Emily, had a paddock near the corner of Purves Rd, Browns Rd and Baldrys Rd. The 1920 rates show that Peter Purvis had Jim?s 102 acres, which was mistakenly described as part of 28C, and 181 acres and buildings14AB, section B Wannaeue. Allotments 14A and B were granted to James Purves on 10-11-1869 and are indicated by 171 D-E 11.
Hec Hanson mentions Green Hills several times but unfortunately does not specify its location. Luckily the rate collector did, in 1900.David Cairns was assessed on 260 acres 13 AB ?Greenhills?. This was immediately north of 14AB but extended west to Gardens Rd with Davos Rd indicating its northern boundary This had been granted to J.Ford on 4-10-1883 (James Sandle Ford. James Ford Jnr or Joseph Ford). In 1864 James Ford Jnr was assessed on 260 acres ?Eaton Hill? (That?s what I thought the illegible scribble said, and it makes sense because of Watson Eaton?s 150 acres east of Eatons Cutting Rd, but it might have meant Green Hill.) As David Cairns was on Greenhills in 1900, it is not surprising that Peter Purves and Bella Cairns were acquainted. The location of Green Hills is confirmed by a map in Hec?s book.
POSTSCRIPT. Emily Quinan obviously had a brother named Robert. While inspecting rate records for the Red Hill entry, I noticed that Robert Quinan was assessed on two blocks in Dromana in 1887. You will remember that his father committed suicide in 1865.

PURVES-WILSON
Barbara Scott Purves , daughter of James and Emily (Quinan), was born at Rye in 1878, married James Wilson in 1915 and died in 1934. By 1920, James Wilson was farming 163 acres at Main Creek, part 23B and 23B2. This was part of William Hillis?s grants and was accessed off Purves Rd via Wilson Rd but James may have had a frontage to Main Creek Rd as well. Jim Wilson?s brother, Bob, was almost killed at Red Hill on 9-3-1902 when he fell and his head was split open by an axe. Happily Bob survived and married Esther. Jim Wilson?s place was called Fernlea. He and Barbara had a boy called Harold, known as ?Cocko?. Jim had a Morris truck.
I had been told by Thelma Littlejohn that this Wilson family was not related to Henry William Wilson. While researching rate records for the Red Hill entry, I discovered that George Wilson was assessed on 32 acres in the first ratebook of the Flinders Road Board. By 11-5-1872, George was farming 48 acres. On 24-2-1882, George was granted title to allotment 66A of 40 acres, bounded by Stony Creek (W), Shoreham Rd (E), and bisected diagonally by the end of Shands Rd (255 H-J 1). In 1887, Elizabeth Wilson, spinster, was leasing 200 acres from the Crown in the parish of Bittern.
It is likely that Jim Wilson was a son or nephew of George and niece of Elizabeth.
It is still possible that George was a brother of Henry ?Wingy? Wilson, unknown to the McLears. George may have been with Henry at the latter?s run near Cranbourne and settled a bit further from Dromana after a disease had killed the cattle.



PURVES-CAIRNS
Peter Purves, daughter of James and Emily, was born at Tootgarook in 1881 and married Isabella Cairns. Peter died in1940 and was buried at Rye Cemetery. Ray Cairns told me that Bella was Jimmy?s daughter. Robert, Alexander and David Cairns all called their first child James but I think that Bella?s father was the son of Alex who was born in 1850 and was buried at Dromana Cemetery. The next son of Alex, John, married Emma Baldry who lived about a mile south of the Purves land. The Cairns family had been, and continued as, neighbours of the Purves. Another Cairns girl who married in this area was George Johnston?s wife, Ollie, who could never work out how she got grass burrs on the back of her gown while she was dancing. I wonder what George thought, Cocko!

PURVES-HANSON
Alfred George Hanson married Frances Ada Elizabeth Purves in 1906. Frances, born on 13-2-1883 at Tootgarook, was the ninth child of James and Emily Purves. Their tenth and last child, Ernest was born in 1885 at Dromana and died in 1886.
Alf?s parents were both born in Norway; Hans Christian Hanson in 1857 and Ellen Olson (en) in 1846. Alf was the fifth of six children. Hans was a bridge-building contractor who worked on all the bridges between Melbourne and Bright. Unless Alf had left the family home very early, Hans and Ellen must have settled near Red Hill. Their son, Alf, was only about 18 in 1902 when Bob Wilson?s head was split open during a hive-robbing effort at Red Hill. It is possible that Hans managed, leased or bought William Hopcraft?s grants, 70 A and B in the parish of Balnarring, between the start of Tucks Rd and Stony Creek, where Alf and Frances lived by about 1913. They called their fine old two- storey house (probably built by Robert Adams? father-in-law), ?Alpine Chalet?. From the house they could see the houses of Bob and Esther Wilson and the Laurissens across the Stony Creek gully.
When part of the property was sold to the Lessings, a new house was built near the north boundary by Littlejohn the builder and given the same name. Alf was a jack of all trades, as most country folk had to be in those days and was well known for his skills as a blacksmith (implements) and animal doctor. Like Robert and Walter Purves, his brothers-in-law, he broke in horses, for G.T.Alnutt who was making the road to Flinders. (Alnutt also improved the road around Anthonys Nose that had first been made by Edward Williams in the 1880?s.)
Alf and Frances moved to Tawonga near Mt Beauty and Frances died at her daughter, Rita?s, place near the Kiewa River.on 20-12-1951. When Alf died in the Tawonga Hospital on 5-3-1960, his body was brought back to be buried at Dromana by his sons, Merv and Hec, and Hedley Tate, in Hedley?s panel van.
POSTSCRIPT.While researching rate records for the RED HILL entry, I discovered that Hans Christian Hansen, carpenter owned 89 acres in Balnarring parish in 1887. I suspect that he had arrived between Spring 1886 and Winter 1887 as he was not assessed in 1886-7 and the rate collector had slotted his entry into the correct alphabetical position in 1887. Due to the location of Alpine Chalet in Hec?s map, it is certain that Hans had bought Hopcraft?s allotment 70B of 89 acres and 2 perches.

HANSON-JENNINGS
Arthur Ernest Mervyn (Merv) was the fifth child of Alf Hansen and Frances (Purves), born almost two years after Hector (the larrikin), at Alpine Chalet on 9-1-1915. He died on 7-7-1990 at Rosebud. When Merv was three and a half years old he lost part of his index finger in a chaff cutter. He was rushed to the Dromana Bush Nursing Hospital (opposite the present B.P. garage on land donated by Nelson Rudduck) and while he was there, his future wife, Dot Jennings was born.
The year before Merv was born the Jennings family settled on Kariah, fronting Browns Rd between Dundas St and Weeroona Rd. However the Hanson and Jennings families were probably already acquainted because the Jennings had previously farmed near Flinders. (See JENNINGS-HADDOW, JENNINGS-TUCK.)
Dorothy was probably the daughter of George Ernest (Ern) and Mary (Wiffen), who had nine children. Ern sold his share of Kariah and bought a milk round from Bob Rowley and later expanded into Rosebud, leasing a large property near Leonard St, Tootgarook for milk production. His daughter, Hannah, did one of the milk runs daily.
(Jennings: A pioneering Rye Family by Linda Berndt, SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS 13-7-2010.)

SHAW-SHEEHAN
Reg Sheehan, who fought in both world wars married Miss Annie Shaw who was a teacher at the Red Hill School.
RUDDUCK-AMOS

JOHNSTON-CAIRNS
HANSON-BROWN
SOURCE:A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA
PATTERSON-WARREN
PATTERSON-BUCHER
PATTERSON-HADDOW
PATTERSON-CAIRNS
GRIFFITH-EATON
GRIFFITH-CAIRNS
GRIFFITH-SHAND
GRIFFITH-McLEAR
BRYAN-MITCHELL
CHAPMAN-BAIN
CHAPMAN-SHEEHAN
CLYDESDALE-DYSON
TOWNSEND-DYSON
ANDERSON-BARKER
McKEOWN-HILLIS
McKEOWN-SHAW
SHAW-WEIR
SHAW-WARFE
WISEMAN-BAIN?
DURRELL-BAKER?
HADDOW-ADAMS
ALLEN-McLEAR
McLEAR-WATKIN
McLEAR-WILSON
McLEAR-PENTECOST
McLEAR-OSBORNE
McLEAR-PROSSOR
BRUCE- CLARKE

SOURCE: Historic Houses of Essendon by Lenore Frost
HEARN-CLARKE
Sources as stated.
ALLISON-WAINWRIGHT
SOURCE: Adams family genealogy. See my ?Adams? Corner? for full details.
ADAMS-BARTON
BARTON-NASH
ADAMS-MORGAN
ADAMS-DUNK
ADAMS-FREEMAN
ADAMS-HALL
ADAMS-McGREGOR
DUNK-PEATEY
DUNK-LACCO
ADAMS-HILL
FREEMAN-PETERS
FREEMAN-JENNINGS
FREEMAN-KYLE
ADAMS-PARKER

SOURCE: Pine Trees and Box Thorns by Rosalind Peatey.
PEATEY-TAFFS
SOURCE: Talking History With Ray Cairns by Ray Gibb.
BARKER-SHAND
WOONTON-EDMOND
WILLIAMS-CAMPBELL
EDMONDS-CAIRNS
CAIN-BRABIZON

SOURCE: On the Road to Rosebud by Peter Wilson.
ROBERTS-BRADY
TWYCROSS-BURRELL
BUCHER-WHITE
FREEMAN-HANCOCK
KENYON-ROWLEY

SOURCE:Rosebud:Flower of thePeninsula.
COBURN-BURRELL

SOURCE: Keith Holmes.See HOLMES entry.
SHAND-HUNTLEY
Jack Shand, son of Alex Shand of Main Ridge, married the widow of John Huntley, who bought 15A Kangerong from John Holmes.
NASH-DAVIDSON
Fred Nash?s daughter, Dolly, married one of the Davidsons

DAVIDSON (nee NASH)- EDWARDS
When her first husband died, Dolly married Bob Edwards.
WHITE- ROBERTS
There were two unrelated men named Robert White. The one who married Hannah Roberts of Main Ridge was known as Bullocky Bob and belonged to the family after which Whites Rd (off Purves Rd) was named.
HOLMES-SHEEHAN
William Alfred Holmes married Emily Sheehan. Their first meeting at Murtoa is detailed in the HOLMES entry.
GOMM-WILSON
George Gomm, the father of Local Footy Hero Murray Gomm, married Jim Wilson?s daughter, Leila, (a grand-daughter of James Purves of Green Hills in Purves Rd.) George Gomm was the grandson of Henry Gomm who built the Somerville Hotel and with his brother William is regarded as one of the legends of the Somerville Football Club.
Murray Gomm, the son of George and Leila was declared a Local Footy Hero on Chanel 31?s Local Footy Show near the end of the 2010 season. (See ?The Mysterious Henry Gomm?.)
ELLIS-TUCK
Smith Ellis married one of the Tuck girls.

WILSON-ELLIS
Bob Wilson married Smith Ellis?s sister. Bob and Jim Wilson were twins according to Keith Holmes. Hec Hansen said that Bob and Thelma Wilson and the Laurissens lived across the Stony Creek Gully from the Hansons? ?Alpine Chalet?. (See PURVES-HANSON.)


SOURCE: ANDREW THOMPSON DESPERATELY SEEKING, HERALD SUN, 13-2-11.
THOMPSON-BECK.
Peter Thompson (1822-1870) married Amelia Beck (1833-1906) in 1853 if I interpreted the ambiguity correctly (I presume she was Peter?s wife and not a descendant born when Peter was 11 years old!) They spent most of their married life in Sorrento. The following entries detail their children and their spouses. Their first child, Joseph, was born and died in 1854. All the others married. Thompson was most likely a limeburner who built a hut on a lime station in the area (on which land the licensee was assessed, which explains the absence of Thompson?s name from the 1865 Nepean rates).
THOMPSON-BENNETT. Louis (1855-1899) married Cecilia Bennett. Cecelia and Rachael were probably daughters of Thomas Bennett, who jumped ship with John Watts and John Dillon. Bennett was an early limeburner with a kiln about 400 metres south of Kalimna Crescent in Rye. Bennett lost his kiln when land hog, Melbourne lime merchant, W.A.Blair received grants for all the land between Rye Township and Browns Rd on 19-6-1867. Some descendants may have moved to Bittern where there is a Bennett St.
THOMPSON-EWIN. Thompson (1857-1932) married Laura Ewin.
THOMPSON-DEPINA. Emily (1859-1941) married John Depean (Depina). Depina and Tony Salvas were of Portugese origin and probably worked first at Kettle?s kiln near Portsea, perhaps with Peter Thompson.
THOMPSON-SALVAS. Caroline (1860-1920) married Antonio Salvas. Despite the conjecture in LIME LAND LEISURE, it was not Tony Salvas that was running the Sullivan lime kiln south of Weeroona Rd. It was Antonio Albress whose grant was about half a mile east on the north side of Browns Rd.
THOMPSON-BENNETT. William (1862-1930) married Rachel Bennett.
THOMPSON-DIXON. Peter (1864-1916) married Annie Dixon.
THOMPSON-MALLOY. David (1866-1934) married Marra Malloy.
THOMPSON-BARKER. Thomas (1868-1934) married Susan Barker. Susan was probably the daughter of John Barker of the Boneo Pre-emptive right, 640 acres bounded by Browns Rd, a continuation of Grasslands Rd, Limestone Rd and Boneo Rd.
THOMPSON- HILL then ROWE. James (1870-1937) married Helen Hill& Maria Rowe.
Helen Hill was probably a member of the Rye family.
Details given in Lime Land Leisure on page130 conflict in regard to Emily Thompson, saying that she was the daughter of John Thompson (no details of birth or death) and K. Hollinshed?s genealogy is full of question marks and I prefer Andrew Thompson?s version. It was therefore Caroline Thompson that married Tony Salvas, not Catherine.
This is what I believe. The woman that Hollinshed resorts to calling K was actually the sister of Elias Kettle and had married a Mr Beck. The Sorrento author states with confidence that K?s husband died on the Ticondera?s ill-fated 1852 voyage and that his surname was Kettle. But the marriage details given are:
---(i.e. name)(?-1852 i.e. birth and death) married K in England c.1844; son Jack (alias Thompson.)
In effect an unknown man married an unknown woman and they had a seven year old son before the husband died in 1852. It is interesting that Peter Thompson had married Amelia the year after K?s husband had died. K was supposed to have married Mercer (year of birth and death and given name unknown) and had a daughter named Elizabeth who married George Hill. As Amelia was 37 when Peter died, it is probable that she married again and she would have enough fertile time left to have at least one more child. It is interesting that Andrew shows a Thompson-Hill connection too.

SOURCE: RYE CEMETERY RECORDS.
BATES ?WATSON.
George Bates (d. ? ) married Elizabeth Stark Watson (b.4-11-1897; d.27-5-1997) mother of Jack (d. 16-8-1962 at 42). P.G.Bates (d.6-7-1963 at 68) was the husband of Elizabeth; as he was born about two years before the Watson girl, it is likely that P.G. was George.
I presume that Elizabeth was from the family of Sorrento fishermen and that the Bates family lived nearby circa world war 1.
CAIN-HUGHES.
Thomas V.Cain, known as Tom, (d.29-7-1971 at 87) married Marie Monica Hughes, known as Minnie. The Cains, particularly John, had land from Dromana and Purves Rd to Portsea one would expect his children and their cousins to know just about everyone west of Safety Beach.

PATTERSON-KENNEDY.
Maryann Patterson, daughter of Ralph and Rachel Patterson, (d.4-3-1910 at 35) married a Kennedy. Maryann would have been born about 1875, not long after the family had arrived in Fingal. (Hollinshed says they arrived there in 1855 but he obviously has not seen early, 1864 onward, ratebooks where the parish had about 6 ratepayers, none called Patterson.) It is interesting that James Kennedy was leasing 150 acres in Fingal from the Crown in 1879, when Maryann would have been nearly ready to start school. James, born in 1835, had married Henry Tuck?s daughter, Harriet, and they had four sons. (LLL page 129.) It is not unreasonable to expect that the youngest was born at the same time as Maryann, when James was 40, and that the two became friends at the school on Anderson?s Barragunda.
There are only two allotments in Fingal containing 150 acres and one was already alienated by 1879, so James Patterson must have been on allotment 18, granted in 1896 to Christopher Cairns. This is indicated by 260 B1 and just south of it is allotment 24 of 317 ? acres granted to Margaret Patterson
The Pattersons had probably selected this land 20 years earlier making the two families neighbours across the road from eachother (ie. The northern section of the Long Point Circuit in Greens Bush.)

CAIN-MULLIGAN
Patricia Josephine Cain (d.23-3-1995) married Jon Patrick Mulligan (d 5-7-2000).

