itellya on Family Tree Circles

sort: Date Alphabetical
view: full | list

Journals and Posts


ITELLYA HAS RETIRED.

After ten attempts to post a comment on the DICTIONARY HISTORY OF BULLA journal (second prize essay on the history of Bulla),itellya has retired. The essay has been posted on Ray Gibb's Facebook page. It is quoted almost verbatim in I.W.Symonds' BULLA BULLA.

2 comment(s), latest 1 month ago

ITELLYA IS A STICKY BEAK: JOSEPH PORTA, THE LADY SURVEYOR AND JAMES DAVEY'S CORAL-COVERED COAL.

ITELLYA DON'T LIKE MYSTERIES
AND READS EVERY HISTORY BOARD HE SEES.
THINGS THAT SEEM LIKE COINCIDENCE
FIT TOGETHER, MAKING SENSE.

Entering the Rosebud West Bowling Club for a Rosebud Rockers dance, I saw an article pinned on the notice board with a picture of a footballer. My wife bought me a jumper years ago; it had "Football is Life" in large letters on it, which showed (a) that my wife understood me and (b)why I just had to look at the article. It was about Ron Porta, who had brought back Somerville Football Club's glory days and had recently died. The bulb lit up. I had seen that surname on my Moorooduc parish map. Ron's wife and brother had never heard of lot 63 Moorooduc but trove proved that Joseph Porta, Ron's ancestor, had been near Somerville a century before Ron coached the side.

I have mentioned the lady surveyor in reference to Bernard Eaton in the RED HILL PIONEER journal. The information on that history board became etched in my memory bank because I knew well the difficulty of just walking in the mountainous terrain near Blackwood. I imagined the difficulty of carrying out a meticulous task like ensuring that levels were spot on so that water would flow for miles, with only gravity to propel it, along races such as the one that the Byers Back Track follows to O'Brien's Crossing. I imagined her tripping over fallen branches and bracken fern, exposed tree roots and protruding reef rock (unseen because of her ankle length dress), which would have been fatal if it happened where the race went around a huge granite boulder about an arm's length from a plunge of a hundred metres into the Lerderderg Gorge. How the author of "Those Courageous Hardy Women" would have loved a story like that to demonstrate how courageous and hardy the female pioneers were near Sorrento. At Greendale, between the Western Highway and Blackwood, there is a Shuter St. I wonder how many Greendale residents know how the street got its name. What a coincidence that there is a street with the same name just south of Puckle St in Moonee Ponds! "Oh really!" as Sam Newman would say. Read about Charles Shuter in Alexander Sutherland's "Victoria and Its Metropolis: Past and Present" (1888.)

The last item was the result of coincidence, just sheer good luck. I usually listen to another station, but on another radio, tuned to 3RPP, the local peninsula station, I heard some good music so as I started the computer, I switched the set nearby to RPP. The next stroke of luck was that I needed to free up some disk space and while that was happening, the next program "Beyond Infinity" commenced. The first discussion in this science program was about a comet that a Professor from Newcastle said crashed into the sea near New Zealand.It caused a giant tidal wave that formed chevrons (spearhead shaped sand dunes)all around the south east coast, 90 metres above sea level and well inland. The theory that aborigines made middens on clifftops was debunked as the same shells were found in cliff faces and buried in concrete-like chevrons. Why was this of more than scientific interest to me? It was only last night while trying to confirm or disprove a theory (that the Davey pioneers of Frankston and near Red Hill were related)that I came across the curious tale of James Davey, son of Mr J.Davey of Balnarring, finding a large lump of coal covered with coral near a creek near "Warrawee" about a mile from the coast. There was great curiosity about how it came to be there. My thought at the time of reading this article was that somebody had found it on the beach but discarded it when his friends displayed a "So? Whatever!" attitude to his unusual find. (See Mornington Standard, 15-10-1896 page 2, 2nd last column.)
Now I think we have an explanation of how the coral-covered coal came to be a mile inland!

1 comment(s), latest 2 years, 8 months ago

ITELLYA'S SOURCES AND WHY HE DOES IT.

I apologise for not listing sources in most of my journals. The reason that I do not do so is that sometimes one sentence might be an amalgam of information from four or five sources. Can you even imagine reading a journal littered with footnote numbers and with a list of sources that is longer than the actual article? One thing that irritates me about reading scholarly histories is the need for a ruler, to locate the page on which the sources are listed.

It is often the case that somebody starting family history research, or even somebody that has vaguely considered it (such as Somerville's "Local Footy Hero"), groans, "I wish I had asked mum, grandpa etc more questions." How many old photos get thrown out because the people, buildings etc in them (and the year or date!!!) have not been recorded on the back? DO IT NOW, FOLKS!
I was lucky that I started my historical research when I did. My older brother was doing our family history and wanted me to check the Broadmeadows rates to confirm that our great grandfather had farmed on Gladstone Park. I transcribed every entry for John Cock (Broombank 1867-1882, Springbank 1882-1992, Stewarton/Gladstone 1892-1911.)

