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HERITAGE WALK, ROSEBUD,VIC., AUST.

There is no museum in Rosebud but there is a virtual one on the internet, mainly consisting of photos, namely:
Rosebud - Rosebud, VIC - History Museum | Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/rosebudhistory

More great history of Rosebud can be found on Steve Burnham's website which can be accessed by googling VIN BURNHAM, ROSEBUD. Vin was slightly out with some of his assumptions and was unsure of The Swedish fisherman's surname.Tony Durham was the grandfather, not father, of Judith Durham. Her father was William Cock, winner of the D.F.C. in W.W.2, who was serving overseas when Judith Mavis Cock was born in 1943. Judith's great grandmother, Emily, married a Greek fisherman, Tony's father, and later married Mr Durham. Emily's sister, Elizabeth married Fort Lacco, whose Rosebud Fishing Village block Emily occupied for decades. The Swede who took over Chatfield's fishing licence at Rosebud West was Axel Vincent. Steve has many photos on the website such as Hindhope (Holiday) Park on the Rosebud Plaza site with the Burnhams' fish shop across McCombe (sic) St, and the original footy ground on the foreshore.

Peter Wilson's ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD also has many great photos. Peter was the grandson of Walter Burnham, whose house on the foreshore became the Sunday School at St Katherine's McCrae.
Our churches - The Anglican Parish of All Saints Rosebud ...
www.rosebudmccrae.melbourneanglican.org.au/our-churches.html
St. Katherine's Church McCrae ... The cottage was relocated from the foreshore, opposite Boneo Road, and was bought from Mr Burnham for 400 pounds early ..


The first history of Rosebud was written by Isabel Moresby whose husband was descended from Captain Moresby who named Port Moresby in New Guinea.
Rosebud wins a name!!
"ROSEBUD, FLOWER OF THE PENINSULA," by Isobelle Moresby. 2/6 at booksellers and newsagents.
A SHIPWRECK isn't always complete disaster. Had a schooner, prettily named, not been wrecked nearby, between 1844 and '45, (SIC, IN 1855) Rosebud not only might have lacked a romantic history, it might have been called Wooloowoolooboolook, the natives' title for their camp site behind.

Rosebud was owned by Edward and Edmund Hobson, who came to Melbourne in 1820, (SIC) and Luttrell Bros. (THEN JAMES PURVES who insured her for 700 pounds!) She traded to New Zealand, Tasmania, and as far afield as the Swan,in Western Australia, in 1838.The wreck was one of the sights of the bayside for years, her planks made fishermen's huts and fences, and housewives delighted in her salvaged damask.

A later wreck, a Peruvian barque carrying Greeks and Austrians, at the same spot, provided from her castaways some of Rosebud's early settlers. All this and plenty more of local and tourist interest Mrs. Isobelle
Moresby tells you in her brochure, "Rosebud,Flower of the Peninsula," a welcome addition to the library of little neighborhood histories.
-IRWIN MOORE (P.15,Argus,8-1-1955.)



FOR EASE OF PARKING,EVEN AT THE HEIGHT OF THE TOURIST SEASON,THE WALK STARTS ON THE FORESHORE OPPOSITE MCDONALDS. ENTER THE MIDDLE PARKING VIA THE FIFTH OR FOURTH AVENUE BREAKS IN THE MEDIAN STRIP. CLOCKWISE COURSE.

1. ROADS AND DRAINAGE; PUBLIC FACILITIES.
The Kangerong Road Board was established in late 1863 to do something about the roads, reserved on the Kangerong, Wannaeue and Nepean parish maps, between Ellerina Rd and Portsea. Some of these reserved roads,such as Burrell Rd (the western boundary of Dromana Township) were never made because of steep terrain and Hiscock Rd, between the junction of Jetty/Old Cape Schanck Rds and Truemans Rd because it crossed the Tootgarook swamp. It was much easier to draw a road than make it! Roads had to cross creeks so bridges were required as well. Drainage was another matter that the road board had to spend its revenue on, not only because lack of it (blocked culverts etc) could ruin roads, but also disputes between landowners where water was diverted from a flooded paddock onto a neighbour's land, such as by Cr Henderson onto Watkins and Pidoto's land at Dromana circa 1880 and by Back Road Bob Cairns onto Robert Henry Adams at Rosebud in about 1905.