SOURCE: T ROVE (National Library of Australia?s digitized copies of newspapers.)
BRUNNING-EDWARDS.
Ruby, daughter of John Brunning of Somerville, married John Edwards. (Argus 7-9-1923, page 14, column 5.) This appeared under MORNINGTON in COUNTRY NEWS. The Brunnings family, at St Kilda and Somerville, was famous for its nursery products and for many years produced a book about gardening which was widely regarded as the gardener?s bible. John Brunning was responsible for the Soldiers? Memorial block at Somerville, which the council plans to sell. Leila Shaw, who is a descendant of John Brunning, wrote ?The Way We Were?, a wonderful history of the Somerville area. Leila and Shirley Walter of Frankston are responsible for my books ?The Mysterious Henry Gomm? and ?The Female Drover: A History of Moorooduc?.
These two books cover the area between Mornington and Jones Rd and detail the link between some of the families, which will not be given in my dictionary history. Several other pioneers of Tuerong are mentioned in my ?Tuerong? which traces the occupants of the Tuerong Station, later called Tuerong Park, and an associated farm known as Moorellen.
I am awaiting confirmation that John Edwards was of the pioneering Red Hill family.If he was, this would not be the only marriage involving residents of Somerville and Red Hill. George Gomm, one of the Somerville Football Club?s Legends, married a Red Hill girl. While marriages usually took place between youngsters who had grown up as next door, or close, neighbours (except in or after wartime when men married girls they had met while based at camps far away or on Soldier Settlement farms), youngsters at these two towns would meet every year at the famous Somerville Fruitgrowers? Show and later at a similar event at Red Hill.

TRUEMAN
Lime Land Leisure gives a few details of this pioneering Tootgarook family and unfortunately many are wrong. So rather than start at the very beginning of my findings, I will start at the end; a seventeen page Trueman genealogy supplied to me by Heather Spunner, the wife of James Trueman?s great grandson, Graeme Spunner.
The family moved around but within the county of Wiltshire. Jeffrey was born in All Cannings in 1719 and died there in 1791, likewise for his son, Thomas, (1743-1810). His son, Thomas, was born at the same village in 1774 but married at Collingbourne Ducis in 1799 and died there in 1841. His son, William, (1800-1870) entered and left the world in this new village. It is of interest that his wife was Jane Bennett, whom he married in 1822. I wonder if Jane was the aunt of Tom Bennett, a peninsula pioneer, and if Tom arranged for James Trueman to come to Tootgarook as a labourer indentured to James Purves. There is little evidence that James would have been able to pay for his passage.
The family seems to have been locked into poverty. Jeffrey was buried by the parish because he had insufficient funds. The same generosity was required for the burial of his son, Thomas?s wife, Elizabeth. William Trueman, Jane and their six children were the recipients of charity from the parish of Collingbourne Ducis in 1837, when money was raised to buy coal for the poor of the parish.
Their first child was James Trueman, born 16-6-1822 in Chute, Wiltshire, which seems to have been Jane?s home village as she died there in 1865. Some of his sisters were Ann, Elizabeth, Ellen and Sarah; I have included them here because no death details have been supplied and one of them could have been the grandmother of the mysterious Mrs Libbis.
James was described as an agricultural labourer in the 1841 Census. He married Jane Cook (b.1827 in Collingbourne Kingston, Wilts.) on 6-6-1850 in Collingbourne Ducis, and in 1851 they were living in Maddington, Wilts. Their first child, Annie, died after living just one month, all 38 days in Collingbourne Ducis. George Trueman was born on 2-3-1852 in Maddington and Henry was born in the same place on 30-9-1855.
Thus when James and Jane boarded the Sabrina at Southampton on 24-1-1857, they had two boys with them, but unfortunately young Henry was destined never to see their new home. He died near the Cape of Good Hope on 10-3-1857. Their passage was swift and they arrived at Hobson?s Bay on 13-4-1857. George must have preferred the open road to farming; he was listed as a carter and James was not impressed with his work on the farm and overlooked him when dividing his grant. He died on 10-10-1932, apparently a bachelor. The other five children were:
SARAH b.1857 Pt Nepean, d.1936 Dromana. Married Charles Moat 1891.
ELLEN b. 1858 Tootgarook, d.1899 Parramatta. Married Henry John Cook.
THOMAS b.1863 Tootgarook, d.1925 Dromana. Married Matilda Elizabeth Geary 1899.
WILLIAM b.20-3-1866 Tootgarook, d.1949 in Wangaratta. Married Elsie George 1901.
JOHN b.1870 Tootgarook, d.1943 in Sorrento. Apparently a bachelor.

Thomas and Matilda had two daughters:
Gladys Emeline Nellie b. 1901, married Andrew Seator in 1932.
Bertha Matilda b. 1906 Pt Nepean, d.1985 Caulfield. Married Lester Brooksbank1941.

William and Elsie had four children:
Albert Edward b.1902 Tootgarook, d. 1975 Tootgarook
Married Florence Annie Dark 921.
William b.and d. at Tootgarook 1904.
Frederick James b. 16-1-1908 Pt Nepean, d. 3-11-1959 Sydney.
Married 1. Olive Runciman:child-Linda (McKay)
2. Zita Muriel Hunter at Auburn NSW in 1942.
Nellie May Trueman b. 4-7-1911, d. 27-4-1967 Melb.
Married Frank Ernest Spunner 18-7-1931 Sorrento.

9 comment(s), latest 2 months, 3 weeks ago

Farms near TULLAMARINE: SPRING FARM, CUMBERLAND, PASCOE VILLA, ARUNDEL, ABERFELDIE, BIG CLARKE,(VIC., AUST.)

CORRECTION OF TEXT AND MUCH BACKGROUND INFORMATION WILL CONTINUE.

Due to faulty digitisation in trove, I often spend hours trying to find an article that I know perfectly well is there, because I have read it before. At the time I had found it by sheer chance because it was near another for which I was searching,and something caught my eye. On many occasions I have failed to rediscover the article so when I make such chance discoveries now I tend to do something about it immediately,no matter how many irons I have in the fire. It is rare to find three articles of such interest on one page of a newspaper and who knows,by the time I finish,there may be more. I found the page because of trove's irritating habit of producing results for just one, rather than all, of the words that are entered for the search. In this case the search was for: "grimes, ford,saltwater river" . I'll have to find whether Pascoe Villa was the original Young Queen Inn and locate the article about the murder charge. I'll have to find if it was Coghill selling Cumberland. Pascoe Villa may have been on the land that Smith bought on Brewster's grant (c/a 15 Doutta Galla, now Strathmore) that I think became John Murray Peck's Lebanon, so I'll have to consult Lemon's Broady history and my title information in EARLY LANDOWNERS.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 30 November 1867 p 2 Advertising.

SPRING FARM
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6.
At Twelve O'clock.
MAGNIFICENT FREEHOLD PROPERTY,
Known as Springs Farm, Adjoining the Keilor Village Reserve, Fronting the Saltwater River, the Deep Creek, and other Government Roads.
To Squatters, Graziers, Agriculturists, Capitalists, and Others.
GEMMELL, TUCKETT, and Co. have received instructions from tho Hon. John Foster Vesey Fitzgerald* (previous to that gentleman's departure for Europe) to SELL by AUCTION, at their rooms, 49 Collins street west, on Friday, December 6, at twelve o'clock,
Those two contiguous sections of land, being Nos.20 and 21 parish of Doutta Galla, containing 710 and 640 acres respectively, facing three** Government roads, and having one mile and a half frontage to the Saltwater River.
The auctioneers beg to call the special attention of parties in search of really good investments to this
valuable estate, being within an easy distance of Melbourne. The land is of the richest quality, clear of all
obstructions, and is abundantly grassed and watered by the Saltwater River. It is well worthy the attention of graziers and sheep farmers, from its close proximity to town, as grazing paddocks. The property is all securely fenced and subdivided into convenient paddocks. The improvements consist of cottage*** and sheep-yards, which with a small outlay may be made a comfortable homestead. It is approached from Melbourne by either the Keilor, the Deep Creek, or Broadmeadows roads. The Government having purchased the Essendon Railway, which is now opened for traffic, considerably enhances the value of the property. The situation of this property can scarcely be equalled for richness of soil, scenery, or easy access to the Melbourne markets, and the district is noted for its productive qualities. Coaches pass the property six times a day.
Title perfect, for particulars of which apply to Messrs. Nutt and Murphy, solicitors, William street.


* This proves the claim made in a Victoria-wide source (possibly SETTLING)that J.F.L.V.(Alphabetical) Foster had changed his name and returned home to claim an inheritance. He would have needed to transfer the titles of all his property to himself (old name to new name!)
** 1.Today's Mickleham/Broadmeadows Rd, 2.Today's Sharp Rd, 3. Fosters Rd, today's Keilor Park Drive south to Spence St.
*** Foster didn't consider it grand but the Crottys called it The Governor's House. Maurice Crotty had been leasing Spring Farm for most of the decade so far and his wife (nee McCormack)wrote a letter in 1867 stating that part of their farm had been sold. The buyer was James Sharp (Volume C folio 979, says my Melway.)




CUMBERLAND ESTATE
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6
At Twelve O'clock.
Beautiful Freehold Property,
Moonee Ponds,
CUMBERLAND ESTATE.
Handsome villa Residence and 1301 Acres of Land.
To Capitalists In Search of First-class Suburban Property.
GEMMELL, TUCKETT, and Co. have received Instructions to SELL by AUCTION, at their rooms, 40 Collins-street west, on Friday, December ?,at twelve o'clock, Cumberland Estate, on the Moonee Ponds, 12 miles from Melbourne, containing 1304a. 3r. lp., partly bounded by tho Deep Creek and Bulla roads, at Oaklands Junction, and intersected by the Moonee Ponds, which b]???????hore????? contain an abundant supply of water in the driest season. About 700 acres are well wooded. The whole is divided into three paddocks by substantial post-and-rail fencing.

The buildings, erected only six years ago, are a handsome villa residence of eight large and well
proportioned rooms, substantially built of bluestone ; a building adjoining, also of bluestone, divided into
storeroom, pantry, kitchen, laundry, and servants' room ; huts, stable, &c., of wood.There is a garden well stocked with both fruit and ornamental trees, shrubs, &c., fowlhouse, stockyard.

There are 1103 acres of the land let for twelve months for grazing purposes. This very desirable property is bounded by the beautiful estates of the late Hon. Donald Kennedy, of Dundonald, and Andrew Sutherland, Esq., of Woodlands.
Particulars as to title can bo obtained from Mr.Wyburn, solicitor, 40 Ellzabeth-street.

The reason for the timing of the sale become obvious.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 8 June 1867 p 8 Family Notices
Funeral Notices. FRIENDS are respectfully invited to attend the funeral of the late Mrs. COGHILL (relict of the late William Coghill, Esq.),to move from her late residence, Cumberland, Moonee Ponds,THIS DAY, (Saturday), at 9, and pass across the Flemington-bridge about 12 ...
.
N.B. MOONEE PONDS (earlier,Moonee Moonee Chain of Ponds) meant NEAR THE MOONEE PONDS CREEK, not the suburb.
Woodlands, and Stewarton (Gladstone Park) were also described as being at Moonee Ponds.)

William had died in 1860. His wife's name was Christian!

Excerpt from my EARLY LANDOWNERS:PARISH OF TULLAMARINE.(SEE COMMENTS-WON'T SUBMIT.)




CORRECT TEXT.


PASCOE VILLA
Sale bv Auction. ;PRELIMINARY NOTICE. To Farmers and Country Families, Residing at Pascoevale, Essendon, Flemington, Deep Creek Road, Deep Creek, Broadmeadows, &c.
From the Celebrated House of Crossleys, Finsbury Pavement, London.
PASCOE-VILLA, PASCOEVALE, About Three Miles Northward of Flemington.
Magnificent Drawingroom, Diningroom, Bedroom, and Other Beautiful Articles of Household Furniture, Pianoforte, Paintings, Engravings. Plate, Plateware, Handsome Buggy and Mare, Harness,Ploughs. Harrows, Draught horses, Dray, Water cart, Milch Cows, Dairy Utensils, Stacks of New mown hay, &c.
STUBBS, OXTOBY, and Co. have been instructed by W. Smith, Esq., to hold a sale of the whole of the above valuable property, catalogues of which, with the day of sale, will appear in a few days.
House and Premises to Let.

As the information about William Smith (earlier leasing part of "Glenroy", probably from Donald Kennedy), and his land either side of the Pascoe Vale Rd bridge, would not submit here or in comments, I put it into a new journal called WILLIAM SMITH OF GLENROY AND BOTH SIDES OF THE PASCOE VALE BRIDGE,which fortunately did submit. There is also a reference to CUMBERLAND and SPRING FARM regarding a lawyer involved in William Smith's trial.

Because so much information about WILLIAM SMITH (the 1847 trial, which affected the reputation of the hotel,the 1850 advertisement seeking to restore it and attract customers,who may have started taking the new (present) Sydney Road when the (Pascoe Vale) road bridge was swept away (pointing out that a new bridge was only about a week from completion and the Old Sydney road was linked with the new one near Somerton Inn), is in the WILLIAM SMITH journal, any findings regarding whether Pascoe Villa was the ORIGINAL Young Queen will be reported in that journal.


ARUNDEL, EDWARD WILSON'S "MODEL" FARM.
FOR SALE, the following STOCK, bred by Mr.Edward Wilson, at his Experimental Farms, at Keilor and Riddell's Creek :
1 entire Spanish ass, three years old, over 13 hands
1 do Egyptian ass, thrco years old, 13 hands
1 do French ass, two years old, 13 hands
2 puie-bred Alderney bull calves, two months old
12 pure-bred southdown rams, two and four tooth, bred from stock purchased from tho late Jonas Webb of England
Danubian and Toulouse geese, (ice?).
Silver grey or Chinchilla rabbits.
For particulars apply to
Mr. ANDERSON*, overseer, Arundel, Keilor.

*James Anderson who later farmed James Wilson's Spring Farm after managing Arundel for Wilson is discussed in my journal 1888 GEOGRAPHY WITH THE MELBOURNE HUNT.


EDWARD WILSON.
Information about Edward Wilson and his model farm can be found in my journal about him. He was an editor/co-owner of The Argus and Tullamarine pioneer. He left money in a Trust* which supported Cr Jack's establishment of a motor ambulance service on the Mornington Peninsula.

*EXTRACTS FROM WILSON'S BIOGRAPHY IN AUSTRALIAN DICTIONARY OF BIOGRAPHY.In the late 1850s Wilson travelled widely among the Australasian colonies. His travel-jottings were published as Rambles at the Antipodes (Melbourne, 1859). His sight was now beginning to fail and in 1859-60 he visited England for advice, travelled on the Continent and served on the committee of the General Association for the Australian Colonies. In 1862 he again went to England; on the homeward voyage his sight deteriorated so badly that he returned immediately, and late in 1864 he had an operation for cataract; he regained good vision in one eye, but decided to remain in England close to the best medical aid. He lived at Addiscombe near Croydon, but in 1867 bought Hayes Place, Kent, the eighteenth-century home of the Pitts. Surrounded by nephews and nieces, he dispensed endless hospitality aided by a small army of servants; the amenities included a small zoo which contained emus, kangaroos and monkeys. Colonial visitors were always welcome; he was on close terms with the Darwins, Archbishop Tait, Edward Lear and Hugh Childers; children adored him.


After several heart attacks, Wilson died peacefully on 10 January 1878. His remains were taken to Melbourne and interred on 7 July according to the rites of the Church of England. He was unmarried. In his will he made twenty-six legacies of ?100 a year to old female friends in the colonies, but the bulk of his estate was used to form the Edward Wilson Trust which since his death has distributed several million dollars to Victorian charities, especially hospitals. A bust by Thomas Woolner is in the State Library of Victoria.)


DISTRICT LICENSING BENCH.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 21 April 1852 p 4 Article
... William Boucher, Gold Diggers Retreat, Deep Creek: Edward Wilson, the Lincolnshire Arms, from Mr Wright.

The above entry from Trove is puzzling in two ways. Was the Argus Editor juggling two jobs? Why would the pub be described as being at Deep Creek,when Tulip Wright had leased his Deep Creek or Bridge Inn (where Bulla's mail was left until 1851-see PETER YOUNG in my journal JOHN THOMAS SMITH AND HIS ELECTORS) to Donohue and built the Linc on its present site, corner of Keilor and Lincoln Rd at "Essendon Crossroads"? (BULLA BULLA, I.W.Symonds, P.8, THE ANNALS OF ESSENDON, R.W.Chalmers.)