Great grandfather had received great coverage in Andrew Lemon's "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History" but I could not help noticing that almost all of the pioneers, whose names my eyes raced past, had not rated a mention.
NOT FAIR, JAN! (For the information of our American and British friends, that's a line in a bank advertisement that has become part of Aussie speech, just like "Tell him he's dreaming" from "The Castle".)

The council elections were coming up and the fantastic rates officer informed me that I could not have access to the strongroom, where the original rate books were kept, until the elections were over. Kindly, he gave me a map "to keep me occupied" until then. It was a map comprising parts of the parishes of Wiil Will Rook, Tullamarine and Bulla that was made to indicate the properties owned by Stanley Korman, a 1950's version of G.W.Taylor. His subdivision of Gladstone Park (with its innovative bullseye road layout) was thwarted by Airport plans and his Stanhill company collapsed, costing many small shareholders their life's savings.

What excited me was that a farm on the map was labelled "A.Cock". That was my great uncle, Alf. Excitedly, I raced to the Tullamarine library to find out more about Alf. I read all the available history of Tullamarine but found no mention of him; not surprising because it consisted of only 1 1/2 foolscap pages! That did it. As it was Australia's 200th year, I decided that as a bicentennial project, I would expand Tullamarine's recorded history.

Tullamarine was in the Broadmeadows, Keilor and Bulla shires, so logically, I needed to transcribe rates information for each and I needed the Tullamarine, Doutta Galla, Bulla Bulla and Will Will Rook parish maps.Later the Maribyrnong parish map joined my collection. How did I get them? The librarians were fantastic: Bev Brocchi at Niddrie, Rosemary Davidson at Tullamarine and Jenny Shugg at Gladstone Park Secondary College.They supplied the maps free because they soon learned that what they gave would be repaid tenfold.

The rest came about because of Gordon Henwood, a cleaner at the school where I taught. I was a fairly dedicated teacher and was always there when everybody else had left, so we became good mates. I mentioned my brick wall about Alf's farm. Gordon knew the Arundel Closer Settlement like the back of his hand; he was a descendant of J.D.McFarlane and had been brought up there. He told me that I was talking about John Fenton's "Dunnawalla" and that I should go and see John. I ignored the "Beware of the dog" sign and my bravery was rewarded. John came out with the usual line of "I'm not a pioneer" although he had been there before Tullamarine was a suburb. (The Drive- in at Tullamarine was called the Essendon Drive In because hardly anyone knew where Tullamarine was!)

John knew enough about Tullamarine to give me a list of about 12 descendants of pioneering families. Every time I spoke to one of these, they'd say, "I don't know much, you need to speak to so and so." They actually knew plenty and provided treasures such as the Methodist Church Centenary book, the 1926 Saleyards proposal, newspaper cuttings such as "The Clan McNab", photos of hay being loaded at Nash's Fairview, the old post office in Post Office Lane, the former Beech Tree Hotel as well as telling me property names, anecdotes and so on. Harry Heaps was funny; he'd always preface his anecdotes with: "I shouldn't tell you this, but". When conducting videotaped interviews with Gordon Connor, Jack Hoctor and Colin Williams, I had to suppress a snigger when they asked, "Are you taking my photograph?"

With the number of contacts and treasures escalating at the rate of one per day, Rosemary Davidson suggested that we have a history display at the Tullamarine Library. Anthony Rowhead, a Federal Airports inspector came, saw and acted. Within a week, he had commenced a project to rename streets in Tullamarine Airport after early settlers, aborigines and aviation pioneers.As mentioned in the airport's wikipedia entry, the project was shelved at the last moment, when all had been finalised but Anthony managed to sneak in Gowrie Park Drive. TAKE THAT BEAN-COUNTERS!
Despite that 1989 setback, the 1989 Back to Tullamarine and the writing of "Where Big Birds Soar" were ample compensation. Due to Winnie Lewis (nee Parr) and her black book of phone numbers and snowball system of communication, practically every living descendant of the Tullamarine pioneers was there. Those that weren't alive were there in spirit; I could almost sense them saying, "What was that?" every time their names were mentioned.

As most of those present had trouble reading captions etc, I raced home to get my trusty magnifying glass. Now these descendants had been well-brought up and were too well mannered to raise their voices but from 100 metres away, their quiet conversation sounded like the roar of a grand final crowd at the M.C.G. as the players run onto the ground. What a thrill! The attendees' only disappointment was that they had no written history to take home.My handwritten book, finished days before the event, which was opened by the Keilor Mayor, was only provided to the libraries.This was rectified at the 1998 reunion where every copy printed of "Tullamarine: Before the Jetport" was sold raising a good sum for Gladstone Park Primary School. At the reunions, the oldtimers provided new information during afternoon talk and a new saint was proclaimed; no lesser title would do justice to Alec Rasmussen, their former teacher, of whom they spoke in such glowing terms.

I stated earlier that I was lucky to have started my research when I did. Why was that? Here are a few reasons. Gordon Connor, Jack Hoctor and Colin Williams were all dead within a year and by now practically all of my witnesses to the past have passed on. The historic councils are no more since Jeff Kennett's municipal amalgamations. Ratebooks are no longer available and microfiche cause so much eye strain that I would have been blind with the amount of transcription that I did. (Some council employees thought I was a colleague because they saw so much of me!) If I had started after Rosemary left the Tulla library, the lack of her enthusiasm might have seen my own dedication expire.

