itellya on Family Tree Circles

sort: Date Alphabetical
view: full | list

Journals and Posts


janilye, Neil Mansfield and John Shorten deserve an ORDER OF AUSTRALIA award!

Family historians are the salt of the earth. They are always ready to help each other out and much of the information in my local history has come from them with great enthusiasm. However some go way beyond the call of duty! janilye typifies that breed. She showed me how to save countless hours and seems to spend half her life clarifying confusion for other researchers.

Neil Mansfield wrote the incredible THE DAVID MANSFIELD STORY, produced detailed records of Bulla Cemetery and volunteered to improve the graphics in some of my histories.

John Shorten is more of a local historian but scanned the first (handwritten) 2500 pages of my DICTIONARY HISTORY OF TULLAMARINE which was produced to give family historians detailed information about their ancestors. Both Neil and I have been supplied with files by John, who helped Neil with the Bulla Cemetery records.

You might want to nominate others and explain why. How about it, Australian members of family Tree Circles. Too many awards for history go to ego -trippers; it's about time these fantastic people quietly working behind the scenes were recognised.

5 comment(s), latest 12 months ago

JIMMY AND TED WILLIAMS OF EASTBOURNE, ROSEBUD (VIC., AUST.) DID DIE ON SUCCESSIVE DAYS.

As you enter the Rye Cemetery from Lyons St there is a group of old graves about 20 metres ahead on the left of the path. If I remember correctly, three of them relate to the Stenniken family, the first their daughter, Mrs Kennedy (Sarah?) I think the next grave after those three is that of James Campbell Williams*. His sister,Carrie,is either buried in the same grave or the next one. However,there is no mention of their brother, Ted Williams (Edward junior.)The Rye Cemetery Index in the local history room of the Rosebud Library has no mention of Ted either but that is probably because it was compiled from grave inscriptions. The late Ray Cairns told me that Jimmy and his brother died a day apart and cleared up my confusion about Ned Williams. Jimmy's father was Ned and Jimmy's brother was called Ted. So the father was the one who moved the lighthouse to the top of Arthurs Seat and dug the Chinamans Creek canal.

(*James was known as Jimmy the Squid. He collected fishermen's catches which were left on the roadside and transported them to the Mornington Railhead,starting his run from Rosebud West. Isobel Moresby* mentioned that Chinese fishermen used to sell squid on the site of the tennis court (the playground in front of the historic kindergarten.) Perhaps their unsold squid catch was sent to Melbourne or other fishermen were catching squid too. (* ROSEBUD: FLOWER OF THE PENINSULA.)

If Jimmy and Ted died a day apart why was Ted not mentioned on the gravestone? At the age of 100 years and 10 days,Ray Cairns' memory was sensational but every now and then he wasn't certain, and he insisted on being certain as Peter Wilson stated in THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO. He was slightly confused about Carrie and Marion and as I didn't want to distress him,we moved onto other subjects. I spent weeks trying in vain to find confirmation of Jimmy and Ted dying on consecutive days.Now,about two years later,I found it while looking for
"Campbell, Rosebud" re the house near the Rosebud jetty that will have to be demolished for the construction of the much-opposed apartment/cafe; a descendant of George Fountain told me at the Dromana Museum last Sunday (19-1-2014) that a grandson of Melbourne's Lord Mayor,Edward Campbell had built the house.

HERE'S THE CONFIRMATION.
WILLIAMS. - On September 10, at EastBourne, Rosebud West, James Campbell, son of the late Edward and Mary Williams,beloved brother of Edward (died September9, 1947). Caroline, Ellen (Mrs. Connop, de-
ceased), Marion (Mrs. Edmonds, deceased) aged 89 years. -At rest. (P.9, Argus, 11-9-1947.)


EASTBOURNE was the name that Sidney Smith Crispo of the Victorian Coastal Survey gave to his grants at Rosebud West, crown allotments 52 and 44 Wannaeue, bounded on the west by Elizabeth Ave and on the south by Hiscock Rd. The Village Glen now occupies most of the land east of Chinamans Creek except the part of crown allotment 44 south of the freeway reservation. Recently (early 2013?), the Friends of the Tootgarook Swamp opposed filling of the swamp in the St Elmos Close area to extend the village and the gang of six on the council tried to sue Cameron Brown who led the protest.

Edward Williams Snr. came from Sydney in 1855 on a ship whose purpose was to survey Port Phillip Bay. The Burrells of Arthurs Seat must have invited the officers to some hospitality and Ned,as he was usually called, probably helped to row them ashore as he obviously enjoyed hospitality with the servants.

One of the servants was Mary Campbell who'd come out with her guardian, Robert Cairns and his wife,Mary (nee Drysdale) in 1852,probably acting as a nanny for the Cairns children. Edward Williams married Mary Campbell. Mary's maiden name was used as Jimmy the Squid's second given name. Young Edward was known as Ted, according to the late Ray Cairns.

Ned was amazingly strong and according to Colin McLear in A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA was a harvester of renown who could scythe an acre of crop in one day and,with Bob White, moved the first wooden lighthouse at today's McCrae to the summit of Arthurs Seat when the present metal lighthouse had been constructed. From 1863, he acted at caretaker of Crispo's grants between Canterbury Jetty Rd and St Johns Rd, Blairgowrie*, until he settled on his own grants straddling Browns Rd just east of Truemans Rd. Ned owned a butchers shop on Butchers Hill at Sorrento which was later sold to George White (of Irish descent and unrelated to the aforementioned Bob White, who like the Cairns family came from the Clackmannan district of Scotland) from whom George St, Sorrento probably got its name. Ned's sons were put in charge of the shop but obviously preferred outdoor life.
(*See my journal THERE WOULD BE NO SORRENTO WITHOUT SIDNEY SMITH CRISPO.)


I had presumed Ned Williams' transfer of his butchering operation from Sorrento to Rosebud was due to increased competition in Coppin's town but it was more likely that the 1890's depression was the cause. It would be interesting to study the Sorrento real estate activity in that decade. As with the 1843 depression, the battlers were affected and many peninsula farmers were forced to desert their farms in the 1890's. However, in both crashes the moneyed classes suffered the greatest losses.Shopkeepers in Sorrento,like in most coastal towns today, made their profits during the tourist season and just kept their heads above water during the rest of the year. If the owners of the clifftop mansions at Sorrento (the bulk of houses mentioned in the Shire of Flinders Heritage Study) were approaching insolvency, the shopkeepers,publicans and guesthouses would also go to the wall.

It has not* been established whether Edward Thomas Williams was Ned or Ted but in any case the butcher shop was certainly lost. (*IT HAS NOW;SEE DEATH NOTICES AT END!) It was probably the assignee who sold it to George White.

COMPULSORY SEQUESTRATIONS. |
Mr. Justice A'Beckett yesterday in the Supreme Court compulsorily sequestrated the estates of-lolm Henry Werner, ol' Rooky Lead, storekeeper, on the application of Mr. Vasey.
Edward Thomas Williams, of Sorrento,butcher, on the application of Mr. Wasley.

I have seen no record of a butchers shop at Rosebud at that time so Edward probably supplied customers from a cutting cart. Crispo died in 1899 at Edward Williams' residence, Eastbourne,so I believe Edward was leasing the property or had received a certificate ending his insolvency, and Crispo, apparently a bachelor,had left the estate to his mate, Ned, or sold it to him on easy terms. Whichever,Ned was able to build the heritage-listed house at 17 William Crescent about half a decade later.

While trying to find a heritage citation for Ned's new Eastbourne homestead, I came across Mike Hast's article about the opening of the Rosebud West Community hub. The summary mentioned William Rd, Blairgowrie so in view of the Crispo/Ned mateship, I checked its location. Sure enough the straight part was one of the main streets of Crispo's village of Manners Sutton (later Canterbury, both names coming from the Governor, Sir John Manners-Sutton who became Viscount Canterbury during his term of office.) So that makes some council officer guilty of TWO acts of historical vandalism! The shire must have resolved to remove the s from the end of street names where it had served a possessive function ('s) and Williams'(Cres., Rd.) from which the apostrophe had been dropped over time became William! It's a pity the know all (who crossed out the s where Peter Wilson, in THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO, had described Ned's house as being at 17 WILLIAMS CRESCENT, didn't ask the council why there was no s at the end of the street name.

NED WILLIAMS' PROPERTIES ON BROWNS RD.
In 1900, Ned's Browns Rd properties were occupied by Edward Connop and in 1910 by John and Marion Edwards of Eastbourne, Dromana. The 1910 assessment is an example of the the reason Cr Terry resigned from council. The shire was nearly broke from the lingering effects of the 1890's depression and Terry was demanding that properties be properly described so that it was clear who owed rates etc. It is unclear whether John and Marion were residing in a house in Dromana named after the Rosebud West farm,but their surname wasn't Edwards, it was Edmonds.

Ned Williams' daughter, Marion,had apparently married Ned Edmonds and one of their daughters had married James Woonton (according to the late Ray Cairns who added that James did road maintenance for the shire.)

In 1919,James had just started leasing the Eagle Ridge site, and the triangular 27A of 20 acres adjoining it on the west,from Ned Edmonds of Boneo. Marion Edmonds was assessed on "94 acres 39A" which John Edwards (sic) had occupied in 1910.
(No wonder Cr Terry was furious! It was 39B of 93 acres 2 roods and 8 perches, and 39A fronting Truemans Rd, consisted of a bit over 83 acres.)

EASTBOURNE.
In 1900,Edward Williams was leasing 69 acres of Eastbourne (crown allotment 52) from Crispo. (The rate collector obviously didn't read the death notices.) He apparently owned 170 acres in crown allotments 52 and 44. As c/a 52 in the high and dry area consisted of 141 acres,Ned was not occupying 43 acres of c/a 44 near the swamp.(Probably the land that Alex Crichton added to the Lovie grants.)

Ned was also assessed on the 20 acres of 27A Wannaeue (Melway 169 west half F12 and south east half E12.) The other Browns Rd grants were 27 B (Eagle Ridge Golf Club to bottom of diagonal western boundary* in Melway 252 G1) and c/a 39B (Melway 169 F11 part 10,part E 10,11.)
(*The western border of 27B went due south from the north west corner of Eagle Ridge.)

In 1910,Caroline Williams (Carrie) was assessed on 69 acres in 52 Wannaeue (near Eastbourne Rd),her address,like the Edmonds, being given as Eastbourne, Dromana. She was also assessed on 162 acres in 7A Wannaeue, east of the southern, swampy half of Eastbourne (Melway 169 K6 to Hiscock Rd, adjoining the Eastbourne Primary School site, and fronting Boneo Rd south of a point opposite the Branson St corner.) Alex Crichton of the Glen Lee family had bought part of crown allotment 44 and sold this with John Lovie's grants between Ned's 39B and Eastbourne to Louis Jensen of Blackburn. Alex, who'd been assessed on Lovie's grants for many decades,had moved to Cockatoo.

In 1919 James C.Williams had crown allotment 7 (see Carrie in 1910) and Ted* had 190 acres and buildings part c/a 44 and crown allotment 52. The William Crescent house was of course on c/a 52. Caroline was leasing 69 acres,pt.c/a 44. (* As Ned was 83, I presume that Edward meant Ted.)

CRISPO.On the 13th October, at the residence of Mr. Edward Williams, Eastbourne, Rye, Sidney Smith Crispo, late secretary and paymaster, Admiralty Survey, Victoria, aged 71. Buried at Rosebud????? Cemetery.
(The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 18 October 1899 p 1 Family Notices)

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 22 April 1915 p 1 Family Notices
...bsp; affectionate family.) WILLIAMS - In sad and loving memory of my dear wife, and our loving mother, Mary Williams, who died at "Eastbourne," Rosebud, on the 21st April, 1914.

WILLIAMS. On the 12th November, at his residence, Eastbourne, Rosebud, Edward, loved father of Edward, James, Caroline, Ellen (Mrs.Connop), Marion (Mrs. Edmonds, deceased), aged 90 years.
(P.17, Argus, 13-11-1926.)

Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 10 September 1947 p 11 Family Notices
... Eastbourne. Rosebud West, Edward Thomas son of the late Edward and Mary Williams, be- loved brother
(Ted was the Edward Thomas Williams who was insolvent.)

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 30 April 1949 p 15 Family Notices
... - On April 29, at Dro- mana Community Hospital, Caroline, of Eastbourne, Rosebud West, eldest daughter ..

[PDF]
March 2013 - The Village Glen, Rosebud
www.villageglen.com.au/webdata/webpages/13/130.pdf‎

March 2013,Issue No 384, Eastbourne by Bergliot Dallas.

The following extract from the VILLAGE GLEN NEWS contains some mistakes but adds some important information, such as Ned making the road around Anthony's Nose in 1866 which I'd forgotten to mention. I'll have to check whether 19 William Crescent could be the original Eastbourne homestead in which Crispo died. There is no rate book evidence that Ned Williams occupied Eastbourne from the 1860's; this might be confusion caused by the author being unaware of Manners-Sutton at Blairgowrie. Bergliot seems to be unaware that there had been two homesteads on Eastbourne, the second, circa 1904 involving Croad and Morse,built for Ned. Probably not having consulted rate books and parish maps, Bergliot assumed that Eastbourne and the Browns Rd. properties adjoined when they were separated by John Lovie's grants,owned from early times by Alex Crichton.There is ample evidence (letters to the editor) that Crispo lived at Eastbourne, which was at times described as being at Rye,the name of Rosebud West not then being used.

Eastbourne Bergliot Dallas
How many of us here at the Village Glen are aware of the existence of Eastbourne, the historic
farmhouse located close by at 19 William Street. It was built between 1885 and 1890, when the
property comprised almost 200 acres and stretched from Eastbourne Road to Browns Road,
roughly between Balaka Street and Elizabeth Avenue.
Edward Williams came from Sydney in about 1860, and was a member of the crew of HMVS, the
Survey Ship Victoria. He was later described variously as a contractor, farmer, butcher and
yeoman! On the Victoria he met Sidney Smith Crispo, the paymaster who lived at Canterbury
Jetty, Rye. He owned the property that Williams and his family occupied from 1864, but never
lived there, and the sale to Williams was only finally concluded in 1899, three weeks prior to
Crispos death from influenza.
Mary Campbell migrated from Stirling, Scotland, in 1852 on the Europa with one of the Cairns
families as a nursemaid for their children. On the Mornington Peninsula, she was employed by
the Burrells at what had been the McCrae homestead. During this time, she met and married
Edward Williams, who was fourteen years her junior. They had five children.
The house is built of local limestone, with exterior walls about 60cm thick. This keeps the
temperature inside quite even, neither cold in winter nor hot in summer. W J Croad was
contracted as the builder and George Morce did the stone work. There are numerous examples
of the work of both these Sorrento men in Portsea, Sorrento and Rye, but the house is certainly
unique in the Rosebud/Tootgarook, area and was named in the Shire of Flinders Heritage Study
inventory as a house of local significance.
Edward Williams contributed quite significantly to the settlement and history of the area. He cut
the road around Anthonys Nose next to the beach, and undertook the contract to drain the
Tootgarook Swamp (as well as most of his pasture), creating Chinamans Creek, so named
because a man called Wong-Shing leased the land on the eastern bank of the creek and used
it as a market garden for many years around the early 1900s. In Sorrento, opposite the Park,
the butchers shop of Williams and Son (Edward and his son, Edward Jnr) traded for many years,
and animals from Eastbourne were slaughtered on the site then known as
Butchers Hill, on the corner of Hotham Road and George Street.
The old dairy, which was at one time the Eastbourne Butter Factory, can still be seen
beside the house. One of the daughters, Caroline (known as Carrie), is remembered
as always wearing a black dress, white bonnet and apron, selling eggs and butter.
She died aged 90 in 1949, a spinster. Edward and Mary and their children are buried in the Rye Cemetery.

Just in conclusion, Eastbourne might have become part of Federanium, the capital city of Australia if Crispo's plan had been adopted. See:
BONEO AND FINGAL IN 1902, MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC ...
www.familytreecircles.com/boneo-and-fingal-in-1902-mornington-peni...‎
Jun 4, 2013 - 'Federanium.' The streets a mile and two miles long. S: 8. CRISPO ... BONEO. Mornington Standard (Vic. : 1889 - 1908) Thursday 17 May 1894 .

JOHN BATMAN'S DESCENDANTS, and the grave at Toolern Vale, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

It's amazing what you find when looking for something else.

You Yangs wrote that a daughter of John Batman had been buried on the Dennistoun pre-emptive right, Green Hills in the parish of Yangardook near Toolern Vale.I found this while checking the correct spelling of Dennistoun which was rendered as Dennistown on another copy of the map. Maybe true, maybe rumour, but I pasted the article in comments under my DICTIONARY HISTORY OF BULLA journal, just in case.

Not long after, I was reading Isaac Batey's memoirs of Sunbury district pioneers,just for fun. Isaac,unlike most historians, wrote about the little people as well as the big-wigs, and this article was about people who had worked for squatters. He mentioned that the Collyer brothers who had managed Green Hills had both married daughters of John Batman. On a scale of 1 to 10, the credibility of the claim about the grave near Toolern Vale had risen to about 9.99. No written history is going to be free of errors, sometimes because of incorrect assumptions (which in scientific method can be discovered fairly soon through experimentation), sometimes through quirks of memory, sometimes through accepting folklore as fact. In hundreds of hours spent reading Isaac's amazing articles,I have spotted only one error. He called the Lady of the Lake Hotel at Tullamarine the Lady of the Lady. Unfortunately this mistake was repeated in the Tullamarine Methodist Church centenary souvenir of 1970.That is the only reason that the credibility score did not rise to 10.

The following confirms his claim about the Collyer lads marrying John Batman's daughters. And what of Batman's sons? No children,they did not move to Gotham City! Read the article.

JOHN BATMAN. DESCENDANTS OF THE FOUNDER. UNPUBLISHED MEMORANDA.
The Broadford Courier and Reedy Creek Times (Broadford, Vic. : 1893 - 1916) Friday 17 April 1903 p 5 Article.

5 comment(s), latest 9 months ago

JOHN COUPAR ROBERTSON, TENT, GOWRIE PARK (CAMPBELLFIELD) AND COBURG (VIC., AUST.) AND HIS WIFE.