The answer to the first question is that Wilson probably needed the second job to pay off loans; see the extract (in italics) from the editor's biography. There is no proof found yet that the editor was the short term publican; the publican may have been one of the editor's nephews. Later that year Johnston* persuaded him to buy the Argus from William Kerr for ?300; Wilson had to borrow money and Johnston became joint-proprietor in 1849. The issue of 15 September 1848 was Wilson's first; from 18 June 1849 the paper became a daily. Circulation declined to about 250, but by the close of 1850 equalled the combined circulation of rivals and by late 1851 had risen to 1500. Wilson successfully met the challenge of the gold rushes. The Argus absorbed the Melbourne Daily News from 1 January 1852 and only the Herald and the Geelong Advertiser survived as competitors for the goldfield market. He brought out forty compositors from England and in mid-1852 doubled the paper's size and reduced its price from 3d. to 2d. Circulation rose from 5000 in May 1852 to almost 20,000 late in 1853, advertisements snowballed and the number of employees grew to about 140. But costs were outrageous and Wilson was almost ruined.
(*Politician and founder of the Craiglee vineyard at Sunbury.)

Deep Creek Road, or THE GREAT ROAD TO THE DIGGINGS might have been a better way of describing the location of the Linc. The term Essendon Crossroads seemed to be mainly used by the Oaklands Hunt after 1888. The popular route was through Deep Creek (Bulla) until Brees' bridge was built as part of the construction of the road to Mount Alexander (Castlemaine) in 1854. Edward Wilson must have heard a whisper about this huge project, to take a chance on running this hotel. I'm not sure whether he had bought Arundel by 1852 but the facts will emerge when I discuss the ownership of Arundel (courtesy of K.B.Keeley's architectural thesis circa 1960 and 1989 owner (Tony?) Cockram.)

My purpose here is to discuss Arundel, granted to Bunbury (possibly acting as a dummy for the next owner who called it Glengyle), Bunbury's right arm, Bertram's Ford and Closer Settlement etc.
Arundel was section 1 of the parish of Tullamarine with a river frontage from just north of the bend in Melway 4 E9 to where Arundel Creek flows into the Maribryrnong at 14 J2 ACCORDING TO J.NOONE'S PARISH MAP OF THE PARISH DRAWN IN 1888. His map obviously satified his superiors, but 125 years later Mr Noone has been found out. If you extend Sharps Rd,the boundary between Tullamarine and Doutta Galla,east to the river,it meets the river at the point where its course changes from south to south east in the top half of 14 J.2,the line just touching the north end of the quarry in 14 K2. This is exactly where Noone had the southern boundary of the parish touching the river.

The creek is shown flowing in the right directions and crosses Grants Lane at exactly the right spot(bottom right corner of 4 G5)but it shows none of the creek's twists and turns, or the fork of the creek that crosses McNabs Rd and flows through Fawkner's lots 63,64, 65 and 66 before heading through the Mansfields' lots straddling Panton Rd (as shown on Melway.) Noone approximated the creek, drawing the general course but hitting the river at the wrong spot (with the creek, not the extension of Sharps Rd.)

I started my description of Arundel's boundaries again, gave some details about the grantee and Tony Cockram's information about the owners of Arundel/Arundel farm but it would not submit, so look in comments for that and much trove information including Donald McDonald's terrific article.(Donald grew up in Keilor.)

THE ARUNDEL CLOSER SETTLEMENT.

CLOSER SETTLEMENT
ARUNDEL ESTATE ACQUIRED.
As forecasted in "The Argus" yesterday,the Land Purchase and Management Board were(sic) successful in their negotiations with the agent for the purchase of 11,000 acres of land near Keilor, known as the Arundel Estate. This property in reality consists of three estates, the Overnewton, the Annandale and the Arundel Estate. The nearest part of the estate is only about 11 miles from Melbourne. The St. Albans, Sydenham and Deer Park railway stations adjoin it. (P.16, Argus, 27-5-1905.)
The article mentions excellent roads but fails to point out that the only access to Keilor for those on Arundel and the east part of Annandale was by means of Bertram's ford which was to take two lives not long after. The whole area was probably bought from the Estate of William Taylor who had obtained permission from the shire of Keilor to dam the creek that flows through Taylors Lakes. (I wonder if I can find that article!)

ACCESS TO ARUNDEL (FORDS AND BRIDGES.)
The road leading from Keilor to Arundel has had several names. By 1865, the Keilor council was calling it Bertram's road (P.4, Argus, 24-5-1865.) Bertram's ford seems to be first mentioned in 1866 (P.4, Argus, 30-1-1866.) The ramp leading to the ford from the Arundel side was still clearly visible circa 1989*.
BORRELL RD.
When the Calder freeway was built, a new link with the old highway and Green Gully was built. The south end of Arundel became a dead end and was named Borrell Rd.because emergency vehicles may have gone to the wrong side of the freeway,wasting precious time if both parts of the road had the same name. Jose Borrell, a Spaniard, came to Keilor after the 1916 flood and bought the Cahill's Gumm's Corner farm, after staying with relatives near Garden St, Essendon,by the Moonee Ponds Creek. As the farm had a gully running through it,he levelled the land with a horse and scoop, giving it the appearance of a gigantic dry dam, and it did become a dam during the 1974 flood. Jose switched to vegetable growing. He extended the Cahills' old house but only that original section,heritage-listed I presume, remains beside the bike track. Joe Borrell, his son, had retired by about 1990 when he provided me with the above information as well as letting me photocopy many of his photos*. Ironically Joe's new home behind the council offices was on the old market garden of another Spaniard,Jack Vert, indicated by Barcelona Ave and Vert St. Also in the Spanish Armarda (on wheels) was the Cuartero family.
(*These photocopies,very grainy, must be in the B volume of my DICTIONARY HISTORY OF TULLAMARINE AND MILES AROUND. If any members of the Borrell family have Joe's album(s),could they please contact the Keilor Historical Society so these priceless photos can be scanned, if this hasn't been already done.

(*PARDON THE INTERRUPTION.I'M GOING TO CONTACT THE BRIMBANK COUNCIL HERITAGE PLANNING OFFICER TO SEE IF THE FORD IS IN THEIR HERITAGE STUDY. Email sent 26 minutes after midnight. Reply received 9:04 a.m.
9:04 AM (6 hours ago) Good Morning Mr xxx
Thank you for taking the time to contact Brimbank City Council.
I have forwarded your request on to the Coordinator Strategic Planning and you will be responded to promptly.)

CLOSER SETTLEMENT.
---------------------#------------------------------
ARUNDEL ESTATE.
MINISTERIAL INSPECTION.
The construction of a bridge over the Saltwater River, which was to provide communication between the Arundel Estate and the township of Keilor, was in progress when the floods of last September came and washed away a considerable portion of the structure.After experiencing considerable difficulty,the Keilor Shire Council let
another contract, and this has now been satisfactorily settled to tin pr?-il i.uiiu etc.
(P.18, Argus,14-7-1907.)

BERTRAM'S FORD SERVED FOR ANOTHER YEAR, AND MISS ROWE'S NEWS BROUGHT MANY A TEAR.

DEATH AT BERTRAM'S FORD.(Yours Truly, 1989.)
They were leading a horse that they'd sold to McRae
Who lived near St Albans, over Keilor way;
Will Mansfield was driving, his son sitting near;
Stephen Hill,leading the horse, sat in the rear.

Will Mansfield and Stephen were mates at the school,
Spent their free time together as a general rule,
So Will's dad let him come on the trip o'er the river;
But his wife wasn't happy and spoke with a quiver.

With a look at the sky and the storm clouds that loomed
She pleaded, "Bill, don't go now or you'll all be doomed!"
But he reassured her as they clambered on board,
"I've been through deeper water than you get at Bertram's Ford."

Halfway there the sun vanished- came a curious silence-
Then the sky opened up with murderous violence;
The clouds, basalt black,turned day into night
As the three reached Arundel and turned to the right.

"Young Hilly, don't wind that rein round your arm;"
His friend's father said, "'twill bring you to harm!"
Then they ceased their descent, to the right they curved;
The roar of river the horses un-nerved.

But Bill urged them on and into the current;
Soon a horse lost its footing, so swift was the torrent
And the jinker was swept like a leaf in a gale;
Mansfield grabbed for his son who had started to wail.

By lightning above, the ghoulish scene shown,
The three from the overturned jinker were thrown.
Sounds of whinnies and screaming and, "Where are you son?"
And the Grim Reaper's harvest had already begun.

While the Mansfield lad to the murky depths sank
The towed horse's reins dragged his mate to the bank.
The father, now desperate, with a weakening yelp
Gasped, "Stevie, please Stevie, go and get help!"

At first, due to shock, comprehension he lacked
But his friend's father's plea soon made him react;
He mounted and thundered away up the slope,
And Bill dived again; he'd ne'er give up hope.

With the last of his strength, Mansfield surfaced again:
That would have been it- for lesser men.
But for Bill Mansfield, that would not suffice;
His son was worth any sacrifice.

By the time that help came it was far too late;
The son and the father had shared the same fate.
Miss Rowe and her pupils on the morrow
Would share the grieving widow's sorrow.


With William Mansfield and his son,William, was Steven Hill of "Danby Farm" (Melway 5 B3 approximately) and I believe these Mansfields were on the triangular 80 acres of section 15, Tullamarine (the Payne pig farm called "Scone" when acquired for the jetport c 1960)now occupied by the airport terminal buildings and north of Melrose Dr/Grants Lane. This land was owned by John Mansfield (memorial 106 595.)
The building of the Arundel bridge in 1906, to improve access to grantees on the Arundel Closer Settlement had started but, partly built, it was swept away by a torrent, ruining the contractor. A new contractor was found and the bridge was built not long after the Mansfield drowning. Stephen Hill escaped because he disobeyed instructions but if my memory serves me correctly, he was killed in world war 1. The McRaes* were involved in the formation of the Oaklands Hunt while on Glenara and were related by marriage to the Mansfields. (*As I pointed out to Brimbank Council in my email re Bertram's ford, McCrae Boulevard at Green Gully (which I had a hand in naming)has the wrong spelling;not my fault.)

The story behind the poem was told to me in 1988-9 by Wally Mansfield, Colin Williams and Gordon Connor, all independently of each other. Somehow, I gained the impression that the father, William John Mansfield was known as John but I have changed his name in the poem to Bill, just in case that wasn't the case. He was the only surviving son of John Mansfield who owned the airport terminal area.

Miss Rowe, the teacher at S.S.2163 (on the north corner of the present Melrose Dr and Link Rd)married Frank Wright who had Strathconnan, if I remember correctly, and was followed by Mr Rogers who (possibly) was the teacher when all the pupils disappeared to the Bone Mill at the end of Wright St one lunchtime and certainly was in 1908 when Colin Williams' head was split open in a playground accident. In 1909, Alec Rasmussen arrived, Saint Alec as I call him.

There are two things in the poem that I am not going to change at the moment. The newspaper article mentioned below states that the lad leading the horse was Phillip Hill but I'm not sure that Phillip wasn't his father. If his name was Phillip, why was S.Hill a pallbearer for the son's coffin? Call the second thing poetic licence if you like. When I was writing the poem, I had The Ballad of The Drover (Fifth Book, i.e. Grade 5 Reader)in mind. The article said that there was no particular flood at the time but I love the bit about the inky black sky turning day into night etc.
N.B.The biggest floods in the Maribyrnong Valley occurred in 1906,1916 (after which the Borrells moved into Gumm's Corner) and 1974 (when the Borrells had to salvage their crop in a rowboat as in the photo.)

FATHER AND SON DROWNED.
A Victorian Tragedy. Melbourne, Monday.
William Mansfield, a farmer, of Keilor with his son, William, aged 7, and a lad named Phillip Hill, were
driving over a deep creek to-day when the vehicle was swept away by the floodwaters. Mansfield and his son
were both drowned, but the boy Hill managed to reach the bank. (P.1,Barrier Miner,16-10-1906.)

N.B. The tragedy was reported far and wide, probably received by editors in the form of a telegram. Kyneton's paper stated that Hill was rescued when an onlooker threw a rope to him. The paper at Parramatta got it right.

"Hill was seated in the back of tho buggy, leading a horse. When the buggy overturned the led horse swam steadily to shore, dragging after him Hill, who had clung to the rope."



CLOSER SETTLEMENT
ARUNDEL ESTATE.
Application for the 22 blocks on the Arundel Estate offered by the Lands Purchase and Management Board for closer settlement have closed. Every block has been applied for, and the special land board, on December 6, will have to decide between the claims of several persons in some cases, and in one case there are no fewer than eight applications. (P.4, Argus, 23-11-1905.)

CLOSER SETTLEMENT. ARUNDEL ESTATE. ALL THE BLOCKS SELECTED
As a result of the special land board, held at the Lands office yesterday, the whole of the Arundel and Annandale portions of the Overnewton Estate were allotted to settlers under the provisions of the Closer
Settlement Act, and not one half of the applicants for the blocks could be supplied. The land offered is about 1100 acres situated on the "?Itu itir Huei ibiint .i mili' from Kulan'. etc.(P.5, Argus, 7-12-1905.)
The article, legible on the actual page, lists the successful applicants. I know for a fact that some of them were not granted, and probably not assessed on, their blocks. Alf Cock, my great Uncle, was not allocated lot 10 ("Glenview")but received the grant (in 1913 if I remember.) Alf's brother, Fred (my maternal grand father) had probably moved to Bunyip by this time, and Alf had probably met the Woods family of Longwarry (the next town)during a visit. Woods may have been Wood or visa versa. (IT WAS!)

Jean, younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Cock, of Glenview, Tullamarine,to Kenneth C., son of the late Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Wood, of Minyip.(P.5, Argus, 7-6-1938.)

COUNTRY.Vlit,.r? V I Lil Min ami I report having sold,on behalf of Mr.G.E.Woods, his farm at Overnewton, Tullamarine, containing 114 acres,to Mr Alfred Cock, of Broadmeadows.(P.5, Argus, 17-10-1912.)

My hunch was right: Woods was Wood!
OBITUARY
Mrs. Charlotte Wood. The death occurred of Mrs. Charlotte Wood, of 'Inverness,' Barellan,at Heidelberg House, Melbourne, on Saturday, December 30.She was born at Birchip, Victoria, 64 years ago, and was a daughter of
the late Hugo Campbell, of Birchip. In 1 9M clip mnrrierf Mi* A .T.Wood and the young- couple lived in
Kupanyup and Melbourne for a few years before moving to Stawell to reside in 1905, where Mr. Wood was
manager of the Wimmera flour mill. During their 21 yeses' residence in that town, Mr. and Mrs. Wood both
played an active part. in the public life of the town. Mr. Wood was on the Borough Council for many yeare
and Mayor for several terms. He was also actively associated with the Stave}) Athletic Club in the running
of the famous Stawell Gift.In 1926 Mre. Wood came to Barellan with her husband, who had purchased the property known as 'Inverness,' at North Moombooldooi. Mrs. Wood was an active supporter of the C.W.A. Association Tfor some years, until ill-health compelled her to relinquish hei activities. Mr. Wood returned to Stawell in 1934 to take over the management of the Wimmera flour mill, at the request of the owners, but in August, 1934, he
died in the Stawell Hospital after a short illness. Mrs. Wood continued to reside on 'Inverness,' until increasing ill-health recently compelled ' her to seek medical attention in Melbourne.Her funeral took place on Tuesday,2nd January, at the Pleasant Creek cemetery Stawell, where the remains were laid to rest beside her husband. (Pardon,non correction of text.)

Sons and daughters of deceased are Messrs. A. Wood (Narandera), G.Wood (Longwarry, Victoria), and
Mesdames A. McCarron (Canowindra),G.Pomroy (Melbourne), A. Warrener (Sydney) and E. Abbott (Barellan.)
Surviving sisters are Mrs. A. Fletcher (Birchip) and Miss S. Campbell(Melbourne).
(P.2, Narandera Argus and Riverina Advertiser, 16-1-1945.)(Pardon,non correction of text.)
Was the move of the Gibb family to Bunyip influenced by the Wood family?

CLOSER SETTLEMENT PIONEERS (TULLAMARINE).
Google TULLAMARINE, COUNTY OF BOURKE to obtain maps showing that portion of the Arundel Closer Settlement.
The first two maps show Arundel and section 2 (Annandale) in their entirety but the third:
digital.slv.vic.gov.au/dtl_publish/simpleimages/30/1258115.html‎ shows the closer settlement blocks. Be warned that not all blocks name the original owners. Also,lots 7 and 8 are shown as one block,Butcher Thomas's "Tullamar" (1943 rates.)

A vital link in my becoming a local historian was Gordon Henwood, who handled the cleaning at Gladstone Park Primary School while I was teaching there. I was his mate, as with Paul Agar at Strathmore North, because I always made sure that my classroom* was clean and the furniture arranged to allow good access for the broom or vacuum, and that I was there late because my free time earlier had been used to take lunchtime gym, soccer practice (2nd in V.P.S.S.A. championship one year) and basketball (one boy set a record of 300 not out at one-bounce lay ups-staggering), recorder group and teaching C.P.R. to every child from Grade 2 up during my time release.