MY SOURCES.
As well as rates, parish maps, directories,the aforementioned descendants, every local history written about the area and some that weren't written as local histories (The Oaklands Hunt, The Gold The Blue, The Life and Times of John Pascoe Fawkner, Memoirs of a Stockman, Boom and Bust etc),there was, and still is, interaction with family historians referred to me by the Broadmeadows Historical Society etc, (I usually get as much as I give.)

As a sample of my sources, I will list the sources for "Tullamarine: Before the Jetport.
Keith McNab, Gordon Connor, Colin Williams, Wally Mansfield, Jack Hoctor, John Fenton, Edie Thomas, Harry Heaps, Merv Henderson, Ina Henderson, Stan Exell, Sid Lloyd, Joyce Morgan, Noel Butler, Olive Nash, Ian Henwood, Eileen Reddan, Hilda Drever, Gordon Wright, Nathan Wright, Joe Crotty, Glenn Cotchen, Winnie Lewis, Leo Dineen, Dave Hatty, Bob Blackwell, Ted Fanning, B and P. Wright, Alma Koch, Peter Anderson, Jean Schwartz and Bev Ellis, Ken Gibb, Deidre Forfar (Robertson, McCracken historian), Mrs W.V.Murphy, Ian Farrugia (last occupant of Camp Hill and Gladstone homesteads), Alf Murray, Jan Hutchinson, Tom Dunne (last teacher at Tullamarine SS 2613.)
Broadmeadows A Forgotten History, Bulla Bulla, McCracken Papers, The Gold The Blue, The Oaklands Hunt, Keilor Pioneers: Dead Men Do Tell Tales, Mickleham Road: 1920-1953, Tullamarine Methodist Church 1970, Camp Hill Title Deeds, Tullamarine Progress Association Minutes Book 1937-1954, Official Opening of Caterpillar- speeches-progress, Birthday Brings Back The Past (Lily Green), Anti-Airport pamphlet of 1959 (containing Korman's plans), 1926 Saleyards Proposal, F.A.C. aquisitions map (circa 1960, showing owners), Broadmeadows History Kit- S.O'Callaghan, Architectural thesis on Arundel (K.B.Keeley), Arundel owners etc (Tony Cockram), Keilor Centenary Souvenirs of 1950, 1961 and 1963, Victoria and Its Metropolis, Cemetery Inscriptions (Bulla, Keilor, Will Will Rook), Greenvale: Links with the Past (Annette Davis, wife of Essendon champion, Barry), The Shire That Took Off (unpublished history of Bulla Shire sourced at the Sam Merrifield Library, plus others mentioned above.
My other work includes Dictionary History of Tullamarine and Miles around (2500 pages handwritten and more on computer, with most of my information on Greenvale and Bulla), Kilts and Cow Dung Flats (Strathmore and Pascoe Vale), A Trickle or a Torrent (Moonee Ponds Creek),information provided to family historians and Bruce Barber (Strathmore),assisting heritage studies, Early Landowners (parishes of Doutta Galla and Tullamarine with extensive titles information) and more recently NEW history about the Mornington Peninsula and preserving heritage buildings such as the Boyd cottage at 62 Rosebud Pde.
Being a local historian, obviously I have belonged to historical societies but I am not really a meetings person. I was the president of the reformed Keilor Historical Society (1988?)but I was so pleased when Susan Jennison took over the reins in the next year. I am purely a research person with a passion to see the contributions of my mates, the pioneers, acknowledged. I have been pleased to see their names added to Melway at my suggestion: Hannah Pascoe, McRae, Delahey, Lavars, Corrigan, Chadwick, McKay, Johnson, Gilmore, Mitchell and their properties: Gowrie Park, Chandos, Willowbank. Unfortunately, my maternal ancestors are unlikely to have a street named afer them. Imagine the ribbing you'd get if you lived in Cock Street!

The reason that I have not published my histories (probably 4000 pages by now)is that I object to the outrageous prices people have to pay for books. That is why I provided my work to libraries and when I sold books they were printed at my schools so that they could raise funds and prices could be low.I cannot express my gratitude enough to Scott for giving me the opportunity to provide the results of my research free to family historians. Although I am still a local historian, it is for family historians that I research and write. Hopefully, nobody will say of my work, "My family was there for 50 years and he didn't even mention them!"
I admire and respect Family historians but will never become one. Why? A local historian is the explorer who embarks on adventure and finds something else if he doesn't discover what he was after but a family historian is the surveyor who deals with the nitty gritty and does the "hard yakka" (another Aussie term meaning hard work from a brand of workwear.) Keep up the good work, Scott and his disciples!

8 comment(s), latest 2 years, 10 months ago

itellya's sporadic comeback

Due to the death of my computer and the reconstruction of this left-hander's left shoulder, my return to action depends on my right index finger and the availability of my wife's laptop. I'd like to thank my FTC well-wishers and inform them that both operations went well.
I feel guilty that so many of my journals have been started and not completed. My first task is to complete the BETHELLS OF BROADMEADOWS AND BULLA journal.