MRS. KATE ROBERTSON
Mrs Kate Robertson widow of the late Mr John Coupar Robertson formerly of Gowrie Park Campbellfield who died at her home in Coburg on January 3 had a long association with the Coburg and Campbellfield districts. Arriving in Australia from Enniskillen, Fermanagh, Ireland in 1875 as Miss Kate Kirkland, she was for some years organist of the first Coburg Presbyterian Church and at the time of her death was the oldest living member of the congregation. (P.5, Argus,7-1-1941.)

From my DICTIONARY HISTORY OF TULLAMARINE AND MILES AROUND,page G.19.
James and Ann Robertson had eight children; their son, John C.Robertson was born in a tent in 1845. The sons of Alexander Gibb and James Robertson experienced contrasting levels of prosperity. Alexander Coupar Gibb received a 2000 pound deposit during the land boom (circa 1890) but John Coupar Robertson struggled financially and was employed at Pentridge before becoming a coke merchant in Albert St.,Melbourne. (Deidre Farfor's genealogical and biographical notes.)

ROBERTSON. -On the 4th November at "Athol," Kendall street, Coburg, John Coupar, dearly loved husband of Kate Robertson, eldest son of the late James Robertson, of "Gowrie Park," Campbellfield, in his 79th year. (Interred privately Coburg Cemetery, Monday, November 5.) P.1, Argus,6-11-1923.

John Coupar Robertson
Found 10 Records, 10 Photos and 2,852,755 Family Trees
Born in Campbellfield, Victoria, Australia on 1845 to Ann Coupar. John Coupar married Kate Kirkland and had 6* children. He passed away on 1923.
Family Members Parents Unavailable Ann Coupar 1814-1872
Spouse(s) Kate Kirkland 1855-1940
Children:
James Archibald Robertson 1878-Unknown
John Kirkland Robertson 1880-Unknown
Alfred Ernest Robertson 1881-Unknown
Douglas Errol Robertson 1884-Unknown
Amy Caroline Robertson 1886-Unknown
Kate Kirkland Robertson 1887-1973

*As I have already found a notice about their THIRD DAUGHTER (Muriel, see below)and only two daughters are listed above, I believe that Deidre Farfor (who supplied her information to me about a quarter of a century ago) was right about 8 children.

ROBERTSON. In loving memory of Muriel Jessie, the dearly beloved third daughter of
Kate and the late John Coupar Robertson, who passed away on 22nd of February, 1924.
And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes, and there shall be no more death,
neither sorrow, nor crying; neither shall there be any more pain.
(Inserted by her loving mother and family, Athol, Coburg.) P.1, Argus, 24-2-1925.

JOHN KERNAN AND GOSSIP ABOUT EARLY PUBLICANS INVOLVED IN MY JOURNALS, VIC., AUST.

John Kernan started leasing Merai Farm in 1856. Had he just arrived, and, if not, what was he doing previously?

PUBLICANS' LICENSES - The following is a list of the applications filed for publicans' licenses for the City of Melbourne and County of Bourke;
John Cosgrave, King-street ; Robert frost, Flinders -streut ; Thomns Moiinhan, Sw auston-street ;


Count or Bourke.--Vi. M. Atkinson, South Yarra ; "John. Brien, Will Will .Rook (Broadmeadows)'; Waller Butler, Williams Town ; Edward Bishop, PuscoeViilc; I. Donohoe, Deep Creek ; John Kernan,junction of the Mount Macedon and Kielor roads; C McDougall, Kalkallo James Mitchell, Keilor; John Mill, Mornington; JurneB Mooney,Brighton; D. W.t CNial, Springs; William liOdrgO BtllllWBY,'iiruiiFii.n t;,."""". -?"'."-I'son,1 Darebin Creek ; George Vutgo, Somerton ;Sarah Wulle, Pentridge.
(The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 1 April 1851 p 2 Article)

COMMENTS.
Only three publicans in Melbourne have been included, for reasons given below. Most in the county of Bourke have been deleted before John Kernan but following entries have been left intact so that his entry can be easily located near the end of the article.

Digitisation has not been corrected so that you can appreciate finding an article that you can just copy and paste into your family history. That is why I get so frustrated when after finding articles,spending hours correcting the text and linking them with comments,I cannot submit the fruits of my labour.

John Kernan's hotel would have probably been on the site of the Moonee Ponds Town Hall*. I think Grant Aldous mentioned a hotel having previously on that site in THE STOPOVER THAT STAYED. It couldn't have been on the site of today's Moonee Ponds Tavern because Robert Shankland built the original section of Dean's Hotel in 1852, according to his biography in VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS.

John Kernan had earlier applied for a licence for a hotel in Melbourne but been refused.
John Kernan, Block Bull Hotel, Melbourne,refused, on the petition of the inhabitants of the locality, the house not being required.(P.2, Argus, 15-4-1850.)

*It is highly unlikely that the road junction was the Bulla/Keilor Rd. corner at North Essendon because Tulip Wright's Lincolnshire Hotel would have been in the process of construction in 1851. There is not one mention of the hotel in 1851 in the Argus and Tulip would have given the hotel this name from its opening, being a native of Lincolnshire. In 1852, Tulip, obviously the first licensee, transferred the licence to Edward Wilson.

Three roads were often called Mt Macedon road at the time: the road to Sydney past the Young Queen (i.e.Pascoe Vale Rd, Postlethwaite's address for his large estate near Broadmeadows Township in 1850); the road to Deep Creek (early address for Colonel Kenny's Camp Hill at Tullamarine); and the road to Keilor(whose main street was Macedon St.)


JOHN KERNAN.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 27 January 1853 p 4 Family Notices
... instant, at the Clarendon Hotel, Collins-street, Melbourne, William Postlethwaite, Esq., of Glenroy, fourth son of John Postlethwaite, of llroad Broad- stonce, Dalton, Lancashire, aged 33 years.

The above is half of the proof that Pascoe Vale Rd. was called Mt Macedon road. I saw the other half in a copy of an electoral roll included in a Keilor Historical Society newsletter by Chris Laskowski in the 1990's. It read ? Postlethwaite, (Mt?)Macedon road, Glenroy. The question marks indicate details not clear in my memory but I am absolutely certain about the rest. I have searched the 1849 list of electors in the Port Phillip and Postlethwaite's name is not on it, but that was probably a preliminary list so that electors could check if they were included.(P.4, Argus, 3-7-1849.)

Pascoe Vale road was called "the road to the Young Queen" in a map found on a sketch of title and the bridge at Pascoe Vale was built in 1843. It was not a government road used as a boundary for crown allotments but a track, forged by early squatters seeking pasture, which passed through crown allotments in Doutta Galla north of Woodlands St, Fawkner's grant at Pascoeville in Jika Jika and the Glenroy Estate in Will Will Rook.

Morelands natural landform and the way it was mapped and organised for subdivision also set a pattern for how its roads and transport routes would emerge and develop in the municipality. Brunswicks parish land was divided into relatively narrow strips on either side of Sydney Road. Many of its thoroughfares subsequently evolved from lanes that ran along the boundaries of larger allotments, giving Brunswick the tight grid of streets that characterise its urban setting today. The north-south road that became Sydney Road was the one public road that surveyor Robert Hoddle reserved when he surveyed the northern part of the (JIKA JIKA)parish. It acted as a boundary between the elongated east and west allotments thus providing these properties with access to a central road. Its northerly route took it to the village of Pentridge, but the narrow dimensions of the road would suggest that it was merely intended as an agricultural road for servicing farming allotments, not the major axial thoroughfare it is today.

By contrast, the route of Pascoe Vale Road developed from a track that followed the natural contours of the
landscape. Unlike Sydney Road, it did not begin as a route to service the needs of an emerging settlement.
Rather, explorers and squatters initially used it as a means to investigate Melbournes hinterland and claim
pasture as well as a route to herd sheep and cattle. Their journey would have followed the path well trod by the first inhabitants, the Wurundjeri-willam clan of the Woiworung Aboriginal group.

The Moonee Ponds Creek was named after a Woiworung Ngurungaeta, Mooney Mooney. Little is known of him except that he was blind in one eye and was also acquitted of sheep stealing on the Werribee River in 1838. He died in February 1840, aged sixty-six.63

The Flemington Bridge crossing began as a ford and in 1839 was upgraded to a log bridge, the first vehicular
bridge in Melbourne. It was built to facilitate the significant loads of stone being brought in to build Melbournes churches and other public buildings such as the Russell Street gaol and the new treasury.71 The bridge provided a direct route along Mt Alexander Road, which deviated at Holmes Road into Pascoe Vale Road. The route crossed Moonee Ponds Creek again near John Pascoe Fawkners village of Pascoeville, in todays Pascoe Vale/Oak Park area. At first the crossing used a ford that was on a circuitous path and was often blocked by subdivisional fences, writes Lay, but pressure of increased usage of the route as a Sydney link led to its replacement by a bridge in 1843, the second bridge in Melbourne.72 The structure was built with government funding as well as funding from the new licensee of the Young Queen Inn, William Smith.
([PDF]THEMATIC HISTORY - Moreland City Council - Victorian Government
www.moreland.vic.gov.au/.../city%20of%20moreland%20thematic%20h...‎)


Pascoe Vale Rd was an early road to Sydney which deviated through Broadmeadows Township (Westmeadows) and up the Ardlie St hill to join the present Mickleham road,which further north is still called Old Sydney Rd. This was a significant detour and as William Smith announced after the Pascoe Vale bridge had been swept away (see below)the road past the Young Queen was being linked to the new Sydney road (i.e. at Somerton.)

AND THAT WAS WHEN THE GENEALOGICAL PUZZLE REGARDING JOHN KERNAN COMMENCED!
John Kernan was still alive and kicking on Merai Farm at Pascovale while John Kernan was running the Somerton Inn and the Somerton family's folklore states that they were not related. Both families were linked by PascoeVale Rd and relationship to the McNamara's. John Kernan Snr of Merai farm married Mary McNamara (title document)and one of Somerton John's sons married a McNamara girl!

Some details of Somerton John are given in the Craigieburn Historical Interest Group's website (place and year of birth, marriage at Coburg)but nothing about his arrival in Australia.

As I could not submit the information gathered about the two Kernan families an email conversation with a descendant of Somerton John about the two families will be posted here if the gremlins allow it.
CONTINUE





THE OTHER PUBLICANS.
JOHN COSGRAVE.
John Cosgrave,supposedly an Alderman (Melbourne or Hotham?) was a pioneer of Kensington and Bulla. Title documents regarding Kensington show that Cosgrave was the council officer and 12 year old Oswald Daniel added the Alderman tag in his history of Bulla.

ALLOTMENT 20.(East of Kensington Rd.)
This was granted to William Highett who came to the Port Phillip District to manage the Union Bank. Highett also received a grant in the parish of Yuroke near Craigieburn Rd.
His land dealings fill many pages of the lands title index; no doubt many were in Highett. The entrance in Dynon Rd between Kensington Rd and the railway bridge is actually Highett St.
Not long afterwards, Highett sold allotment 20 to lawyer, Henry Jennings, after whom Henry St was probably named. In 1854, Jennings subdivided the land, selling the land north east of Derby St in 78 lots. The main buyers were F.J.Coote, William and David Winder, and John Cosgrave. Coote was a partner in Jennings legal firm and Cosgrave was treasurer of the Corporation of Melbourne. William Winder was a brickmaker and David Winder had purchased the land between Stubbs St and the Macaulay Station site in 1849.

The McMeikans bought land from Cosgrave in 1864 and Coote in 1868 to extend their property to Bellair St. In 1863, J.T.Smith bought all of Cosgraves land east of Gower St (sold to Durham in 1879). Smith also bought six of Cosgraves blocks south west of the (Holy Rosary)church site, Robert Wallace buying the other 9 blocks (to Derby St) in 1869.(From my EARLY LANDOWNERS: PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA.)

The section extending from Musgrove's corner to the late Andrew Carroll's was owned by Mr William Wright, who cut it up and sold it about the year 1852, Messrs Musgrove, Johnson, Daniel, Carroll, Tulloch and Waylett were among the original purchasers. Mrs Mary Daniel purchased two blocks of the estate, one of which is still held by her grandson, Mr A. F.Daniel.

The adjoining block she sold to the late John Cosgrove, who was alderman and first treasurer of the City of Melbourne. Mr Cosgrove used to cycle out on a 'bone shaker,' (a term given to a certain make of early cycles) that must have had an earlier history than the famous machine of the late Professor Kernot, and in his trips from North Melbourne to the farm he used to arrive with such an enormous appetite that one of his standing boasts was that he could eat anything that was put before him. On one occasion a crow was prepared, and he was invited to have a meal of crow. After he had finished the meal he remarked : 'Humph ! I can eat crow, but I don't hanker after it.'
Mr Cosgrove afterwards sold to Messrs Hunt and Standen. Mrs T.H. Dean, of Moonee Ponds (a daughter of Mr Standen) next possessed the property; then her son, Melbourne; and it has now become the property of
the Hunt Club. ("Sherwood", Melway 178 C6.)
OSWALD DANIEL. (Age, 12 years 10 months). ((P.2, Sunbury News, 4-6-1910.)

ROBERT FROST.
Robert does not seem to have been running the Bridge Inn at Bulla circa 1860 but a beer there would have been a Frosty one,so there was possibly a family connection.
Advertising
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 17 August 1860 p 1 Advertising
. TO LET, the DEEP CREEK INN, Bulla. Apply to Arthur Frost, Bulla.

The relationship between (Arthur?) and the Bulla Road Board became FROSTY when a payment was asked for the use of a room by the Board.
A meeting was called on 23rd October, 1862, at the Bridge Inn for the purpose of forming a Road Board District.
...After holding two or three meetings at the Bridge Inn Mr Frost wanted to charge the Council for the use of the room and Mr Melville of the Inverness came to the rescue, and allowed the council to have a room free of charge. (Oswald Daniel, as above.)

THOMAS MONAHAN.
I had not known that Thomas Monahan was a publican,but I suspect that he was successful in this occupation. He was able to engage in land speculation in the parish of Kangerong near Dromana and suburban blocks at Rye (parish of Nepean) on the Mornington Peninsula.

JOHN BRYAN.
DEATHS.
BRYAN. On the 16th inst., at his residence, Victoria Hotel, Broadmeadows*, Mr. John Bryan, aged 55
years. (P.4, Argus, 17-6-1859.) Jane Bryan carried on the hotel after John's death.It was destroyed by fire in 1879.

A plaque on the Broadmeadows Hotel refers to the Victoria Hotel having been on the site of the Broady's car park which would be clear enough if there wasn't a car park at each end of the Broady. Luckily an early purchase by J.Bryan shown on the Broadmeadows Township map (the one showing the two ends of Ardlie St joined by the 1854 timber bridge) indicates that the Victoria was a few blocks uphill of the original Broadmeadows Hotel site.

*Broadmeadows Township is north of Forman St and south of Kenny St in present-day Westmeadows. The hotel was described as being in (the parish of)Will Will Rook in 1851 because nobody would have known where Broadmeadows Township was,having only been declared the year before. The Fawkner St part of the township was in the parish of Tullamarine.

EDWARD BISHOP.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 2 March 1853 p 6 Article
... Young Queen, Pascoeville, from Edward Bishop to John William Roberts. Postponed to the 11th In Inst ...
(The Young Queen Inn became a landmark for travellers to Sydney and Pascoe Vale Rd was labelled in a pre-1850 survey as "road to the Young Queen Inn". After the direct route through Pentridge (Coburg) became the NEW ROAD TO SYDNEY, and the bridge at Pascoeville was swept away in about 1850,William Smith launched an extensive advertising campaign to reverse the declining number of travellers using the old route (one of the problems being the steep climb in either direction from the creek at Ardlie St in Broadmeadows Township.) Smith pointed out that a new bridge was being built and that the road now connected with the new Sydney road (probably via Cliffords Rd at Somerton.) He called his hotel the ORIGINAL Young Queen Inn because another hotel of the same name(which later became Father O'Hea's residence if I remember Richard Broome's BETWEEN TWO CREEKS correctly) had been built beside the direct road through Pentridge.

It seems that the campaign didn't work and Smith (son in law of Tulip Wright, according to sources) moved to Bulla and built the bluestone store which was for so long the post office/store of the (William) Bethell family. He would have been delighted that Edward Bishop wanted to run the pub, which was, according to the City of Moreland Thematic Heritage Study Volume 2 on the corner of Pascoe Vale and Main St (Oak Park), but title documents indicate it was near Bass St,just north of the bridge.

(PHILLIP?) DONOHUE.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 16 April 1851 p 2 Article
... Rest, Dandenong Grunted. P. Donohoe, Bridge Inn, Deep Creek.
(William "Tulip" Wright had transferred the licence of his hotel at Bulla to Donohue while he got the Lincolnshire Hotel at North Essendon up and going. Tulip later returned to Bulla and died there.)

DAVID WILLIAM O'NIALL.
David established the LADY OF THE LAKE Hotel at Springs (Tullamarine) in about 1847. He planted a cape broom hedge and his two shy little daughters, Catherine and Minnie, watched in awe through the hedge as Robert O'Hara Burke's expedition straggled past on its way to the second encampment by the Inverness Hotel (near the north end of the north-south runway.) The associated farm, "Broombank" is discussed in my journal (O'NIALL/BEAMAN.) David died young and his widow married Richard Beaman. The hotel burnt down and its land became part of Broombank (leased by John Cock, the late Colin Williams' parents and Ray Loft.)

Ray wanted to buy the property but Catherine and Minnie refused to sell for sentimental reasons and it was not until the death of the two sisters, about three years apart in the early 1930's, that Ray was able to buy the property, which was subdivided in 1952. The Broombank homestead was set back about 70 yards from Bulla Rd,the driveway from the main road becoming Millar Rd, but was derelict so Ray and Maggie lived at 3 Eumarella St on the subdivided 40 acre portion of Tommy Loft's "Dalkeith" west of Broadmeadows Rd. The Loft and Millar families were both associated with the Greenvale and Tullamarine areas so Ray Loft may have met Maggie Millar in either area, Greenvale by about 1920 or Tulla afterwards. Robert Millar occupied the Junction Estate (Northedge, Andlon and Londrew), which adjoined Broombank, before his death in 1912 and his son Alex may have continued there until the Lofts arrived from Greenvale before buying John McKerchar's "Greenvale" which he renamed the Elms. (Sources for this entry would fill an A4 page. Private message me for details.)