If I remember correctly, Gordon's mother was John Duncan McFarlane's daughter and Gordon had grown up on lot 12 (or perhaps lot 17 at the other end of Browns Rd.) I showed him the Tullamarine/Will Will Rook map (now at the Hume Global Learning Centre) that was produced by Broadmeadows Shire to sort out Stanley Korman's holdings, and given to me by the Broady rates officer (to keep me occupied while I could not access the Strongroom during the 1988 elections.)I pointed to A.Cock on the map and told Gordon that I'd found nothing about him at the Tullamarine Library, and since the Tullamarine history there consisted of one and a half foolscap pages, I had resolved to write a history. "You should speak to John Fenton;" he said, "he lives there."

John denied that he was a pioneer and wrote a list of contacts, which rapidly snowballed. And that's how my head became, very rapidly, crammed with history.


Extract from TULLAMARINE:BEFORE THE JETPORT.(1998) with some additions.
*=Not part of the closer settlement.
ANNANDALE AND ARUNDEL RDS (to MCNabs Rd.)
LEFT.Nash (Tom,then Arthur) 188+ 165 acres*, Glenview (Alf Cock, John Fenton's Dunnawalla)139 acres-part of Leslie Banks- + 115 acres, O'Donnell and then Frewen's lot 11, 32 acres,Arundel Farm (details given above.)

RIGHT. Bill Parr's Annandale, 165 acres*,Geraghty's Paddock ( Fox's FARM NAME???)121 acres, Closer settlement lots 7 and 8 (MaherA.Williamson on 8?)200 acres, Lot 6 (later, maybe still in 2013, Frewen), Elm Grove (Wallace) 71 acres, Arundel Farm creek frontage,lots 3 and 4, 113 acres.

McNABS RD.
WEST. Turner's (William Turner in 1861,McNab) 124 acres, Two Fox blocks, 128 acres -end of Closer Settlement.



ARUNDEL ESTATE. CLOSER SETTLEMENT HOLDING. Estate of EUPHEMIA BARR. Deceased.
Tenders are hereby invited by John Milburn and James Wallace, as Trustees for the purchase of Allotment 16,
Section One, Parish of Tullamarine, County of Bourke, containing 7 acres and 28 perches or thereabouts, on
which is erected a double-fronted four roomed weatherboard house, with front and back verandahs and outbuildings,consisting of dairy, man's room, buggy shed, stable (one-stalled) and fowl house. Amongst the improvements are an underground tank and a galvanised iron tank (300 gallons) connected with kitchen.
The property formed part of the Arundel Estate, and is situated one mile from the Keilor township, and
fronts the Saltwater River. Closer Settlement requirements etc.
(P.3, Essendon Gazette and Keilor,Bulla and Broadmesadows Reporter,.)

Robert Brown,member of a very old Keilor family*,took over the crown lease of lot 16, at the end of Brown's Rd, and gained his grant in 1928. John Milburn, was not a Closer Settlement resident. He lived directly over the river near Milburn Rd.The Wallaces are longtime residents of the closer settlement and Don** of Elm Grove was heavily involved with the market gardeners' state body. **FIND ARTICLE.
*FIND ARTICLE ABOUT THIS.




ABERFELDIE, BIG CLARKE
PRIME FAT STOCK-DALMAHOY CAMPBELL and Co will have for SALE, at the Market yards, Flemington, on Wednesday, December 4, (selections only!)
........
SOO do do, for Mr W J T Clarke--SEE COMMENT OF 27-10-2013.

14 comment(s), latest 3 years, 8 months ago

FIELD DAY AT TULLAMARINE, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA IN 1935; CLEAR PHOTO OF 3 YEAR OLD KEITH McNAB & ABOUT THE FAMILIES.

The following article was found in an attempt to find how early Sam Merrifield had resided in Tullamarine, the trove search terms used being POULTRY, TULLAMARINE.
TULLAMARINE 1935

Part of the social fabric of areas beyond the urban fringe was the Young Farmers' Club. Schoolchildren were encouraged to improve their knowledge of farming through events such as the reported field day and activities at school such as illustrated in this photo:
ELLIS STONEY DENHAM BUTLER


Farmer's wives were provided with social interaction through the Country Womens' Association or in this case the women's section of the Victorian Farmer's Union, the branch strangely called the Essendon branch and the meeting held at my great uncle's farm, Glenview" on the south side of Annandale Rd between Steeles Creek and the descent to the Arundel creek. W.S., V.F.U.

Tullamarine was still a quiet farming community in 1935 and continued to be so until the mid 1950's, when Caterpillar established its factory. The only shop in that era was the Green's Corner store at the junction of today's Melrose Drive and Mickleham Rd, established by Cec. and Lily Green in the former Junction Hotel which had been closed down in (1929?), mainly due to the urging of Tommy Loft whose "Dalkeith" was just across the road, and later owned by Leslie King Dawson after whom Dawson St was named. The last owner of Dalkeith was Percy Hurren, postmaster at Jones Corner Mooorooduc in 1950 who had occupied the property in 1951, immediately joining the Tullamarine Progress Association which he later assured that Caterpillar would be good for the area.

The centre of population was up Melrose Drive (known successively as Mt Macedon/ Deep Creek/ Bulla Rd and later Lancefield Rd) because of two subdivisions circa 1850 by John Pascoe Fawkner (on the Keilor side) and John Carre Riddell after whom Riddells Creek was named. Part of Riddell's grants between Bulla Rd and Derby St was divided into one acre blocks as far north as Nash's Lane (part of which is now called Mercer Drive.)Apart from these acre blocks in what was called Hamilton Terrace (after Riddell's partner)there were blocks of about 7 acres except for Glendewar and Chandos, large farms fronting the Moonee Ponds Creek on Riddell's land between the roads to Bulla and Broadmeadows Township (Westmeadows south of Kenny St.)

J.F.L.Foster leased and then sold portions of section 3 south of the Derby St. corner on both sides of Bulla Rd as well as donating land for the Wesleyan school. David William O'Niall's LADY OF THE LAKE HOTEL, and the 33 acre "BROOMBANK" (which my great grandfather leased 1867-1882)were on the Broadmeadows side of the road with Millar Rd being the driveway of the farm. (When the hotel was burnt down, John Beech's BEECH TREE HOTEL was built on the south east corner of Fawkner's subdivision just north of opposite today's Melrose Drive Reserve.) Today's Trade Park Industrial Estate was sold by Foster to purchasers who were mainly Methodists, such as Ann Parr and Charles Nash, who owned much of it, which he called "Bayview". Charles donated the land for the Tullamarine Methodist Church, built 1870, which stood for over a century between Trade Park Drive and Post Office Lane (opposite the Derby St. corner.) Its stained glass window are now in the Uniting Church in Carrick Drive, Gladstone Park.

The first schools were the Wesleyan School fronting the inside angle of the bend in the Melrose Drive service road/ Cherie St, and the Seafield school on the south side of Grants Lane at Melway 4 J6, many of whose pupils lived on J.P.Fawkner's subdivision straddling Mansfields Rd. In 1884, these were replaced by Tullamarine State School 2613 on the north corner of Conders Lane and Bulla Rd, top of Melway 5 F9.

The next major subdivision was the Arundel Closer Settlement west of the start of Steeles Creek on Annandale Rd from about 1906. Apart from today's Arundel Farm, these farms consisted of roughly 100 acres except for smaller blocks on Browns Rd near the Arundel bridge. This land had been bought from the estate of William Taylor of Arundel, as was the Overnewton Closer Settlement near St Albans. Land had also been resumed by the Crown at Avondale Heights.

Children on the Arundel Closer Settlement went to school at Keilor or Conders Lane. Those nearer the latter would take a beeline through paddocks to and from school but had to watch out for snakes in the fields of hay. By 1935, because motor vehicles were starting to replace horses, the demand for hay dropped, with pig and poultry farming becoming more common.

In the 1950's Mansfield's Triangle (bounded by Sharps Rd, Bulla Rd and Broadmeadows Rd) was subdivided, many of the purchasers being immigrants attracted by employment offered by Caterpillar, and the ESSENDON Drive In (now Forum Place etc. south of Camp Hill Park, and so-named because hardly anybody knew where Tullamarine was)was established on the north end of Gowanbrae, formerly Camp Hill. In the 1930's Ray Loft (son of Tommy and father of Gordon)who'd married Maggie Millar and had been leasing Broombank from David O'Niall's daughters (who'd watched the Burke and Wills expedition passing in 1860, gazing in awe through the Cape Broom hedge)purchased the farm after their death; he subdivided this property in 1952 with Walter V.(Major)Murphy buying the block north of Northedge.

At the end of the decade Fawkner's subdivision and GOWRIE PARK, GLENDEWAR etc. to the north, were purchased for airport purposes (the school being relocated to the Dalkeith Avenue Corner and the War Memorial, later, by Major Murphy),and Tommy Loft's 40 acre subdivision on Dalkeith, Broadmeadows Rd, Eumarella St and Gordon St (named after Tommy's grandson) was attracting buyers at last. Also houses in Theresa St. were built for Americans constructing the Airport. What was left of Percy Hurren's farm became the Broadwood Park Estate but it was not until the mid 1970's that the bridge linking the two ends of Dawson St was built. John Denham's farm north of Dalkeith became Catherine Avenue.

SQUIZZY TAYLOR.
The Junction Hotel was closed down because of riotous behaviour. One of its patrons was Squizzy Taylor. After it had become Cec. and Lily Green's store a retired policeman visited and told them about the hotel being raided in an attempt to arrest Squizzy, who escaped with shots being fired by the police. He told them there might be something related to this incident and very quickly found a bullet lodged in a door which the Greens had never noticed.(Communicated by a Green descendant decades ago.)



ABOUT THE FAMILIES.
The Field Day.
McNAB.
See: THE GRANTS AND MCNABS
The file for the Mc volume of my dictionary history of Tullamarine and miles around can be supplied to any McNab researchers if they request it in a FTC private message supplying their email address. Keith McNab supplied much information to me from 1988, that would never have been found in rate books or newspapers.

ELLIS.
At the south corner of Grants Lane and Bulla Rd,(now the bend in Melrose Drive in Melway 5 D6, the east end of Grants Rd having been renamed)was a farm named Ecclesfield of 101 acres which remained intact for many decades having been part of Fawkner's subdivision. The Ellis family owned this and built several houses inside the bend which became known as Ellis's corner. Ecclesfield and the major (450 acre) portion of Gowrie Park were purchased from Bill Ellis circa 1960 for airport purposes. Young Vivienne Ellis became Vivienne Sutherland who was a wonderful worker for Tullamarine Primary School when I was teaching there 1971-3. She and her sister (Mrs Schwartz) were living next to each other opposite the Methodist church in 1988 when I started my Tullamarine research and supplied much information. Another Ellis family,of Greek ancestry, lived between Nash's Lane and Glendewar and were related by marriage to the owners in the 1950's of Glendewar (the anonymous charity workers discussed in another journal.)

There were only three results on trove for ELLIS, TULLAMARINE but enough to remind me that the Greek Ellis family included Peter and Paul and that the related family next door (to the north west on Glendewar) was named Chambers. This property was shown on the airport acquisitions map provided to me by the Department of Civil Aviation, which I donated to the Hume Global Learning Centre when I moved from Tullamarine to Rosebud.

As I was only concerned with which pioneers lived where during my research circa 1988, the only genealogy I included was volunteered by such as Keith McNab. Perhaps this deficiency can be remedied regarding Vivienne's family.

When I tried an ELLIS, GRANTS ROAD search, my memory of the multiple initials of Vivienne Sutherland's father on the acquisitions map (re Ecclesfield and the southern 460 acres of Gowrie Park) was refreshed. I had wrongly assumed that Vivienne told me that he arrived in Tullamarine in 1943 but that was probably when he bought the land on the north side of Grants Lane. A stock report (P.12, Argus,31-7-1935)confirms that he was known as Bill and that he was on Ecclesfield by 1935.

LAW NOTICES
MARY ELLIS Formerly of 160 Hampton Street Hampton But Late of Corio Street, Shepparton Widow Deceased - After fourteen clear days Alfred Henry William Ellis of Grants road Tullamarine farmer and Eric Clive* Ellis of 23
Carrier street Benalla dry cleaner the executors appointed by deceased's will dated the 21st day of December 1936 will APPLY to the Supreme Court of Victoria for PROBATE thereof. (P.19, Argus, 30-5-1951.)

*Eric Clive's birth record seems to indicate that his and A.H.W.'s father, William, could had married a city girl (Mary)from the Brighton/Hampton area. (However as revealed later, she was born at Crossover near Warragul.)
EventBirth Event registration number26107 Registration year1911
Personal information
Family nameELLIS Given namesEric Clive SexUnknown Father's nameWm Mother's nameMary (Lancaster) Place of birthBRTON

A.H.W.Ellis was very much older than Eric and had been born at Warragul.
EventDeath Event registration number11284 Registration year1959
Personal information
Family nameELLIS Given namesAlfred Henry William SexMale Father's nameELLIS William Mother's nameMary (Lancaster) Place of birthWARRAGUL Place of deathTULLAMARINE Age72

It is of interest that the surname LANCASTER has been noted in Greenvale's early history. However that was not where Vivienne's paternal grandmother, Mary, was born. Where the heck was Crossover? Mary's death record.

EventDeath Event registration number19474 Registration year1951
Personal information
Family nameELLIS Given namesMary SexFemale Father's nameLANCASTER Henry Mother's nameMary (Wilkinson) Place of birthCROSSOVER Place of deathSHEPPARTON Age80

Crossover is north of Warragul, a 12 minute drive (13.7 km) via Old Telegraph Rd E and Brandy Creek Rd/C425.

BOND.
The Bonds were early pioneers of Greenvale,William recalled by Bonds Lane on Machell's 1850's subdivision between Section and Mickleham Rds. John Bond owned a property called "Fairview" which was roughly Melway 179 B-C 7-11 and years later the climb past Fairview up Somerton Rd to Wal French's dairy farm on the right and Hughie Williamson's Dunvegan on the left on the way to school 890 at Section Rd was known to kids as Bond's Hill.

The judge from Dandenong at the field day was probably the son of John Bond whose obituary follows. Like John McKerchar of "Greenvale" (after whose farm the southern portion of the parish of Yuroke was named)and Donald McKerchar of "Greenan", John Bond benefited from the breeding stock of the McNabs and Grants of section 8 in the parish of Tullamarine at the south corner of Grants and McNabs Rds.

The funeral of the late Mr. John Bond, of Greenvale, Broadmeadows (who was killed at his own gate by a buggy accident),took place on Monday afternoon, the remains being interred in the Bulla Cemetery. A large concourse attended, including Mr Gair, M L A, Councillor A Tait(of the City Council), and Mr John Grant(the veteran Ayrshire breeder). The Rev.H. Richardson of the local Methodist Church conducted an impressive service at the house and grave. Mr. Bond was a colonist of 53 years' standing, and was widely known as a successful breeder of
Ayrshire cattle and a popular judge at agricultural shows. (P.5, Argus, 2-12-1902.)

I am sure that John's property was called Fairview in Broadmeadows Shire rate records but it may have actually been FAIRFIELD.

THE ROYAL AGRICULTURAL SHOW.-To-day, the weather has been very fine, and consequently there has been a large attendance for the closing day of the Royal Agricultural and Pastoral Society's show.The milch cow prizes, about which great interest is now taken, were made known today. The first prize (£10 10s) went to Mr. John Bond's Fairfield, Greenvale, Ayrshire cow, Annie,(etc.)PAGE 3, BENDIGO ADVERTISER, 6-9-1897.)

John had married Mary Ann Cuthbert in 1869. The Cuthberts would have been early residents of Providence Plains, Machell's subdivision between Section Rd and Mickleham Rd and another Cuthbert girl had become Mrs Papworth, the Papworths moving to Greenvale from J.P.Fawkner's subdivision near Mansfields Rd, Tullamarine well before Greenvale was called Greenvale and becoming stalwarts of the heritage listed Methodist church in Providence Lane.

EventMarriage Event registration number1040 Registration year1869
Personal information
Family nameCUTHBERT Given namesMary Ann SexUnknown Spouse's family nameBOND Spouse's given namesJohn

This is almost certainly the birth record of Mr.J.Bond of Dandenong, the judge at the field day at Tullamarine in 1935. He was on Fairfield in 1907 after his father's death but by 1912, Fairfield was occupied by a Mr Forster (perhaps from near Forster Rd near Dandenong.)