J.P.FAWKNER'S CO-OPS, SURNAME LIST FOR SECTION 13, TULLAMARINE, VIC., AUST.

The names in the surnames list are the members of John Pascoe Fawkner's co-operative which purchased land in section 13 of the parish of Tullamarine, north and south of Mansfields Rd, Tullamarine (Melway 4 A1 and 4 to G3-5).

The Melway reference and lot number of each purchaser's block(s)will be given in the journal: JOHN PASCOE FAWKNER AND HIS CO-OPERATIVES.

J.P.FAWKNER'S CO-OPS,SURNAMES LIST FOR PART SECTIONS 6, 7, TULLAMARINE (and George Scarlett.)

The names in the surnames list are the members of John Pascoe Fawkner's co-operative which purchased land in the part of sections 6 and 7 on the south west side of Bulla Rd (now Melrose Drive)in the parish of Tullamarine.

Section 5 was "Stewarton" (renamed Gladstone in about 1892 after the Engllsh Prime Minister's cousin. Its south west corner was the present corner of Lackenheath Drive and Mickleham Rd (Melway 5 J11.) Its boundary with the Township of Broadmeadows was Forman St (5 K7.) The eastern boundary was the Moonee Ponds Creek.

By drawing a line between Forman St and the west end of Grants Rd, the northern boundary of section 6 and all but about 180 metres of section 7 can be seen. If you continue the line of Lackenheath Drive 16 centimetres to the west on your Melway,you will find the exact south west corner of section 7 (just 5mm on the map north of gate 22 on Operations Rd.) The boundary between sections 5 and 6 was Broadmeadows Rd (now Mickleham Rd.)

J.C.Riddell, after whom Riddell's Creek was named,purchased section 6 and as the south west corner was across the road (a triangle roughly enclosed by Link Rd, Trade Park and Melrose Drive, he sold it to Fawkner. In return, Fawkner sold to Riddell the north east corner of section 7, a triangle south of the Cleanaway waste facility mainly comprised of Melway 5 E7.


The Melway reference and lot number of each purchaser's block(s)will be given in the journal: JOHN PASCOE FAWKNER AND HIS CO-OPERATIVES.

GEORGE SCARLETT.
In comments, garyboy alerted me to the issue in which George Scarlett's land was advertised for sale. The location of the land and lot numbers are given in my comment following his. The map showing subdivision lots has been sent to garyboy and is available to descendants of the other pioneers named in the surname list.The digitisation needed correction,which I have done, so that garyboy can copy and paste from here (there are still a few errors on trove.) The Lady of the Lake hotel was built on section 3 by David William O'Niall,subject of one of my journals, on land leased from William Foster by about 1847 and was a well-known landmark.It was just south of the Derby St corner and adjoined Broombank (Millar Rd area), leased by my great grandfather, John Cock, from 1867 until 1882. The 10 acre lot adjoined lots 31 and 32 and the reason it needed to be fenced separately is that a lane ran between it and the double block. (See my comment under garyboy's.)

MONDAY, 4th SEPTEMBER.
By Order of the Executors of the late Mr. George Scarlett.
Farms on the Deep Creek Road, Ten Miles from Melbourne.
A BLISS and CO. have received Instructions from the executors of the late Mr. George Scarlett to submit to public auction, at the Lady of the Lake, on the Deep Creek road, on Monday, 4th September, at two o'clock,
20 acres of beautiful agricultural land, having erected there a very substantially built four-roomed wooden
house, panelled doors, spouted, with a tank capable of holding water for the year; all fenced in, clear
and ready for the plough.
Also, 10 acres of splendid land adjoining, partially fenced in. To be sold in one lot or separately.
This being the property of a trust estate it must be sold without reserve, for the benefit of those interested
under the will.
Terms-Half cash, the remainder to remain (at the option of the purchaser) for two years at 8 per cent, on mortgage. 101. (Item 8,column 2,page 7, Argus, 26-8-1854.)

And as always when I help a family historian,I receive as much information as I give.