GEORGE VINGE.
New Somerton Hotel Page
www.chig.asn.au/new_somerton_hotel_page.htm‎
The Somerton Hotel with owner John Kernan and his wife pictured out front. ... George Vinge ran the hotel from 1847 to 1853 (Cole Hotel Index) and was known ...

Convict Records: George Vinge
www.convictrecords.com.au/convicts/vinge/george/116095‎
George Vinge, one of 168 convicts transported on the Red Rover, ... April 1842: Took over the licence of the Golden Fleece Hotel in Sydney Road, Somerton, ...
TO BE CONTINUED.

JOHN PASCOE FAWKNER'S CO-OPERATIVES NORTH WEST OF MELBOURNE, VIC., AUST.

This journal arose from my journal about Pascoe Vale and Strathmore. I wished to mention the pioneers on his grants obtained on behalf of his co-op. members in areas outside the scope of that journal.

The following comes from my EARLY LANDOWNERS:PARISH OF TULLAMARINE. Sections mentioned are in the parish of Tullamarine. As maps are not able to be pasted here, I will give Melway references for the plots of land bought by the co-operative members and transposed on my trusty old Melway.

Only purchasers in section 10 will be included in the surname list here. Surnames of members of Fawkner's co-ops involved in the purchase of land in sections 13 and 6/7 will appear in the surname lists of journals entitled J.P.FAWKNER'S CO-OPS,SURNAMES LIST, SECTION 13 TULLAMARINE and J.P.FAWKNER'S CO-OPS,SURNAMES LIST, SECTIONS 6 AND 7 TULLAMARINE.
Unfortunately I have wasted many hours in the past, retyping surname lists from which the majority of names entered have disappeared after a while. This seems to occur when there are more than about 25 names, and there are 32 for section 10, so the surname list journals are an insurance policy.

SECTION 10.

This 448 acre section was bought by John Pascoe Fawkner, as chairman of the Victoria Cooperative Freehold Land Investment Society, with money paid in by those who wanted to buy land. Upon the conveyance of each members land an additional 10 shillings was paid to Fawkner. The 10/- payment, probably to cover stamp duty, was also paid on conveyance of Fawkners land at East Keilor, in sections 13 and 7 in the parish of Tullamarine and at Hadfield and Coburg.

Fawkners land was generally broken into lots of about 6 acres, probably to make it possible for even the poorest yoeman farmer to own his own land. However the lots must have proved too small and they were to become consolidated into large farms such as Shelton at East Keilor, Glenalice in section 13 and Loves dairy in section 7.

Memorials concerning section 10 land rarely mention lot numbers; only those for Boone and the Presbyterian church land do so.



Andrew Lemon mentions the above school on P. 38 of his Broadmeadows history but assumes that it was two miles west of Broadmeadows. It is likely that this was the .3 acre site at the north west corner of lot 14 on section 10. This was conveyed into the trust of J.P.Fawkner, Henry Langlands, David Smith and Dugald Stewart on 15-10-1855 (70277). Rev. Reids argument that the parish was intersected by creeks (always flooded in the rainy season) makes me believe that he was talking about Tullamarine Island rather than the area near John Grants Seafield where a school also commenced in 1959. Tullamarine Island School 619 operated 1-7-1859 to 30-4-1865 and 3-12-1875 to 31-8-1882. (2nd period probably on the site on Bulla Park mentioned by I.W.Symonds.)

POSTSCRIPT. Although Henry Langlands was a trustee, it is likely this school was on section 10. Langland's children,if they attended this school would have had to walk from 5 B-C6 to 3 E2, crossing Deep Creek!

The land bought from Fawkner by the following is shown in the section 10 subdivision map.All map references are for Melway.


LOCATION AND PURCHASERS OF LOTS IN THE SUBDIVISION OF SECTION 10.
Vol. Fol.; Purchaser; Date; Lot number(s); Location in Melway.
S 654; Edward Pope; 27-11-1852; 7; 3 B 2-3 and road frontage* in western third of C3. The south west half of the northern part of the horseshoe bend, now entirely part of the Organ Pipes National Park.(* The road once led to a ford over Deep Creek that Harriet Sharp would have used, but it now finishes at the south east corner of lot 7.

S 736; Thomas ;27-11-52; 12, 13; Between Loemans Rd and the western two thirds of the green part of the organ pipes park in the western half of 3 D 3 and eastern half of E3. The Coopers Rd corner is over Loemans Rd from the midpoint of lot 11 and lot 12 is to the east.

S 737; Thomas Collins; 27-11-52; 2; The words ORGAN PIPES NATIONAL in 3 D4 just fit in between the north and south boundaries of lot 2. Its eastern boundary is that of the park.

T 292; Elizabeth Sweetnam; 24-12-52; 23; Top third of the left half of 3 E1 north east of the bend in Coopers Rd. Continuations north and east of the lines of Coopers Rd indicate the west and south boundaries.The eastern boundary of lots 1, 2, 4, 13, 14, 21,22, 23,30,31, 40, 41, 44 and 45, also the eastern boundary of section 10, can be ascertained by extending the eastern boundary of the Organ Pipes National Park(in 3 E 3-4)to the north. If you cross from map 3 to map 176 properly you'll find that the north east corner of section 10 is in the middle of the horseshoe bend in 176 E-F 11.


T 879; William Pollock; 20-12-52; 31; central ninth of 176 E12,its southern boundary an eastern continuation of Coopers Rd and its eastern boundary discussed in bold type under lot 23.

T 980; John Dwyer; 23-1-53; 4;the almost rectangular part of the park in 3 D-E3 extending south to include a third of the incredible formation,the organ pipes.

U 191; Hugh Cameron; 10-12-52; 10; a triangular block in 3 C2, and D 2-3, bounded on the north west by the road that led to the ford,on the south west by the park,its eastern boundary indicated by the west boundary of the rectangle-like part of the park in 3 D4 and continuing to the private access road that runs west from Loemans Rd.

U 195; George Lewis; 10-1-53; 6;southern part of the horseshoe bend in 3C3, with its north east boundary being a continuation (across the road to the ford)of Pope's (lot 7.)

Although the combined maps 3 and 176 map has been attached, I will continue my description of the various purchases in case any descendants wish to mark the boundaries of their ancestors' land on their own Melway.

U 437; Thomas Biggin; 27-11-52; 15; right third of top third of 3 D2.

V 918; John Beasley; 10-12-52; 9; 3 C-D2 between road to the ford and Jacksons Creek.

V 927; Edward Jennings; 26-3-53; 26; top right corner of 3 C1 between Jacksons Creek and Cooper Rd.

W 27; John Christian; 2-4-53; 18; South of lot 26 in small horseshoe bend in 3 C1.

*W 328; Fred. Anthony Thies; 10-12-52; 8;north east half of horseshoe bend protruding into 3 B2 with a frontage to the road to the ford in 3 C3.

3 144; Nicholas Close; 24-10-1853; 27 ;176 C12 fronting Jacksons Creek and the n-s and e-w parts of Cooper Rd and adjoining lot 26 halfway to the bottom of 176 C12.

3 367; Edward Blair; 8-11-53; 11;middle longitudinal third of 3 D 2-3 (between the private access continuing the line of Loemans Rd to the west and the western third of the almost rectangular part of the park north of Jacksons Creek in 3 D-E.

3 407; John McKechnie; 28-10-53; 24; fronts the northern side of the eastern half of Cooper Rd in 3 D-E 1.Northern boundary just above "private access".

4 764; Robert Lechmere; 10-1-53; 20; right third of (almost) bottom third of 3 D1. Frontage to half of the n-s section of Cooper Rd and the eastern third of the e-w section.

4 948; Stewart Davidson; 3-12-52; 37; top right corner of 176 C 12 plus a triangular part in a small portion of C-D 11 where the northern boundary heads east nor' east to meet the eastern boundary (a continuation of the last n-e section of Cooper Rd) at Jacksons Creek. The southern boundary is just south of the easternmost part of the curve near the end of the private access.

5 846; Kezia McCurdie; 29-12-53; 22; Not quite the middle latitudinal third of the west half of 3 E1 between Cooper Rd and the east boundary of section 10.

6 801; John Hughes; 1-12-52; 21; the bottom third of 3 E1 between McCurdie's lot 22 (previous entry)and lot 14 (Cavour Country Club.)

6 802; George Davis; 1-12-52; 32; Middle latitudinal third of 176 D 12 (eastern three eighths)and E12 (western quarter.)

6 805; Alfred Monk; 26-1-54; 30; bottom third of left half of 176 E12. Northern boundary is an extension of the Cooper Rd line to the east.

6 827; William Bedford; 20-12-53; 34 (northern half.The location of the whole of lot 34 is given here.
The southern boundary is just south of the e-w end of Cooper Rd (or it might be the southern boundary because the number of links in the sketch of title,or my transposition is slightly out;I'm discussing a difference of one millimetre on Melway!)The northern boundary is about four fifths of the way to the top of 176 C12 and the eastern boundary is a continuation of the last n-s section of Cooper Rd. William Burrell (below) bought the southern half including (or fronting)the end of Cooper Rd.

8 465; Jn Hy Broughton; 10-12-52; 28; bottom third of (a bit more than) the left half of 176 C12. North boundary is an eastern extension of the e-w section of Cooper Rd.

12 329; William Burrell; 31-12-53; 34 (southern half fronting or including the end of Cooper Rd ; the location of the whole of lot 34 is given under the William Bedford entry (just above.)

23 135; Ben. Escott Cozens; 10-12-52; 19; middle longitudinal third of 3 D1 fronting the south side of Cooper Rd and extending south halfway to the private access between Loemans Rd and the creek.

26 995; B.Brookman; 10-12-55; 25; top left corner of 3 D1 having Cooper Rd as its south and west boundary. North west corner indicated by the E in COOPER RD in 176 D 12.

25 46; Charles Boone; 26-1-54; 5 3 38-45.
Lot 5. 3C-D3. The part of the park south east of the road to the ford between the diagonal park boundary with a parallel south west boundary and the ROSETTE ROCK just inside its southern corner.
Lot 3. 3 D-E 3-4 east of Jacksons Creek. The southern two thirds of the ORGAN PIPES are inside its northern boundary and the south boundary is just above ORGAN PIPES in 3 D4.
Lots 38-45. Top third of 176 D12 and left half of top third of 176 E 12, and north to Jacksons Creek.

30 303; David Smith; 31-8-55; 36; the horseshoe bend in 176 B 11-10 with a southern boundary just inside 176 C and D11.
*30 331 Repeats W 328 correcting errors.

34 804; Alex. Cameron; 10-12-52; 16; same western and eastern boundaries as lot 19 to the north,that is lines leading (magnetic)south from points one third and two thirds of the way along the e-w section of Cooper Rd. Fronts the private access and goes halfway north to Cooper Rd.

70 277; Trustees 15-10-58; 1/3 acre; 14. Cavour Country Club,3 E2. Was this Rev.Reid's school?

161 44; William Jolley; 14-6-1866; 17; western third of 3 D1 part 2 fronting Cooper Rd and the private access leading west from Loemans Rd. The western boundary was a southern continuation of the n-s part of Cooper Rd at the top of 3 D1.

168 702; John Jones; 10-12-1852; 1; 3 D4,the south west portion of the Organ Pipes National Park with its northern boundary between the words NATIONAL and PARK on the map.




COPYRIGHT MELWAY PUBLISHING PTY. LTD. REPRODUCED FROM MELWAY EDITION 27, WITH PERMISSION.

The lot numbers as shown above were unknown until I was trying to establish the locations of farms owned by the Tates and Randalls. Luckily a plan of Fawkners subdivision of section 10 was included in the sketch of title for Application 12224

(by Paul Tate in 1879.)

The plan showed that Fawkners index did not include details about the sale of three lots, unless I missed the entries in my transcription.

LOT 35 WAS BOUGHT BY HENRY JOLLY (285 117).

LOT 29 WAS BOUGHT BY COGAN BRUMBY (6 228).

LOT 33 WAS BOUGHT BY THOMAS HORLEY (HORTEY?)

Joll(e)ys purchase of lot 35 was probably not memorialized until 1880 when Letitia Roy Smith (Davids wife) applied for title, stating that she bought it from Henry Jolley for 90 pounds on 26-3-1856 (Application 13198).

It is obvious that the purchase of lot 33 was never memorialized. Some proof of the purchase must have been provided in application 13537.

In superimposing the lots onto Melway maps 176 and 3, I have used the dimensions given in memorials but I have had to show with a dotted line that the south- west corner of lot 42 was at the bend in the river.


SECTION 10 FARMS.
Abraham Hodgkinsons farm consisted of lots 7, 8 and 9. The part of it that is now part of the park passed to his widow Harriet, who also received the grant for allotment 7A of section 5, Holden on 1-12-1875. (Harriet then lived in Holden, so the farm on lots 7 and 8 was then called the Old Farm.) Harriets second husband, William Sharp, bought lot 6* on 29-6-1865, so Harriet (a daughter of Thomas Faithfull) would have toiled on lots 6, 7, 8 and 9 as well as Starr Grove. The rest of Abrahams farm was sold to Harry Mildenhall, husband of Harriets sister. Henry sold this to George Randall for 75 pounds on 3-4-1862.

*Lot 6 was sold to Sharp by R.G.Nichols (who had bought it from Lewis on 23-8-1854 for 120 pounds) .Was this George Nicholls who married Harriets sister Jane? Nichols sold to Sharp for only 60 pounds.


COPYRIGHT MELWAY PUBLISHING PTY. LTD. REPRODUCED FROM MELWAY STREET DIRECTORY EDITION 27 , WITH PERMISSION.

Allotment B of section 5 in Holden was granted to Paul Tate and the other executors of the will of C. Rhodes. Ed Fanning does not believe that it became part of Pleasant Vale. Paul Tate probably gained title to lots 35 and 27.


George Randall also bought lots 11-15 from Thomas Fraser on 20-11-1861 for 325 pounds (112 484). It is likely that Randall also bought lots 10 and 16 from Fraser. Ed Fanning says that the 108 acres that Alf Randall had after Hall had bought this section 10 farm was in the western quarter of 11B.

William Bedford sold the southern half of lot 34 to David Smith for 40 pounds on 12-3-1861 (6 827). He had bought lot 3 from Boone for 10 shillings on 3-4-1855 and lot 2 from Collins on 12-3-1856 for 112 pounds. He later added lot 1, purchased from John Jones for 129 pounds on 25-1-1867 (Application 26569).

Henry Ernest Hall applied for title to lot 4 (Application 27053) and then Harriet Sharps old farm and lot 6 in 1891. Application 40141 shows Hall in possession of lots 1-13 (all the section 10 land south of the line of Loemans Rd) as well as lots 14 and 16. Ratebooks (1902, 1915) show that he owned 106 acres.

John Heagney bought 11B from the grantees but by 1882 Katherine and James Heagney were reduced to leasing Craigllachie from the OBriens. Paul Tate had the western half of 11B and the Ritchies had the eastern half.


ABRAHAM HODGKINSON.

Abraham Hodgkinson was the 3rd mate on the Royal Consort which left for Australia on 9-11-1843 and arrived on 18-2-1844. He was paid L8/19/6 for his duties, which indicates that he did not jump ship as many sailors did a decade later during the gold rush. On board as passengers were Thomas Faithfull 37, his wife Mary Ann 39, and their children: Harriet Ruby 19, Sarah Amelia 17, Henry 14, Jane 11, Moses 8, William 4 and Thomas 2. The Faithfull family must have soon arrived in this area for when their eighth and last child, Anne, was born on 9-6-1846 the birth was registered at Bulla.

Now it seems that Abraham Hogkinson, about 31 during the voyage out, was using his time off duty for more than sleeping. A certain 19 year old lass had caught his eye and he was to marry Harriet on 10-2-1850. Abraham was to live only nine years after his marriage but fathered eight children because he started early! Did they elope? The registrations of his childrens births indicate his whereabouts before buying land on Tullamarine Island:

Ester b. Moonee Ponds* & d. Melbourne 1845, Maria b. Gippsland 1848, William b. Keilor 1849, Marian b.1851 and Sarah b.1853 at Jordans Creek (up Castlemaine way), Thomas b.1855 Tullamarine, Harriet b.1857 Flemington (may have needed special medical care for the birth), Abraham b.1860 Tullamarine (d.1861.)

(Moonee Ponds could have indicated that he was working for Loeman on Moreland, Robertson on La Rose or Fawkner on Belle Vue Park, leasing part of 23 Doutta Galla, working for Kenny on Camp Hill, McDougall etc on Glenroy, Peter McCracken on Stewarton, Coghill on Cumberland, Dewar on Glendewar, Greene on Woodland or Firebrace on Melford Station, i.e. anywhere near the Moonee Ponds Creek!

Several historians have made the mistake of assuming that Moonee Ponds meant the present suburb.)

Anyhow, getting back to Abrahams farm. On 25-2-54, Abraham bought Edward Popes allotment for 150 pounds (12 981). For an amount that was not entered in the memorial, he then purchased the neighbouring allotment from Frederick Anthony Thies on 4-5-1855. I have not been able to find the conveyance of John Beasleys allotment, but Abe obviously owned this by 1-9-1855, when he mortgaged all three allotments to J.H.Brooke for 100 pounds (30 384).

On 30-7-1858, Abraham conveyed Beasleys lot and the eastern part of Thiess lot (which is not part of the Organ Pipes Park) to Henry Mildenhall for 125 pounds (66 695). Mildenhall became the husband of Sarah Amelia Faithfull, the sister of Abrahams wife, Harriet. Abraham Hodgkinson died on 2-12-1859. In 1862, his widow married William Skill Sharp but Harriet again became a widow when William died on 4-8-1870.

On 15-7-1879, Thomas Hodgkinson conveyed Popes purchase and the western half of the lot originally bought by Thies (both now part of the park) to his mother Harriet Sharp for 140 pounds. (282 230). The memorial indicates that the title was converted (to Torrens?) in 1890 so details of further conveyance cannot be obtained for free.