EventBirth Event registration number25621 Registration year1873
Personal information
Family nameBOND Given namesJohn SexUnknown Father's nameJohn Mother's nameMary Ann (Cuthbert) Place of birthMELB N

EXCEL (sic).
Tommy Loft subdivided the Broadmeadows Rd frontage of the 200 acre "Dalkeith" soon after moving to Tullamarine from Greenvale, (obviously before 1924 when he convened the meeting at which the Tullamarine Progress Association was convened.) However in 1930 and 1943 the only names assessed in the 40 acre subdivision were LOFT, EXELL and SCOONES. Ray Loft*, who'd married Maggie Millar a Greenvale girl, had built a Californian bungalow at 3 Eumarella St, Tullamarine and farmed "Broombank" near Millar Rd as mentioned earlier, while Tommy used the site of today's Tullamarine Primary School to conduct auctions. Apart from the above named Loft in-laws, the first real buyers on the subdivision were the Lloyd brothers who'd come to the area in about 1920 to share farm with the Orrs north of Broadmeadows Township. Jim Scoones' wife, Doris, was an esteemed teacher at the Tullamarine Methodist Sunday School and ended the wowserish Methodist traditions with her concerts performed at the Forresters' Hall in Broadmeadows Township. The remaining 160 acres of Dalkeith were owned by Leslie King Dawson in 1943 and Percy Hurren in 1954 but the Scoones and Excells continued the Loft family presence at Tullamarine. Here Tommy's death notice.

LOFT.-On June 1, Thomas B.. beloved husband of Clara*, father of Hazel (Mrs.Exell), Doris (Mrs. Scoones), Raymond*, and Harold, aged 79 years. (Privately Interred.)PAGE 9, ARGUS, 4-6-1947.

Hazel's marriage record.
EventMarriage Event registration number2636 Registration year1923
Personal information
Family nameLOFT Given namesHazel Phyllis SexUnknown Spouse's family nameEXCELL Spouse's given namesJos Danl Pryse

Ray Loft's son, Gordon after whom Gordon Street was named.
LOFT (nee Maggie Millar).-On the 1st February, at Sister Davies's private hospital, Scott street,Essendon, to Mr.and Mrs. Ray Loft, Wahroonga,Tullamarine-a son (Gordon Raymond).PAGE 56, THE AUSTRALASIAN, 16-2-1929.

As I have never mentioned Tommy Loft's wife, here's her death record and probably birth record.
EventDeath Event registration number8248 Registration year1949
Personal information
Family nameLOFT Given namesClara SexFemale Father's nameBRADLEY Unknown Mother's nameUnknown (Unknown) Place of birthMELBOURNE Place of deathMORANG SOUTH Age82

EventBirth Event registration number16720 Registration year1867
Personal information
Family nameBRADLEY Given namesClara SexUnknown Father's nameEdward Mother's nameSophia Caroline (Standeven) Place of birthMELB

COOPER.
Alma* Koch was living at Forman St, Westmeadows in 1988 when she told me that her father, Mark Cooper, had married a Nash girl. She didn't mention his suicide. Coopers Hill Drive, formerly Black St, in Westmeadows was named in honour of Mark Cooper, an early resident of Broadmeadows Township.

COOPER.— The Friends of the late Mr. MARK COOPER are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of interment, the New Melbourne General Cemetery, Fawkner. The funeral will leave his residence. "Hill View," Broadmeadows,this day, (Wednesday), at 2 o'clock.(P.12, The Age, 31-12-1919.)

*Alma's birth record.
EventBirth Event registration number26158 Registration year1911
Personal information
Family nameCOOPER Given namesAlma Flor SexUnknown Father's nameMark Mother's nameEllen (Nash) Place of birthBROADMEADOWS

MAHER.
By 1930, J.C.Maher had replaced the Williamsons on lots 7 and 8 of the Arundel Closer Settlement. Consisting of 199 acres 3 roods and 9 perches, the farm fronted the north side of Annandale Rd from the bend at the right hand side of Melway 15 A1, extending west to the right side of 14J1, its western boundary having a bend so it had a creek frontage. Operations Rd. is today just within its northern boundary.Trove indicates that the Mahers had moved onto the farm by 1924 and their children included a boy (L.Maher) and daughters Irene and Betty.

MANSFIELD.
The Mansfields purchased several blocks on J.P.Fawkner's subdivision of section 13, bisected (but not for long because of airport expansion) by Mansfields Rd. After about 90 years, the farm was sold, probably because demand for hay and Clydesdales had declined. Wally Mansfield was living near the Niddrie Shopping Centre when I interviewed him in 1988. He supplied some terrific anecdotes, which enabled me to write the poems, THE STUDEBAKER, THE WISDOM OF SOLOMON, DEATH AT BERTRAMS FORD and RITCHIE'S FOE. The first was about a car bought by the McNabs, tamed by Wally, used during the Royal Melbourne Show every year and then place on blocks till the next show. The second was about two quarreling Mansfield brothers who were told by the judge to shake hands and have a beer together; from that time on they never argued again. The third was about the tragedy of 1906. Neil Hamilton Mansfield has produced the 700+ page THE DAVID MANSFIELD STORY including RITCHIE'S FOE.
RITCHIE'S FOE

MERCER.
As mentioned previously the south end of Victoria St, known to Tullamarine old timers as Nash's Lane,is now called Mercer's Drive. I thought this name might have been connected with Mercer's Vale, later renamed Beveridge after Peter Beveridge, an early settler near Mount Fraser. However George Mercer of Edinburgh did not seem to have come to Australia and was the home-based representative of the Port Phillip Association who lobbied the authorities in London in the mid 1830's. However Mercer's Vale was probably related to his two shares in the association's carve up of the land specified in John Batman's treaty.

The land between Charles Nash's "Fairview" and Bulla Rd was sold by John Carre Riddell to several purchasers including the Andersons. It may be possible that a Mercer family came into possession of this land.I did not come across the surname in my transcriptions of Broadmeadows Shire rate records, but as these were only transcribed in 1863, 1879, 1900, 1920, and 1940, not all residents east of Bulla Rd were transcribed.

William Mercer of Bulla Road, Tullamarine was charged with being an unlicensed dairyman in 1933! You'll see why I didn't copy and paste the article.
DAIRYMEN NOT LICENSED


MORGAN. TULLAMARINE BEFORE THE JETPORT (1998).
P.23.Tom Morgan, a carpenter, came from England in 1924 and settled on "Wattle Glen, recently vacated by Mick Corrigan, which was accessed via Elizabeth St. in Broadmeadows Township. His first job was building new pews in the Presbyterian church in Coghill St.Later he worked on the new theatre in Leake St, North Essendon. A year or so later (by 1930), Tom and his wife, a Lloyd, moved to Stone's 27.5 acre farm which surrounded the S.S. 2613 site at the Conders Lane corner and was later Joseph Wood's and then Mrs J.Carter's. Later the Morgans moved to a 2 acre site, which is now filled with home units on the north west side of the Melrose Drive reserve. Joyce Morgan lives in a road frontage unit. The Morgans were stalwarts of the Tullamarine Methodist Church and had a whole shed full of newspapers collected to boost the organ fund.As the church seemed doomed, this paper was put to good use in about 1973 when I started the Kindergarten paper drive.

P.27.After only four members had attended the Tullamarine Progress Association meeting of 13-10-1945 cast doubts about the body's future, Tom Morgan was one of the new members who joined.
P.28. The 1948-9 Broadmeadows ratebook shows that the only residents on the east side of Bulla Rd between Greens Corner and Nash's Lane were Cec and Lily Green, Ray Loft on Broombank which he subdivided in 1952, Andrew Craig on a triangular block on the south corner of Derby St, E.T.Morgan on 2 acres to which he'd moved in 1938 plus Handlen's acre which is now part of the reserve, Ina Henderson on 20 acres, Harry Heaps on Sunnyside, Marshall (34 acres), Bert Anderson (40 acres), Lily Walsh (20 acres)and the Nash family on Fairview.
P.32-3. 1958. A special service was held at the Tullamarine Methodist Church to dedicate stained-glass windows donated by the families of Bill and Sam Parr and Edgar Wright, and installed by Tom Morgan and Harry Nash.

Tom (obviously not his first given name given the above assessment)must have been a reader of The Age. Joyce was a member of the Junior Section by 1941 and won a prize in 1943.
PRIZE WINNERS
Prizes of Junior Section Propelling Pencils awarded for the palindrome puzzle which closed on Tuesday were won by JIM HAMILTON. TONGALA and JOYCE MORGAN. TULLAMARINE. (P.5, The Age, 5-2-1943.)


NASH.
From DHOTAMA page F2.
Charles Nash, a native of Cambridge, England, came to Victoria in 1849, spent a year as a farm labourer with Mr Riley of Saltwater River, and was then at the diggings for about two years, settling on his homestead, "Fairview" in 1852. In 1854, he married Mary (nee Gage) who had just arrived in the colony and whose family became early residents of Broadmeadows Township.Recently widowed in 1888, Mary was carrying on the hay growing and dairying business. Charles and Mary had three sons and six daughters who survived.( Information from Victoria and its Metropolis and Alma Koch, their grand daughter.)



From DHOTAMA N-Z.
CHARLES NASH was one of the early pioneers of Tullamarine, establishing Fairview on the east side of Victoria St. in 1852, on land in sections 6 and 15 that he bought from John Carre Riddell. In 1868, he bought Bayview, which includes Catherine Ave. and the Trade Park Industrial Park from John Foster Vesey Fitzgerald (the grantee of section 3, formerly known as John Fitzgerald Leslie Foster). A staunch Methodist, he sold land at the n/e corner on which the Methodist church was built in 1870. From early times he also owned about 20 acres, which was used to spell dry cows, near the s/w corner of McNabs Rd. and Mansfield Rd.
THOMAS NASH, who mainly farmed south of Sharps Rd. in the parish of Doutta Galla, leased James Sharp’s Hillside (Caterpillar site and westwards to creek) near the turn of the 20th century and by 1913 had bought land west of Fosters Rd near Annandale Rd. and land on the east side of Fosters Rd. just south of the Crottys’ Broomfield. Thomas, Arthur and Bernard were three members of this branch of the family. Joe Butler, whose mother was a Harrick, told me that there were two Nash houses on the east side of Fosters Rd. One was between Elata Dr. and the creek while the other was near the bend in Fosters Rd. (near Ascot Dr.) There were also two houses on the west side of Fosters Rd. One still stands just north of the Keilor Botanical gardens on the old Moonya dairy and the other was the Chesterfield homestead on Annandale Rd., just west of the present “Discount Freight Parcel Distribution” as shown in Melway edition 26. In 1913, Thomas and Arthur Nash were assessed on 165 acres of land in the Tullamarine Riding. It was specified as being in section 2 of the parish of Tullamarine and probably included Chesterfield.
In 1941 Claude Butler bought the 189 acres that the Nash family had owned on Fosters Rd. He later bought Chesterfield from the Loft family of Dalkeith. Chesterfield consisted of 44 acres north of a westerly extension of Sharps Rd. with Steele Creek on the west and Annandale Rd. forming its northern boundary.


From the journal whose link can be found under WRIGHT.
GAGE.
DICTIONARY HISTORY OF TULLAMARINE, G2.
Members of the Gage family buried at the Will Will Rook cemetery and date of burial:
ANN STEWART, 18-5-1867; ELIZABETH, 21-8-1889; GOUGH, 6-10-1870; JANE, 14-11-1914; RICHARD,28-12-1895;
RICHARD, 9-11-1915; RICHARD,3-3-1937.

G.Charles Nash,who came to Victoria in 1849 and established his farm "Fairview", the so called VICTORIA ROAD HOMESTEAD*, married Mary Gage in 1854 so it can be presumed that the Gage family was living in Broadmeadows Township by that time. Mary carried on the dairying and hay growing on Fairview, and Bayview (see COUSER above) after the death of Charles at 58 on 19-8-1884, and died at the age of 83 on 21-2-1919.
(*Google VICTORIA ROAD HOMESTEAD to get the ON MY DOORSTEP article and add TARDIS to get the archeological assessment.)

It is possible that the longtime Gage residence in the township was on lots 4 and 5 of section 24,on which Hugh Gage was assessed in 1920, a half acre fronting Grundy St at its junction with Bent St. Harry Heaps who arrived in Tullamarine in 1923 as a 14 year old and lived on Wallis Wright's old Sunnyside between Fairview and Wright St,told me that Dicky Gage was renowned throughout the district as a haystack builder and didn't mind a drink or six.

Hugh Gage was one of four township residents given work in the 1892 depression by Broady Shire.(BROADMEADOWS:A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.)

MARY NASH'S DEATH RECORD.
EventDeath Event registration number1602 Registration year1919
Personal information
Family nameNASH Given namesMary SexUnknown Father's nameGage Richd Mother's nameUnknown (Unknown) Place of birth Place of deathEssdon Age81

NASH -On the 21st February at her daughter's residence (Mrs Kelly), Mount Alexander road, Moonee Ponds, Mary, relict of the late Charles Nash, Tullamarine, aged 82 years. Peace, perfect peace.

NASH. The Friends of the late Mrs. MARY NASH are respectfully invited to follow her remains to their last resting place, the Bulla Cemetery.
The funeral will move from her old residence,Mr.C.Nash's* "Fairview", Tullamarine, tomorrow (Sunday, February 23). at 2 o'clock.(BOTH P.13, Argus, 22-2-1919.)
*Charles Nash Jnr.

I can't remember whether I've confirmed that Thomas Nash of Fosters Rd was a member of the Fairview family so I'd better do it here.

NASH.-On February 11, Thomas, the dearly beloved husband of the late Edith Nash, late of Keilor, and loving father of Arthur, Charles, Thomas, George, Gladys(Mrs. H Martyn), Bernard, and Lillian(deceased) aged 88 years. -At rest. (P.19, Argus, 12-2-1947.)

EventDeath Event registration number1627 Registration year1947
Personal information
Family nameNASH Given namesThomas SexMale Father's nameNASH Charles Mother's nameMary (Gage) Place of birthTULLAMARINE Place of deathROYAL PARK Age88





WRIGHT.
N.B. RE THE PROPERTY "VIEWPOINT": THE LEASE OF THIS PROPERTY, (BETWEEN TODAY'S MICKLEHAM ROAD AND THE MOONEE PONDS CREEK FROM THE LACKENHEATH DRIVE CORNER SOUTH TO ADJOIN TODAY'S CAMP HILL PARK) WAS SHARED BY JOHN COCK AND A MEMBER OF THE WRIGHT FAMILY, THE NORTHERN PORTION OF 159 ACRES COMING INTO THE OWNERSHIP OF THE WRIGHTS WITH THE SOUTHERN 169 ACRES BECOMING JOHN MANSFIELD'S "GRANDVIEW". THE NORTHERN 159 ACRES WAS LAST FARMED BY BILL STONEY AND WHAT WAS PROBABLY THE GRANDVIEW HOMESTEAD WAS LAST OCCUPIED BY MRS PALMER. OCCUPANCY OF BOTH PORTIONS WILL BE DETAILED IN THE STONEYENTRY.


This will be a marathon effort because I have been mystified by the various Wright families in Tullamarine for 29 years knowing only that Joseph and Bernard Wright (relatives of Gordon Wright, headmaster of the Tullamarine Primary School in the latter 1970's)of Seafield circa 1929 were unrelated to the Wrights of Sunnyside, Viewpoint and Strathconnan. I did receive a letter from a Wright descendant which I used to write a handwritten history of THE wRIGHT FAMILY OF TULLAMARINE which was among my material donated to the Hume Global Learning Centre and was used by Tardis for its archeological survey of the VICTORIA ROAD HOMESTEAD (basically about Charles Nash's Fairview and Wallis Wright's Sunnyside.)

I will therefore start with Kitty Wright, a prize winner at the 1935 field day. Her brother, whom I will call YOUNG TOM (as oldtimers did) for reasons you will see later, indicated that his little sister was born in about August 1922. He was living on Viewpoint between today's Mickleham Rd (from the north boundary of Camp Hill Park to the Lackenheath Drive corner) and Moonee Ponds Creek.

Tullamarine.
Dear Queen Bee, — We will soon be starting harvesting again. The crops are looking well. We had Bird Day at school on October 26, and each child had to draw a bird. We have a little sister, 16 months old. She is a
little trick, and she says everything you say. Her name is Kitty. Will you please let her join the Hive. I
am sending 6d. for a badge. We had our school picnic on October 17 at Keilor. I won 3/, so John and I are
sending 5/ for the cot fund. — Your loving bee,
TOM WRIGHT (9 years.)PAGE 10, FARMERS' ADVOCATE, 28-12-1923.

YOUNG TOM, JOHN AND KITTY'S PARENTS.
My great grandfather, John Cock, farmed Stewarton/ Gladstone, the property north of Viewpoint from 1892 till his death at the end of 1911. He also leased Viewpoint from Edmund Dunn's estate, later sharing the lease with OLD TOM.