Thanks xxx for your well researched information relating to the location and sale of George Scarlett's land holdings in 1856. Interesting about the nearby Lady of the Lake Hotel and a very good chance George and sons patronized the establishment at some time. Interesting that George sought to acquire a rural acreage as after arriving in Melbourne in March 1841 with his wife and six children he established a jewelry business in Collins street however sales could not have been as brisk as expected and by 1843 he appeared on the Port Phillip Insolvency list. I'm uncertain as to when he applied for and was granted his land at Tullamarine but I know he was living there in early 1854 as his grandson also named George was born there in February of that year. I discovered this fact quite recently when I viewed a copy of George's 1878 (Ballarat) wedding certificate. Young George'e father James who was also residing at the Tullarmarine farm listed his occupation as gardener. Perhaps James and his other two brothers were farming the block however on the 14th June 1854 George (snr) passed away at the Watermans Arms Hotel in Little Collins street of a stroke, aged 52. I was never aware until a few months back whilst conducting a family history that the second son James Scarlett married an Irish Famine orphan girl, Lilly Ann Barber (Barbour) in 1853. They died in 1901 and 1903 and are buried in the Ballarat Cemetery. Lilly Ann was my grandfathers grandmother but I never heard him ever mention his Irish ancestry, Also my father who lived to 95 never mentioned Lilly Barber, George's Bankruptcy or of him dying in the Waterman's Arms. Possibly they never knew or it was things best forgotten. Thanks to Google it's not. Getting back to the Tullarmarine block.... I notice that a large portion of the 20 acres is outside the Airport restricted area so hopefully there isn't a problem with access as much of the area appears to unfenced open grassland. Aspirations to locate the site of the original dwelling which presumably would be on the northern section adjoining Andersons? lane. We'll see how I go and will keep you posted if I'm fortunate enough to stumble upon any relics of the era.. Apologies for straying into my ancestors closet but without your diligent and painstaking research I would have been facing an arduous task researching the Tullamarine connection. Kind Regards, Gary.

To save me sending a further email to Gary,having already told him about the 1858 advertisements, the partly fenced 10 acre block must have sold in 1854 but not lots 31 and 32. There is no doubt that Gary will be able to make a close inspection of the East Collingwood corner block (if he can find out which corner.) The Park/Stafford St intersection is at Melway 2C J8.The house block at Tullamarine (36 x 26 feet, about 10 x 8 metres) occupied only a small part of the 20 acres (140 x 280 metres) so the majority of the land was used for farming.

As stated earlier,each 10 acre block (on map 5 in my 1999 Melway) measures roughly 7 millimetres (frontage) by 14 millimetres (depth), the boundary dimensions having been roughly 700 links X 1400 links (140 metres X 280 metres.) As it would have been ridiculous to try to measure fractions of amillimetreI had to divide up the space filled with 10 acre blocks so that the space was filled and all blocks had the same dimensions (as demonstrated by title documents.) Using the dimensions of 700 X 1400 links,the product is 9.8 acres,fairly close to 10 acres.Gary will find that the total frontage of lots 31 and 32 on the map that I sent him is actually 14.5 millimetres so that the width of each 10 acre block is 7.25 millimetres (obtained by dividing the total space as described above.) As you can see,the Maths I learnt at school was not entirely useless and any subdivision maps I have produced were done with such care that I have actually found mistakes in parish maps as a result,such as the spot where Arundel Creek flows into the Maribyrnong River in Foote's Doutta Galla map.

THIS DAY.
To Speculators,Persons Seeking Investments, and Others
Unreserved Sale of Valuable Freehold Property.
By Order of tho Executor and Trustee of the late George Scarlett
SYMONS and PERRY have received instructions from the executor and trustee of the late George Scarlett to SELL by AUCTION, at their new rooms, Collins-street, on Monday, 8th inst, at 12 o'clock,
Lot 1.
2O acres, a little more or less, part of section 7, parish of Tullamarine, county of Bourke, 10 miles from
Melbourne, on the Deep Creek-road, and near the Beech Tree Hotel, on which is erected a good substantial weatherboard house standing on a frontage of 36 feet, by a depth of 26 feet. There is also a splendid
tank, well built of stone, with a good supply of water. The land is all fenced in.
Lot 2.
All that piece or parcel of land situate in East Collingwood, having a frontage of 108 feet 6? inches to
Park street, by a depth along Stafford street of 75 feet. The above is a splendid corner allotment, and is
worthy the attention of persons seeking investments.
Terms liberal, declared at sale.
The auctioneers wish to call the attention of capitalists and speculators to the above really choice pro-
perties as being of sterling quality, and are to be sold to the highest bidder. 1970
(P.2,Argus, 8-2-1858,near bottom of column 2.)


The above is,I think,the earliest reference to the Beech Tree Hotel that I have seen. The earliest reference to it in the Cole Collection of Hotel records was a ball held there in 1864. It is possible that the Lady of the Lake Hotel had been burnt down by this time and the Junction Hotel did not exist for some time, giving John Beech an opportunity to establish his hotel without competition. The Travellers' Rest near the site of Airport West Shoppingtown probably hadn't been built and the Inverness at Oaklands Junction was far enough away.

As shown in advertisements for the Beech Tree,it also had a huge underground tank.It is likely that it was lined with stone as George Scarlett's was.

2 comment(s), latest 8 months ago

James Hearn and Big Clarke: KANGERONG/MOOROODUC; ESSENDON; YUROKE (VIC.,AUST.) The Ashes.

In a history of Essendon's historic houses, or historical origins of street names in the Essendon area,probably written by Lenore Frost,it was stated that James Hearn was the son-in -law of William John Turner Clarke (often referred to as "Big" Clarke.) At the time of Big Clarke's death,he was practically paralysed and was being cared for at "Roseneath",the residence of James Hearn.