Harriet Sharp died on 24-12-1885. Her will of 17-12-1885 left the old farm (lot 7 and the western half of lot 8) to her daughter Amy Ann Sharpe and East End Farm, her present homestead (allotment 7A of section 5 in Holden) to her son, John Sharpe. Thomas Hodgkinson was appointed as Amys trustee until she turned 21.John Sharpe, her sole executor, specified on 31-3-1886 that the Holden farm consisted of 36 99/160 acres and the old farm of about 31 acres. (See 11A re spouses of Harriets kids.)

DAVID SMITH.

David Smith purchased lot 36 in section 10 from Fawkner. He later acquired the nearby lots originally purchased by Burrell (1854), Cozens (55), Bedford (61) and William Jolly (67). His wife Letitia Roy Smith bought Henry Jollys lot 35 on 26-3-1856. David was one of the four trustees for the Presbyterian land on lot 14.David also owned John Byrnes old farm of about 150 acres (between Overpostle and the westernmost quarter of 11B) from 1862 until he sold it to Paul Tate on 18-3-1876. Letitia sold about 12 acres to speculator, Aaron Waxman, on 17-12-1879.


SECTION 13.

As the Mansfields owned land in both allotments, details of both allotments need to be read in conjunction with each other. See J.P.Fawkners 80 lot subdivision of 13B and the southern half of 13A superimposed on Melway map 4.

CROWN ALLOTMENT A.
This allotment consisted of 492 acres and was granted to John Pascoe Fawkner and George Coghill in December 1850.On 28-9-1852 the allotment was bisected with Coghill taking ownership of the northern half and Fawkner the southern 246 acres. Fawkner then subdivided this land and 13 B (south of Mansfields Rd). The original purchasers of this land are shown on Melway map 4. Lots consisted of about 6 acres.

Purchasers in 13 A whose names persisted in the area for many years were George Emerson (family associated with the area at the start of Loemans Rd), William Trotman (family associated with land between the two parts of Waltham, Glenarthur, Springfield and Greenan, all on the northern side of Somerton Rd at Greenvale), and Donald Gray (land retained until 1915 at least by Agnes).


George Coghill mortgaged his property Glencairn (the northern half of 13 A, 17B and the part of section 16 s/w of Bulla Rd) to Henry Miller for 2100 pounds on 9-6-1856. Perhaps he needed the money to build his boiling-down works on Glencairn.




Most of the Fawkners subdivision blocks, and obviously Coghills half were eventually purchased by David Mansfield. In 1891, David had obviously sold two properties of 343 and 320 acres to Herman who was listed as the owner with nobody listed as occupant. Davids 320 acres farm was obviously Roseleigh plus 50 acres and the 13 acres later added to Glenalice, and the 343 acres was the farm given to Walter later on with the addition of 13 acres.

G.W.Taylor (Gladstone Park and Chandos) and the Essendon Land Tram and Investment Co. (Crotty and Delahey land on both sides of Fosters Rd), had been forced to relinquish their land as well as payments already made when the depression struck. The Hermans (Thomas and Marks) who had also bought Gowrie Park and much land near the Bulla cemetery and shire hall, would have suffered the same fate.

Coghills half of 13A (246 acres) and Fawkners lots 1-14 of 6 acres 12 perches each (88 acres plus the private road 50 links wide and 11620 links long running east-west 1220 links north of Mansfield Rd, another 5.8 acres), became his son, Walters Glenalice. The above adds up to 340.3 acres, fairly close to the acreage of the first farm sold to Herman by David Mansfield. The magnificent duochrome brick Glenalice near the west end of the runway would have been demolished in about 1965 at about the same time as the Inverness hotel. Roseleigh of 257 acres, owned by Walters brother Ernest, was partly north of Mansfields Rd, but its homestead (still standing) and much of its land were on the south side.

A 28 acre block owned by T.W.Taylor/Emerson originally and later occupied by Charles Farnes (1860s) John Duncan McFarlane of Worrough at Keilor (1922-3) and Kevin Ernest Butler (1946-7) was sold for the jetport C 1961 by the Butlers. This block, lots 27-29, fronted north side of the east end of Mansfields Rd. The easement granted to Walter Mansfield in David Mansfields will of 1903 was probably on the western boundary of this 28 acre block. (See section 14 about what I think is a wrong assumption that Samuel Mansfield owned Gowrie Park.)

By 1946-7, the Mansfields had gone, their land having been bought in equal halves of 312 acres. Walters Glenalice was sold in 1939 with the clearing sale on April 12 bringing poor prices such as 5/- for a draught horse.

James Mackie Smith, a chemist according to Keith McNab, owned Roseleigh and Charles William Willers owned Glenalice. In 1950 or before, P.J.Shelley purchased Roseleigh, which was mainly in 13B but extended 1020 links north of Mansfields Rd. The Commonwealth purchased his 115 acres in 13 A in 1961. This 115 acres probably consisted of lots 15-26 of Fawkners subdivision (12 x 9 a. 1 r. 38 p. = 113 acres 3 roods 16 perches). Walter Murphy was trying to persuade the select committee in 1963 and 1970 that the remaining 186 acres should also be purchased.

By 1961 a Mr Finchett had bought Glenalice of 357 acres and sold it for the jetport.

LOTS PURCHASED BY FAWKNER'S CO-OP. MEMBERS IN 13A.(Lot No.; Name; Area; Document; location on Melway.)
14. James Bullied. (Volume 19, folio 934.) 4 B- small part C, fronting south half of eastern extent of horseshoe bend to Perimeter Rd.
13, 12. William Warr. 18 acres 25 perches. (Volume 4, folio 460.)The rest of 4 D2, middle latitudinal third.
11, 10,9, 8, 7. Correction fluid. I'd forgotten to amend what I'd written and, alas, I no longer have my notes.
North east corner of 7 just west of south corner of west end of runway.
LOTS 6-1 FRONT THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE RUNWAY BUT BECAUSE THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY IS MAGNETIC EAST-WEST,RATHER THAN BEING TRUE EAST-WEST AS THE RUNWAY IS, THE NORTH EAST CORNER OF LOT 1 TOUCHES THE BOTTOM OF 4 H2 AT A NORTHERN CONTINUATION OF McNABS RD.
6. Charles Snooks. (V.2 f.226.) Small parts E-F 2-3.
5. William Lees.(V.3 f.143.)Small parts F.2-3.
4, 3, 2, 1. William Trotman. F-G 2-3 and H3(top half, to corner mentioned above in bold type.)

THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF LOTS 15 TO 29 IS MANSFIELD RD,THUS MELWAY REFERENCES MEAN NORTH OF MANSFIELDS RD. THEY ADJOIN LOTS 14-1 ON THE NORTH.
15-19. Donald Gray. (V.2 f.639.) Projection in 4 A2 to western quarter of D3.
The part of Mansfields Rd climbing up from Deep Creek (where there were good kaolin deposits)was called Gray's Hill. Malcolm Ritchie of Aucholzie, adjoining Fawkner's subdivision on the south, married a Gray girl.
20, 21. Correction fluid. (V.64 f.332 and V.19 f.890), possibly Gray. 4 D3, part D4.
22.Thomas Brown. (V.2 f.429.) Almost left half of 4 E3. Includes gate 11.
No lot number but obviously 23. School. Almost right half of 4 E3.
24-26. Patrick (probably a given name)correction fluid. (V.2 f.88 written only on 25.)4 F3.
27-28. George Emerson. (V.96 f.92.) Left two thirds of 4 G3.
29. John Taylor. (V.29 f.197.) East to Farnes' corner,the corner of McNabs and Mansfields Rds.
THE LOTS SOUTH OF MANSFIELDS RD WERE IN 13B.



ALLOTMENT B (SECTION 13).

Consisting of 415 acres, this was granted to Fawkner in December 1850. He subdivided it, along with the southern half of 13 A. Original purchasers are shown on Melway map 4. Charles Nash bought the land now occupied by Broadacres Kennels and Cattery and his widow, Mary, still owned it in 1922 and used it to graze dry cows. Harry Nashs widow, Olive still owned it in 1970. The Ritchie family added 110 acres of 13B to Aucholzie and David (and then Ernest) Mansfield seem to have had 186 acres if Walter Murphys details about the Shelleys farm were correct. Patrick Murphy had Ritchies 110 acres in 1914-5 and much of the remaining 119 acres would have been John Mansfields Pine Tree Farm and part of his 205 acres (including the 83 acre Scone) which Alf Wright was leasing. In 1922-3, Christina Elizabeth Turner had 114 acres, probably Pine Tree Farm, which was between Roseleigh and McNabs Rd. In 1946-7, R.J.Gilbertson had 119 and 106 acres in 13 B, obviously having acquired Pine Tree Farm and 4 of the 110 acres being added to the 114. In 1914-5 James Miller, a mechanic, had 12 acres between Nashs block and McNabs Rd and in 1922-3 Robert Miller had it. The 1914-5 acreages ,using Walter Murphys numbers, exceed that of 13B by 27 acres so it seems that Percy Shelley only had 160 acres in 13 B (and hence David and Ernest Mansfield).

CO-OP. MEMBERS AND THEIR BLOCKS IN 13B.(Lot No.;Purchaser;Area; Document;Location on Melway.)
The northern boundary of lots 48 to 30 is Mansfields Rd unless otherwise stated.
46-47. James Timms. Fronts eastern run of Deep Creek from the old ford in James Robertson's Upper Keilor
(west end of dotted line at the end of Mansfields Rd)with the south boundary starting from the bend to the south in 4 C3. Extends eastward just into 4 D3 and small part of C4.
47-48. James Amos. Eastern boundary is the southward-running part of Deep Creek in the bottom left corner of 4 C3. Small parts of C3 and 4. North east corner near the n in Airport Boundary.South of Timms' blocks.
44-43.Archbald McKenzie. Mansfield Rd boundary from the north east corner of Timms' purchase to two thirds of the way across 4 D3. Contains the private access road and goes south halfway to Bassett Rd.
42-41. John Cumming.Manfields Rd boundary from two thirds of the way across 4 D3 to halfway across 4 E3. Same depth as lots 44 and 43.
NO LOT NUMBER(S). Isaac Mansfield. (Volume Y folio 751.) Road frontage to Mansfields and Bassett Rds of about 600 links (6 chains or 120 metres, 6 mm on Melway) and a frontage to the West side of Panton Drive of 3000 links (30 chains or 600 metres.)
NO LOT NUMBER(S). Samuel Mansfield. (Volume X folio 838.)Same dimensions as Isaac's block but fronting the east side of Panton Drive.South east corner a touch east of the proposed runway.
33. John Mansfield. (V. folio 926.) Same dimensions as Issac and Sam's blocks. Northern half of east boundary adjoins Broadacres Kennels and Cattery in 4 G4 (in my 1999 edition but by 2007 acquired for airport expansion.)
This was almost certainly the farm that John called "Pine Tree Farm".
32, 31. Charles Nash. (Volume Y folio 419.) Broadacres Kennels and Cattery land.Frontage to Mansfields Rd of 260 metres, running east from a point 400 metres west of McNabs Rd. Top left two thirds of 4G4 extending southward halfway to the line of Bassett Rd.Charles and his son, Harry, used this land for spelling dry cows.
30.W.Spiers. Corner of Mansfields and McNabs Rd with frontages of about 140 and 300 metres. James Spiers was assessed by the shire of Keilor in 1868. Peter Spiers was assessed in 1900 on 101 acres that later became Bill Ellis's "Ecclesfield" and was probably Langlands purchase in Fawkner's subdivision of part sections 6 and 7.

The southern boundary of lots 49 to 62 is Bassett Rd.
49-51. James Robb. Horseshoe bend in 4 A-B 4 and first quarter of C4 on Bassett Rd frontage. Deep Creek is the western and most of the northern boundary.The northern boundary of this and other smaller blocks can be indicated by drawing a line from the westward flowing portion of the creek that forms Robb's northern boundary to the exact bottom right corner of 4 H4.
52. John Matthews. Roughly the next 120 metres to the east with the same depth as Robb's.
53. Thomas Clements.Ditto. Goes East to a planned (but probably never made) road that ran from Bassett Rd to meet Mansfields Rd at the western side of McKenzie's purchase to provide access for James Amos.
54, 55. Peter Nettleton. Next 280 metres to the east.Left two thirds of 4 D4. Same depth as Robb's.
56. James Jackson. Next 140 metres east. The rest of 4 D4. Same depth as Robb's.
57. William Gapper. Ditto. Left third of 4 E4, part 5.
58. Thomas Thomas. Ditto. Middle longitudinal third of 4 E4 part 5.
59. John Mansfield. Ditto. This block was 280 metres west of John's large block, 2nd east from Pantons Drive.
*Mansfield's large block on the west side of Pantons Drive.Proposed runway at north west corner.
*Sam Mansfield's large block on the east side of Pantons Drive.Proposed runway at south east corner.
* John Mansfield's large block for the next 140 metres east.
(* These blocks fronted both Mansfields and Bassett Rds.)
60. William Adams. Next 140 metres east. Left third parts 4 G4 and 5.
61. John Mansfield. Ditto. Middle longitudinal third of 4 G 4 and 5.
62. Arthur Millington. Last 140 metres to McNabs Rd. Right third of 4 G4 and 5.

The following tragedy led to my poem DEATH AT BERTRAM'S FORD.
Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Tuesday 16 October 1906 p 1 Family Notices
... Colonist 53 years. MANSFIELD.-On the 15th October (accidently drowned), at Keilor, William John, beloved lim husband of Catherine Mansfield, and only surviving son of John Mansfield, of Tullamarine, aged 50 years also his eldest son. William John Mansfield Slans aged 7 years. "In ... 1116 words

This clash between brothers led to my poem THE WISDOM OF SOLOMON.The judge told them to shake hands and share a beer together (obviously not in the reporter's vicinity.) They were the best of friends from that day forward. (The late Wally Mansfield.)

An action was tried in the Supreme Court yesterday, before Mr. Justice A'Beckett and a jury of six, in which John Mansfield, of Tullamarine, sued his brother David Mansfield, of the same place, for damages for placing an obstruction across a road in Tullamarine, which it was alleged the plaintiff had a right to use. The plaintiff also asked that the obstruction should be removed from the road, and that an injunction should be granted against its re-erection. Mr. Topp and Mr. R. A. Smith appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. Duffy and Mr. Bryant for the defendant. The plaintiff's case was that the road in question ran on one side of the defendant's land, and the defendant put a fence across it, and thereby prevented plaintiff from using it, or having access by it to the Deep Creek, to which it led. The defence was that the plaintiff had no right to the use of the road. The plaintiff produced evidence to show that he owned land in the district, and that his title to the land gave him also a right to use the road in question, the right being derived from the original owners of the land which constituted the road. After the jury had retired to consider their verdict, Sir Bryant stated that an affidavit had been filed with the judges associate by a clerk of the defendant's solicitors, in which the clerk swore that on the previous day he saw the plaintiff and his brother, Samuel Mansfield, enter a hotel together with one of the jurymen who was empanelled in the case. About a quarter of an hour afterwards the clerk went into the hotel and there saw John and Samuel Mansfield drinking and talking with the juryman, but when they saw the clerk they left the hotel by different doors.

Mr.Bryant therefore asked his Honour under the circumstances, to defer entering up judgment until an application could be made to the Full Court. Shortly after Mr. Bryant made the request, the jury returned into court with a verdict for the plaintiff with damages, 1s. Mr. Bryant then renewed his request, but his Honour stated that he did not think it was in his province to take any notice of the affidavit. He entered up the verdict for the plaintiff, damages 1s, with costs, and granted the injunction, the obstruction to be removed within one month. (P.4, Argus,20-11-1890.)
The road that David had closed could have been Panton Drive but might have also been several other subdivision roads that disappeared long long ago.


Bassett Rd is the northern boundary of lots 63 to 80.The south boundary of lots 63 to 80 can be pinpointed by extending the south boundary of the land shaded yellow in the 1999 and 2007 Melway (bottom of 4 F-G 5) to Deep Creek. This line was a continuation of Grants Lane and the boundary between the shires of Keilor (south) and Bulla (north);Fawkner's subdivision was entirely in the latter,as was the one in Section 10. The subdivision on the parts of section 6 and 7 west of Bulla Rd was entirely in the shire of Keilor, being south of Grants lane.

(These are listed from McNabs Rd to Deep Creek.)
63.John Mansfield. 200 metre frontage to McNabs Rd and frontage of 140 metres to west on the south side of Bassett Rd (which ran east to McNabs Rd.)The Grants Lane bridge (at the bottom right corner of 4 G5) was just across McNabs Rd from its south east corner.
64-65. Thomas Saunders. East to just inside 4 F5.
66-7.Thomas Threlfall. East almost to Panton Drive corner.
68-9.Graham Jameson. South west corner two fifths of the way across 4 E5.
70. James Figgins. South east corner almost three quarters of the way across 4 E5.
71. John Dewar. Southeast corner at the left boundary of 4 E5.
John Dewar might have been related to William Dewar, who founded Glendewar (Melway 5 C3 to E6.)
72-3. John Maglehose. South east corner three fifths of the way across 4 D5. In 1999 (with lot 74) comprised Mooreholme Kennels owned by Harry Moore and his wife, Val, both members of the reformed Keilor Historical Society. Harry was a gracious opponent in the 1974 Tullamarine ward election.
74.D.Hill. South east corner nine tenths of the way across 4 D5.The purchaser was possibly an ancestor of Stephen Hill who escaped death in the Mansfield tragedy at Bertrams Ford and was probably living at that time at Danby Farm at the east end of the east-west runway. William Mansfield was on Scone (Airport terminal site) at that time if I remember correctly. The two families had been neighbours for over 50 years by 1906.Like the McRaes, the Hills moved to St Albans.
75-78.Richard Thomas. 4 C5, parts B, D5 and C4.
79. No documents mentioning this were found. Possibly Richard or Arthur Thomas.
80. Arthur Thomas. Southern boundary 200 metres to Deep Creek and northern boundary (line of Bassett Rd)420 metres.

The north west corner of section 7 (and J.P.Fawkner's other subdivision in Tullamarine) was only one mile west along Grants Lane, past John Grant's "Seafield", from the south west corner of his section 13 subdivision.