FROM MY JOURNAL: JOURNAL
WRIGHT-COCK. On the 11th June, 1913, at Christ Church Essendon by the Rev Whitton, Thomas Henry, son of the late Wallis and Mary Wright late of Tullamarine to Catherine Eliza daughter of the late John and Elizabeth Cock late of Gladstone Broadmeadows (Present address, View Point Tullamarine.) (P.8, Argus, 11-6-1930.)


WALLIS WRIGHT'S PARTLY PARALYSED GRANDSON.
My recent journal PHOTO OF CHARLES NASH'S FAIRVIEW AT TULLAMARINE gives the exact date of Charles Nash's sale of 20 acres fronting the west side of Wright St (Riddell Rd on the Camieston Estate plan)to Wallis Wright. I thought I'd try to find any mentions of Wallis Wright before that date but before I refined my trove search to the 1850's, I discovered that Wallis's grandson, Wallis Wright, had drowned at Frankston in 1925, yet another merging of the historIES of Tullamarine and miles around and the Mornington Peninsula. The article mentioned that Fred Wright's son was partly paralysed. Fred Nash's biography is in VICTORIA: PAST AND PRESENT (1888)but I have no idea where I would have transcribed it as I only got up to the Mc volume in DHOTAMA. However my 25+ year old memories recall that he was apprenticed to blacksmith, William Munsie, and later bought his business, working with his brother Ted until the latter set up on the north corner of Black St (now Coopers Hill Drive) in Broadmeadows Township (now Westmeadows south of Kenny St) as a coachbuilder. Fred's forge was on Hamilton Terrace blocks, on the north east side of today's Melrose Drive near the present Link Rd corner.

YOUNG WALLIS'S DEATH RECORD.
EventDeath Event registration number1567 Registration year1925
Personal information
Family nameWRIGHT Given namesWallis SexMale Father's nameWRIGHT Frederick Mother's nameWillhemina (Gardner) Place of birth Place of deathFRANKSTON Age37

Man Drowned at Frankston
EARLY MORNING FATALITY.
Early this (Wednesday) morning Wallis Wright, aged 38, of 14 Mackey street, Essendon, was drowned while bathing at Frankston, at a point on the bay opposite Beach street. Wright only arrived in Frankston yesterday afternoon, on a visit to friends residing at "Penzance," Frankston. This morning, at 6 o'clock, he left the house in bathing suit and boots only, he was unaccompanied, and was not seen in the water alive. About 7 a.m., some people passing along the beach saw a body floating. They called for assistance and the body was pulled out of the water. Mr. McIntosh, dentist, came on the scene and endeavoured to restore life by the usual methods. Dr. Johnson was sent for, and pronounced life to be extinct. Senior-Constable Elliott had the body removed to the Pier Hotel, where an inquiry will be held. Deceased has been identified as Wallis Wright. Wright, who was a single man, was a cripple, being paralysed on one side. It is surmised that he went in to swim in a fairly rough sea; that he was knocked, over, by the waves and in,his crippled condition was unable to regain his feet.
(P.5, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 21-1-1925.)

WALLIS WIGHT AND MARY BATESON'S WEDDING RECORD AND BIRTH RECORDS OF THEIR MANY CHILDREN.
I already knew that Wallis Wright had married Mary Bateson but wrongly thought that they had married in 1854 so when I searched for Mary's marriage record, I discovered that a Mary Bateson had married Robert Anderson in 1854. Perhaps this Robert Anderson was a member of the Anderson family which bought a fair amount of land between Charles Nash's purchase on Block A of the Camieston Estate and Bulla Rd., maybe even Robert Foster Anderson,whose biography was in VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS (1888)and who later moved to Greenvale,and his wife was the widowed mother of the other Mary Bateson, and this would explain why Wallis and his wife moved to Tullamarine about two years after their marriage.

EventMarriage Event registration number1243 Registration year1856
Personal information
Family nameWRIGHT Given namesWallis SexMale Spouse's family nameBATESON Spouse's given namesMary

Mary died in 1910 and had been a colonist for 54 or maybe 56 years. I believe that Frank Wright was on the 140 acre Strathconan by 1910, having married Jessie T. Rowe, a teacher who transferred from the Holden School (Melway 176 B11) to Tullamarine S.S. 2613 (Melway 5 F9) by 1906 (in 1903?*) when she had the sad task of telling her pupils of the Mansfield drownings at Bertram's Ford.

*It really annoys me when I can't find an article which I know perfectly well is on trove. A Holden School 1903 search worked.
Miss Rowe, the new teacher, was tendered a complimentary social on leaving the Holden school for Tullamarine.--'Essendon Gazette.' (P.2, The Sunbury News, 25-4-1903.)

I also hadn't found the article about Jessie leaving the Tullamarine school but having found the year of her marriage to Frank helped this time.
RESIGNATION

WRIGHT.—On the 17th September, at the residence of her son, "Strathconon," Broadmeadows-road, Tullamarine, Mary, relict of the late Wallis Wright,Surrey Sid.(Sunnyside), Tullamarine, aged 80 years. A colonist of 5[] years.
(P.1, Argus, 19-9-1910.)

Mary's death record shows that the other Mary Bateson was not her mother.
EventDeath Event registration number8061 Registration year1910
Personal information
Family nameWRIGHT Given namesMary SexUnknown Father's nameBateson Jno Mother's nameElizth (Salmon) Place of birth Place of deathBmdws Age80

*JESSIE ROWE'S MARRIAGE NOTICE.
EventMarriage Event registration number5670 Registration year1908
Personal information
Family nameROWE Given namesJessie Thomson SexUnknown Spouse's family nameWRIGHT Spouse's given namesFrank

Jessie died in 1935, probably at a hospital.
EventDeath Event registration number6724 Registration year1935
Personal information
Family nameWRIGHT Given namesJessie Thompson SexFemale Father's nameROWE John Henry Mother's nameCath (Mcivor) Place of birth Place of deathPRAHRAN Age63

WRIGHT.—On tho 30th July at the Alfred Hospital, Jessie Thompson, beloved wife of Frank Wright, Tullamarine, and loving mother of Mary (Mrs Barwick, Glen Iris), Harry and Alex. (Private interment.)P.1. ARGUS, 31-7-1935.

Frank died the year before Jessie. It is confirmed that he was the son of Wallis and Mary but not that he was on Strathconan in 1910 when his mother died.

WRIGHT.— On the 22nd April, Frank, second son of the late Wallis and Mary Wright, Tullamarine. (Interred Bulla Cemetery, April 23.) P.13, ARGUS, 25-4-1936.

Finally we get a family notice with information about probably all the children of Wallis and Mary Wright, most likely in order of birth. Edgar was known to oldtimers such as Jack Hoctor as Ted.

WRIGHT.-On the 6th August (result of accident), John Walter loving husband of Anna Mary Wright, Northcote avenue, Canterbury, eldest son of the late Wallis and Mary Wright, of Tullamarine, brother of Frank, Frederick, Elizabeth (Mrs. Furphy, deceased), Herbert, Edgar, Wallis, Gertrude (Mrs. Doery), and Thomas, aged 73 years.(P.13, Argus, 9-8-1930.)

Wallis Wright obviously had an older brother called John* as John's eldest son, Thomas (Old Thomas as stated below), was married in 1874. North Pole Rd was the original name of Milleara Rd from Keilor Rd to Buckley St. The Bennetts and Harraps were among several pioneers near Tullamarine who moved to the Mornington area.

WRIGHT-BENNETT [Golden Wedding].-On the 5th August, 1874, at the Presbyterian Manse,Essendon, by the Rev. W. Fraser, Thomas,eldest son of late John and Ann Wright, Tullamarine, to Elizabeth, second daughter of late
William and Elizabeth Bennett, of Euroke(colonists). (Present address, North Pole road,Keilor.)
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 9 August 1924 p 11

*The Broadmeadows road Board assessment of 1863 listed the following as ratepayers: W.Wright. T.Wright and J.Wright. Charles Nash also had a brother named John.
While looking for this evidence in TULLAMARINE BEFORE THE JETPORT that Wallis may have had brothers at Tullamarine in the early days, I stumbled on the information provided in a letter from a descendant.

"THOMAS HENRY WRIGHT who was born in about 1876 married Kate Cock in 1913, Thomas Henry being the son of Wallis. Thomas Henry and Kate had three children: Tom (who married Flo Peachey*), John, and Kitty, who married John Ellis and lives in Turramurra, N.S.W."

Confirmation of the above.
WRIGHT On September 20,at his daughter's residence, 5 Williamson avenue, Strathmore, Thomas Henry, formerly of View Point, Tullamarine, beloved husband of the late Catherine and loving father of Tom, John and Kitty (Mrs J. Ellis) (Private interment.)PAGE 19, ARGUS, 21-9-1954.

*From c.1920 Stephen Peachey from today's Hadfield had a 6 acre dairy near Boyse Court which was subdivided by Snowy Boyce.
See the letter to Queen Bee by Tom Wright(9)about Kitty and his brother John and their parents' marriage record in italics above in reference to the information in bold type just above.

"Old Tom who married a Bennett started sharing John Cock's lease on Viewpoint about five years after Cock commenced his lease on Stewarton/ Gladstone in 1892-3. Young Tom, as Colin Williams referred to Thomas Henry Wright, was the one who bought Strathconan (the southern 142 acres of Chandos)in 1907-8 and in 1920 was farming Strathconan and the northern 159 acre northern portion of Viewpoint WITH HIS BROTHER, FRANK."

Thomas Wright, the one assessed in 1863, appears to have married a sister of Mary Bateson whom Wallis married.
EventDeath Event registration number7973 Registration year1860
Personal information
Family nameWRIGHT Given namesJohn Thomas SexUnknown Father's nameThomas Mother's nameElizabeth (Bateson) Place of birthTUL Place of death

OLD TOM WRIGHT, WHO MARRIED A BENNETT, FARMED AT GREENVALE UNTIL HE BECAME INSOLVENT.
This would explain why he was sharing the lease on Viewpoint with John Cock from about 1898.My great grandfather, John Cock farmed Broombank (Melway 5 H11) from 1867 till 1882, then either Dundonald on Gellibrand Hill or Springbank (6 A-C 3,4) until 1892-3 when he started leasing Stewarton whose name changed to Gladstone the following year. While researching the 1880's rates, I discovered that Thomas Wright was farming on James Pattison's 186 acre grant at Greenvale (178 K10)and leasing 63 acres (178 H10) from James Musgrove.

This might explain why he started leasing Viewpoint with John Cock.

NOTICE to CREDITORS -Notice is hereby given, that THOMAS WRIGHT, of Greenvale,near Broadmeadows, in the state of Victoria, farmer and grazier, has by deed dated the thirteenth day of February, one thousand nine hundred and
one, convened and assigned all his estate, property, and effects whatsoever and wheresoever to Edward William Small, of No. 31 Queen street, Melbourne, in the said state, accountant, in trust for realisatlon and otherwise for the benefit of all the creditors of the said Thomas Wright, as in the said deed mentioned.etc.
(P.9, Argus, 16-2-1901.)


PARR.
Generation 1- ANN PARR.
PARR -On the 28th inst., at her residence, Elm Farm, Tullamarine, Mrs Ann Parr, aged 72. Her end was peace.
(P.1, Argus, 30-1-1879.)

EventDeath Event registration number1837 Registration year1879
Personal information
Family namePARR Given namesAnne SexUnknown Father's nameHanger Mother's name Place of birthDEVONSHIRE Place of death Age72

Biography. It seems that the only Parr biography was in the Tullamarine Methodist Church centenary souvenir of 1970. I thought that James Henry Parr's biography might be in VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS but WHERE BIG BIRDS SOAR (1989)made it clear that this was not the case for many pioneers such as James Sharp and James Henry Parr.

However, I do remember that Ann Parr and young James Henry did not come directly to Victoria, but via New Zealand and in TULLAMARINE:BEFORE THE JETPORT, I have mentioned in the Annals of Tullamarine section that Ann and James Henry arrived at Tullamarine in 1853, information that could only have come from the 1970 souvenir.

This booklet contained photos of James Henry Parr and Charles Nash, which appear on page 98 of Big Birds Soar along with a photo of the Tullamarine Methodist Church which was on the front cover of the centenary souvenir. The souvenir must have provided the following information.
1. The Church was built on a quarter acre block on Charles Nash's land ("Bayview")which he sold for ten shillings.
(The ten shillings paid by the church trustees would have been a transfer fee required by the Lands Department to cover the cost of a clerk writing a lengthy memorial detailing the exact location and dimensions of the block which Charles more likely DONATED as well as a sketch of title, starting with section 3 being granted to William Foster and it being conveyed to his brother, John Fitgerald Leslie Foster,land being sold to George Mounsey (south corner of Post Office Lane), John Fletcher Blanche (Volume 179 folio 880), Thomas Purvis (V.30 F.772), jOHN WRIGHT (V.201 F.174), ANN PARR (V.348 F.302)and Charles Nash (V.176 F.787 about six acres surrounding Mounsey's and including the actual church site on the north side of today's Trade Park Drive, and V.180 F.402, 109.5 acres south to the line of the Catherine Avenue/ Janus St midline extended west to the middle of Melway 5 E12.)
2.The two families (Nash and Parr) were musically inclined with J.H.Parr playing the clarinet and Elizabeth, Ann, Amelia and Elln Nash serving in turn until each was married.Ellen married Mark Cooper of Broadmeadows Township. James Henry Parr and his wife were known as Da and Ma Parr by the congregation.

From one of the Keilor souvenirs (1850, 1861, 1863), I'd added: "James Henry Parr was the president of the shire of Keilor in 1900-2, 1907-8 and 1914-15. His son, Bill, was shire president in 1932-3, 1935-6, 1937-8 and 1944-5."

Neil Hamilton Mansfield had obviously seen the 1970 church centenary souvenir as he makes mention of New Zealand in his Bulla Cemetery Index.

1664 PARR James Henry 86Y 00/00/1848 28/05/1934 30/05/1934 Meth. 4 A Son of James Parr & Ann Unknown. Died in Broadmeadows, Victoria, Australia.
1665 PARR (nee HANGER) Ann 72Y 00/00/1806 29/01/1879 31/01/1879 Meth. 4 A Daughter of Unknown Hanger. Born in Devonshire, England - mother of James Henry Parr (husband died in New Zealand?).
1666 PARR (nee MANSFIELD) Emily 68Y 22/09/1849 15/07/1918 17/07/1918 Meth. 4 A Daughter of John Mansfield & Eliza Jane Missen. Born in Tullamarine, died in Keilor, Victoria, Australia.

Neil Mansfield has also written the 698 page THE DAVID MANSFIELD STORY. On page 47, he gives details of Emily Mansfield who married James Henry Parr in 1876, and states that James Henry was born in Exeter, England in about 1848 and his father's name was James Parr. Neil also states that Ann and her son, James Henry (then about 5) had arrived in Victoria in 1853.
Neil then make a very understandable assumption that James Henry owned "Greenvale" at Tullamarine, established by John McKerchar and had renamed it "The Elms." "Greenvale" was at Greenvale, crown allotment 10 Q, Yuroke of 328 acres with a 4050 link (810 metre)frontage to the north side of Somerton Rd 3740 links (748 metres) west of Mickleham Rd. It was Robert Millar (also related to the Mansfields) who renamed this property as The Elms, the same name as the Parrs' Tullamarine property (for which Neil gave the correct Melway reference.)

On pages 48 and 49 Neil gives extensive detail re Ellen Eliza Parr who married Charles Nash Jnr in 1898, William James Parr, Samuel Noah Parr, Henry Edward Parr, Charles William Parr, Freda May Parr and Annie Ethel Parr.
Send me a family tree circles private message if you'd like this information.


Generation 2- DA AND MA PARR.
EventMarriage Event registration number2800 Registration year1876
Personal information
Family namePARR Given namesJames Henry SexMale Spouse's family nameMANSFIELD Spouse's given namesEmily

PARR-MANSFIELD.-On 3rd inst., at Wesley Church by the Rev. J G Millard, James Henry Parr, of Tullamarine, to Emily, second eldest daughter of Mr John Mansfield, of Tullamarine.(P.1, Argus, 5-8-1876.)

