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Mornington Standard (Frankston, Vic. : 1911 - 1920) Saturday 2 November 1912 p 2 Advertising

GOLD MINING (Column 4, item 4.)
BLAIR'S (Column 3, item 2.)

Sometimes when I'm looking for something on trove,I happen to notice another item on the same page. I read it out of curiosity but not wanting to be sidetracked, especially when a massive amount of time will be required to correct digitisation, I get back onto the original search. Unfortunately,my memory is so good that I will remember this chanced-upon item years later, and wishing to post it in reference to the subject currently under discussion, spend countless hours trying to find it again.

One such item, LAKE V JONES, that I have been looking for during the past two years, was found by chance again last night and posted as a comment regarding 858 Pt Nepean Rd, Rosebud in my FERRIER, HUTCHINS journal. In that comment I mentioned another case, JAMIESON V LAKE/LEAK/LEAKE, that I had discovered by chance and had never been able to find again. My latest attempt involved a JAMIESON,WANNAEUE search on trove.

I have included such chance finds in "Notes" journals re the Tullamarine,Blackwood,Mornington Peninsula etc. areas but I thought it best to make this morning's finds the subject of a new journal. The digitisation is not corrected but the print on the actual newspaper is easy enough to read.

Much has been written about the Tubbarubba diggings in LIME LAND LEISURE, THE GOLDEN PLAINS OF TUBBARUBBEREL and so on. They were in James Hearn's easternmost grant in the parish of Moorooduc and to the south at the eastern end of Jamieson's Special Survey in the parish of Kangerong. There were rushes circa 1860 and again during the 1890's depression when the mysterious Mr Eaton (BERNARD Eaton) was a major operator and the Moat boys found a watch that had been a missing clue in the Schnapper Point murder case about two decades earlier. Not much success had been found at these diggings although Mr Barnes was apparently an exception.

Jamieson's Special Survey's western end is indicated exactly by the north and south boundaries of Safety Beach and it extended east to the line of Bulldog Creek Rd. The northern 1000 acres,north of the line of the Martha Cove Waterway (formerly Tassell's Creek) was by 1864 owned by John Vans Agnew Bruce (after whom Bruce Rd was named)and leased by Edwin Louis Tassell until his death and then others. Bruce, who with Cornish built the Murray River and Mt Alexander railway to Sunbury and beyond, and lived in Essendon, spent the summer "season" there and employed Maria Stenniken,who married Godfrey Wilson,as a servant.

The southern and major part of the 5280 acre survey was owned by William John Turner (Big)Clarke and was leased by many pioneers of the Dromana area, as detailed in Colin McLear's A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA. Luckily the workers in the Titles Office caught my infection of enthusiasm and provided me with free copies of the subdivision of Clarke's Estate, and all the lot boundaries are transposed on my Superpages. Lot 14 has the eastern end of Wallaces Rd as its northern boundary and the eastern boundary is the line of Bulldog Creek Rd south to the northern end of Junction Rd. The western boundary runs north from the top left corner of Melway 161 G7 to meet Wallaces Rd about 40 metres east of the barrier in 161 G3. As you will notice, Bulldog Creek runs diagonally through lot 14 and the 40 acres that O'Connor applied for would have been along this approximately 70 chains (1400 metres) portion of Bulldog Creek.

As mentioned before,much has been written about the Tubbarabba diggings circa 1860 and in the 1890's (although names of the diggers are not much mentioned) but little has been seen about later mining there.

William Allison Blair bought most of his Mornington Peninsula land because of what was under it. It is wrongly stated by Charles Hollinshed in LIME LAND LEISURE that Blair settled at Ngarveno near the (future) Moonee Valley but it was actually (Netherly?-See Blairs of Essendon journal.) This was the site of the former Essendon Technical School at Melway 28 D4.

The Mornington Peninsula west of Boneo Rd was in the early days the preserve of lime burners.William Allison Blair,a lime merchant bought as much land as he could at West Rosebud and mainly south of Rye Township to displace these pioneers, getting their kilns and creating a near monopoly. Irish tenants' rights hero, Charles Gavan Duffy,bought much land west of Owen Cain's Tyrone to subdivide. It was inevitable that the two would clash as Blair sought land further west. There was a huge court case with each accusing the other of employing dummies. One parcel of land in dispute between the two could not be decided so Sidney Smith Crispo suggested that it be proclaimed a village and it was. It was named after Sorrento in Italy which had so impressed Duffy during his voyage to Australia.

Blair, whose son married a daughter of John Murray Peck of Lebanon and lived at "Wannaeue" (now Red Rooster, Melway 16 J9), later moved to a farm at Braybrook. When the Lilydale quarries opened,peninsula lime lost its value and this probably convinced Blair that buying land for subdivision rather than what was under it was a better prospect.However with so much land on his hands that had lost much value because of the 1890's depression, it was noted in the 1900 rates as "In lig." which I presume meant insolvency. The lime burners had loosened the topsoil providing a suitable habitat for ti-tree and rabbits. The former Blair "Lime" land along Browns Rd was bought from the banks for a song by James Little Brown who transformed the devastated area into the beautiful pasture we see today.

Blair's as mentioned in the advertisement was certainly not bought for its lime deposits.


Why has this duty been thrust upon me? My neighbour has had dizzy spells so I spent some time with him, resulting in the need for another journal, despite the fact that I have the Red Hill Dictionary History, the Pioneers' Pathway and the Watson/Stirling on the go as well as so many other unfinished journals. Since 1988, I have been recording information that would otherwise have gone to the grave and there don't seem to be enough hours in a day!

Gordon Boyington's father, Alfred, joined the Royal Navy as a boy but when W.W.1 started he was too young to be allowed into combat. However he managed to rejoin using documents that weren't his. After he'd had three ships sunk underneath him he figured he'd used all his luck and transferred to the army. He hadn't used it all and managed to survive the carnage at Flanders. After he was discharged he emigrated to Australia, meeting Gordon's mother on the voyage out. Gordon was born nine months and a few days after their marriage.

Gordon remembers his time living in Aspen St, Moonee Ponds(Melway 28 H7.) as a four year old. Later they lived at Carrum Downs before moving to Daly St in Frankston and then Station St in the same town. He recalls that Cranbourne Rd was sealed as far as the cemetery and was just a dirt road thereafter.

The organist at the Church of England at Carrum Downs, Mr Hadwin, used to travel in his T model Ford car to houses in the area teaching organ, piano and another instrument.

Gordon's brother, Raymond, was a professional boxer, known as Snowy Boyd, who fought the Australian middleweight champion (NAME)four times during the mid 1940's. Gordon gave the sport a go too, the venue for their bouts being the West Melbourne Stadium in Dudley St, North Melbourne, near the railway bridge. I asked Gordon if he remembered Russell Horsborough, and the name rang a bell, but Russell probably fought under a ring name too. Russell used to live at 21 McConnell St, Kensington, two houses from me, and introduced me to boxing as a skinny 11 year old at the Kensington Police Club where I knocked a triple Australian champion off his feet: Frankie Flannery was probably affected by a liquid with an Arabic name at the time.