------------------------------------------------------

Sections 6 and 15 were granted to John Carre Riddell an early squatter of Cairn Hill near Gisborne. Section 6 is west of "Gladstone" extending from Freight Rd to Bamford Ave with its western boundary roughly indicated by the northern part of Link Rd. Section 15 is between Bamford Ave and the creek,extending west to the Airport Terminal.

Section 7 was granted to J.P.Fawkner, as head of a co-operative, on 28-6-1850. Section 7 is the square mile west of section 6; its n/w corner is indicated by airport gates 33 and 34 and its s/w corner by the Quantas maintenance area.(1999 Melway.)

On 28-2-1851, Fawkner paid Riddell 217 pounds for the (almost) 107 acres of section 6 south west of Bulla Rd and Riddell paid Fawkner L 63/16/3 for the (almost) 64 acres of section 7 north east of the road.




SECTIONS 6, 7 AND 15.

Copyright Melway Publishing Pty. Ltd. Reproduced from Melway Ed. 27 with permission.


This map shows Fawkners subdivision of sections 6 and 7 south-west of Bulla Rd and Riddells north east of it. The location of the Beech Tree Inn on John Beechs purchase is indicated by a dot. The lane starting at the north west corner of Beechs land became known as Andersons Lane and the one starting between lots 7 and 8 was Conders Lane. Tullamarine State School 2613 was at the south west corner of lot 8. Fergusons purchase, labelled Stewart on the airport acquisitions map*, was actually 46 acres but a very old clerical error (reversing the digits) led the McNabs to believe that the rent and rates they were paying on 64 acres was justified.


See J.P.Fawkners subdivision s/w of Bulla Rd and J.C.Riddells subdivision n/e of Bulla Rd (superimposed on Melway map 5) on the next page.

On 28-2-1851, Fawkner paid Riddell 217 pounds for the (almost) 107 acres of section 6 south west of Bulla Rd and Riddell paid Fawkner L 63/16/3 for the (almost) 64 acres of section 7 north east of the road.

SECTIONS 6, 7 AND 15.

Copyright Melway Publishing Pty. Ltd. Reproduced from Melway Ed. 27 with permission.

This map shows Fawkners subdivision of sections 6 and 7 south-west of Bulla Rd and Riddells north east of it. The location of the Beech Tree Inn on John Beechs purchase is indicated by a dot. The lane starting at the north west corner of Beechs land became known as Andersons Lane and the one starting between lots 7 and 8 was Conders Lane. Tullamarine State School 2613 was at the south west corner of lot 8. Fergusons purchase, labelled Stewart on the airport acquisitions map*, was actually 46 acres but a very old clerical error (reversing the digits) led the McNabs to believe that the rent and rates they were paying on 64 acres was justified.

As much about the airport had changed between 1999 and 2007, I will provide new indicators for the north west and south west corners of Section 7, parish of Tullamarine (and Fawkner's subdivision.)

NORTH WEST CORNER of section 7. In Melway 5 B6, extend the line of Grants Rd west past Airside Rd to a spot above the A in Air (in Aust. Air Express). Make the western boundary by lightly drawing a line from this spot to gate 22 in 5 A10. Gate 22 is just south of the south west corner.

SOUTH WEST CORNER of section 7. Extend the north boundary of Trade Park in Melway 5 G-H11 (dotted blue line, formerly Post Office Lane) to a line joining the north west corner and gate 22.

PURCHASERS ON FAWKNER'S SUBDIVISION OF SECTIONS 6 AND 7.
SECTION 7. (Lot No; Purchaser; Document; location on Melway.)
18(and,apparently 19). David Beckinsale. North west corner with a 140 metre frontage east along Grants Rd to a road leading south which may have been called Spiers Lane. This road went south 280 metres(from the point where Service Rd and Grants Rd now meet) where it met an east west road at the north boundary of Menzies Cargo. David's eastern boundary then resumed 40 metres east along the latter road and was another north-south road that continued to gate 23 on the border of 5 A and B 10.David's south east corner was the top of the C in RESTRICTED AREA (5 B8.)


17, 16, 15, 14, 13. Henry Landlands. The rest of the Grants Lane frontage to Ellis's Corner ( the Bulla Rd corner, in Melway 5 D6.) The start of Grants Rd between Ellis's corner and Centre Rd has been renamed Melrose Drive for the benefit of motorists. These lots are bisected by Francis Briggs Drive. The southern boundary is the northern boundary of MENZIES CARGO extended towards Melrose Drive*, the east-west road referred to earlier.
(*The eastern 280 metres of this road bent about 15 degrees to the north from the eastern border of 5 C7.Apac Drive only extended east to halfway across 5 C7 in 1999 and it is likely that it now meets Melrose Dr at the corner of Landlands' land. It is likely that this was the 101 acre property owned by Spiers, Vaughan and Bill Ellis (who called it "Ecclesfield".)

AS OUTLINED IN COMMENT 1, I WILL NOW DEAL WITH THE BLOCKS BETWEEN THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF SECTION 7, HEADING TO GATE 22 AND THE ROAD LEADING TO GATE 23.
20 (and, apparently 21).Charles James Watts.The north east corner is indicated by the west end of Apac Drive.The southern boundary is just below the westernmost six red arrows in 5 B8.
22. Joseph Allen. From Watts' southern boundary, three quarters of the way south to taxiway W in 5,parts A and B 8.
23. Timothy Francis. Taxiway W runs across its northern third and the southern boundary was where the (white) north western corner of the Qantas maintenance area touches the boundary between 5 A and B9.
24 and 25. Benjamin Bates. Includes the large Qantas (green) buildings with gates 22 and 23 being the south west and south east boundaries.

NOW BACK TO MELWAY 5 B7.
62 and 63. Mary Ann Vaughan. Northern boundary is that of Menzies Cargo taken east to the eastern boundary, which is the western boundary of Melbourne Gateway Facility. The east-west part of Airside Rd is its southern boundary.
64. J.Murphy. Melbourne Gateway Facility in 5 C7. The eastern boundary (and part of the southern) can be seen on Melway, a faint dotted line. I am prepared to bet that this was the pioneer at Diggers Rest in 1888, whose biography was in VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS.I think his first name was John.

63, 12, 11. Richard Hartnett. Fronts Melrose Drive from the Apac Drive corner to the north west boundary of the airport staff car park in parts 5 D-E 7-8.The western boundary is the dotted line referred to as Murphy'seastern boundary. The southern boundary is a continuation east of Murphy's to the centre of the bottom of D7 where it bends to meet Melrose Drive at a right angle.

10, 9, 8. John Parker. Fronts Melrose Drive including the Airport Staff car park, the taxi holding area and LPG refuelling and carwash; Continues south to the Link Rd corner. From this corner, Parker's southern boundary,Conders Lane, ran (magnetic) west through the subdivision to meet the road which ran north from gate 23. Parker's purchase became part of James Love's dairy and the land for State School 2613 was bought from Love.

WE HAVE REACHED THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 7. BEFORE RESUMING AT LOTS 61, 60 AND 59, I WOULD LIKE TO SAY HOW HISTORICALLY INSENSITIVE ARE THE NAMES OF MERCER DRIVE (5 F7, D8) AND LINK RD (5 E9-10.) I presume these names were bestowed by the same boffins who destroyed Anthony Rowhead's bicentennial project to name airport roads after indigenous, European and aviation pioneers. Mercer Drive should be named after the Nash family and Link Rd should be named after the Parr family. Not one descendant of a pioneering Tullamarine family would disagree with this. Victoria St (of which Mercer Drive is a part) was named after the young Queen but every local called it Nash's Lane. Link Rd runs (on the section 7 and 6 boundary) through Sam Parr's "The Elms" to Bill Parr's "Annandale",just as the Oaklands Hunt used to do.

61, 60, 59.Mary Ann Vaughan. Like her lots 62 and 63 to the north, this purchase has a frontage on the eastern side of the road that runs from Menzies Cargo to gate 23. The northern boundary is the top of the pink area (to what used to be Perimeter Rd) in 5 B-C7.(Perimeter Rd is shown in the 1999 Melway.) Conders Lane,the southern boundary, was just north of taxiway W and can be shown by extending the east-west boundary of the pink area (at the top of 5 D9)to Melrose Drive and west to touch the intersection of the entry to the Qantas maintenance area and taxiway W. The boundary with lot 58 goes from the bend (south of the Melbourne Gateway Facility)in the pink area's boundary to the middle of the bottom of 5 C8.

58. Frederick Plumridge. East of Mary Ann Vaughan's lot 59. North east corner is at the junction of C and D 7 and 8. Fronts the north side of Conders Lane.

57 and 56. E?.M.Dyne. Left half of 5 D8. Bisected from north west to south east corners by border of yellow and pink areas.

55. M.J.McCulla. Triangular block in east side of 5 D8 and part E8,the north eastern boundary being parallel with Melrose Drive. Between Lot 55 and Melrose Drive were John Parker's lots 10,9 and 8 which were discussed earlier.
CONDERS LANE LEFT BULLA RD (MEROSE DRIVE)AT THE LINK RD CORNER AND ANDERSON'S LANE WAS OPPOSITE WRIGHT'S LANE (LATER HEAPS' LANE AND NOW SPRINGBANK ST), ALSO RUNNING (MAGNETIC)WEST TO THE LANE LEADING TO GATE 23. BETWEEN THESE SOME PROPERTIES FRONTED BOTH LANES AND THEY WILL BE SO DESCRIBED. (Anderson's Lane was at a right angle to Bulla Rd before turning west at the back of the Airport Club.)

47, 48, 45, 46. Edmund Parker. 5 B9. Fronts the three lanes.
49 and 44. D? Carroll. (Volume M folio 482), 20 acres 2 roods. Fronts both lanes. West half of 5 C9.
50,51. C.C.Horrett. (Volume M folio 722.) Top half of 5 C-D9 including part of South Centre and Cargo Rds.Fronts Conders Lane.
52, 53, 54,7. John Gibbs*. (Volume 32 folio 433.) Top half of 5 D-E9 east of Cargo Rd. Fronts Conders Lane.
43,42, 41. H.W.Cass. (Volume M folio 505.)Fronts Andersons Lane. 5 C-D 9 (bottom half), 10 (top third).
40-39. John Gibbs*. (Volume 32 folio 433.) Fronts Anderson's Lane. Gate 27 was near its south west corner and it went east three quarters of the way to Link Rd where Gibbs' two purchases adjoined "The Elms".

THE FOLLOWING LOTS WERE BETWEEN ANDERSON'S LANE AND THE SECTION 3 AND 7 BOUNDARY, POST OFFICE LANE (THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF TRADE PARK, EXTENDED EAST TO MEET THE NORTH SOUTH LANE AT GATE 23.)
26-28,part 29. John Ferguson.(Volume M folio 620.) 41 acres.Top half 5 B-C10.The reason it was only part of lot 29 was that the east half of the parking area north of building 48 was reserved as a waterhole. The waterhole and a lane leading to it from Andersons Lane would have consisted of 5 acres making a total of 46 acres,which was recorded in Keilor rate books as 64 acres for almost a century and only corrected during airport acquisitions circa 1960.
30. Name not recorded on my Melway because of insufficient space and I no longer have my notes.. (Volume M folio 157.) 10 acres. Roundabout at the Operations/Sth Centre Rd is the middle of the south boundary and gate 26 is the north west corner.
31, 32. George Scarlett. Bottom half of 5 D10.
33, 34, 35. Benjamin Bates. Bottom half of 5 E10. Lot 35 was actually in section 6.

SECTION 6.
THERE WERE ONLY THREE PROPERTIES IN THE SMALL PART OF SECTION 6 THAT WAS ON THE SOUTH WEST SIDE OF BULLA RD.
5, 6, 38. I was so excited to find the boundaries of "The Elms"that I forgot to write the purchaser on my Melway.It might have been Ann Parr, the widowed mother of James Henry and grandmother of Cr Bill and Sam. Link Rd runs through The Elms following the section 7/6 boundary as it turns south. Probably about a quarter of the 31 acres would be in section 7.The southern boundary is the east -west part of Anderson's Lane. Surrounds Bengrey's block.
Lot 4? George Bengrey. The Airport Club. North Corner of Anderson's Lane.
36. John Beech. (Volume M folio 481, purchased 1-5-1851.)Melrose Drive frontage between the Airport Club and Trade Park with a western boundary halfway between Link Rd and the proposed Airport Drive Extension.John built the Beech Tree Inn opposite the north west corner of Tullamarine Reserve. (See my journal about hotels near Tullamarine.)



LOCATION OF SECTION 10 PURCHASES AND NAMES/LOCATIONS FOR SECTIONS 13, 6 AND 7 WILL BE ADDED SOON.

COBURG -I HAVE NO DETAILS ABOUT THIS GRANT.CAN'T EVEN GET A JIKA JIKA MAP ONLINE.

BOX FOREST.RATE INFORMATION MAY BE IN MY DICTIONARY HISTORY IN THE HADFIELD ENTRY.

CROWN ALLOTMENT 22C,PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA. NO TITLES INFORMATION AVAILABLE. RATES INFORMATION WILL BE PASTED FROM MY EARLY LANDOWNERS:PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA.


4 comment(s), latest 1 year, 4 months ago

JOHN PASCOE FAWKNER'S PASCOEVALE, VIC., AUST.

I had hopes of proving or disproving that Pascoe Villa, Pascoevale,which William Smith advertised for sale in the latish 1860's, shortly after the death of his wife (see my WILLIAM SMITH journal), had been his ORIGINAL Young Queen Inn. As usual when I am unable to solve such puzzles, I had a local history dream, in which, as always, I was reading an article. It was written by Edward Butler, great grandson of Edward Butler who built* the Young Queen Inn at Pascoeville.

(* P.16-17,BROADMEADOWS: A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.(In 1839) "Lot number three,of 1.5 acres on the left hand side of the main road not far over the creek, was bought for L 24/9/6 by J.W.Shaw, who---promptly disposed of it to Edward Butler for L44. Butler built-as the title deed expresses it-'a large house and tenement' named the Young Queen Inn in honour of Queen Victoria in the third year of her reign.......(In 1840?)Edward Butler took advantage of the boom by disposing of his property to John Watson for L1300. Watson unloaded it towards the end of the boom,in December, 1842,to the unsuspecting William Smith of St Kilda for L1700. Smith had no one to sell it to but he persevered with the inn for the next twenty-nine years.")

Having had many local history dreams involving trove, I didn't immediately rush to my computer as I once would have. I googled "Edward Butler, Young Queen"(1840-1849) and, blow me down, Edward Butler was running the Young Queen Inn during the 1840's, IN LAUNCESTON, where Fawkner had run the Duke of Cornwall.Whether he was of the prominent Tasmanian legal family has not been discovered.

Keeping the decade limit, I searched for "young queen,pascoevale" and due to trove's quirky ways, this journal's title changed from THE YOUNG QUEEN,PASCOEVALE to PASCOEVALE.


PASCOEVALE.

Pascoevale.-Among the other disasters attendant upon the flood, is the carrying away of the bridge across the Moonee Moonee Ponds at Pascoevale, and the consequent stoppage of communication with the city in vehicles
of any description by that road. Major Firebrace, J. P., who lives in the immediate vicinity, has
brought the matter officially under the consideration of tho Government.(P.2, Argus, 4-12-1849.)

1855
On 1 November, Catholic school 269 opens on the north corner of Glass St. (now Napier Cres.) and Pascoe Vale Rd. (which was known as Ashurst and Firebrace Streets at that time). It closed on 31-11-1874, and the iron schoolhouse, which had also served for worship, was moved to form the first St. Monica's. (VR, St Monica's History, EH)(Annals of Strathmore and Surrounding Areas.)

Major Firebrace was an early squatter in the Bulla area with his home station on the site of the Oaklands Hunt Club's "Sherwood" (Melway 178 C5.)SOURCE: probably D.F.Cameron-Kennedy's THE OAKLANDS HUNT but possibly BULLA BULLA by I.W.Symonds,or THE SHIRE THAT TOOK OFF by Grant Aldous, whose manuscript was probably rejected by the shire because of the tale about George Evans leaving a pistol on the table to remind Big Clarke to keep his hands off the young mistress of Emu Bottom.

Macedon (Deep Creek/Bulla)road had been surveyed in 1847 according to a descendant of E.E.Kenny of Camp Hill but was not yet THE GREAT ROAD TO THE DIGGINGS so Pascoe Vale Rd was probably the route that Firebrace took to Melbourne.


YOUNG QUEEN was deleted from the search terms at this stage but of course still appeared in many of the results. The Port Phillip District was allocated places in the New South Wales parliament but as representatives were not paid and would have to frequently be in Sydney,there was a ground-swell for separation. One of the three Keilor souvenirs has an article called THE PORT PHILLIP FARCE which involved J.F.L.Foster,with Lord Grey,the (Colonial Secretary? in England) being nominated. Little Johnny Fawkner had more to do with the separation movement than I had realised.

THE DISTRICT ELECTION.
* (From the Corio Chronicle)
On Friday, R. W. Pohlman, Esq.,Returning Officer, repaired to the hustings at Geelong, and proclaimed the
result of the voting in the several polling places, for the Electoral District of Port Phillip, to elect a representative in the room of James Williamson, Esq., resigned. The nomination of candidates took place on the 15th February, when the following candidates were put in nomination.William Macarthur*, Esq., of Camden ; John Pascoe Fawkner, Esq., of Pascoevale ; and (with a view to carry out the principle of non-representation)
Arthur Wellesley, Duke of Wellington,who was put in nomination by Mr.Fawkner himself.(P.4, Argus, 16-3-1849.)

(*This was probably the son of the merino breeder who followed Foster as acting governor until Hotham arrived.)

CHILD EXPLOITATION WAS THE ORDER OF THE DAY!
A lad named John Meyers, was brought before the Police Bench on Tuesday charged with absconding from the service of Mr.J. P. Fawkner, of Pascoevale. The lad was only eight years of age, and had been taken away by his parents. He was ordered back, and to pay all expenses. (P.4, Argus, 16-3-1849.)

NEIGHBOURING LANDOWNERS AT WAR.
The Moonee Ponds Creek formed the boundary between section 23 Doutta Galla (south west) and John Pascoe Fawkner's Belle Vue Park in the parish of Jika Jika (north east), from Marks St near the Pascoe Vale bridge to the southern boundary of the Kingsford-Smith Ulm Reserve. Whether Major St John actually lived on "St John's" (as Harry Stevenson's portion of the former was still called circa 1920 when the Aero Club established their "St John's Field" aerodrome) is unknown, but this neighbourly dispute was not about a fence or the creek.