EventDeath Event registration number14066 Registration year1934
Personal information
Family namePARR Given namesJames Henry SexMale Father's namePARR James Henry Mother's nameAnn (Unknown) Place of birthENGLAND Place of deathBROADMEADOWS Age86

Generation 3- BILL AND SAM PARR.
BILL AND ELLEN MAY PARR.
EventMarriage Event registration number7908 Registration year1909
Personal information
Family namePARR Given namesWm Jas SexUnknown Spouse's family nameFURPHEY Spouse's given namesEllen May

DESCRIPTION OF WEDDING

EventDeath Event registration number7486 Registration year1956
Personal information
Family namePARR Given namesWilliam James SexMale Father's namePARR James Henry Mother's nameEmily (Mansfield) Place of birthMELBOURNE Place of deathCOBURG Age76

PARR. Ellen May.---On April 27, at Royal Melbourne Hospital, the dearly beloved wife of William James Parr, of Tullamarine, and loving sister of Florence (Mrs. D.Wright), Charles (deceased), William (deceased), Alma (Mrs. R.Laing), Eileen (deceased), and John, aged 69 years. (Privately cremated April 29.)P.17, ARGUS, 1-5-1954.

Death of Mrs. Parr
At Keilor Council meeting on Tuesday reference was made to the death of Mrs. Parr, wife of Ex-Cr. W. J. Parr.
The late Mrs. Parr had been an active worker in many charitable and public organisations in the Keilor Shire.
She had worked for Red Cross, the Women's Hospital, Essendon Hospital, Benevolent Society, the Methodist Church, and Tullamarine Progress Association. She assisted greatly her husband during his four terms as shire president. (P.4, Sunshine Advocate, 7-5-1954.)

SAM AND FLORENCE PARR.
Record information
EventMarriage Event registration number969 Registration year1913
Personal information
Family namePARR Given namesSamuel Noah SexUnknown Spouse's family nameWRIGHT Spouse's given namesFlorence Louisa

EventDeath Event registration number3528 Registration year1956
Personal information
Family namePARR Given namesSamuel Noah SexMale Father's namePARR James Harry Mother's nameEllen (Mansfield) Place of birthTULLAMARINE Place of deathTULLAMARINE Age73

EventDeath Event registration number2605 Registration year1954
Personal information
Family namePARR Given namesFlorence Louisa SexFemale Father's nameWRIGHT Eduard Mother's nameMarion (Harrap) Place of birthESSENDON Place of deathESSENDON Age69

PARR. Florence. - On March 15, loved wife of Samuel, of Tullamarine, loved mother of Harry,Charlie, Freda (Mrs. Stone), and Winnie (Mrs. Lewis). -At rest.(P.12, Argus, 17-3-1954.)

When I organised the BACK TO TULLAMARINE reunions in 1989 and 1998, I only had to book the hall and display the material that had been provided by descendants of the pioneers. Winnie Lewis contacted all the pre-suburban descendants and my fellow community workers of the 1970's contacted the rest. The hall was packed on both occasions.

THE PARR PROPERTIES.
See the attached map.
Ann Parr's purchase from the grantee's brother, John (volume 348 folio 302), 15 acres at the north west corner of section 3 Tullamarine was west of the Methodist Church (48) at roughly the top right quarter of Melway 5 E11, adjoining John Wright's purchase just into F11.

Annandale was section 2 Tullamarine of 640 acres granted to George Annand and eventually came into the ownership of William Taylor of Overnewton at Keilor, as did section 1, Arundel. After Taylor's death, all of section 1 and 210 acres of section 2 were resumed circa 1904 by the Crown to become the Arundel Closer Settlement which went east to the start of Steeles Creek including Alf Cock's Glenview and John Fox's Geraghty's paddock (which I seem to recall was named "Bendene".) East of the creek to the west end of Sharps Rd., were two 165 acre properties owned by Thomas Nash (son of Charles and Mary)and Bill Parr, presumably south and north of Annandale Road. Bill Parr's farm retained the ANNANDALE name and the homestead homestead is number 19 on the map.

The Elms was indicated by the 10 MILES (from Melbourne) POST according to Winnie Lewis. It consisted of lots 5, 6 and 38 of John Pascoe Fawkner's subdivision of the parts of sections 6 and 7 on the Keilor side of Bulla Rd. Consisting of 35 acres, its original purchaser would be named in volume M folio 246. Straddling the boundary between section 7 and 6 just west of the north-south part of Link Rd the 35 acres are indicated by Melway 5 parts E_F 9 and E-F 10. As I no longer have my rates transcriptions, it is unclear whether other purchases were absorbed into the property but Winnie Lewis stated that The Elms adjoined Bill Parr's Annandale and this most likely was at Melway 5 E 11 (middle of top.) The homestead location is shown as number 47 on the map.





COCK.
The late John Cock, of Broadmeadows, who failed by a year or two the other day to reach the allotted span, was probably one of the most remarkable personalities in the farming community of the Commonwealth. He was, in the first place, the pioneer user of almost every agricultural implement introduced to Australia in his time. In fact, the acquirement of new farm machinery became an incurable habit with him. His most striking achievement, apart from a long line of successes on the land in the face of big odds, was his fourth marriage sometime
back. His first wife came out with him from Lincolnshire in '64. A fine, open, typical example of the English husbandman was John Cock. He was for twenty years, a councillor at Broadmeadows, and three times President of the Shire. (P.6, Punch, 18-1-1912.)

JOHN COCK'S FARMS.
As stated above, John Cock arrived in 1864, a fact glossed over in his biography in VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS in 1888 due to the fact this this prominent citizen had arrived as an indentured labourer for John Hall, probably at "Southwaite Gill", the first property on the east side of Bulla Rd south of Camp Hill (today's Gowanbrae.) An indentured labourer could not accept a better-paid job elsewhere without being charged under the Masters and Servants Act and had little chance of success in court if his wages had not been paid.

Thus his arrival was stated as being in 1867 and he spent 15 years at a farm which rate records reveal was Broombank, then he spent about a decade north of Broadmeadows Township which was never named in rate records but which I had concluded must have been Springbank. In 1892-3, he commenced a lease on Stewarton, following John Kerr as tenant and the very next year this property, where he remained till his death at the end of 1911, was renamed Gladstone**. Soon after settling on this property, he also started leasing Viewpoint, between Gladstone and Camp Hill, from Edmund Dunn*, later sharing this lease with Old Tom Wright who had lived just north of Springbank until he became insolvent. (*Actually the estate of Edmund Dunn who had died in 1891.)

** John's four wives are detailed below. The property had already been renamed Gladstone by the time of the death of this one whom he would have met while he was on Springbank and socially engaged in the Bulla/ Greenvale community with people such as the famed James Musgrove whose property was on the east corner of Somerton and Oaklands Rds.

COCK.—On the 5th inst., at her late residence, Gladstone, Broadmeadows, Mary Jane, the dearly beloved wife of John Cock, and eldest beloved daughter of Thomas Musgrove, Greenvale, aged 40 years.(P.1, Argus, 6-12-1893.)



In the early 1900's he bought Chandos across Broadmeadows Road, now Mickleham Rd, from Gladstone. By the time of his death he had sold the southern 140 acres of Chandos (Strathconan) and the 123 acres north of today's Bamford Avenue which became Percy Judd's Chandos Park, retaining the middle 190 acres that became Bill Lockhart's "Springburn".

The locations of all these farms are indicated on the attached map.

After his new property had been renamed Gladstone, the lease on his former property, (which may have been named Dundonald in rate records but could not have been on Gellibrand Hill because of its acreage), ended, and the advertisement of his clearing sale there confirms my conclusion of 29 years ago that his farm was SPRINGBANK.

CLEARING-OUT SALE
On Account of Mr. John Cock, Springbank, Dundonald Estate, Broadmeadows.(P.2, Argus, 17-10-1893)

FOUR WIVES.
1.EventDeath Event registration number8176 Registration year1876
Personal information
Family nameCOCK Given namesHannah SexUnknown Father's nameWilson Thomas Mother's nameElizabeth Place of birthLINC Place of death Age33 Spouse's family nameCOCK Spouse's given namesJohn

John Cock was born on 30-1-1843 in Spalding, Lincolnshire, England and died 29-12-1911 in Broadmeadows, his burial being at Bulla Cemetery on 30-12-1911. Hannah Wilson was born at Spalding on 9-4-1843 and married John on 3-12-1863 at Spalding. Their children were John Cock b. and d. 1864 at Tullamarine; Elizabeth Draper Cock b. 13-6-1866, d. 4-3-1954; Frederick William Cock b.16-3-1868 d. 24-6-1932; Hannah Cock b. 29-9-1869 d. 17-1959; Mary Ann Cock b.17-4-1872 d.2-10-1957; John Cock b 1875 d. 1881; Alfred Cock(1876-1960)

2.COCKS (sic)—HOWSE.—On the 8th of November, at St.Mary's Church, Bulla, by the Rev. R. H. Rodda, John Cocks, farmer, of Tullamarine, to Elizabeth Alice, only daughter of the late Thomas Berridge Howse, sen., of
Doutta Galla. Adelaide and Sydney papers please copy.(P.14, Illustrated Australian News, 23-1-1878.)

THE Friends of Mr. JOHN COCKS(sic) are Invited to follow the remains of his late Wife to the place of interment in the Campbellfield Cemetery. The funeral is appointed to move from his mother-in-law's residence, the Travellers' Rest Hotel, Deep Creek-road, Doutta Galla, THIS DAY (Thursday), the 2nd inst., at 12 o'clock.
(P.4, The Age, 2-6-1881.)

The Howse family had bought John Hall's Southwaite Gill where John Cock had probably been living when his first child was born at Tullamarine in (1864?). The Travellers' Rest, located across Bulla Rd at 16 A4, was burnt down in 1899.

John married Elizabeth Alice Howse (born 1857 at Flemington) on 8-11-1877. Their children were William Henry Cock b.28-8-1878 d. 16-3-1962; Edwin Cock b.1-3-1880 and died 2-3-1880 at Broadmeadows; Catherine Eliza Cock b.2-4-1881 d. 24-11-1950.


3.
EventMarriage Event registration number1804 Registration year1883
Personal information
Family nameMUSGROVE Given namesMary Jane SexFemale Spouse's family nameCOCKS Spouse's given namesJohn

Cocks (sic)— Musgrove.— On the 10th May, at St. Mary's Church of England, Bulla, by the Rev. F.. H. Rodda, John Cocks, of Springbank, Broadmeadows, to Mary Jane, eldest daughter of Thomas Musgrove, of Greenvale, Bulla.
(P.1, The Age, 16-6-1883.)

EventDeath Event registration number13255 Registration year1893
Personal information
Family nameCOCK Given namesMary Jane SexFemale Father's nameMusgrove Thos Mother's nameEliza (Unknown) Place of birth Place of deathBmdws Age40

John married Mary Jane Musgrove in 1883. Mary was born in 1853. Their children were: John Harold Cock b. 11-3-1884 in Greenvale (death*); George Henry Cock b.25-4-1885 (death* ); John Clifford Cock b.17-6-1886 m. Ethel Levings in 1922 (death*); Alister Arthur Cock b. 1887 d. 28-2-1971; Ellen Alice Cock b.1890 d. 7-5-1973; Mayme Cock b. 1890 (death*); Mabel Clara Cock b. 30-1-1892 d. 2-1-1985; Rose Cock b. 1893 (death*)
*No death records were found for George Henry or John Harold. No marriage or death record was found for Mayme. John Clifford died at Mooroopna aged 73 in 1959 and Rose died in 1893 aged 1.



4.
EventMarriage Event registration number1969 Registration year1894
Personal information
Family nameCOCK Given namesJno SexMale Spouse's family nameDUCAT Spouse's given namesEliza Amature Archer

EventDeath Event registration number15895 Registration year1934
Personal information
Family nameCOCK Given namesEliza Amaja Archer SexFemale Father's nameDUCAT James Mother's nameEliza (Unknown) Place of birth Place of deathBROADMEADOWS Age82

John married the daughter of James Ducat and ALICIA FORSYTH, born in about 1852, in 1894. She died on 30-7- 1934 in Broadmeadows. They had no children.

MY GREAT UNCLE,ALFRED COCK, CONTINUED THE FAMILY'S PRESENCE IN TULLAMARINE UNTIL ABOUT A DECADE BEFORE MY ARRIVAL IN 1971.
EventDeath Event registration number2569 Registration year1960
Personal information
Family nameCOCK Given namesAlfred SexMale Father's nameCOCK John Mother's nameHannah (Wilson) Place of birthTULLAMARINE Place of deathMELBOURNE Age84

See this 1936 article about Alf's love of the Royal Mebourne Show.
WENT IN A PRAM

His birth on Broombank had probably led to Hannah Cock's death. Broombank, described as 27 or 33 acres, the latter probably including the site of David O'Niall's former Lady of the Lake hotel,would hardly have made John Cock "the largest fal mer in Broadmeadows Shire in the 'sixties and seventies."

CHILDREN AT SCHOOL.
STONEY.
N.B. RE THE PROPERTY "VIEWPOINT": THE LEASE OF THIS PROPERTY, (BETWEEN TODAY'S MICKLEHAM ROAD AND THE MOONEE PONDS CREEK FROM THE LACKENHEATH DRIVE CORNER SOUTH TO ADJOIN TODAY'S CAMP HILL PARK) WAS SHARED BY JOHN COCK AND A MEMBER OF THE WRIGHT FAMILY, THE NORTHERN PORTION OF 159 ACRES COMING INTO THE OWNERSHIP OF THE WRIGHTS WITH THE SOUTHERN 169 ACRES BECOMING JOHN MANSFIELD'S "GRANDVIEW". THE NORTHERN 159 ACRES WAS LAST FARMED BY BILL STONEY AND WHAT WAS PROBABLY THE GRANDVIEW HOMESTEAD WAS LAST OCCUPIED BY MRS PALMER. OCCUPANCY OF BOTH PORTIONS WILL BE DETAILED IN THE STONEYENTRY.

MARCH 5TH, AT 8 P.M. (N.B. The date and time seem to belong to a previous advertisement about a meeting!)
Farm to Let.
Messrs. Keast. Morris and Miles invite tenders up till 24th February for the lease of Mr. John Mansfield's farm of 169 acres at Tullamarine.(P.2, Flemington Spectator, 22-2-1917.)

Tullamarine Sale.
Keast, Morris and Miles will, on Tuesday, 27th inst., at 2 p.m., hold a clearing sale at Tullamarine, on account of Mr.John Mansfield, "Grandview", junction of Bulla and Broadmeadows roads.etc.
(Same page of same paper on same date.)
N.B. This was probably the son of David Mansfield, not his brother John who died in 1912.

Viewpoint consisted of crown allotments 1 (96 a.3 r. 12 p.) and 2 (225 acres) of section 4 Tullamarine making a total of 321 acres 3 roods 12 perches. The two portions of Viewpoint were consistently described in rate records as being 159 acres (north) and 169 acres, a total of 328 acres. Section 5 (Stewarton/ Gladstone) was described as 785 acres when granted but later as 777 acres. I had thought that the loss of eight acres was due to land being purchased to construct the road between Bulla Road and Broadmeadows Township but it could have been a surveying error circa 1842 leading to about eight acres being deducted from section 5 and added to Viewpoint.

From pages 113-114, WHERE BIG BIRDS SOAR (1989.)
John Martin Ardlie, after whom Ardlie St. in Broadmeadows Township (Westmeadows) was named was the grantee of c/a 2, section 4 Tullamarine with the younger brother of Benjamin Baxter being the grantee of c/a 1. After spending five years at Jamieson's Special Survey, between Mount Martha and Dromana, with his brother Henry (a peninsula pioneer), Edmond Dunn purchased Viewpoint (c/a's 1 and 2 section 4, Tullamarine.) Edmond Dunn died in 1891 and John Cock started leasing Viewpoint soon after moving from Springbank to Stewarton in 1892. In 1909, the lease was split (Cock and Wright) and the northern 159 1/2 acres were farmed by the Wright family till about 1949. It includes this brick house built by Bill Stoney. (Shocking photocopy of a photo I had taken. Luckily, I scanned the photo which will be attached to my journal:
PHOTO OF BILL STONEY'S HOUSE AT TULLAMARINE

Palmer's house, next door to the south was demolished during the last decade or so (1980's)and would have been occupied by Considine (1921), George Dalley (who at various times was on Carinya, Mansfield's Triangle and Springbank according to George Lloyd), Cusson (1930), and Trevethan ((1940)before Palmers came in 1945 to the 169 southern portion of Viewpoint.

Stanley Korman had bought section 5, Stoney's and Palmer's portions of Viewpoint-all fronting Old Broadmeadows road, now called Mickleham Rd and Cowan's dairy farm, Gowanbrae, which fronted Bulla Rd (later Lancefield Rd and now Melrose Drive) south to the railway bridge. He'd also bought "Strathconan", the 142 acre southern portion of the original Chandos across Old Broadmeadows Rd from R.Kay (originally Kowarzic, manager of A.N.A. until Reg Ansett bought the company). Korman's plan fronted Old Broadmeadows Rd and Bulla Rd from Forman St Westmeadows south to the railway bridge. Korman went broke but had cleverly put Gladstone Park in the ownership of a family syndicate, selling it to Costains in July 1964 at about a 500% profit.