Gordon's brother, Raymond, was a very good horseman and was involved with a camping facility at Mt Eliza where suburbanites could live with nature. It was location. During the second world war, American servicemen were stationed at a girls' school near Mt Eliza; from Gordon recognising my description of Old Mornington Rd, I believe the school was Toorak College. The Principal of the college kindly supplied part of its history "The Echoes Fade Not" which states that on 15-4-1942, Colonel Davey of the Australian Army phoned to ask that the army's request to use the Toorak College property. On the last Friday of the term 1 vacation the Government revoked its decision to use the property which led to frantic activity notifying boarders' families that they could return and unpacking textbooks, crockery and photographs.
Despite this, Gordon insists that the college was used by the Americans, so a road trip will be necessary in order to clear up the confusion.

When Gordon spoke about Moonee Ponds, my thoughts turned to a book that the almost 100 year old Gordon Connor had given me in 1998. Called Memories, it compiled the life highlights of members of the St John's (Essendon) Friendship Club. Gordon's father was a bootmaker at Moonee Ponds, where Gordon C. was born on 17-7-1899. Gordon was married in the original bluestone St John's in 1927 and moved to Strathmore. He and his neighbours stared in amazement at the first brick veneer house they'd ever seen, expecting it to collapse. I'll let Gordon C. paint a word picture of the depression that Gordon B.'s parents faced.

"Depression days which were very sad for those out of work.Those of us who were working helped those who weren't so lucky. We formed a committee and every week bought groceries with the money donated. (The committee members) doled it out as evenly as they could." I hope there was a committee in Moonee Ponds too!

Gordon B. recalled the Moonee Theatre in Puckle St, where Gordon C. had seen his first film in 1912. Thank you Gordon Connor! Now back to Gordon Boyington, who will hopefully tell me more of the Moonee Ponds of his boyhood.

There are two very good reasons that Gordon can remember little else about Moonee Ponds. He was only about four and remembers only walking to the milk bar in Puckle St for a treat. Such treats would have been few and far between. Gordon's father was frantically looking for work as so many others were. Gordon went to live at Moe with a Scottish woman who had worked as a maid with Gordon's aunt. Her husband was foreman of a gang maintaining railway lines in that area. Younger brother, Raymond was taken in by a Protestant minister in the Moonee Ponds area.Gordon went to school at Moe for about two years, with his unofficial aunt's two sons (older than Gordon) ensuring that he did not get into trouble. The family was reunited when the chance arose to live on a big block on the Brotherhood Settlement at Carrum Downs.

Gordon remembers that at his eighth birthday party at Moe, he was dared to climb onto the table at his "aunt's" house. He fell of course, headfirst onto a cabinet and breaking his nose.

As soon as Gordon spoke of a scheme to settle jobless families at Carrum Downs, I thought of another book donated to me, this time by Steve Johnson, a descendant of Henry Cadby Wells. Called "Fishing, Sand and Village Days" it recorded the history of the Frankston area 1900-1950 and provided training to three long-term jobless people.

The Brotherhood of St Laurence Settlement at Carrum Downs (Melway 100 F-G 1) was founded in 1935 when Father Gerald Tucker initiated a program to move unemployed men down from Melbourne. Father Tucker also envisaged the settlement helping pensioners and in 1948 moved to the settlement to organise the transition.

Lois Lambert recalled that little, bespectacled, grey-haired Father Tucker was quite eccentric. He always wore little tight rings* around his legs and leathers, and used to walk in from Carrum Downs to Frankston. Lois was proud that she remembered this remarkable man so well. (*Probably metal bicycle clips.)

Harley Klauer lived near Seaford Station and his family used to send the big catches to Melbourne but after small catches of mixed fish Harley would put an angler's basket over his shoulder and tramp around the district to the far side of Carrum Downs. Harley remembered the Brotherhood bringing old houses from Melbourne and putting them on blocks in the bush for the poor people from Melbourne. He recalled children chewing crusts of bread for something to eat. (The idea was for the jobless to be self-sufficient but at this early stage vegetables, chicken etc weren't ready for the table.) Harley was so moved by the Brotherhood's work that he donated a whole basket of fish.

Lloyd Walton's brother was the manager of the settlement. After helping out during visits to his brother, he was asked to set up a dry cleaning factory to employ older residents, but it would have been too expensive. A while later he took on the maintenance on the settlement. LLoyd discussed the wood or coke stoves used for cooking, the oval portable galvanised baths and copper-heated water, the outdoor toilets, but this was the way of life for almost everybody, not just Carrum Down residents. A bright old lady started a kindergarten at Carrum Downs because the area lacked one. If someone's milk or paper hadn't been taken in, neighbours would always check if that person was all right. Once there was suspicion that Miss Vann might have had a mishap, and, the door being locked, Lloyd climbed in the window- to be confronted by Miss Vann and her rolling pin.
Loyd said that Father G.K.Tucker would have been able to inspire audiences to walk through brick walls, despite his stutter. Although he wasn't practical, Father Tucker was a dreamer, whose dreams always came true.
Father Tucker led by example and even refused invitations to tea because he'd then have to accept all invitations and would not be an example of the self-sufficiency he wanted the settlers to develop.

Miss Turner told of how Father Tucker had been appalled by the poverty in Fitzroy and obtained financial assistance from Mr Coles. The single men used to live in Kempton Court and then up in Cafeteria (i.e. Cox Court.) When the depression ended, men got jobs and moved away. She pointed out that Father Tucker would not suffer fools but regarded him as a saint.

Mr Lomax, Licensee of the Carrum Hotel, gave Carrum Downs residents their first experience of radio at the Carrum Downs school in about 1924. Carmen Tomlinson thought that they listened to 3AR and they probably did but the station probably had nothing to do with the A.B.C.* The letters stood for "Associated Radio", a firm whose transmitter and tower were in Airport West. (*At that time.) The radio concert appears to have taken place on Saturday, 28-2-1925.(P. 2, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 18-2-1925.

Due to terrible headaches, Gordon is finding that memories come in flashes and often halt at the end of his tongue. However, he has drawn a map of the Brotherhood Settlement and described some nearby residents.

The entry road of the Settlement was most likely today's Tuxen Ave. Entering from Frankston-Dandenong Rd, Gordon would see, on his left, a dam which was built in about 1938, a vacant block, probably of one acre, and then a house occupied by Mrs Pope and her 13 children; Gordon thinks she might have been a widow.Then there was an elderly widow living on her own.

Gordon remembers a shop which was on the south corner of Tuxen Ave which opened about six months after the Boyington family arrived. Then there was vacant land and a track which may have been today's Weigall Avenue. On the far corner of this track lived Mr and Mrs Hadwin. Further on was another track heading south up a slight rise to a place where outdoor services were held in Summer. This track might have been Church Hill Crescent. There was a (describe) altar and concrete blocks for the worshippers to use as seats.

Mr Hadwin, the organist mentioned earlier, and his wife lived over the entry road from the Boyingtons' first house. Gordon used to walk, with billy in hand, to a dairy farm diagonally across Frankston-Flinders Rd from the settlement.

Two nearby farmers that Gordon remembers are Caine/Kane/Cain?) and Broderick. Caine's farm was near Amayla Crescent, west of Caine's Bend (Melway 100 D4.) Gordon was trying to pinpoint the location of Broderick's farm when I saw it: Broderick Rd !(100 E-F 3.) SEE BELOW RE CAINE AND BRODERICK.

The Boyingtons' first home was opposite Mr Hadwin's, their second on (Caine's?)farm, entered from Frankston-Flinders Rd and the third on the Settlement again but way back in the bush.

Gordon and Raymond attended Carrum Downs Primary School. It was a one-teacher school and the teacher, Mr Parker, wore a grey pin-striped suit.There are no prizes for guessing that the children referred to him as Nosey! Probably in 1938 a female assistant was appointed and took charge of the lower grades. Unfortunately Raymond was one of her pupils and when he undid his shirt to show what he had brought for "Show and Tell", she screamed very loudly at the sight of the blue-tongued lizard.