Roseneath was just east of the water reserve at the south corner of Mt Alexander Rd and Woodland St and was later the residence of William Salmon who donated part of his estate (Salmon Reserve) to the Essendon Council. The part of the Township of Essendon north of Glass St, named "Hawstead" contained larger "suburban" blocks and the one on which Roseneath was built seems to have been granted to a member of Big Clarke's family. GET ALLOTMENT DETAILS.

Despite claims that William Pomeroy Greene of Woodlands was responsible for the name of Woodland St,the above author (if my memory is correct)stated that the street name came from a huge estate/run in the west of Victoria held by Big Clarke. Greene may have been responsible for the naming of Essendon, being associated with a village of that name in England whose Anglican Church still has a font donated by the Greene family. This latter article (font etc)was in the Essendon Historical Society newsletter. The Water Reserve,fed by Five Mile Creek,is now Woodlands Park.

Since I started researching my SAFETY BEACH journal,I have been trying, unsuccessfully, to prove that either James Hearn or John Vans Agnew Bruce (a big contractor from Essendon who owned, by 1863,the 1000 acres of Safety Beach etc north of the line of Martha Cove Waterway or Tassells Creek leased by Edwin Louis Tassell)was a son-in-law of Big Clarke.

"THORNGROVE" in the parish of Yuroke was granted to Big Clarke and later owned by James Hearn, as was a grant a bit further south in the parish of Will Will Rook that Hay Lonie had been leasing as a dairy farm. Big Clarke was said to have bought all of Jamieson's Special Survey in stages and (a) sold the northern 1000 acres to Bruce at a big profit (LIME LAND LEISURE) OR (b)given it to his son-in-law,Bruce, as a wedding present (A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.) The Survey was the northern part of the parish of Kangerong and immediately north of the Sea Lane (Ellerina/Bruce Rd)in the parish of Moorooduc, was the Mount Martha Run,last held by James Hearn who received the grants for most of it, along the coast from Balcombe Creek's mouth to Hearn's Rd,the Dalkeith pre-emptive Right (north to White's Lane, now Range Rd)and other land east to the Tubbarubba diggings.

The passing of ownership from Big Clarke to James Hearn of two large tracts north /west of Melbourne and ownership of adjoining property near Mt Martha and even Clarke's death at Roseneath could just indicate a very close friendship,akin to that between Edward Williams and Sidney Smith Crispo,the former managing Manners-Sutton (west of Canterbury Jetty Rd)in early days and buying the latter's Eastbourne estate at Rosebud West,even caring for the great Crispo there during his last days. However it seems more likely that the association between Clarke and Hearn was more than just a friendship,probably a relationship.

While asking that great detailer of history,Isaac Batey, about John Rankin with the aid of trove,the truth may have finally emerged.
During my stay in the Riverina, falling in with Mr. James Hearne, a first cousin of the late Sir William Clarke,I learnt that (etc.) (P.4, Sunbury News, 4-7-1903.)

Sir William was Big Clarke's son and built Rupertwood (named after his own son) where the tradition of "The Ashes" started. I'm hoping that a F.T.C. member has a copy of the Clarke family history and can provide the exact details of the Clarke-Hearn relationship.My guess is that Big Clarke's wife was a Hearn. Help!

JAMES HEARN OF YUROKE AND MT. MARTHA. (VIC., AUST.)

On the 1st inst., at his residence, Thorngrove, Sydney-road, James Hearn, Esq., aged forty-six years: an old colonist, much respected ; leaving a widow and large family to deplore the loss of an affectionate husband and loving parent. (P.4,Argus, 2-9-1857.)

James Hearn of Mt. Martha and James Hearn north of Broadmeadows were one and the same! Lenore Frost said that W.J.T.(Big)Clarke died at Roseneath in Essendon,the property of his son-in-law,James Hearn. I presumed this James Hearn was the grantee of so much of the parish of Moorooduc but could not find any marital connection between him and a daughter of Big Clarke. Thorn Grove was granted to Big Clarke and might have been a wedding present to James Hearn. A page by Family Tree Circle's Tonkin may have uncovered the Hearn/Clarke family connection.

(PORTER Claude married Caroline HEARN 1878 - Family ...
www.familytreecircles.com/test-52905.html)

Groom: Claude Robert PORTER.
Birth place recorded as Launceston.

Bride: Carolind Louisa HEARN.
Birth place recorded as Melbourne.

Year married: 1878.
Place: Victoria.

Claude died 1925 in Malvern East, victoria, aged 67 years.
Parents named as William PORTER and Mary Ann MAKEPEACE.

Birth Note.
Claude was born in Tasmania on 26 March 1857.
Parents named as William PORTER and Mary Ann MAKEPEACE.

Mary died 1913 in Hawthorn, Victoria, aged 62 years.
Parents named as James HEARN and Louisa CLARKE.

James HEARN and Louisa CLARKE had several children in Melbourne but I'm unable to find a baptism/birth for Caroline.

MARRIAGE.
On the 3rd inst., at Thorngrove, by the Rev. M.Clarke, of Castlemaine, William Hann, eldest son of Joseph Hann, Esq., of Coolort Station, Western Port,to Mary Burge, eldest daughter of the late James Hearn, Esq., of Thorngrove, Yuroke. (P.4, Argus, 4-11-1859.)