When I first read a report of the libel case about twenty years ago,Fawkner had been found guilty but fined some paltry amount indicating that his action had been considered just, but St John must have appealed the decision, and had the fine raised to 95 pounds. A "St John v Fawkner" trove search will supply the trial reports. Fawkner applied to Latrobe for the fine to be paid by Government and the refusal was criticised by The Argus.
BRIBERY AND CORRUPTION.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 5 December 1848 p 2 Article
... Sir, Your most obedient servant, C. J. LA TROBE. Mr. J. P. Fawkner, Pascoevale. The Government ... 842 words

PASCOEVILLE TO PASCOEVALE.
Observing that all the 1840-1849 results (most of them William Smith advertisements about the refurbished Young Queen,the swept away bridge being replaced and the connection to the new Sydney road -see CLIFFORDS RD journal) were from 1849, I suspected that the locality's name had recently changed so I changed my search to Pascoeville.

Colonial Secretary's Office, Sydney 11th September,1849.
ROADS:
WITH reference to the Government notice of date 13th April, 1848, relative to opening of certain Parish Roads in the District of Port Phillip, and to that described as No. 3 therein, namely :-The Old Sydney or Pascoe
ville
Road leading from Mount Macedon* Road to the New Sydney Road : notice is hereby given (etc.)
(Colonial Secretary's Office, Sydney, 11th September, 1849. ROADS.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Monday 24 September 1849 p 1 Article.)


(*Mt Macedon road is now Mt Alexander Rd with the Pascoeville road leaving it at Moonee Ponds Junction.)

There was only one more result for Pascoeville in the 1840's.
Horticultural Society. On Saturday last a meeting was held at the "Queen's Head Hotel," Queen-street, pursuant to public notice, for the purpose of taking into consideration the propriety of forming a Horticultural Society in Melbourne, embracing in its operation the entire Province. Mr. J. P. Fawkner, of
Pascoeville, was called to the chair, and that gentleman addressed the meeting at considerable length in favor of the proposed institution,pointing out the utility of such societies in causing a praiseworthy emulation among gardeners, and others employed in the culture of our fine soil. (P.2, Argus, 28-11-1848.)


Was this because of faulty digitisation? Did Pascoeville persist into the 1850's? What was the original name for the locality? Delete the limit of only articles from The Argus.
Ah ha!
The Argus had previously been The Melbourne Argus. The name change had come between AUG and November, 1848.

Most of the Melbourne Argus results concerned the proclamation of parish roads as mentioned above (where Pascoe Vale Rd was wrongly called No.3, unless the digitisation was wrong.)
e.g.Colonial Secretary's Office,
Sydney, 13th April, 1848.
ROADS.
HIS Excellency the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, having deemed it expedient to open and make certain Parish Roads, in the District of Port Phillip, viz. :
1. New line of road from North Melbourne to the Village of Bulla, known as the Mount Macedon Road.
2. Proposed Keila, or Portland Road,from the Mount Macedon Road, to Keila Bridge.
3. Occupation Road, leading from the Mount Macedon Road to Taylor and Green's purchases in Bulla Bulla
Parish.
4. The old Sydney or Pascoeville Road, leading from the Mount Macedon Road to the New Sydney Road,(plans etc.)
(P.1, The Melbourne Argus,30-6-1848.)

THOSE ROADS TODAY.
1. Present Flemington Rd,Mt Alexander Rd,Wirraway Rd, Bulla Rd, Melrose Drive, and, from Melway 177 F9, Sunbury Rd.
2. Keilor Rd. Keilor was a gaelic word (whose meaning was given in one of the Keilor souvenirs) for the run of Hunter and Watson, who must have pronounced it as most un-pedantic people do instead of Kee-law. (*I can check it in my dictionary history if requested.) Because of the gold rush, Keilor road became known as Mt Alexander Rd and retained the name into the 1900's.
3. This was Oaklands Rd. Ann Greene was granted a square mile (section 4, Bulla) at the north west corner of Somerton and Oaklands Rd and Taylor section 9,also of 640 acres, a mile further north and across the road. This was later part of the estate of Glenara's Walter Clark who called it Dunalister after his son of M.V.R.C. and black rose fame; it is now called Balbethan.
4.Pascoe Vale Rd.


SALE of LAND.--Mr. W. H. Mortimer sold by auction on Wednesday last, on the ground, at Pascoeville, sixteen allotments, forming in all one acre and a half at 65. The sale was but thinly attended, owing to the boisterous state of the weather. (Port Phillip News.The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (NSW : 1838 - 1841) Thursday 13 August 1840 Edition: MORNING p 3 Article.)

In the Insolvent Estate of John Pascoe Fawkner,of Pascoeville, in the District of Port Phillip.
NOTICE is hereby given that an account and plan of distribution of available assets in the estate of John Pascoe Fawkner, of Pascoeville, the above named insolvent, now lies at the Office of the Chief Commissioner of Insolvent Estates for the District of Port Phillip, at the Supreme Court House, La Trobe-street, Melbourne, for the inspection (etc.) (The Melbourne Argus (Vic. : 1846 - 1848) Friday 25 December 1846 p 2 Article.)

Fawkner sold off the Belle Vue land between Pascoe Vale Rd and Northumberland Rd, a large part of which fronting Gaffney St was purchased by Henry George Ashurst* (after whom part of Pascoe Vale Rd was originally named) who leased it out to such as John Kernan who settled there in 1856 and called it Merai Farm. Fawkner could not be dispossessed of the rest of Belle Vue Park because he put it in his wife's name**.

*COAL. On Mr. Ashhurt's property at Pascoeville, the men employed sinking a well near that gentleman's house have come to a vein of coal eighty feet from the surface ; the vein is three feet thick, and samples of the coal have been brought to town and found to be of excellent quality ;such a discovery we need not say is of the
utmost importance to our province. Herald.(Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899) Saturday 30 July 1842 Edition: MORNING p 8 Article.)

** John Stephen further adds that he is informed and believes that I reside beyond the distance of seven miles; this is a fact which he could have easily tested; equivocation will not do on this point, all I say on the
subject is, that my farm is on the five-mile line from Melbourne, as laid down by the surveyors, and the five-mile land reserved to be sold at an enhanced price joins the corner of my land, or my wife' s land at
Pascoeville. (P.7. Launceston Examiner,1-3-1843.) John Stephen had probably challenged Fawkner's entitlement to stand for public office because of his sentence to hard yakka at Coal River and being outside the residential limit.

BHURR STONE.- Bhurr Stone which, for the purpose of constructing mill-stones, is of the greatest importance, is abundantly found in the neighbourhood of Melbourne, On the banks of the Saltwater River, near' Maine's and Dobson's quarry*, as well as at Pascoeville, on the east side of the valley, it exists in large
quantities, which were discovered about four years ago.(etc.) (P.2,Geelong Advertiser, 18-4-1844.)

The Niddrie quarry,now a residential area, was near the north west corner of J.P.Main's grant,section 12 Doutta Galla. Probably a lot of the metal used by George Holmes to make the road to "Keila" came from Main's Estate.

PASCOEVILLE ROAD IS BETTER!
Carriers between Melbourne and Seymour complain of the heavy state of the roads, especially that via Pentridge; on the other hand the Pascoeville or Young Queen road is in comparatively good condition, arising from the limited traffic thereupon, the former being somewhat shorter. This hint is worthy of note by parties having business upon the line. (P.2, The Melbourne Argus, 15-8-1848.)

CATTLE STEALING.- Pat Connerty, keeper of the town herd, and John McManus, butcher,were placed at the bar of the Police Court,on Tuesday morning last, charged with having received stolen cattle, the property of Mr.
Francis William Cobb*, of Pascoeville, who stated that be had lost, on Tuesday, the 15th instant, seven head of cattle from his station,(etc.)
(The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) Thursday 7 April 1842 p 4 Article.)
Although he was not mentioned by Andrew Lemon, I'm sure I saw Cobb's name in the 1863 Broadmeadows assessments.
*HE MAY HAVE BEEN FAWKNER'S BROTHER IN LAW! (See below.)

Edward Butler did run the Young Queen.I had wondered about that.

Prisoners of the Crown. On Saturday morning Mr Butler, of Pascoeville, was fined 20(s.?) for permitting a prisoner of the crown to drink on his premises. (The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) Saturday 23 January 1841 p 2 Article.)

HOW DID PASCOEVILLE BECOME OAK PARK?
The fruit and forest trees imported from England in 1839 and planted at Pascoeville, have grown very luxuriantly.The forest trees,; as horse chestnut, oak, maple, lime, sycamore, acatia, alder,walnut, and edible Chesnut (which last is showing blossom) have made wonderful growths.
(Geelong Advertiser and Squatters' Advocate (Vic. : 1845 - 1847) Saturday 8 November 1845 p 3 Article.)

Joseph English bought Fawkner's remaining portion following the death of Eliza (nee Cobb*) Fawkner's widow, and enlarged or replaced Fawkner's homestead. The Morgan and Knight (related) families were involved and I have just spotted Pine Avenue which might indicate the location of Fred Morgan's "The Pines".Later Hutchinson, owner of a flour mill at Glenroy,bought the property and renamed it Oak Park.

Oak Park Reserve - Victorian Heritage Database
vhd.heritage.vic.gov.au/places/result_detail/59161?print=true‎
Remnant trees on the site, including an oak, cypresses and peppercorn trees, have been estimated to date from Fawkner's residency. The park's close proximity ...

Fawkner was no great lover of native vegetation and the document recording his lease of portion of the property to his father in 1841 states that the lessee: "shall and will fell cut down grub up and otherwise destroy and remove all the native indigenous trees wood scrub and underwood whatsoever growing or to grow upon the said land or any part thereof except fruit trees or such trees as are or shall be marked...for ornamental hedgerows or boundary marks." (P.17 BROADMEADOWS: A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.)

P.W.Welsh who handled sales of village blocks for Fawkner "inferred that Fawkner's planting of orchard, gardens and nurseries was in someway a village work (instead of being part of his private farm,which it was): etc."
(P.17 BROADMEADOWS: A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.)

I wonder if the following trees had been intended for "village works" and Fawkner changed his mind in order to get a certificate of discharge on his insolvency.Apart from a variety of fruit trees, they included:

Forest Trees, of two sorts, Oak and Maple; these trees were also imported from England, at great cost and risk, and at severe loss, only about twenty remain on sale. As these trees will only be taken from the ground upon the order of the buyer, they may ensure their good state, and as they will not be liable to damage by sea water, or the saline deposition incident to a sea voyage, and as every care will be taken to preserve the roots as perfect as possible, parties buying will find these cheaper even than those sold by auction, for there they
must pay for them, faulty or good.Orders will be received at my residence, in Flinders Lane by Mr E. Vernon, Grocer; or at the Orchard, Pascoevale, by Mr Wm. Martin. Trees ordered and paid for will be delivered in town (on Saturdays only ) free of expense to the purchaser.
(P.4, Geelong Advertiser and Squatters' Advocate, 16-5-1846.)

PASCOE VALE.
The earliest use of Pascoe Vale in family notices was in 1854 in the death notice of a pioneer who had settled in Victoria in 1803.

WHAT'S THAT ITELLYA, HAVE YOU GONE STARK RAVING MAD? DOES THE YEAR 1835 MEAN ANYTHING TO YOU? EVEN THE HENTYS WERE WAY AFTER 1803. HANG ON,DO YOU MEAN THE SORRENTO SETTLEMENT?

DIED.
On the 24th inst., at Pascoe Vale, John Fawkner, Esq., in his 84th year, father of J. P. Fawkner,Esq., M.L.C.
P.4, Argus,25-9-1854.)

JOHN PASCOE FAWKNER, CHAMPION OF THE YOEMAN FARMER.

WE WANT LAND!
Just think,this letter was written at Pascoe Vale.

THE BEST WAY TO ESTABLISH A COLONIAL YEOMANRY.
Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 - 1851) Tuesday 21 August 1849 Edition: MORNING p 1 Article.


My time researching in the Titles Office showed me how much land was in the hands of a very small number of people. Many of the gold miners had been farmers, a large number of them having been tenant farmers in Ireland. They did not have the money to buy the large crown allotments that became available when parishes had been surveyed. In the parish of Will Will Rook,north of J.P.Fawkner's Belle Vue grant a huge area of land was bought by speculators, Hughes and Hosking, and later became part of the Kennedy estate.Much land in the parishes of Tullamarine and Bulla was alienated in square mile blocks.

Later land acts tried to prevent big landowners from obtaining so much land in grants but the use of dummies, and possibly loopholes enabled James Hearn, W.A.Blair, Charles Gavan Duffy, James Ford, James Purves, the Cains and Professor Hearn to buy huge tracts of land between Balcombe Creek's mouth and Portsea on the Mornington Peninsula for example.

Former squatter he may have been, but John Pascoe Fawkner had a great affection for yoeman farmers. He made a plea to the government to help them obtain freeholds in 1839, and a decade later he was sick and tired of the lack of action. You must read the letter. When Townships were established, suburban blocks were provided,but often multiple blocks were snapped up by such as Frederick Dawes Wickham at Horseshoe Bend near Keilor and William Allison Blair at Rye.

The only real efforts to establish closer settlement that came from Government were caused by the 1890's depression and the aftermath of war. The first effort was probably an attempt to remove beggars from the city (as one does before the Olympic Games are conducted!) Village settlements gave these people a chance to be self-sufficient and to pay off their land on easy terms.

After world war 1 an obligation to servicemen led to the establishment of soldier settlements in many areas.
By the 1930 depression the government probably decided it was easier to put the unemployed on susso projects such as Coburg Lake and the Great Ocean Road.Father Tucker's village settlement at Carrum Downs is discussed in my GORDON BOYINGTON journal.

However it was mainly the death of big landowners and the burden of death duties that caused many big landowners, such as Sir Rupert Clarke of Rupertswood and the family of William Taylor of Overnewton at Keilor, to ask the Crown to resume their huge estates. The Closer Settlement Acts circa 1900 finally achieved what John Pascoe Fawkner started in 1850, shortly after he wrote the letter,at the top of today's Oak Park Court;to give people the chance to buy their own small farms, not because they were out of a job or they had served King and Country but as a right.

Tulip Wright (section 3 Bulla) and Charles Gavan Duffy (the Irish Land Rights hero) did subdivide their grant fairly early but I doubt that their motives were as pure as good old J.P.F.,THE CHAMPION OF THE YOEMAN FARMER AND CLOSER SETTLEMENT.

Details of the many pieces of land bought by J.P.Fawkner on behalf of his co-operative members are given in several other of my journals.

JOHN THOMAS SMITH AND HIS ELECTORS, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA, 1852.

As I no longer have notes or maps, this journal comes entirely from memory.It is prompted by a McCracken search on Trove, the National Library of Australia's digitised collection of newspapers, and an article headed NORTH BOURKE on page 5 of the Argus of 20-1-1852. (Apologies. The date should read 20-12-1852.) In short, the article is about a meeting of electors resolving to ask John Thomas Smith to vacate his seat as a member of the legislative council for North Bourke.The intention of my journal is to give detail of most of the people involved.

SMITH.
J.T.Smith, seven times Mayor of Melbourne,arrived from Sydney to teach at George Langhorne's mission for the aborigines on the Botanical Gardens site. He soon became a businessman and received grants for land at Green Gully near Keilor in the parish of Maribyrnong; North Essendon,and Kensington (including the State School site) in the parish of Doutta Galla and what became the Ranelagh Estate, Mt Eliza, at the north west corner of the parish of Moorooduc.
At the time of this meeting, he was probably living in Melbourne,possibly in the oldest surviving house in Melbourne, photographed by the wonderful MUZZA OF McCRAE. He later built Ascot House in Fenton St Ascot Vale. In the early 1860's, he was a foundation member of the Borough of Essendon and Flemington and became one of the three M.L.C.'s for West Bourke. He was accused of bribing voters with inducements such as oranges that he grew; his orchard was probably near Cranwell St, North Essendon not far east from the Irish Dr Harbinson's orange grove (Melway 16 E12.)The Fitzroy Historical Society website states that he was also an alderman in that area.His portrait can be seen on the internet. Edward Wilson, editor of the Argus, constantly criticised J.T.Smith.(Sources: The Stopover That Stayed" Grant Aldous;parish maps; Keilor Centenary Souvenir 1950? eMelbourne past and present website under Mayoralty etc.)

MCDOUGALL.
Robert McDougall's biography must have been in Victoria and Its Metropolis for me to know so much of his movements. I believe he spent 10 years on Glenroy, which seems to have been divided into three farms: from Camp Rd, heading south, Pasture Hill, Bayview Farm and Glenroy Farm. Glenroy farm extended south to Rhodes Pde. John Kerr much later purchased the other two farms and built Glenroy House or Kerrsland which still stands as part of Penola College. Glenroy was so named by the Camerons, the original squatters, and they were still on Glenroy at this time as well so it is not clear which parts Mc Dougall and the Camerons had.
Robert McDougall later leased the Aitken Estate (section 8 Doutta Galla and possibly part of section 7 as described in the Thomas Miller (sic, Millar) journal) before moving into his newly- built "Arundel" mansion (Melway 4,G11) in about 1872.Unfortunately the Arundel mansion was ruined by Robinson's "fenestrations" circa 1950.
Robert was a foremost proponent of the Booth breed of Shorthorn cattle; as a result Harry Peck, in "Memoirs of a Stockman", stated that he and his neighbour, Harry Stevenson of "Niddrie" (Melway 15 K and 16 A 8-10)were bitter enemies, the latter being an advocate of the Bates strain. Ironically, Murray River steamer owner, McCulloch, who followed John Cochrane on Glenroy Farm, was also a prominent breeder of shorthorns.
You might well ask how McDougall and Stevenson could be neighbours. The answer is that they had other adjoining land on St John's grant (23 Doutta Galla), Stevenson near Strathmore Heights and McDougall near Strathmore North, both properties extending south into Essendon Aerodrome, which was originally called St John's Field.
The McDougalls also bought Warlaby, section 11 of the parish of Bulla Bulla (Melway 384 J8.)They probably owned it by 1888 when the first meeting of the Oaklands Hunt followed a trail from Warlaby laid by Farquhar McRae (not McCrae but possibly related)who was in charge of the hunters on "Glenara". "Warlaby",640 acres or a square mile, extended north to a western extension of Craigieburn Rd, which separated it from the Brannigans' St Johns. Due east of Warlaby was "Oaklands" which gave Oaklands Rd its name and north of that farm was Harpdale whose beautiful homestead (circa 1992) still bore the Brodie name set in tiles.
Warlaby was the home of Robert McDougall's son, Alexander (Sandy) who married Sandy Smith's daughter and moved to Western Australia in the early 1900's. Sandy Smith owned a mansion, Coilsfield, which was demolished to build the Essendon Hospital; he had earlier farmed near the Aitken Estate. (Sources:Victoria and Its Metropolis; Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History" Andrew Lemon; Keilor rates; "The Stopover That Stayed" Grant Aldous; Doutta galla parish map, Bulla rates and parish map, Bob Blackwell re farm names; "The Oaklands Hunt" D.F.Cameron-Kennedy; "Bulla Bulla" I.W.Symonds; various essendon histories; videotaped visit to Jack Simmie's Harpsdale; "Early Landowners: Parish of Doutta Galla" Ray Gibb; K.B.Keeley's architectural thesis on Arundel.)