Jack Broderick of Carrum Downs came third in an examination for a Frankston High School scholarship donated by Dr Kennedy of Frankston. (P.2, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 26-11-1926.)

John Leo Broderick, probably the above scholar, was to marry Irma Carmen Hayes of Elmore on 15-5-1943. (P.6, The Argus, 14-5-1943.)

Gordon remembers the Broderick farm being operated by two brothers. Their father, John, had died in 1927 leaving a widow, two sons and two daughters. (P.1, F&S Standard, 1-4-1927, OBITUARY.)

J. Broderick and S.Hadwin played leading roles in the Carrum Downs Concert Club's production of "Circus Days".
(P.4, Standard (Frankston), 2-6-1939.)

John Leo Broderick, dairy farmer of Dandenong Rd, Carrum Downs must have been a keen golfer but wasn't so keen on the vagrant who stole his clubs.(P.3, Standard, 3-4-1942.)

John's brother was probably A.Broderick of Carrum Downs who advertised 100 tons of 2 ft firewood for sale. (P.2, F&S Standard, 20-1-1939.

BRODERICK RD.-see above.
LATHAMS RD. Ashton Latham of Carrum Downs was a member of the Frankston Methodist Circuit Choir.(P.4, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 6-3-1936.) In a concert in 1925, the performers included Ashton, Misses D and V.Latham and Mrs Latham.(P.2,F&S Standard, 21-8-1925.)
BAWDEN ST. As well as being a frequent performer at concerts, Mr Bawden was the foundation secretary/ treasurer of the Carrum Downs branch of the Victorian Wholesale Milk Producers' Association. (P.4, F&S Standard, 8-8-1923.) Mr Bawden was probably Hubert Bawden, but may have been his father, Mr J.Bawden who had died before Hubert's marriage in 1927. (P.4,F&S Standard, 9-9-1927.)
COLEMAN RD.Masters Jack, Arthur and Alex Coleman's recitations and Mr Bawden's usual mandolin solos were some of the items in a concert reported on page 4, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 22-10-1924.
Mr Coleman attended the meeting to form a local branch of the milk producers' association (see Bawden.) Mrs G.Coleman was passing Latham's farm on the way home from Seaford when a gunshot (to frighten off birds)spooked her horse which resulted in Mrs Coleman and her younger son being thrown from the cart and rendered unconscious; while the son recovered quickly Mrs Coleman was unconscious for some hours.
HALL RD. It is possible that this road was named after a Frankston councillor because the surname has not been mentioned in articles relating to Carrum Downs.



All details about the grantees and early occupants of land, such as Kensington Park, will be found in my Kensington Pioneers journal. The main reason for this journal is to attach a map showing the crown allotments. the grantees, the location of Peter McCracken's dairy etc. I could not attach two maps on the same journal.

My original map was hand drawn with biro (with countless hours spent trying to scale down a Lands Department map on an A3 sheet so it would fit onto an A4 page.) The reproduction was shocking being very faint etc. Neil Mansfield, who wrote the fantastic 600+ page "The David Mansfield Story", has volunteered to improve my graphics. He has been working on this map for days! Unfortunately I had not picked up the fact that some initials could have stood for more than one grantee; Neil of the sharp eye did though. I am awaiting a response from the Kensington Association History Group, with which I was last in contact in about 1999, to clear up this ambiguity.

1 comment(s), latest 3 years, 10 months ago


The map, which I'll enlarge when my computer genius sons next visit, covers the area shown on Melway maps 159-161,171 and 190-1. (Incidentally, while working this out, I discovered Tar Barrel Corner, Melway 191 F4, about which janilye's question prompted my Red Hill journal.) I used a tourist map as my base; it showed only main roads so I had to estimate the course of creeks and roads such as McIlroys, Callanans, Whites etc which form (as closely as terrain permits) crown allotment boundaries. The courses of roads on the base map are not very accurate so some allotments are not the right shape on my map.
As stated in the Red Hill Pioneers journal, the area now in Red Hill and Red Hill South is located in three parishes, Kangerong, Balnarring and a small part of Wannaeue which was called Red Hill and Main Creek. The boundaries of these parishes, indicated by K, B AND W, are shown with double lines.I will list the grantees, starting at the top left corner of the appropriate part of each parish and reading left to right. The grantee's name is followed by a number which is rounded off to the nearest acre and a date if it is on the parish map.

BALNARRING. See Tubbarubba journal for updates re Alf Downward's grants.
All the land, almost 1000 acres, bounded by Bulldog Creek, Foxeys, Tubbarubba, and Myers Rds was granted to Alfred Downward, possibly in about 1905 when he bought another block inside the curve of Myers Rd just to the south. Alf was a popular member of parliament being often called upon to achieve aims such as improvements to the stockyards at Moorooduc Station. Rye often enlisted his support but Downward and Albress were obviously two words the pupils did not learn to spell, being rendered as Downard and Albas.The area that Alf bought north of Myers Rd had formerly been part of the Tubbarubba diggings which had been reserved from alienation at the request of locals.
The diggings provided a livelihood for many in the late 1880's when Bernard Eaton, brother of the late Watson and probably father of Maude, started operations and during the 1890's depression when the Moat boys found evidence that could not be produced at the 1874 "Schnapper Point" Murder trial, so named because the trial was held at Mornington although the murder occurred at the diggings.
Alf, who had earlier lived in Tasmania,according to Joan Downward, first bought land on the western side of Wilson Rd in Mornington. He acquired it in 10 acre lots, the grantee PRICKMAN ( a hard name to forget) or a later owner having subdivided it. Alf called his property Redwood because of the redwood gums (the correct name)that grew there. Balcombe of The Briars owned the land between Redwood and Strachans Rd and he or a later owner called it Redgum Flat! The redgums are a botanical curiosity because until the homestead 10 acres was put up for sale by Alf's elderly daughters (Miss Downward and Mrs Pitt after whom streets were named)and locals requested protection for the trees, botanists had not known of any redgums growing south of Frankston.
Alf Downward's election to parliament was disputed and among the witnesses who testified at the inquiry was Thomas Gomm of Dromana who drowned a few years later in 1898. He was the son of Convict Henry Gomm and the brother of Rosebud's Harry ("of whom little is known" according to LIME LAND LEISURE) and William of Hastings, none of them related to Somerville's Henry Gomm, although they had him surrounded.
South of Myers Rd.
80B, A.Downward, 44, 1905. 80A, J.Oswin, 83, 4-7-1888. 15. J.Journeaux, 308, 2-11-1882. 14A, J.Davey, 122, 20-1-74. 14BC.Fooks, 122, 21-7-74. 79A, J.Davey 129, possibly 1874. 79B, G.Sherwood, 129, 29-11-72. 55,J.Oswin 2x140, A.4-8-74, B.25-8-72. 78A, W.Gibson, 190, 22-7-74. 78B,J.B.Journeaux, 95, 22-6-77. 78B2 and 54A, J.Smith, 255, 4-5-85. 54B, A.Duff, 169, 12-11-73.
To Mornington-Flinders Rd/Arthurs Seat Rd corner.
72A, R.H.Holding, 140, 20-2065. 72B, J.Pitcher, 140, 8-7-68. 73 AB, 215, no date. 74, Red Hill Village-see Pioneers journal. 77,88, W.Aitken, 305, 10-4-81. 81,82A, J.R.Thompson, no acreage, 18-2-74. 82B, 83A1, B.Tonkin, 275, 27-7-75. 82B1, J.Hindmarsh, 61, 14-3-71. 82BB1, 64, 27-7-75. T.Attenborough, mentioned in the Pioneers journal had lots 53 and 52 which both extended from the line of Tonkins Rd to Merricks Rd, a total of 544 acres, 16-12-71.
Back to Mornington-Flinders Rd.(5th time lucky!)
71A, A.Head, 83, 26-5-84. 71B, A.Head, 117, 5-6-74.
75A, J.McConnell, 182, no date. 75B, J.McConnell, 122, 2-6-71.
89A, J.Simpson, 142, 8-3-84. 89B, W.Bayne, 142, 8-9-80.
87-85, J.Buchanan, 1040, first part in 1872. The Wightons, mentioned in the Pioneers journal, then had 710 acres whose north east corner was the Thompsons/Meyrick Rd corner. J.Palmer had lot 51 of 281 acres, fronting Merricks Rd, between the Wightons and Attenborough (no date.)
Back to Mornington-Flinders Rd.
&0 AB, W.Hopcraft 178. 69A, M.Byrne 93. 69B, F.Bullock, 97, 6-10-75. 60AB, A.Allan, 117. 67AB, E.Gray, 107. 66A, George Wilson, 40, 24-2-82. Quarry 2 ac. Military purposes, gazetted 1889, 20 ac. 66B and 65, Helen Bayne (spinster!) 140 , lot 65 14-3-81. 90, 91, J&J Bayne, 322, 4-7-79. 92, J.Buchanan, 107. 93-6, William Roy, 514, 9-1-79, 64A, J.Bayne, 70, 16-3-81. 97,98 J.R.Thompson,251, 24-8-69.
Much land near the coast was granted to Alex Wighton, J.Palmer and Thomas Hamilton.