The connections between the area north of Broadmeadows Township and the Mornington Peninsula keep on coming.
Ferdinand B.Hann owned Dunhelen,north of the Greenvale reservoir, not far from Thorngrove.
05 May 1903 - The Argus - p4
nla.gov.au/nla.news-page332211
Mr. George Howat reports having sold by private contract, on account of the executor of the late F. B. Hann, part of the Dunhelen Estate, Broadmeadows, ...



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19.
Unreserved Sale of Valuable Freehold Property. In the Parishes of Will Will Rook, Mickleham, and Moorooduc. ,
DALMAHOY CAMPBELL and Co. have received instructions from the executors of the late James Hearn, Esq, to OFFER for SALE by PUBLIC AUCTION, at Kirk's Bazaar, Bourke-street west, on Thursday, the 19th December next, at eleven o'clock, Without reserve,
The following very valuable properties:-
Lot 1,
containing 805a. 2r. 22p, situate about 10 miles from Melbourne, on the old Sydney-road,bounded on the west by the said-road, on the north by Portion 6, parish of Euroke ; on the east by Portion 18, parish of Will Will Rook ; and on the south by part of Lot 15.This property is all securely fenced with a four-wire fence. About 30 acres have been cultivated, and the land is well wooded and watered. It is let to Mr. Stephen Toogood for five years from January, 1858, at 200 per annum.
Lot 2.
containing 476a, in the parish of Mickleham, situate about 20 miles from Melbourne, bounded on the west by the Broadmeadows-road, on the north by the property of Mr. John Hatly, on the east by the property of Captain Pearson, and on the south by the township of Mickleham. This property is securely fenced on the east with a
post-and rail and wire fence, with a brush fence on the south west, and north boundary lines. This land is also well wooded and watered, and is let to Mr.Robert Creely for two years from March last at 100 per annum.
Lot. 3,
containing 380a 3r, in the parish of Moorooduc, Mount Martha, situate about four miles from Schnapper Point, bounded on the west by a three-chain road, being the main road to the Heads ; on the north and east by Lots 29 and 16, and on the south by a one chain road leading down to Port Phillip Bay. This land is well grassed, and fenced in with a wire and rail fence.
Lot 4,
containing 1,260a. in the same parish, and adjoining the above property, upon which is erected good substantial slab house, with kitchen,store, &c. ; also a good stock-yard and garden. This property is entirely surrounded by roads, and is fenced in with a substantial three-rail fence.
Lot 5,
containing 1,305a. 3r, in the same parish, and bounded on the west by Port Philip Bay, to which it has a magnificent frontage ; on the north by Osborne Village reserve ; on the east by the main road from Schnapper Point to the heads; and on the south by a Government reserve.This lot is fenced in with a three-rail fence on the north, east, and south ; and is, together with the last mentioned properties, situate about 35 miles from
Melbourne.
The auctioneers beg to draw particular attention to the sale of the above properties, as the executors have
decided on selling without reserve. The titles are unexceptionable, and the terms are unusually liberal, viz.-26 per cent cash; 25 per cent at six months; the remainder at the option of the purchaser, for three, five, or seven years, at 8 per cent. per annum. (P.2, Argus,23-11-1861, column 3 item 7.)


HEARN-CLARK.-On the 28th ult, at Lyndhurst,Brunswick, at the residence of the bride's brother-in-law, by the Rev. A. McVean, William Clarke Hearn, second son of the late James Hearn, Esq , of Thorn grove, to Elizabeth Anne, fourth daughter of the late Lieut Charles Griffin Clark, R.N. (P.4, Argus,2-8-1869.)

BIG CLARKE, THORN GROVE AND ROSENEATH, ESSENDON.
Read about Big Clarke and his residence,as he declined,at Roseneath. Read my journal:
YARNS: ABOUT BIG CLARKE AND HIS BRO AND DAVID DUNCAN THE BUILDER, VIC., AUST.

continue

7 comment(s), latest 1 month, 2 weeks ago

JAMES MELDRUM IS A FASCINATING MAN! VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

My wife is always complaining that I spend so much time dealing with dead people so here's a live, and lively one for a change. I was waiting for Chris Fatouris to finish a song so I could buy the CD of songs he has written. A few months ago, I had bought this world -class singer/guitarist's other CD and Mornington is fortunate to have him at its famed Main St market.

I noticed a man in a captain's cap listening intently, so I commented, "Good, isn't he?" The reply echoed my opinion and as we chatted, I must have mentioned Graeme Bell of Melbourne jazz fame. His assessment that Chris was an excellent singer and an excellent guitarist carried so much more weight when I found out that he had played clarinet with Graeme Bell and most of the other greats of the Melbourne jazz scene, including Frank Trainor. He was obviously overseas in about 1960 when Judith Mavis Cock started singing with Frank's All Stars before becoming the lead singer for The Seekers.