PARDON MY IGNORANCE!
Some people whose names were included in the article lived outside my area of research, which started as Tullamarine, but expanded rapidly due to Bob Blackwell and George and Syd Lloyd. These surnames are Budd, Kyle, Guthrie and Reynolds. I have seen the name Guthrie and "Glengyle" which ring a bell but not very loudly. If I remember correctly, Reynolds was mentioned by Richard Broome in "Between Two Creeks", the history of Coburg. The names of Reynolds Pde and Reynard St, near Coonan's Hill may have been connected to this pioneer. Incidentally, Pentridge was the original name for Coburg and was changed during a royal visit in (1869?) to honour the Royal name Saxe-Coburg, which was changed to Windsor due to anti-German sentiment during W.W.1. Many families of German ancestry anglicised their surnames during W.W.1, such as the Groenberger family that was running the Junction Hotel at Tullamarine (SOURCE:Gordon Connor, whose testimony, like that of Colin Williams' also 99 at the time, can be taken as GOSPEL.)
POSTSCRIPT-GUTHRIE. I had a dim recollection of seeing the name, Guthrie, in relation to the Bulla area (Glenn & Guthrie?) and near Keilor Village. A search on trove revealed that Alexander (and J.) Guthrie had a farm called Glengyle, one mile from Keilor.They were living there in 1851.
I had a dim connection in my brain of Guthrie with Thomas Bertram and it proved to be correct. The Argus of 15-4-1854 reported on page 4 that Elizabeth, the second daughter of the late Murdoch Campbell of Scotland had died at the residence of Thomas Bertram Esquire, Glengyle, near Keilor.
The ford over Deep Creek, on Arundel Rd, which provided access to Keilor Village (where the Mansfields drowned in 1906 because the partly built Arundel bridge had been swept away) was known to all as Bertram's Ford.The ramp leading to the ford can still be seen between the house on the Browns Rd corner and the river(Melway 14 H2.)
Section 1 of the parish of Tullamarine was granted to R.H.Bunbury in 1842 but K.B.Keeley believed he was a dummy bidder for Colin Campbell who was the owner from 1843 until 1851 when he sold it to Donald Cameron. Two parts of "Arundel were sold off before Argus editor, Edward Wilson bought it in 1854; farms that were later known as Ellengower (or Ellengowen, I could not decipher the Keilor rate collector's writing) and Turner's. Was Colin Campbell a brother of Elizabeth Campbell and Thomas Bertram's wife?
Either of these farms could have been Glengyle. Ellengower was the Browns Rd area and the ramp passed through it, making the naming of the ford a foregone conclusion if Bertram had owned it. Turner's, later bought by the McNabs of Oakbank, (as was the land at Melway 4 B11)is situated between the east-west section of McNabs Rd and the river (4 D-F 12.) The decision on which was Glengyle rests on the description of Glengyle being one mile from Keilor. Bertram's Ford was about a mile from Keilor while Turner's was at least 2 1/2 miles.Therefore Glengyle, occupied by the Guthries and Bertrams, would have been in the horseshoe bend bisected by Browns Rd (Melway 14 G2.)
My suspicion of a connection with the Bulla area also proved to be correct so I'll go one step further and suggest that there was some sort of connection between the Guthries and Peter Young of Nairn, who will be discussed later. Alexander Guthrie Young, a colonist of 52 years died in 1891 at the age of 59.
(The Argus 9-12-1891 p.1) Alexander Guthrie obviously moved from Glengyle to the Bulla area. Mrs Alexander Guthrie gave birth to a son at Bulla Bulla, Deep Creek on 1-5-1859.(A.3-5-1859 p.4.)
Alexander Guthrie died at Togarf, Sunbury at the age of 70 on 27-11-1880. (A. 29-11-1880 P.1 and 8.) Togarf was obviously a farm and his widow, Ann, exhibited her Ayrshires with success at many shows. She died at Murtoa at the age of 80. (A. 27-9-1901 p.1.)
Postscript. Having obtained a map of Bulla Bulla parish, I can state that A& J. Guthrie's grants, issued in October of the years stated, consisted of section 14 (1852,503 acres), 22, part 4 (1854,135 acres 3 roods 10 perches) and 23 part 2 (1854, 384 acres 37 perches.) As I no longer have my Bulla rates transcriptions, I have no idea whether his farm (Togarf)remained this size.These grants were in the area shown on Melway map 383. I would imagine that they had been squatters before alienation and that section 14 was the homestead block and pre-emptive right. Section 14 was bounded by Southern Plains Rd, the line of Gellies Rd continued south almost to Emu Creek, and this creek on the south and west. A now-closed road, leaving Sunbury Rd opposite the east boundary of Craig and O' Grady's grant (Shepherds Lane), crossed Emu Creek in the east side of 383 D7, and travelled through the grant to the west end of Southern Plains Rd. This would have to be the private road to Daameeli; this property is on Richard Brodie's grant, 24(1). This road was the eastern boundary of 23 (2) and Emu Creek was the eastern boundary of 22 (4). The former fronted Sunbury Rd, the latter Gellies Rd and both Lancefield Rd.The tributary shown in Melway 383 B-D7 was about 100 metres (5mm on the map)north of the boundary between the two allotments.
Finally, although my memory is not too hot about what you say to Jan if things don't seem fair, it is pretty reliable concerning local history. I stated earlier that I had vague memories of seeing "Glenn and Guthrie" somewhere. Joseph Dubois returned my material yesterday and while looking for something else I found it!
In the Annals of Tullamarine (a large part of "Tullamarine: Before The Jetport").
1863. (After mentioning that James Sharp was leasing 40 acres of Chandos from J.C.Riddell and was to move to Hillside four years later.)Broadmeadows' rate records list the following Tullamarine residents east of Bulla Rd from the present bridge to Nash's Lane:
H.J.Brown and Glenn & Guthrie (Camp Hill), E.Dunn (Viewpoint), J.Maconochie (Stewarton)Love and Sharp as above, C &J.Nash (Fairview), W.Wright (Sunnyside), R.Beaman (Broombank), J.Foster, T.Anderson, R.Mitchell, T.Wright, P.Kettle, J.Gawley, J.Wright, J.Hendry (store, later P.O. too), C.Evans (shop.)

One last thing. Applications for occupation licences were invited on page 1 of The Argus of 11-6-1847.The various parcels of land were numbered but no location was given other than parishes. Alexander Guthrie had leased 640 acres in Will Will Rook for the previous two years. I checked the parish map on the internet, but there were no dates for the issue of grants. Then I remembered that Joseph had returned my material. According to "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History" only two grants were not issued in 1838. They were sections 5 and 2. Alexander Gibb purchased section 5 in 1848 after leasing the 640 acres for some time (Page 20) so Alexander could only have been leasing Box Forest, granted to John Pascoe Fawkner in 1850 (on behalf of his co-operative.) This square mile, bounded by the Northern Golf Club, Hilton St/ Box Forest Rd, the cemetery and Boundary Rd is now named after a Broadmeadows Shire Councillor, circa 1927, Cr Rupert Hadfield.



PETER YOUNG.
In "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History", Andrew Lemon mentioned George Langhorne conducting Free Presbyterian services at Peter Young's Nairn and how the United Presbyterians had caused problems. Andrew's source was obviously Peter Young's letter published on page 4 of The Argus of 19-2-1851.
Here are the headlines about Peter Young. He was a very proud Scot with a good knowledge of the "land o' cakes" and a love of poetry. He was on the front foot when situations needed correcting. He was a stalwart of the Free Presbyterians and a member of the Order of Oddfellows, working hard to advance the former and defending the latter group from unjustified criticism. Above all he was an expert farmer, and I mean an EXPERT. He seems to have moved to Clyde Park, Westernport before his death.

As I have the Bulla Bulla map now I'll tell you about Nairn before I detail the trove articles. See Melway map 384. Peter Young received the grant for Section 8 (a square mile/ 640 acres) on 26-11-1848. He added the 130 acre 7B on the other side of St John's Lane on 18-9-1851. (St John's lane led to the Brannigans' "St John's Hill", not heaven!) The William Inglis and Son thoroughbred horse sales complex is in the south east corner of section 8 and the end of the public section of St Johns Rd indicates its north western corner. Allotment B of section 7 is between St Johns Rd and Deep Creek; the southern boundary was the now closed road in C-E 12 and the northern boundary is indicated by 110 St Johns Rd.

TROVE- A CHRONOLOGY.
While reading Isaac Batey's fascinating historical articles in the Sunbury newspaper, I half-noticed his reference to a Mr Young being ( a squatter?) near Essendon in the early days (probably 1847.)This could have been Peter Young. I will start with an advertisement that Peter placed in The Argus (as I thought, soon after arriving), which outlines his past.He was actually in Victoria by 1842!
All items are from The Argus unless otherwise specified: 1846-8 was the Melbourne Argus.

24-9-1847 page 2. Peter announced that he was setting up as an auctioneer and commission agent. He said that he had been land steward for the Marquis of Breadalbane (in Scotland), an experimental farmer and land steward for A. Speirs, the M.P. for Richmond (Tasmania), superintendent of the Government Domain farm in Van Dieman's Land and latterly superintendent of J. and W. Macarthur's stations. Peter must have arrived in Melbourne by 1846 or very early 1847. A letter he wrote to the Port Phillip Gazette was republished in the Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (12-6-1847 page 4.) There had been an outbreak of black leg in young cattle near Port Fairy,to which no solution had been found,and Peter wrote from the Crown Hotel outlining his method that had worked so successfully in New South Wales in the winter of 1837. He had been in charge of 8000 cattle and the sudden death of cattle 20 miles away was put down to snake bites until Peter arrived and diagnosed black leg after dissecting a carcass.

27-1-1847 page 1-2. Peter made a toast at the Robbie Burns Festival that was a virtual history of Scotland and occupied 4 1/2 columns of The Argus.

28-5-1847 page 2. SEYMOUR. Preparations are being made for the sale to be conducted by Mr Peter Young on the 24th. This was to be the first ever in the township.Peter was auctioning well before the advertisement appeared.

1-6-1847 page 2. An excited report of the sale was given. The correspondent told of Peter's plans for regular sales.

3-8-1847 page 2. A DANGEROUS NUISANCE. At the close of business at the Police Office on Saturday, Mr Peter Young informed the Mayor of the cattle, horses, pigs and goats in Latrobe St West and no constable ever being seen to control this. The Chief Constable, who had earlier ignored Peter's complaints, was huffy but the Mayor instructed him to send two constables and impound these animals.

30-11-1847. The Seymour correspondent understood that Peter had intended to conduct quarterly sale but none (bar the first) had come off yet.

20-4-1849 page 4. Peter complained that he hadn't been getting his Argus or Patriot.He was now on Nairn.

19-4-1850 page 3, column 4. FOR SALE. Seed wheat and potatoes of a very superior quality grown from seed of last year's crop at Warrnambool. On sale by the undersigned, Peter Young, Nairn, Deep Creek.

27-4-1850 page 2. BIRTH. At Nairn, parish of Bulla Bulla on the 25th, Mrs Peter Young of a daughter.

8-1-1851 page 2.(Original correspondence to the Mt Macedon paper.) Peter said that up until the end of 1850 mail had been picked up at Mr Wright's Bridge Inn but the mail run to Mt Macedon now went through Keilor. (This is of interest because it seems that Tulip Wright did start the Lincolnshire Hotel's construction during 1851. Donohue applied for the Bridge Inn licence in 1851 but his application was postponed because of the filthy state of the Bridge Inn. (See THE HOTELS NEAR TULLAMARINE journal.) It may have been because Tulip had left, abandoning his hotel, that the route was changed.)Peter complained that 500 residents near Bulla now had to pick up their mail from Melbourne or Gisborne, stating that only about 5 people lived on the new route between Keilor and The Gap. (He was talking about William Taylor of Overnewton, James Robertson of Upper Keilor,possibly the Page Brothers of Glencoe-I'll have to ask Isaac Batey if they were still there; their drinking might have seen them off by 1851, and one or two others.) P.S. Edward Page advertised the homestead block in 1859. (The Argus 27-6-1859 page 2, column 2.)


10-2-1851 page 2. Peter hasn't given up. He now accuses two magistrates of using undue influence to change the mail run. One magistrate was certainly William Taylor; I'm not sure if Robertson was a J.P. too. His son, James, was and another son, Francis, was a member of parliament.

19-2-1851 page 4.Peter wrote a letter about Langhorne teaching Sunday School at theschoolhouse on Nairn on Sunday mornings and conducting Free Presbyterian services in the afternoon and how the United Presbyterians
were interfering with their fund-raising for a church for Broadmeadows and Deep Creek (Westmeadows and Bulla.)
"Vision and Realisation", the Victorian Education Department history of 1972, mentioned an early school on the McDougalls' "Warlaby" (probably named Oaklands) in a declivity; this may have been a mistaken reference to Peter's school unless another was built on Warlaby later. My memory from reading the book 20 years ago is dim but I think it mentioned two schools with different National School numbers.

31-5-1851 page 2. Another farming problem had arisen, smut in wheat. As everyone would know, when crops are affected, prices rise. Think bananas! Due to his innovative ideas and experience, Peter had worked out a solution and he could have cashed in big-time. He had put down 140 acres of wheat at Nairn the previous year and not one head of smutted wheat had grown due to his treatment of the grain before planting that he had developed 17 years earlier. Peter was not going to keep this a secret and let his colleague suffer. Could you imagine Coles giving Woolworths a helping hand?

25-6-1852. Peter wrote a letter headed "To Improve Crops by Pollen" which showed that he had a thorough grasp of the history of the development of the various types of wheat.

11-8-1852 page 6.Peter Young of Nairn requested permission from those who had donated money for the church in the parish of Bulla (not enough to proceed) to hand it over to the National School, whose establishment had been resolved at a meeting he'd recently chaired.

The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston) 3-11-1852 page 722 (no kidding!) As Peter McCracken , the President of the Port Phillip Farmers' Society was absent (due to the drowning of his young son, William, in the Moonee Ponds Creek near the bottom of Pascoe St, Westmeadows; see McCracken below), Peter Young of Nairn took the chair, filling it most capably, at the function to honour David Duncan's service to the organisation. (See the WILLIAM THOMPSON AND DAVID DUNCAN journal.)

6-3-1868 page 2. Evan McIntosh was holding a clearing sale at Nairn, his lease having expired. Peter may have moved to Westernport but he also could have been conducting a business in Melbourne.

6-5-1895 page 1. H.W.Shepherd married Susan, the daughter of the late Mr Peter Young Esquire of Melbourne and Clyde Park, Westernport.

While trove is a fantastic resource, it does not distinguish between the surname Young and the opposite of old, which led to many wasted hours. I did not find any other family notices or references to Clyde Park, Westernport apart from the 1895 marriage of his daughter.

I tried googling YOUNG with CLYDE, BERWICK and WESTERNPORT, the last named combination reminding me of a discovery I made at the P.R.O.V. (See SQUATTERS IN THE WESTERNPORT DISTRICT journal.)

A website headed FREDERICK XAVIER TO ARTHUR ZOUCH has the following information.
The Melbourne Times of 23-4-1842 recorded that Peter Young had been granted a publican's licence for the "Bushman" in Sydney Road.The Port Phillip of 21-4-1843 shows that the hotel, once again described as being on Sydney Road was now called the Sugar Loaf Inn. The same paper, on 27-4-1844,stated that Peter had been granted his licence but the hotel was again called the Bushman.
(An alphabetical listing of squatters and their runs, from correspondence with the Governor, which is a different website, lists Peter Young of the Sugar Loaf Run.) Given Peter's purchase of land in Seymour at the first sales, his conducting the first sales in the township and the fact that Sugarloaf Creek intersects the Hume Highway in Seymour, it is reasonable to assume that the hotel was at Seymour and not in modern-day Carlton, Brunswick (or Plenty, Pascoeville near the Young Queen Inn, or Tullamarine near the Lady of the Lake- routes more likely to be called Sydney Road in the early 1840's.)
Rev. Peter Gunn, who became the minister at the Campbellfield's historic Scots Church (Melway 7 H6), had visited the Golburn (River?) area and Peter was among a large number who signed a letter of encouragement and contributed 50 pounds to support his ministry; another signatory was from Sunday Creek, which joins Sugarloaf Creek.(Port Phillip Herald 1-10-1844.)

Peter Young and Elizabeth christened John William in 1843.
Peter Young purchased allotments at the first sale of blocks at Seymour. (Melbourne Weekly Courier 23-3-1844.)
Peter Young was one of 469 voters who qualified by freehold in Seymour in the list of electors in the District of Bourke (Melbourne Courier 8-8-1845.)Peter Young was listed in the (1847?) Port Phillip directory as a settler, Seymour, Sydney Rd.