KANGERONG.(EAST OF WHITE HILLS RD TO BOUNDARY RD.)Dates generally not clear but those that are will be given in the Pioneers journal.
As well as enlarging my map, I will also have to correct it. George Peatey's grants are shown as being at the east corner of White Hill Rd, but they were actually at the east corner of Harrisons Rd. The land between White Hills and Harrisons Rds (north of the recreation reserve, the old racecourse) was granted to William Moat. Moats Corner (Melway 160 H5)is a very historic location name. Incidentally, the name is pronounced as Mowatt.
27a, 27c,George Peatey, 101. 27?,Alf Harrison, 63. 26a,James Clydesdale, 43?, 26b and 25a, W.J.McIlroy 350.
25b, L.N.Matheson, 119.
Not shown on map; between Dunns Ck and Myers-JunctionRds: 24, C.Downward, 116? 24b, Andrew Fritsch,103.
27? and 20c, Thomas Appleyard,429. 20b, S.L.Loxton, 106. 20a, W.Kemp, 100. The parish map is so hard to read that I accidentally called the allotments east of Loxton and Kemp 26 on the map; it should be 21.
21a, C.Counsel, 121. 21b, Robert Coxon Young (he of the 5 roomed house)121. ??a,b, J.Davey, 156. William McIlroy, 150.
Eaton's Cutting Rd, the somewhat scary link with Dromana takes its name from Watson Eaton, the area's amateur doctor, who settled on 150 acres west of the Red Hill end of the road before his death in 1877, resulting from a fall while riding to attend to a patient. This land was granted to his executor, Rebecca Griffith who was not his sister, as I had earlier supposed. Its northerly and westerly extent is shown by the Dromana boundary, the bend being its north western corner.
Between Eaton's Cutting Rd and White Hill/Sheehans Rd: 9, Charles Golding(cordial manufacturer)263, 18-4-1890,
10A George Sherwood,172? ac, 10-2-1856?, 10 B, Robert Caldwell, 172 ac., 10-1-1868?

18A (S.E. cnr White Hills and McIlroys Rd),(shown as H) Henry Dunn, 50, "Four Winds". 18c (shown as C), S.P.Calder (son of the C.R.B. chairman and Red Hill Show Committee President if I remember my trove correctly), 22?, R.Ringrose (south of Calder and Dunn, 59ac F.E. (Frances?) Windsor 17 a,b,154 ac (plus 23 ac at the north end of 13 straddling the creek), 16A, T.Milner88 ac., 11-12-1862, 16B W.McIlroy 88 ac, 15B, J.Holmes & Co.105 ac., 1872? 15A, J.Holmes, 105 ac., 8-7-1887?
CLOCKWISE BACK TO SHEEHANS RD.14B, W.McIlroy, 103 ac., 1864, 14 A, ditto, 103 ac, 1890?, 13 AB, Margaret Davies, 130 ac., 1877?, 12ab, J.Arkwell, 2x 71 1/2 ac., 1862 and 1870?, 11AB, J.Wiseman, 43 and 93 ac?

William Calder owned Four Winds, which was sold in 1929 following his death. Ringrose was an early pioneer and seems to have arrived 1864-5.

29, Ben Hards, 371 acres, probably 1860's, 28A, James Davey Jr, 159 ac, 5-9-1878 (see DAVEY journal), 28B John Griffith,136 ac., 4-5?-1885, 27A, Robert James,160 ac., 6-4-1897?, 27B1, John Hopcraft, 86 ac, 1-2-94 (see below). Land further south was generally considered to be Main Ridge and was mainly granted to the Shand and Brady families, the latter's homestead being called Mt Evergreen. The Shand steam saw mill provided packing cases and probably employment to the hill men.
Between Main Creek and Purves Rds, early grantees included Professor Hearn of Heronswood and lime merchant, W.A.Blair, but William Hillis (see Davey journal) was part of the fabric of Red Hill.On the other side of Purves Rd, the descendants of [b}Peter Purves, the unsung pioneer of the Tootgarook Run had Green Hills, and several other properties of which they were grantees.
William Hopcraft lived across Mornington Flinders Rd from John Hopcraft. In about 1878, Robert Adams was farming, on license from the Crown, in the angle of this road and Tucks Rd and one of the Sawyers of Moorooduc/Bittern parishes was just south of John Hopcraft. Little surprise that the Hopcrafts were related by marriage to the Sawyers and Adams families! If you wanted the death notice for the mother of the Sawyer children fathered by Isaac Sawyer, it would be useless entering Sawyer on trove. Try Renouf and discover the link with the Prosser and Griffith families!

2 comment(s), latest 3 years, 10 months ago


Gray's hill was described by the late Wally Mansfield a quarter of a century ago as the eastward climb up Mansfields Rd, Tullamarine, from Deep Creek. This meant little at the time because I had not yet inspected Bulla rates and it was not for another decade that I saw a plan of John Pascoe Fawkner's subdivision of Crown Allotment 13 A in the parish of Tullamarine. It is likely that it was Malcolm Ritchie walking from Overpostle on Tullamarine Island (Melway 3 J3) to Aucholzie (4 F6) in the following article. They might have been going in the opposite direction but in each case, Ritchie would have passed the Gray family's "Bellno" and young Gray's problem most likely happened as he walked uphill.