"What's so facinating about playing in jazz bands?" you might be asking. But wait, there's more; no, not steak knives, silly! This same man was a well-known artist who associated with Arthur Boyd (subject of one of my journals), Sidney Nolan and even Picasso, about whom he told me an erectile disfunction story. As well as showing me some of his paintings, he demonstrated his skills as a ventriloquist and a magician. His stories about the Mexican bandito types in Mexico, the madamoiselle in Paris and the Mafia in Carlton were sprinked with faultless quotations in Spanish, French and Italian (with translations for silly me.)

These bursts into foreign languages completely dispelled any suspicions that this elderly man was romancing. But I really didn't entertain any doubts because of the raid- fire succession of stories. Anyone who has tried creative writing knows the agonies of determining plot, sequencing and so on and anyone who has been forced to make a speech without notes knows how difficult it is to remember what they had rehearsed. Some people might think that my journals are just made up but I can assure you that if I were making them up, the task would be 1000 times more difficult than reporting facts absorbed into my memory or noted previously.

He was a gymnast and was most impressed when I told him of the Gault girls at Gladstone Park Primary School who were the only ones able to reproduce the fully-extended horizontal hang from a pole. He gained free passage on his travels by joining the crew of a steamer, served as a diplomat which nearly saw his end in front of a firing squad in Egypt during the Suez crisis.

I believe him but it would be difficult to verify the above. However, he told me a bit about his family. His son, Paul Meldrum, played for Carlton. His father was an architect and employed a nanny for his children. His brother was Lord Mayor of Melbourne and snaffled his architect father's estate while the fascinating man was overseas. Oops, I think I might have given you a clue with the footballer's name. I thought I'd tease you a bit by not putting the fascinating man's name in the title. Okay, the surname is Meldrum but it's not Max, even though he was a famous artist, and it's not Mollie.

He's writing a book called "From One Damn Thing to Another" which sums up the above fairly well. I think it should come with an audio version so that the "flavour" I experienced can be shared. What a wonderful TV series could be made from this book if a multi-talented actor could be found for the role of James Meldrum .

The following can be checked on trove and art/architecture websites. James was an artist, winning an important prize at the age of 17, and featuring in exhibitions with many notable artists. James told me his other son was overseas; he might be the famed jazz clarinetist in Britain. James Meldrum's brother was Richard who followed the father's occupation as architect; the firm is still prominent. Richard's term as Mayor was marked by a return to tradition and the banning of cars in some parts of the city. James and Richard were the sons of Percival Meldrum, who designed many well-known buildings.

THIS TEXT ACCOMPANIES THE ATTACHED JAMES MELDRUM PAINTING ON THE WEBSITE "FEATURED ARTIST: JAMES MELDRUM".
NAME: James Meldrum
OVERVIEW: James Meldrums paintings were first shown in London, then at Kozminsky galleries in Melbourne 1953. His large, colourful, surrealistic canvases depicting non functional furniture have appeared in many exhibitions and won him the 1971 Sulman Prize. He held about 30 solo exhibitions 1951 2006 including in London, Sydney and Melbourne. Widely traveled, his commissions included a number of mural commissions for architectural firms in Melbourne and Brisbane.


N.B. Durham Place (Rosebud Fishing Village ) was named after Emily Durham, the grandmother of Judith Mavis Cock whose daughter married Bill Cock, a D.F.C. winner. Judith spent her summer holidays there until 1949 before Bill moved to Tasmania. Unfortunately the timber house in the middle of the block on the west side of Durham Place has been demolished. When she started singing with Frank Trainor's band Judith used her mother's maiden name.


3 comment(s), latest 2 years, 7 months ago

JAMES PIGDON OF "DUNHELEN" (NEAR GREENVALE, VIC., AUST.) HAD A SENSE OF HUMOUR.

ENTRY IN DHOTAMA.
PIGDON
James Pigdon was a man with a sense of humour. A tale related to me by the late Bob Blackwell appears under BLACKWELL in the B volume but I will give the gist of it here. Bobs grandfather, William, worked for Pigdon on Dunhelen and tended to have an ale or six at Lavars Hotel whenever he was passing the hotel, which was located at the s/w corner of Mickleham and Somerton Rds.(not at the n/e corner as wrongly shown in some maps.) Pigdon warned Blackwell not to stop at the hotel or he would be sacked. The latter could not resist the temptation so to disguise his state, he stood up on the dray as it bounced up the driveway to the bluestone homestead and loudly declared, Nobody can say Im drunk! James Pigdon laughed so much that his threat was never carried out.
Broadmeadows rate record of 1899-1900 shows that James C. Pigdon was leasing a house and 1000 acres from the Ham executors. The rate collector was obviously not acquainted with the late owner, Ferdinand Bond Brown Shortland Hann, who bought the Dunhelen estate of 2500 acres in 1885.
Dunhelen, whose historic house and stables still stand at 1240 Mickleham Rd., originally consisted of sections 11,12 and 13 of the parish of Yuroke, a total of just over 1980 acres, whose location is indicated by Melway 178, E/1-2 to 179, H/2-4. By Pigdons time, Dunhelen land west of Mickleham Rd. had been sold to the Crinnions (426 acres) and Michael Crotty (200 acres); this later became the Hall familys Kentucky. Pigdons leased 1000 acres was on the east side of Mickleham Rd.