The website also lists newspaper reports showing that Peter Young was given depasturing licences in July 1843 and October 1844 in the Westernport District.Ah hah, I thought, perhaps Peter had been on Clyde Farm, Westernport before he went to Bulla. Then I remembered my search for a grant (or licence) that Captain Adams of Rosebud was supposed to have been given in about 1841. All such matters were dealt with in Sydney and the Public Records office gave me an index of correspondence. As Peninsula pioneers were referred to as late as 1888 in "Victoria and Its Metropolis" as being in the Westernport District, I concentrated on those entries.

Imagine my surprise to find Barker's Mt Alexander Run (near Castlemaine) described as being in the Westernport District! In view of what has been mentioned before, Peter Young's depasturing licences were almost certainly near Seymour.

Still none the wiser,about when Peter left Nairn, I returned to Trove and tried "Nairn, Bulla, Young, 1850-1867".
Argus 18-4-1853 page 12. Peter was offering Nairn for sale by private contract. He had probably only been there for about five years but how much he had accomplished! The advertisement describes the property in great detail, including the waterfall.For the sale of his furniture, library, stock, vehicles and so on, Peter employed prominent auctioneer, Dalmahoy Campbell (much discussed by Harry Peck in his "Memoirs of a Stockman.) (See Argus 20-5-1853 page 9.)

Argus 4-6-1853 page 8, column 1. Peter offered an incredible variety of grape vine cuttings for sale.

Joseph Clarke of "Goolpala", Saltwater River (Probably the future "Rupertswood")might have bought all of Peter's property north of Melbourne.The Argus of 16-9-1865 reported, on page 2, the sale of the late Joseph's estate: lot 1. Nairn; lot 2.About 9 acres of portions 29 and 30 Doutta Galla near the racecourse (the future showgrounds site near Clarke Ave, Melway 28 F11); lots 3-9. original allotments in the Township of Seymour. N.B. Clarke may have bought the showgrounds land from the grantee, Pearson, who had sold 4 acres to John and David Charles Ricketts in 1851.

The advertisement states that Nairn was split into two farms, leased by Mr McIntosh (300 acres) and Mr Millar (450 acres.) Part of Nairn was to become William Michie's "Cairnbrae". It also stated that Peter had framed the economy of Nairn upon sure principles and described the orchards and so on. In 1860, W.C.Howie had been on Nairn and placed a notice about a black pig that had strayed into his paddock (The Argus 30-6-1860 page 8, last column.)

As we know that Peter was an auctioneer, he may have been a partner of the firm of Young and Timbury,which advertised the sale of the cargo of a ship in The Argus of 18-5-1860 (page 2, bottom of column 4.)
A George Young, from Tasmania was a pioneer near Dromana and might have been related to Peter. (See "A Dreamtime of Dromana".)Peter was certainly not related to Frankston pioneer, Mark Young, who was a Roman Catholic.
As Clyde is near Berwick, J.Young and James Grant Young (Argus 11-7-1883 page 5 and 10-10-1867 page 6 column 3) may have been related, although Mark Young was involved in the Dandenong area before moving to Frankston and they might have been related to him instead.

McCRACKEN.
Peter McCracken farmed on Stewarton from 1846 until 1855.This was the 777 acres of Gladstone Park/Gardens between the Forman St and Lackenheath Dr. corners and extending to the Moonee Ponds Creek, which formed the eastern boundary.I have just spent two hours looking for the death notice of Peter's three year old son, William, in 1852, which I read last night but cannot now find! However, an indication of this death is found on page 722 of The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston) of 3-11-1852.

One of the extracts from Melbourne papers was THE FARMERS' SOCIETY. The article concerns a presentation of a silver service to MR DAVID DUNCAN OF THOMPSON AND DUNCAN, CORNFACTORS, BOURKE ST, MELBOURNE. (David had been treasurer of the body since its inception.See David Duncan and William Thompson journal.)As the President, Peter McCracken of Stewarton, was absent due to a severe domestic calamity , Peter Young of Nairn took the chair.

Young William had walked with his siblings part of the way to school (at the two year old St Paul's Church of England in Broadmeadows Township at Melway 6 B7.) They would have crossed at the bottom of Pascoe St, where there was later a bridge according to Sid Lloyd, until it was swept away in a flood and required entry to Jim Barrow's Gladstone via Forman St.Young William probably slipped into the creek on the way home. (Extracts from The McCracken Letters provided by Deidre Farfor.)

Peter then had a dairy farm at Kensington, on allotments 19 and 18 of section 2, Doutta Galla, leased from John Robert Murphy, the grantee, from 1855 until 1863.This land lay between Kensington Rd and a line near Tennyson St (Melway 42 K4.)Peter suffered the loss of all his haystacks in 1861 and struggled through 1862 because the grass was poor and the hay expensive. After he had moved to "Ardmillan", his mansion at present 33-39 Ardmillan Rd, and ended his lease on the Kensington land, pork butcher, Samuel Cox, leased the old dairy and from 1874 to 1882 William Samuel Cox ran his Kensington Park Racecourse; when Kensington Park was subdivided, W.S.Cox started a new course on Feehan's farm, where it still stands, extended onto Long John Mooney's grant, and then to Wilson Rd.
(The McCracken Letters, P.5 "Early Landowners: Parish of Doutta Galla" Ray Gibb, "Ardmillan" Ray Gibb re address of the mansion.)

Optimistic reports of the Melbourne and Essendon Railway's meeting appeared on page 6 of the 30-8-1859 issue of The Argus. Directors appointed were George Holmes, Hugh Glass, J. Dinwoodie, C.Bradshaw, J.C.King, Peter McCracken and E.B.Wight. I think Holmes, a major contractor, who was building this line, was the man after whom Holmes Rd in Moonee Ponds West was named. Hugh Glass of Flemington House was a neighbour of Peter's brother, Robert and, with the McCrackens and Robertsons, owned most of the railway's route. Dinwoodie held a mortgage on the Aitken Estate at one time, the Bradshaws owned land at Hawstead and between Epsom and Union Rds, and Edward Byam Wight owned "The Ridge" across present Kensington Rd from Peter McCracken's dairy and the "Temperance Township" triangle mentioned in relation to the Bradshaws.(Early Landowners: Parish of Doutta Galla- titles and parish map, The Stopover That Stayed.)

Peter is known to have been on Ardmillan by 1860; on page 4 of The Argus of 24-4-1860, appeared the death notice of John, the fourth son of Peter McCracken of Ardmillan near Essendon, who had died of croup at the age of 2 years and 7 months.The railway opened at about that time but by 1864 it had to close because of insufficient patronage. No doubt James McConnell had sold his grants at Kensington and Moonee Ponds (bisected by Puckle St)at a good profit but the majority shareholders such as Glass and Peter suffered heavy losses. The former died from an "accidental overdose" and Peter lost Ardmillan.

He'd sold the part east of the railway to Taylor and by 1874, the rest of his estate had been sold, the homestead block to stock agent William Hudson and the western and northern portions to Edward Dale Puckle who sold subdivided land to such as Thomas Jennings Jnr, born in Melbourne in 1837.In a letter, Peter said that one consolation was that his new residence in Powlett St, East Melbourne was at least closer to work. And what was that? I'm going to make you wait.

Peter's brother, Robert, bought Ailsa from Captain Buckley; a letter from "Ardmillan" to Scotland indicates that this took place in April/May 1865, not in 1864 as stated by A.D.Pyke.The property was north of Kent St and went north to the Filson/South St midline. Glass had earlier purchased the Ascot Vale Rd frontage. In 1873, the Essendon Football Club commenced and played on the Ailsa paddock; it is claimed that the club had to move to another ground because the V.F.A. demanded a fenced ground in 1877, but it is more likely that the club moved to the East Melbourne Ground in 1875.John Filson lodged a subdivision plan for the paddock in 1875, naming the main streets after himself and his wife (nee Harding.)

Why didn't the club play at Windy Hill? Most football teams had formed from cricket clubs but Essendon was mainly composed of horse lovers. As most of the councillors were cricket lovers, they refused the "Same Olds" use of the ground. Later the council made the ground available to a V.F.A. club, Essendon Town (later known as Essendon A),which experienced great success in about 1910 when the great Dave McNamara was place kicking goals from 80 yards out and kicked the first century ever.A decade later many of their stars transferred to North Melbourne and the club folded. At last the ground was made available to the V.F.L. club "the Same Olds" which adopted the Bombers as a nick-name when aeroplane manufacturing no longer relied on aeroplane dope.

Ailsa was demolished when the house and a small portion of the land was sold to the Catholic Church. The new buildings functioned as a convent and college/university for a great length of time and recently became a Scientology centre.

The Mar Lodge Estate, adjoining Hoffman's Butzbach (later Croft's Buckley Park)was inherited by Francis Robertson of Upper Keilor, whose brother, James, inherited Upper Keilor and "Spring Hill" which became Aberfeldie. Francis, a bachelor and member of Parliament 1860-1864 and 1868-1886, built the 43 square homestead in 1863. He died at 1 p.m. on 11-3-1886 and the McCrackens bought MarLodge in 1888 according to the Essendon Conservation Study.

Coiler and Alexander McCracken sold 3 acres to the Government on 27-11-1910 for 1000 pounds; this was the original small portion of the Essendon High School site. Gordon Connor, one of the school's early pupils recalled cows grazing right to the high school fence. This continued for almost a decade until Mar Lodge was subdivided in 1919. There would have been no need to mow the grass because, on 7-1-1919,fire destroyed 150 acres of grassland owned by the late Alexander McCracken and tenanted by F.Flanagan.

Before continuing, I had better mention a bit about the McCracken family. It hailed from Ardwell Farm on the Ardmillan Estate in Ayrshire, Scotland. Peter, Robert and Alexander Earle were three brothers involved in the Essendon area and there was apparently a sister, Grace, who married Alexander McGeoch, spirit merchant and died at the residence of her brother, Robert McCracken (The Argus 20-4-1859 p.4.)

Alexander Earle McCracken returned to Scotland in 1857 due to the ill health of his wife Jane. This reminds me of an error that I need to fix in the Thomas Miller (sic, Millar) journal. I stated that Jane had mentioned Thomas Millar's funeral but she had written about a grand festivity on "Miller's Farm"; another family member had written about the funeral.
Mar Lodge extended west from McCracken St to include all present Hedderwick St house blocks.Between there and Hoffmans Rd was Butzbach, granted to William Hoffman, a brick manufacturer. Alexander Earle McCracken was probably the first tenant on Butzbach and within ten months of the grant being issued had built stables with four stalls and a barn.In March 1851, he was building a house which was probably between Croft St and the bend in Price St (Melway 28 B2.)Alexander grew wheat (probably supplied to Barber and Young's flour mill on the Pipeworks Market site at Campbellfield) and the farm prospered but as mentioned earlier Alexander Earle and Jane returned home in 1857.

In a letter dated 14-4-1858, Robert told Alexander Earle that the McAuleys were now farming Butzbach. In the following year, the death occurred of nine year old Grace, the daughter of Mr Alexander Earle McCracken late of Butzback (sic), Saltwater River (The Argus 12-10-1859 p.6.) Not a good year for the McCrackens; little Grace had taken the same journey as her Auntie Grace and the optimism regarding the railway was to turn to heartache within a few years.

When Essendon F.C. started playing at Ailsa, Robert's 17 year old son, Alexander, a 17 year old Scotch College student, was its first secretary. Peter's son, Coiler or Collier, was the team's first captain. Alexander was to become the first President of the V.F.L. until shortly before his death in 1915. He was to become prominent in the Oaklands Hunt Club. He purchased "Cumberland" whose homestead ruins can still be seen at Melway 178 C12. After-hunt festivities were generally held at Cumberland, Alister Clark's "Glenara" or the Inverness Hotel until the club purchased "Sherwood". The Tullamarine community picnics, organised by its schoolteacher, Alec Rasmussen, were conducted on the 880 acre Cumberland, in 1909, 1910 and 1911. After Alexander's death, the Johnsons of "Glendewar" across the creek lived in its beautiful homestead but had to return to a humbler home when the Cumberland mansion was destroyed by fire.

Cumberland had a strong footy connection because of Alexander McCracken but also because of Thomas Wills, the grantee (of section 5 Will Will Rook?), an overlander, who was the uncle of Tom Wills, footy's creator, and Colden Harrison, codifier of the rules in 1866 and called the father of football.
("Running With The Ball" ? and A. Mancini.)

Cumberland was Alexander's country retreat but his real home was "North Park", now the Columban Mission on the south side of Woodlands St, Essendon. His cousin, Peter's son, Coiler (obviously named after Coiler Robertson of La Rose) built Earlsbrae, which is now part of the Lowther Hall school. Coiler got into finncial difficulty and left for Bourke in New South Wales. (See "The Gold The Blue for extensive detail.)

COILER ROBERTSON, LA ROSE. See the journal about the 1847 Port Phillip Directory to find details about the "La Rose" Robertsons, the farm's location and two other Robertson families in the area.

4 comment(s), latest 9 months, 2 weeks ago

JOHN TOWNSEND, DROMANA, VIC., AUST. : FIRST TO USE MOUTH TO MOUTH IN AUSTRALIA?

In 1954, James Elam was the first to demonstrate experimentally that cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was a sound technique and, with Dr. Peter Safar, he demonstrated its superiority to previous methods. Peter Safar wrote the book ABC of resuscitation in 1957. In the United States, it was first promoted as a technique for the public to learn in the 1970s.
(Wikipedia.)

John Townsend(or perhaps his father) may have been one of the first people in Victoria to save a life using mouth to mouth resuscitation about 70 years before the technique was introduced in Australia.

In A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, Colin McLear wrote the following about John Townsend.
P. 74. John Townsend (1840-1918) seems to have been a jack-of-all-trades. At one time he farmed where a Rosebud golf course is now situated on the slopes of Arthurs Seat. He also built houses and ran an early store in Dromana,in what had been George McLear's butchers shop. He lived on the (south)corner of Ligar and McCulloch Street opposite the State School,in what old-timers call Townsend's. The old house still stands. John is believed to have shot the last dingo on the Peninsula on the Anderson property (Barragunda)at Boneo (Cape Schanck).

John helped Simon,commonly called "Simon the Belgian" fence his land on the side of Arthurs Seat.

P.84.Charlie Dyson married a daughter of John Singleton and one of their children became Mrs John Townsend.(Does this tie in?)

P.120. John Townsend was one of the bondsmen for a loan of 300 pounds to build St Mark's Church of England in Dromana.

P. 126. An entry in George McLear's notebooks in 1880 advises that Townsend paid 35 pounds for the church....John Townsend was a man of many parts, among them a sometime builder. Perhaps he had a contract to re-erect the church...
(The above relates to the relocation of the Methodist Church from a site in Heales St to the Esplanade.)

MOUTH TO MOUTH.
Harold Wilson, eldest son of Mr and Mrs H. W. Wilson. of M'Culloch street, Dromana, had a very narrow escape from drowning last Saturday week. It appears the little fellow, in company with a small lad named Stanley Evans, was playing on the banks of a waterhole close to where Mr. Wilson is erecting his new slaughter house, and in some way he slipped into the hole, which had at least 5 feet of water in it. The other boy being un- able to render his unfortunate play mate any assistance, had the presence of mind to run down to where Mr Townsend and the Messrs Wilsons were at work, and informed them what had happened. They immediately hurried to the hole. Seeing no trace of the child, the father plunged in, and succeeded in bringing to the surface what he considered was the lifeless body of his son. However, Mr Townsend,who acted with judgment,was quickly at work, vigorously blowing his warm breath into the little fellow's lungs, until he slowly began to regain consciousness. Mr.G.M'Lear, who lives close to where the accident happened, was sent for, and rendered valuable assistance, but had it not been for the artificial respiration resorted to by Mr Townsend, it is doubtful whether the boy would have recovered.(P.5, Mornington Standard,10-12-1904.)

The wikipedia entry for Mouth to mouth resuscitation describes how it was developed in 1957 and was promoted in the U.S.A in the 1970's.

John Townsend's grants near Rosebud were crown allotments 31D and 31C,section B in the parish of Wannaeue. The former, consisting of 37 acres 1 rood 15 perches is bounded by Bayview/Old Cape Schank Rd,roughly the north-south part of Leura Crescent and Waterfall Gully Rd. The latter, of 100 acres and 2 perches adjoined it on the east and extended to the full length of Rosebud Avenue.(Melway 170 G 4-5.)

Early Horton Tasmania Settlers
and family from around the world
John Townsend

1865-1923

Gender: male
Birth: 1865 Dromana, Vic, Australia (More...)
Death: 1923 Melbourne, Vic, Australia (More...)
Parents

Father: John Townsend
Mother: Allison Mitchell
Family 1

Partner: Susannah Caroline Hanson (1864-1906)
Marriage: 1887 Dromana, Vic, Australia (More...)
Children

Elsie Townsend (1890-)
Jessie Allison Townsend (1892-)
Ellen Carolina Townsend (1893-)
John Leonard Townsend (1894-1951)
Arthur Gould Townsend (1899-)

It is possible that Susannah Caroline Hanson was a niece of Christian Hanson,who in 1887 was first assessed on one of William Hopcraft's grants in the parish of Balnarring on the east side of Tucks Rd at its northern end.
Hec Hanson's MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN makes it clear that she was not Christian's daughter. Her father or brother was possibly Charles Hanson,who with John Townsend was a member of an early dramatic company in Dromana, the Black Gulls. (Harry Wilson,probably the father of the boy saved by John Townsend, and George Townsend were also member.) The Townsends of Mornington may be related.

FLINDERS AND KANGERONG
SHIRE COUNCIL.
---------------
[Present, Crs Downward, (president), Baldry, Brown, Griffiths, Hurley, Wilson and Stanley.
REVISION COURT.
The Council sat as a Revision Court for the purpose of revising the voters' lists. The applications of T. M.
Dorley. and John A. Crichton were entertained. Those of Alfred P.Beecher and Charles Hanson, were disallowed.
(P.2, Mornington Standard, 4-8-1892.)

EXCERPT FROM "Old Peninsula Days, Plays and Players"
Standard (Frankston, Vic. : 1939 - 1949) Thursday 21 February 1946 p 9 Article.

Mr. Harry Wilson. As a ? to these items was "Uncle Tom's Cabin in Five Minutes," the parts? in which were played by Mr. John Townsend (Simon Legree),Mr Chas. Hanson (Uncle Tom), and Mr Fred. Mellor (Little Eva).

1 comment(s), latest 1 year, 1 month ago