The coroner held a second inquest at the same place (Tullamarine) on the body of Charles Edward Gray, aged twenty-eight years, who died on the 27th ult. On Wednesday morning deceased, accompanied by a farmer, named
Ritchie, were proceeding to a farm belonging to the latter person, but they had not walked 200 yards when deceased fell down and complained of a pain in one of his legs. He became worse, and suffered from pain in the
region of the heart until the time of his death, which occurred within an hour after his illness. A post-mortem examination made by Mr. Gibson showed the cause of death to have been effusion into the pericardium. A verdict was returned that deceased died from disease of the heart.

On the 26th ult., at North Melbourne, by the Rev.John Reid, Mr. Malcolm Ritchie, Aucholzie, Keilor,to Miss Jane Gray, daughter of Mr. Donald Gray,Bellno, Deep Creek.(P.4, Argus,2-10-1856.)

GRANT-RITCHIE.-On the 28th inst., at Aucholzie, by Rev. Hugh McKail, Angus Francis Grant, Yarrawonga, son of John Grant, Esq., Seafield, to Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Malcolm Ritchie, Esq., Aucholzie, Tullamarine.
(P.1, Argus,30-1-1880.)
Seafield (Melway 4 J7) was across McNab's Rd from Aucholzie and young Angus and Elizabeth had probably been schoolmates at the Seafield school under Samuel Lazarus. William took over Craigllachie,(Melway 4A2) directly across Deep Creek from Donald Gray's Bellno but he displeased David Mansfield by blocking the road that joined Loemans Rd to Gray's Hill on Mansfields Rd via the ford.

From J. R.Thompson, solicitor,Melbourne, stating he had been consulted by Mr. David Mansfield with reference
to a fence which obstructs and is placed across the Government road leading from his client's property at Tullamarine to Sunbury. He understood the fence was on that part of the road that crosses 'Tullamarine Island.' His client asked that the council, whose duty it was to keep open for public use and free from obstruction every road on the public highways, would take steps to have the said fence removed.

The Secretary said the road was on Grant's property on Tullamarine Island (Loeman's)road and there was a swing gate available. The President said he understood the road was only required to bring stock to Sunbury, a saving of four miles being effected. The track was not safe for vehicular traffic, but a slight deviation on to Peters' property (Overpostle, now owned by William Peter)would give a good crossing. (etc.)
(P.2,Sunbury News, 22-8-1903,Bulla Shire.)

1 comment(s), latest 1 year, 4 months ago


While writing the George and Ollie Johnstone journal, I determined from Alex Johnstone's email that George's 180 acres bought from James Purves was the southern portion of The late Dr Hearn's Green Hills.(Lot 7 below.)
In the advertisement re Dr Hearn's estate in 1891,Green Hills was obviously the name of a farm, just as Roselands was the name of the farm across Purves Rd.
GREEN HILLS-MELWAY 171 C-F7,west to Gardens Rd, south to Davos St.
ROSELANDS- MELWAY 171 G-K 7,8, from Wilson Rd corner south to opposite the Davos St corner, and fronting Rurves and Main Creek Rds.

lot7- Green Hills being Allotments 29A and 29B, parish of Wannaeue, county of Mornington, containing 301 acres 1 rood 20 perches agricultural and grazing land fenced and subdivided, timber rung and partly cleared, well adapted for orchards, prettily situated in the Arthurs Seat Range from which is obtained extensive views of the bay and Southern Ocean.

Lot 8 -Roselands being Allotment 22, parish of Wannaeue containing 265 acres 2 roods 22 perches good grazing land, fenced, separated from Green Hills by Government-road.
(P.2, Argus, 25-3-1891, Sale of the estate of the late Dr.Hearn of Heronswood,column 6.)

While investigating Walter Cairns' Quamby and Ned and Edna Cairns' land at the end of Duells Rd, I discovered in my transcription of the 1900 rates:DAVID CAIRNS, 260 ACRES,13AB, WANNAEUE, GREENHILLS.
What's more, James Purves was assessed on 180 acres, 14AB Wannaeue, not 29AB,despite Hector Hanson's statement that "up at 'Green Hills' the men were clearing the land,putting in underground wells and building the shingle roofed sheds and dairy" in the late 1880's when Emily Purves and her younger sister Frances had their frightening encounter with seven aborigines at Tootgarook.

13AB, MELWAY 171 B-F9,from Davos St to opposite 463 Purves Rd and west to Two Bays Walking Track.
14AB, MELWAY 171 d-E11, fronting Purves Rd (south of a point opposite No.463) and Browns Rd (to a point opposite No. 27.)

Crown allotments 14AB were granted to James Purves on 10-11-1869. This was probably the son of Peter Purves Senior,not Peter's architect brother. It is likely that James had bought his land in the parish of Fingal and 14AB with money inherited from his father circa 1860 when Peter died.

It seems that the name of Dr. Hearn's farm "Green Hills" had been used to describe the locality, as in the case of John McKerchar's "Greenvale" and John Brock's "Janefield" near Bundoora. Purves Rd (the Government road in the 1891 advertisement) seems to have been known as Green Hills Rd by 1899.

DEATHS. QUINAN. On the 21st of June, at 'Green Hills.' Dromana, Victoria, Frances Emma, in her 85th year, relict of the late R. D. D. Quinan, and mother of Mrs, John Laird, Gawler, Mrs. James Purves, Victoria, and Robert and Arthur Quinan, W. A., and sister in-law of Lady - Ribton, Henry and Dr. E. Quinan, Dublin, Ireland. Dublin papers please copy.
Family Notices. Bunyip (Gawler, SA : 1863 - 1954) Friday 5 July 1907 p 2

LENZ-PURVES - On the 20th December 1899 at St John's Church Dromana by the Rev M M Witton. Gustaf F.P. LENZ of Gawler, South Australia to Emily*, eldest daughter of James Purves, Green Hills, Dromana.
Family Notices. The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 7 April 1900 p 9
(*See the encounter with the aborigines above.)

Red Hill and Mornington Horticultural Society. DROMANA SHOW.
Mornington Standard (Vic. : 1889 - 1908) Thursday 25 March 1897 Edition: MORNING. p 3 Detailed lists, results, guides
... ferns, dried and mounted in book or card, etc. First. 5s, gift of J, Baldry, Esq., Green Hills, Dromana; ... value £110s, gift of Mrs. Purves, Green Hills, Dromana

John Baldry was assessed on 161 acres, Wannaeue in 1900.This was crown allotment 8 of 161 acres and 30 perches,granted to John on 25-20-1902,located at Melway 254 E5, south of the equestrian ground and containing
the part of the Baldry Circuit walk east of the tributary arising in D4. The boundaries of Green Hills were expanding rapidly but Alex Johnstone, who family came after 1920, had never heard the term!

gravelling on Green Hills road, J.Purves £15 31 5d ;
Shire of Flinders and Kangerong.
Mornington Standard (Vic. : 1889 - 1908) Thursday 2 November 1899 p 2 Article (Tenders)

See the MURRAY GOMM journal for some PURVES genealogy.


Green's Corner is now occupied by the 711 service station. It was a Mobil garage when I arrived in Tullamarine in 1971 and until very recently. All the old timers knew it as Green's Corner because Cec and Lily Green bought the old Junction Hotel after Tommy Loft got it closed down in 1929.They conducted a shop in it and had a petrol bowser outside.One of Lily Green's happiest memories was serving Alister Clark of Glenara.
One story not mentioned in the attached newspaper article was told to me by a Green descendant. A former policeman called into the shop, and as they chatted about the old days, he said that he could show them something that would interest them. Cec and Lily followed him as he walked over to a door. "There it is!" he said. Funny, they had never noticed it! Almost completely lodged in the timber was a bullet fired in an attempt to arrest a bloke who had made the Junction one of his haunts: Squizzie Taylor.