GLADSTONE GARDENS AND THE BROKEN SERVICE ROAD ON THE EAST SIDE OF MICKLEHAM ROAD.
From the journal showing the photo of Bill Stoney's house.

In the early 1950's Stanley Korman had purchased three farms on the east side of Old Broadmeadows Road between Forman St, the south boundary of Broadmeadows Township, and today's Camp Hill Park. The farms were "Gladstone" from Forman St south to the Lackenheath Drive corner purchased from F.N Levin in 1954, the northern 159 acres of Viewpoint south to about 40 metres north of the Scampton Crescent corner purchased from Bill Stoney and the southern 169 acres of Viewpoint purchased from Charles Palmer. These purchases and others are shown on page 196 and 197 of Andrew Lemon's BROADMEADOWS A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.

Korman's Bullseye plan of subdivision of his land between old Broadmeadows Township and the Albion-Jacana railway line fronted Old Broadmeadows Road but Korman's companies went broke and development of Gladstone Park did not start until Costains purchased Gladstone in 1964. By this time the construction of Tullamarine Airport had begun and land was reserved for the Tullamarine Freeway, thus isolating land on the three farms mentioned above, west of the freeway to Old Broadmeadows Rd, which was developed later as the Gladstone Gardens Estate. This estate may have included Strathconan whose main access roads were Freight Rd and Garden Drive because the service road on the east side of Old Broadmeadows Rd (now called Mickleham Rd)was directly linked with Garden Drive in Melway 5 J11.

When Bill Stoney and Charles Palmer, who obviously regained ownership of their farms due to Korman's insolvency, sold their farms again, they must have done so on the condition that their ADJOINING homestead blocks would be exempted from the Gladstone Gardens subdivision and with these two house blocks fronting the original chain wide road there was an 80 metre gap in the service road with access to the southern section of the service road provided just north of the Scampton Crescent corner.

Incidentally, Korman's original bullseye plan on page 197 of BROADMEADOWS A FORGOTTEN HISTORY (which Andrew Lemon vaguely describes as being from "a brochure issued during the campaign against siting a new jetport at Tullamarine") was actually from THE CASE AGAINST A JETPORT AT TULLAMARINE, published by Walter V. Murphy, a copy of which was provided to me by descendants of Tullamarine pioneers, was given to the Tullamarine Library and should be available at the Hume Global Learning Centre at Broadmeadows. No doubt Korman financed the brochure.

Charles Palmer had died by 1973 when I started the Tullamarine Kindergarten Association's paper drives. Dear old Mrs Palmer, who lived in the weatherboard house immediately south of Bill Stoney's brick house and part of the break in the service road, saved her papers for me and always insisted that I share a cuppa with her before I left. Her house was possibly built by John Mansfield when he bought the southern 169 acres of "Viewpoint" and called it "Grandview" but may have been Edmond Dunn's original homestead built in 1849 or even John Martin Ardlie's homestead of 1843.

W.A.STONEY.
I rarely use quotation marks in trove searches because many results such as the photo below can be missed by doing so. Bill was on the northern 159 acres of Viewpoint by November 1951 according to the sole result for "STONEY, TULLAMARINE" which makes me suspect that Bill's given names were William Armstrong.
Sheep Down 3; Lambs 2
The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Tuesday 13 November 1951 p 6 Detailed Lists, Results, Guides
... /; 36, W. A. Stoney, Tullamarine, 72/4;

Syd Lloyd told me that Bill Stoney had built his brick house in the 1950's' and this was probably prior to mid 1952 when his sons' photos appeared in The Age.
MURRAY AND ALAN STONEY

DENCH'S LANE, GREENVALE.
The farms in Mickleham Rd from Kenny St, Westmeadows (the northern boundary of Broadmeadows Township) and Melway 178 top of J-K12, were Willowbank and Springbank, the boundaries of these properties never having been discovered. The parkland in 178 J-K12 and another patch, also running east-west in 179 B-C12, indicate the boundary between the parishes of Will Will Rook to the South and Yuroke to the north.The two 180 acre Yuroke farms between Springbank and Somerton Rd were owned by Bob Jefferies and Hughie Williamson according to George Lloyd's MICKLEHAM ROAD 1920-1952 which indicates that there were two farms east of Willowbank and Springbank accessed via Elizabeth St in Broadmeadows Township. This track is now the pipeline from Greenvale Reservoir, the first farm being Wattle Glen with Annette Farm to the north.

I no longer have my copy of George Lloyd's history having donated it to the Hume Global Learning Centre when I left for Rosebud, but recall George Lloyd mentioning that Bill Stoney was (before moving to Tullamarine) down Dench's Lane, possibly near Mossgiel Avenue and east from Bob Jefferies' farm to the said pipeline. The track from Elizabeth St apparently went only as far north as Annette Farm so Bill Stoney would have accessed his farm opposite Swain St along the Will Will Rook/Yuroke boundary.

DENHAM.
John Denham's farm, appears from the map on page 196 of BROADMEADOWS A FORGOTTEN HISTORY to have been Charles Nash's former "Bayview" adjoining "Dalkeith" at the Janus St and Catherine Avenue midline and extending to Post Office Lane the north border of Trade Park industrial Estate opposite the Derby St. corner. George Lloyd said that John Denham's land passed into the ownership of Ernie Campbell with whose name the land is labelled in the page 196 map. This map was also in the brochure THE CASE AGAINST A JETPORT AT TULLAMARINE published by Major Murphy. George Lloyd knew John Denham well because both were related to the Williamsons of Greenvale as shown below.

From my LLOYD AND WILLIAMSON journal.
Gordon Williamson apparently married John Denham's daughter.
DENHAM-WILLIAMSON.—Mr.and Mrs. J. Denham. Bulla road, Tullamarine, have pleasure in announcing the engagement of their only daughter, Ivy Joan to Gordon Keith, younger son of Mrs. H.Williamson and the late Mr. H.Williamson. Greenvale.(P.8, Argus, 12-1-1954.)

WILLIAMSON (Derham).-Joan and Gordon happily announce the arrival of Gayle Lynn on December 5, at Sacred Heart, Moreland. (Both well.)(P.12 , Argus, 10-12-1956.)

AT LAST, PROOF THAT OLIVE WILLIAMSON MARRIED GEORGE MORRIS LLOYD. HUGH WILLIAMSON HAD DIED IN 1953.
EventDeath Event registration number8722 Registration year1953
Personal information
Family nameWILLIAMSON Given namesHugh SexMale Father's nameWILLIAMSON James Mother's nameRebecca (Watkins) Place of birthWARRAGUL Place of deathPARKVILLE Age55

WILLIAMSON, Hugh. —On August 7 (suddenly), at Royal Melbourne Hospital, beloved husband of Bertha, of Dunvegan, Green Vale, loved father of Ollie (Mrs.Lloyd), Jim, Marj (Mrs. H. Bradley), Joan, Joyce (Mrs. N. Taylor),Gordon, Vera, Thelma, Jessie, and Pam.—One day we will all be reunited. (Interred August 10.)
(P.11, Argus, 11-8-1953.)



BUTLER.
Few pupils would have walked as far to Tullamarine S.S. 2613 as Joe Butler, although Alf Cock Jnr.of Glenview at !5 A1 would have been close. His parents moved from Essendon to Fosters Rd (now Keilor Park Drive), as I remember where the Keilor Botanical Gardens are situated at Melway 15 D4, in about 1943. His grandmother was a daughter of James Harrick*, an early Keilor pioneer whose homestead in Harricks Rd is now the headquarters of the Keilor Historical Society. The Butlers established the Moonya Dairy and later delivered bottled milk when pasturisation was introduced. When I started the Kindergarten paper drives circa 1973, Joe's mum would have her newspapers neatly bundled up for me each month.

*HARRICK.—On the 10th October, at his residence, Keilor, James Harrick, the beloved father of Thomas and Joseph, of Keilor; Patrick, of St. Albans; John, William, and Francis, of Moonee Ponds; and Mrs. E. Butler, Essendon
aged 86 years. R.I.P. (P.1, Argus, 11-10-1912.)
Edmund Butler married Catherine (Kate) Harrick, born 1873, in 1900.

The W.S., V.F.U.
ORR.
The Orrs were leasing Kia-Ora, part of the Dundonald estate on the east side of Mickleham Rd from the Moonee Ponds Creek to the Victoria Police Attwood property by 1917* and were joined by the Lloyds in share farming nearby properties on the estate in about 1920. The curious thing is that in about 1917-8, John and Jim Orr were assessed on land on the west side of Trueman's Rd (Melway 252 D2)which is now the residential section of the Moonah Links Golf Course and were succeeded there in 1919-20 by Tommy Loft (who soon after bought Dalkeith at Tullamarine) whom the late Ray Cairns, then aged about 10, remembered with affection*. When the Dundonald estate was sold in 1929, the Orrs bought Kia Ora. (* J.Orr, Broadmeadows was appointed a J.P.in 1916.)

*I had assumed that they were leasing this land but they actually owned it. The ratebook gave Tommy'a address as 265 Ascot Vale Rd and the property bwas described as 158 acres, c/a 28AB and 165 acres, c/a 29, section A Wannaeue, which is how was able to work out its location from the parish map.
Transactions in Country Properties.
Yea Chronicle (Yea, Vic. : 1891 - 1920) Thursday 25 March 1920 p 3 Article
320 acres situate at Rye, on account Mr John Orr, Broadmeadows. to Mr T B Loft,of Ascot Vale.

The fire in 1923 could have been on Kia Ora or one of the nearby farms being share-farmed with the Lloyds but the first trove result for Orr, Kia ora might lead to a bit of genealogy.

CLARK.—On the 30th March 1937 (suddenly) at Kia Ora Broadmeadows, Daniel Robert, beloved son of the late Agnes and Alexander Clark, loving brother of James, Alexander, Thomas, William, Margaret (deceased), Agnes (deceased), Sarah Elizabeth (deceased) and Annie (Mrs Orr), aged 67 years.(P.1, Argus,31-3-1937.)

I couldn't find a marriage or death record for Annie (Mrs Orr) but of the following I'm in AWE apart from the spelling of Fawkner. It seems that the Orrs had settled on Kia Ora in 1912 and John's brother offers some explanation of the interest in land at Truemans Rd. The surname ORR appears quite early in Victoria's history.

Death, with extreme suddenness,came to Mr. John Orr, Broadmeadows, on Friday last. He was the respected brother of Mr. A. C. Orr, of the motor works, opposite the Dandenong railway station.- He had been a resident for 20 years, of Broadmeadows, where he was owner of a fine agricultural area, which he used for sheep and cattle raising. For sometime he had been ill, and was thought by his friends to be improving. He had gone to the station to bid adieu to his sister in-law (Mrs. R. Adams), who was to depart to her home in Numurkah. Crossing the line, he felt a severe pain in the region of the neck. Mrs. Adams released him of his parcels, and invited a porter to steady Mr. Orr, who was lapsing into unconsciousness. He did so, but death soon came. The Orr family are known throughout the State as a worthy one, and the sire, Mr.James Orr, was for many years a farmer on the “Oatlands” property, at Woodend North. Mr. John Orr was buried on Saturday, at Faulkner cemetery.
(P.5, The Dandenong Journal, 1-12-1932.)



CROTTY.
From DHOTAMA.
Page C.210. Maurice Crotty, a native of Tipperary, Ireland came to Victoria in about 1853. He spent the first three years working for Mr Branagan, Deep Creek, then rented 80 acres for four years. Going to the Keilor district, he rented and then purchased the farm he now occupies and has owned for about nineteen years, carrying on dairying and hay growing. About 1860, he married Miss McCormack, a native of Westmeath, Ireland and has a family of two sons and one daughter.(Victoria and its Metropolis:Past and Present, Alexander Sutherland, 1888.)

The marriage record and notice could not be found as I was searching in 1860. The marriage actually took place at the McCormack property, (Chesterfield, 44 acres of Section 2 Tullamarine on the south side of Annandale Rd between Sharps Rd, which they had been leasing since 1850) on 11-2-1861. Joe Crotty, one of my informants in 1988, put me onto Glen Cotchin who had been researching the family history and supplied the information that allowed me to find the following Victorian BDM records.

EventMarriage Event registration number475 Registration year1861
Personal information
Family nameCROTTY Given namesMaurice SexMale Spouse's family nameMCCORMACK Spouse's given namesMary

MARY'S PARENTS.
Annie McCormack died in 1867 aged 78. I PRESUME THAT WEST MEANS WESTMEATH.

EventDeath Event registration number5766 Registration year1867
Personal information
Family nameMCCORMACK Given namesAnn SexUnknown Father's nameCarey Neil Mother's nameBridget (Dabbon) Place of birthWEST Place of death Age77

James McCormack died in 1875 aged 85 at Springfield. (I PRESUME THAT MEAT MEANS WESTMEATH.)
EventDeath Event registration number10663 Registration year1875
Personal information
Family nameMCCORMACK Given namesJames SexUnknown Father's namePatrick Mother's nameMary (Bourke) Place of birthMEAT Place of death Age85 Spouse's family nameCAREY Spouse's given namesAnn

MAURICE AND MARY.
EventDeath Event registration number14145 Registration year1887
Personal information
Family nameCROTTY Given namesMary SexUnknown Father's nameMccormick Jas Mother's nameAnn (Oneil) Place of birth Place of deathKEILOR Age65 Spouse's family nameCROTTY Spouse's given namesMaurice

EventDeath Event registration number12287 Registration year1906
Personal information
Family nameCROTTY Given namesMaurice SexUnknown Father's nameCrotty Michl Mother's nameBridt (Hayes) Place of birth Place of deathCarl Age80

From EARLY LANDOWNERS: PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA, Section 21.
In 1860, Maurice Crotty, who married a McCormack* lass from Annandale, on the other side of Fosters Rd., started leasing “The Springs”. Charles Kavanagh was the occupant of The Springs before Crotty moved in. Seven years later, Mrs. Crotty reported that someone had bought part of their farm. That was James Sharp who was probably raised on Craigllachie south of Glenloeman. Tullamarine Park Rd. was close to the boundary between Sharp’s Hillside and the portion that Maurice bought in 1868 and called Broomfield. The original Broomfield homestead was across Tullamarine Park Rd. from Allied Drive and their 1890 house was on the site of Honda’s riding school.

Titles information on sections 21 and 20.
Maurice Crotty bought the north western portion of section 21, roughly bounded by Tullamarine Park Rd and consisting of 243 ½ acres, for 913 ½ pounds on 8-6-1868. The Crotty dairy farm, Broomfield, was a feature of the area for a century. The original house was opposite Allied Dr and the 1890’s house near the motor cycle school. Incidentally, in 1867, both Sharps Rd and Broadmeadows Rd were known as Foster’s Lane (Vol. 175 folio 509).

Broomfield, so named, like Broombank, because of the cape broom which was planted there, was operated as a dairy farm for about a century by the Crotty family until Joe retired to live in Ray Loft's californian bungalow at 3 Eumarella St. Tullamarine. At about the same time my great uncle Alf Cock retired from Glenview, living in a house in Gordon St. which backed onto it. In the Airport streets renaming proposal initiated by Tony Rohead of the Federal Airports Corporation in 1989 and approved by Keilor Council, South Centre Road was to be renamed Crotty Road.

KEY TO THE ATTACHED MAP.

From EARLY LANDOWNERS: PARISH OF TULLAMARINE.
1.Glenara 2. Inverness Hotel 3. Woodlands 4.John Bond’s "Fairfield" 5. Brook Hill 6. Dunvegan 7.Later Bob Jefferies’ 8. Harry Swain 9. Annette Farm 10. Wattle Glen 11. Willowbank
12. Glen Allan 13. Gladstone (Claredale Ave. site) 14. Viewpoint 15. Camp Hill
16. Mansfield’s Triangle homestead 17. Hillside 18. Brightview 19. Bill Parr’s Annandale house 20. Bendene 21. Glenview 22, 23. lot 7,8 (Maher) 24. O’Donnell 25. Arundel 26 two Fox houses
27. Barbiston 28. Oakbank 29. 1st Victoria Bank 30. Seafield 31. Elm Grove 32. 2nd Victoria Bank 33.Aucholzie 34. John Mansfield 35. Roseleigh
36. Glenalice 37.Gowrie Park 38. Danby Farm (Hill) 39. Glendewar
40. Fairview (Nash) 41. Sunnyside(Wright) 42. Chandos (Judd) 43.Bill Lockhart's "Springburn" 44. Strathconnan (Wright)
45. Love’s dairy 46. State School 2613 (Conders Lane corner) 47. The Elms (Ann, James Henry and Sam Parr.) 48. Methodist church 49. Post Office 50. Broombank 51. Junction Hotel 52 Dalkeith (Loft) 53. Cumberland


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