I am sure this lady could have told a few stories.

28th September 1934, Frankston & Somerville Standard
The death of Mrs. Marion Haddon, aged 96 years, At the residence of her son-in-law, Mr G. McBride, at Main Ridge, on September 19 marked the passing of one of the Peninsula's earliest pioneers. Burial took place last Friday in the Flinders cemetery, the remains being Interred in the same grave as those of her husband who died about 20 years ago. Many beautiful floral tributes were received and the funeral was attended by a large number of persons representative of all parts of the district. The casket was carried by Messrs. J. Berkley, D. Campbell, C. White and J. Haddon. The pall-bearers were Councillors Higgens and Rudduck, Messrs. W. Gibson, R. White, J. Matthews, T. Derby and G. White. The Rev. W. Adams of Dromana, conducted a service at the house and read the burial service at the grave. Mr.Hector Gamble of Frankston, and Mornington, had charge of the funeral arrangements.
The late Mrs. Haddon was ill for only a few days before her death. Despite her great age, she recorded her vote at the polling booth on September 15. Married when aged 18 years, she came from Scotland with her husband 76 years ago. After their arrival in Australia they settled at Dromana. The late Mr. Haddon was employed by Mr Anderson on his station at Cape Schank where they lived until about 20 years ago. Mrs. Haddon lived in the districts of Dromana and Flinders for 76 years. She said that the first white woman she met in Dromana was the late Mrs. Holden who died only a few weeks ago. Mrs. Haddon had a family of nine children of whom two sons and five daughters survive her. There are 32 grandchildren, 49 great -grand- children and 18 great-great-grand children. The late Mrs: Haddon was held in high esteem and had a large circle of friends.
I wonder if Robert Joseph Haddon was a descendant of Marion. He produced a calendar some time before 1927,with one of his paintings being of a yacht sailing in Dromana bay.

Mr. Thomas Haddon passed away on 26th April. He was a native of Red Hill, and leaves a wife and four
children to mourn his loss. His parents live at Flinders. The funeral took place on 28th April, the remains being interred in the Frankston Cemetery. The pall-bearers were Messrs J. Haddon, G. McBride,J. Wilson, J. Patterson, G. Tuck, G.Cairns. The coffin-bearers were: Messrs J. Haddon, C. Tuck, R.Thompson, G. White. Rev.. C. H.Ball read the burial service, and Messrs Hector Gamble and Son conducted the funeral arrangements.((P.7, Standard (Frankston), 10-5-1945.)

Pall and coffin bearers' names seem to indicate that the Haddon family may have been good friend, if not relatives of the descendants of Sarah Wilson. James Matthews, a Dromana carpenter, one of Henry Tuck Jnr's daughters and Robert Wilson were all related to Sarah.


I will never forget the first time I saw Hay Lonie's name in a Broadmeadows Shire ratebook. I was having trouble deciphering some of the words because of terrible handwriting, sometimes taking five minutes to establish what a particular letter might be. "What sort of name is Hay?" I thought. It was not until nearly a year later, when I found his name in the Bulla shire ratebook re the assessment for Lochton, that I was reassured that he indeed had the same name as the area's principal crop.

I have included details (obituary, location etc. re Pasture Hill, Camp Hill and Lochton) about Hay in my journal 1888 GEOGRAPHY WITH THE MELBOURNE HUNT and having found the location of his Kilmore property, I decided that a separate journal might allow me to include that and other information I might discover.

Mr' Norman Bowers' Valleyfield estate was one of the very earliest settled farms in Kilmore district. It
is about four miles north-west of the town, with extensive frontages to Pyalong road, which runs through
the property. Some eighty years ago the original place was farmed, and later the home, which was right on
the roadway, was used as a hotel Harvest Home, the proprietor being Mr A. Downs. For a period the spot was a favorite locale for Kilmore picnics, which were numerous about 65 years ago. The property was added to considerably, and subsequently became an extensive dairy farm, conducted by the late Mr Hay Lonie.
About 250 cows were milked on the premises morning and evening, all by hand, and Mr Lonie himself despatched a waggon load of milk by the first train,' at 7 a.m., from Kilmore East, and again in the evening, six days a
week for Melbourne, and also a consignment on Sunday evenings, each trip meaning six miles from and to his farm. After Mr Lonie's death,the Valleyfield property changed hands, and Mr S. Bowers became owner.
(Present & Past WOOL v. MILK Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 24 October 1935 p 4. )

Golden Vein.
On Wednesday Messrs. Osborn and Hudson conducted a clearing out sale on account of Mr. J. H. McIvor at the Golden Vein estate in Moranding, when a large number of sheep, cattle, horses, plant, hay,furniture, and sundries came under the hammer to a big attendance of buyers and onlookers. A good clearance was effected at satisfactory prices.

In the late sixties and early seventies the Golden Vein property of 869 acres was owned by Mr.Laurence Bourke, M.L.A., and about 1872 the holding became the property of Mr. Hay Lonie, of Tullarmarine (sic), and from whom it was rented by Mr James McLeod at 5/- per acre. Fifty-seven cows were milked twice daily, giving an average of two and a half gallons, one gallon of milk making one pound of cheese.

Mr. McLeod introduced the Cheddar system into the district. (Details.....).

During Mr.Bourke's ownership, the Golden Vein was in a slovenly and untidy condition, owing to the fact that Mr.Bourke had to be absent a good deal on Parliamentary business, and the men he employed were careless and
slovenly, and the fences broken down and left there, because the men would not repair them. On the expiry of Mr. McLeod's lease, .Mr.Lonie went on to the farm and worked it for many years; principally in dairying. After Mr. Lonie's death the property was purchased by Mr.R. Fennelly,and leased to Mr.I W. Mclvor, who carried on a high class Ayrshire stud herd for some years. (etc.)
( Golden Vein.Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 16 January 1936 p 2 Article.)

This must be the article mentioned in his obituary (which debunked rumours that Hay had committed suicide.)

Mr Hay Lonie, well known in this district, has been missing since Wednesday, 14th instant. On the evening of that date he left Mr Grace's, South Melbourne, and since that time nothing has been heard of his movements. Much sympathy is felt for Mrs Lonie and family, whose state of anxiety can well be imagined. [Since writing above we learn with much regret that the remains were found in Melbourne yesterday, but up to the present we
have not been able to find further particulars than those conveyed in the following from the Herald of
yesterday :-"About 7 o'clock this morning a boy named William Bell, went to Constable T. Martin, who was on duty on Prince's Bridge, and informed him that the body of a man was floating in the River Yarra a short distance east of the bridge. Martin went to the spot indicated, recovered the body, and conveyed it to the City Morgue. The death has been reported to Dr Youl, and an inquest will be held, probably to-morrow." The remains
will be interred in the Kilmore Cemetery this (Thursday) evening.]
(P.3, Kilmore Free Press, 22-12-1892.)

The reason for this search will be explained later.

1884.October 23- The sudden death of Miss Barbara, oldest daughter of Mr Hay Lonie,and a most amiable girl, took place on 19th instant aged 19 years.
(Early Kilmore. PART LXI.
Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 10 June 1915 Edition: MORNING. p 1 Article.)

Not much else turned up except that Hay seems to have been awarded a government contact for the supply of milk while he was milking all those cows on Pasture Hill at Campbellfield.
(THE GAZETTE, P.6,Argus,8-12-1866.)

Oh dear,let's try JOHN THOMAS SMITH AND HIS ELECTORS on google.

No wonder, the above search did not produce clear results; I had the right area but the wrong town!

A website headed FREDERICK XAVIER TO ARTHUR ZOUCH has the following information.
The Melbourne Times of 23-4-1842 recorded that Peter Young had been granted a publican's licence for the "Bushman" in Sydney Road.The Port Phillip of 21-4-1843 shows that the hotel, once again described as being on Sydney Road was now called the Sugar Loaf Inn. The same paper, on 27-4-1844,stated that Peter had been granted his licence but the hotel was again called the Bushman.
(An alphabetical listing of squatters and their runs, from correspondence with the Governor, which is a different website, lists Peter Young of the Sugar Loaf Run.) Given Peter's purchase of land in Seymour at the first sales, his conducting the first sales in the township and the fact that Sugarloaf Creek intersects the Hume Highway in Seymour, it is reasonable to assume that the hotel was at Seymour and not in modern-day Carlton, Brunswick (or Plenty, Pascoeville near the Young Queen Inn, or Tullamarine near the Lady of the Lake- routes more likely to be called Sydney Road in the 1840's.)
Rev. Peter Gunn, who became the minister at Campbellfield's historic Scots Church (Melway 7 H6), had visited the Golburn (River?) area and Peter was among a large number who signed a letter of encouragement and contributed 50 pounds to support his ministry; another signatory was from Sunday Creek, which joins Sugarloaf Creek.(Port Phillip Herald 1-10-1844.)

Peter Young and Elizabeth christened John William in 1843.
Peter Young purchased allotments at the first sale of blocks at Seymour. (Melbourne Weekly Courier 23-3-1844.)
Peter Young was one of 469 voters who qualified by freehold in Seymour in the list of electors in the District of Bourke (Melbourne Courier 8-8-1845.)Peter Young was listed in the (1847?) Port Phillip directory as a settler, Seymour, Sydney Rd.

The website also lists newspaper reports showing that Peter Young was given depasturing licences in July 1843 and October 1844 in the Westernport District.Ah hah, I thought, perhaps Peter had been on Clyde Farm, Westernport before he went to Bulla. Then I remembered my search for a grant (or licence) that Captain Adams of Rosebud was supposed to have been given in about 1841. All such matters were dealt with in Sydney and the Public Records office gave me an index of correspondence. As Peninsula pioneers were referred to as late as 1888 in "Victoria and Its Metropolis" as being in the Westernport District, I concentrated on those entries.

Imagine my surprise to find Barker's Mt Alexander Run (near Castlemaine) described as being in the Westernport District! In view of what has been mentioned before, Peter Young's depasturing licences were almost certainly near Seymour.

Still none the wiser,about when Peter left Nairn, I returned to Trove and tried "Nairn, Bulla, Young, 1850-1867".
Argus 18-4-1853 page 12. Peter was offering Nairn for sale by private contract. He had probably only been there for about five years but how much he had accomplished! The advertisement describes the property in great detail, including the waterfall.For the sale of his furniture, library, stock, vehicles and so on, Peter employed prominent auctioneer, Dalmahoy Campbell (much discussed by Harry Peck in his "Memoirs of a Stockman.) (See Argus 20-5-1853 page 9.)

Argus 4-6-1853 page 8, column 1. Peter offered an incredible variety of grape vine cuttings for sale.

What does Peter Young have to do with the price of fish?

I have a theory that Peter Young influenced Hay Lonie's move to the Kilmore area and may have even been the land agent who handled the sale of Bourke's "Golden Vein" to Hay. Young would have been familiar with the Kilmore area, from very early days as he would pass through it on the way from Sunday Creek to Melbourne. As we all do,he'd return nostagically to his former haunt and perhaps visit relatives at Kilmore; James Young of Tabilk might have been a son (both having agricultural links with Tasmania.) With the eye of an expert agriculturalist and land agent,Peter may have noted the decrepit state of the "Golden Vein" and its potential as a dairy farm, and told Hay while making a nostalgic visit to Nairn at Bulla.

Hay Lonie's "Lochton" was 5a, Bulla, south of "Airey's" (through which Wildwood Rd zig-zags its way almost down to Deep Creek from the St John's Rd junction and which became part of David Patullo's "Craigbank estate)and Hay would have passed Lochton to reach Nairn, which he may have been leasing to McIntosh at the time, (7b-Melway 384 D-E11 and south half E10, and section 8-between St Johns and Oaklands Rds, 384 F-J, part 9-12.)

Born in Cupar, Fife, Scotland on 22 Nov 1842 to Andrew Lonie and Mary Fife. Hay married Jane McGregor and had 4 children. He passed away on 1892 in Melbourne East.
Family Members
Parents: Andrew Lonie 1804-1873; Mary Fife 1809-1877. Spouse(s) Jane McGregor
Children: Barbara Lonie 1865-1884; Mary Fife Lonie 1869-?; Andrew McGregor Lonie 1874-?;
Jean Elizabeth Lonie 1883-?
( Hay Lonie - Profiles and Historical Records -‎)

Hay was a brother of Henry Fife Lonie, one of whose children was William Hay Lonie. Good photos of W.H.Lonie and Henry's wife in:
William Hay Lonie - Profiles and Historical Records -‎

Given Names Hay
Surname / Family Name LONIE
Gender Male
Birth Date 22 NOV 1842
Birth Place Cupar, Fife, Scotland
Death Date 1892
Death Place Melbourne, Victoria, AUSTRALIA

Name at Birth: Hay LONIE
Birth: 22 NOV 1842 - Cupar, Fife, Scotland
Census: 1851 - Cupar, Fife, Scotland
Departure: 1854 - Liverpool, Lancashire, England
Arrival: Aboard the "Black Eagle". 19 OCT 1854 - Melbourne, Victoria, AUSTRALIA
Death: 1892 - Melbourne, Victoria, AUSTRALIA
Gender: Male

As the text in the following item has been corrected, obviously by a family historian, I do not wish to interfere with sales of the book that must be underway. Hay put 313 acres at Kilmore into the name of Henry's wife, Jane (Hay's sister-in-law),to avoid paying tax. The McGregors are mentioned.
(Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 11 October 1883 Edition: MORNING. p 3 Article)

Henry Lonie's wife was Jemima (nee Hall.) Hay had put the 313 acres into the name of his own wife,Jane (nee McGregor.) Henry obviously leased his farm at Kilmore to his cheese-making in-laws until he moved north.The text has not been corrected so I will post the following.

Sir,-In your issue of the 11th inst. you gave a report in re Land Tax case wherein there appears to be a slight error in having used the name of "Henry" instead of "Hay." It should have been "Jane Lonie wife of Hay Lonie" not of "Henry Lonie," and the mistake is attributable to a clerical error for which you are not accountable.-.You will greatly oblige Mr Hay Lonie and myself by kindly giving this publication.
Yours faithfully, ALEX. GRANT.59 Temple Court, Melbourne, 23rd October, 1883.
(P.3,Kilmore Free Press, 25-10-1883.)

Family Notices
Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 23 October 1884 Edition: MORNING. p 2 Family Notices
... DEATH. LONIE.-On the 19th instant, suddenly, Barbara, daughter of Mr Hay Lonie, Valley field, aged 19 years.

The following won't be found online apart from here. It comes from a general rundown on Tullamarine and surrounds circa 1860 on page 11 of my TULLAMARINE BEFORE THE JETPORT (1998.) The source for this excerpt has to be the Broadmeadows rate book of 1863.

Hay Lonie is renting land at Campbellfield with Brunton (possibly the flour miller and later owner of Roxburgh Park.) Not long after,he buys Camp Hill (16 B2) and Lochton (177 C4) to conduct his dairying.

Hay might have had outlets for his milk in Fitzroy and Hotham (North Melbourne.)
J ANTED, a good MILKER and DRIVER Apply Lonie s dalry, opposite Fltzroj Market.(P.1, Argus, 24-10-1867.)

If you think the digitisation above is bad, try this.
I've corrected the relevant bits. (REMEMBER TO SEARCH THORNGROVE)

TUESDAf, MARCH iiHi} esend. Agricultural inil Grazing Fjrni, ATill ff ill Rook, fronting the Old Sydney road *,Between Broadmeadows and Campbellfield 305 Acres Tlrat-elosa Land In tho Trust Estafo ofltho late Mr James Hearn.
M3 ROBERT BYRNE** ia favoured with Instruc. tiona to SELL bj AUCTION, ut his rooina, 2S Collins street east, on Tjesda}, March 24, at twelveo clock noon precise!}, {
That well known dairy and agricultural farm, adjoining Campbellfield, being Allotment B of Section 15 parish of Will Will Rook, containing 305.5 acres lately occupied by H Lonie, Esq.
(P.2, Argus, 16-3-1868.)

*The original Sydney Rd passed the Young Queen Inn at Melway 16 H9,near Bass St,turning left at 6 G9, veering right onto Johnstone (sic) St at 6 C8 (to avoid the creek) and left into Raleigh St, turning right again up the Ardlie St hill and then it was follow your nose (Mickleham Rd)to Wallan. The road is still called Old Sydney Rd north of Donnybrook Rd. This roundabout and very hilly route was necessary because of the Sydney road track being extremely boggy in wet weather. Later Pascoe Vale Road was made to the line of Somerton Rd, which was made toward Sydney Rd between Thorngrove and Cameron's Stony Fields/Roxburgh Park,with travellers possibly veering north east through the middle of the township where the Cliffords and Kernans were pioneers (Cliffords Rd.) Another route was along High St or Plenty Rd which also joined the Sydney road (and the road to the McIvor Diggings) near Wallan. When the direct route was made, the Young Queen and Broadmeadows Township went into limbo and a new Young Queen was built at Coburg.(Melway touring map 510 A10.)

**James Hearn owned much land at Mt Martha, as did Robert Byrne.

Messrs. Campbell and Sons, Kirk's Bazaar, report having sold, on account of Messrs. W. C. Hearn andThomas Wragge, trustees in the estate of the late James Hearn, their farm, situate at Somerton, and known as the Thorngrove Farm, and containing 338 acres. Mr. John Hearn was the purchaser, at a satisfactory price.
(P.5,Argus, 18-2-1892.)

I thought I knew the location of the farm on which Hay Lonie had been dairying prior to the 1868 advertisement. Big Clarke died at Roseneath in Woodland St, the residence of James Hearn, whom Lenore Frost said (in her book about Essendon's historic houses), was his son-in-law. Having done extensive research about the farms on Somerton Rd, I presumed Hay had been on Thorngrove (Melway 179 G-J9-11) but that was 4J of the parish of Yuroke and consisted of 338 acres.

The Will Will Rook map is also available online and it shows the 305 acres 2 roods 22 perches, 15B, Will Will Rook, described in the 1868 advertisement. Like Thorngrove,it had been granted to W.J.T. (Big) Clarke.

Crown allotment 15B, Will Will Rook, is indicated by Melway - I apologise for the delay. Before I could transpose this on my Melway, I had to plot the Yuroke/Will Will Rook boundary on maps 178,179, 6 and 7. As there is no road along the boundary,I had to start at Swain St (198 H12) and continue east through Dench's Lane
178 J-K12)so that my line met Merri Creek at exactly the same place as shown on the parish map,which it did. The parish boundary meets Merri Creek at the point where the Hume Freeway crosses the creek,which is also the north west corner of the Lalor Golf Course. (If you manage to transpose parish and crown allotment boundaries properly, there are always indications that you are right.)

The parish boundary is also the northern boundary of 15B, Will Will Rook. The corner of Berringa Court (6 J1) is at the north east corner and the boundary passes through the Kyabram St/Flynn Crescent corner ending at the top of 7 C2, 40 metres west of the Upfield railway line.

The southern boundary of 15B is Barry Rd,named after the pioneering family that lived on "Glenbarry".
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 24 April 1856 p 4 Family Notices
Campbellfield, Mr. William Barry, aged fifty-six years etc.
Garrett Barry married an Angel!

The western boundary of the 305.3875 acres is the original course of Pascoe Vale Rd,just west of the railway and the Barry Rd railway bridge. The eastern boundary is indicated by the line of King St (as it crosses Barry Rd) continued to meet (not quite) the Upfield line; if continued it would meet the western boundary of the Ford land just over the railway line (one of those welcome confirmations of accuracy I was talking about.)


In THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO, written by Peter Wilson (descendant of Walter Burnham), the late Ray Cairns (then a spring chicken in his seventies) thanked Peter for putting his (Ray's) information into a readable form and expressed the wish that somebody would expand the information contained in the book.

Family tree circles has enabled me to sort out the different White families on the southern peninsula (and Blooming/Bullocky Bob White of Red Hill, due to help from descendants of the lime burning Irish family and the Rosebud/ Red Hill family and help toolaroo write his book about the latter (which is connected to the Cairns family of Clackmannan in Scotland.) I have been also able to bring together family historians who were able to ease the work load and expand what they knew by sharing their knowledge.

Well, Ray's wish has been granted by Cameron Cairns. I hope somebody else is also researching the Cairns family and that person and Cameron can team up to not only expand what each has achieved but also solve those puzzles and dead ends which so often crop up. If this somebody is you,can you private message me with your email address and I will pass it on to Cameron. (P.S. We've already had a lengthy phone chat.) I apologise to Cameron for not reacting re his desire to discover a fellow Cairns researcher earlier; see bold type in the email.

Hi Ray,

Thanks for your reply.

I have spent today covering most of your journal entries which include references to the Cairns family in Boneo. Your work to date is very impressive, especially the rates and valuations. I recently obtained/downloaded the electronic copies of several of the parish maps available through the State Library of Victoria website

I have Peter Wilson and Ray Cairns' booklet (my second copy). I have been building on that book using the electronic records that would not have been previously available as a means to cross reference and expand the previous work. I have also managed to find a few elderly distant relatives who have been good enough to meet with me and in some cases provide me with copies of some valuable photos (including one of Mary Drysdale, Robert snr's wife, and another with 5 of Robert and Mary's oldest sons)

I grew up in Blairgowrie but now live in Brunswick. I still have family in Blairgowrie and Rye and will probably be down again in the next couple of months, if so it would be good to catch up to exchange notes if possible? Apart from that perhaps I could give you a call sometime in the next week if there was a suitable time and day for you? I would be interested to contact anyone you may know on the Peninsula who is currently researching Cairns family history.

I think I can help you with you the following post: "THE HALF BROTHERS OF THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO: "LYNDFIELD" IN THE PARISH OF LYNDHURST, VIC., AUST" The half brothers and the second marriage in Scotland is something I have been trying to crack which has been a little frustrating to say the least.

Look forward to keeping in touch


Cameron Cairns