By 1869, most of the road boards formed at the same time as the Kangerong Board had built their own home, but for many decades, even after Kangerong merged with the Flinders board in 1874 to create the Shire of Flinders and Kangerong, the municipality rented accommodation at the Dromana Hotel and later the Dromana Mechanics' Institute. Why? Lack of revenue!

Most of the ratepayers in what we call Rosebud lived in the Rosebud Fishing Village and ratebooks show that none of these paid rates until 1873, the first assessment after the Village was declared. The land across the beach road between Adams Avenue and Boneo Avenue, referred to as Wannaeue (the parish name)was owned at that time by five men with Cr William Ford owning the 660 acre Wannaeue Station between Ford's Lane (Eastbourne Rd) and the never-made Hiscock Rd beside the Drum Drum Alloc Creek.

Farm land had a very low nett annual value which would almost double if even the most basic house was built on it. Because of bad roads and distance from markets, farming was basically of the subsistence variety. Most farmers relied on off-farm income such as timber getting near Arthurs Seat,lime burning near Boneo Rd and farther west, employment on the big stations and road maintenance to garner enough money to buy items they couldn't grow themselves-such as clothing, willow pattern crockery and horses,and of course to pay their rates.

Thus revenue was very low and most of it went to paying for roads, bridges and drainage. Services such as Melbourne residents came to expect, such as rubbish and sanitary collections were out of the question. Recreational facilities were completely out of the question! At Dromana, reserves were proclaimed near the Dromana Secondary College site (serving as one of the two racecourses) and on the Bowling Club (showgrounds)and Court/Information Centre (Soldiers' Memorial Park) sites; the other racecourse and the footy ground were behind the Dromana Hotel on two private 17 acre parcels owned by the Pidoto and hotel families.At Rye, cricket was played on Mrs Hill's paddock near the original post office, and on the foreshore where the Australia Day Celebrations are held according to the late Ray Cairns.

No privately owned land seemed to have been offered at Rosebud. The Rosebud public golf course land had been reserved for public recreation, as was a small block on the north side of Waterfall Gully Rd near the waterfall, but these were too far from Rosebud to be of much value. The shire could not afford to buy any land but land had been reserved on the foreshore for recreational purposes and council enthusiastically supported any requests from residents for the government to supply land for public facilities. The Mechanics'Institute site on crown allotment 15 of the fishing village was gazetted in 1874 but rapid development of Rosebud after W.W.2 saw the need for a bigger hall as well as a bowling green,yacht club and motor boat squadron. The carnival helped to pay for the soldiers' memorial hall.

Crown Land Sought At Rosebud.
Mr Galvin, Minister for Lands, was asked yesterday by a deputation from Rosebud and surrounding seaside centres for an acre of Crown land, close to the Rosebud Recreational Reserve, for the erection of public utilities, including a hall, library, and infant welfare centre.

He was opposed to the alienation of the people's land unless it could be proved that the use of the land by
the public would not be stopped, Mr Galvin said, however, he would inspect the area.
(P.2, Argus, 28-3-1946.)

BOWLING GREEN AT ROSEBUD
A notification was received by Flinders Shire from the Rosebud Foreshore Trust, that it desired to construct a bowling green on the foreshore. Cr. Wood said the approximate cost was £800 to £1000. The new green was essential and would improve Rosebud greatly. A Resolution was carried that,in the opinion of the Council,
there was nothing to prevent the Trust from establishing a green.(P.16,Standard,10-7-1947.)

2.VILLAGE GREEN.
The foreshore land west of the Rosebud Fishing Village was permanently reserved for Public Purposes, gazetted in 1923. This seems to have extended to the outlet of Chinaman's Creek which had originally entered the Bay opposite the Rosebud Hospital site until Ned Williams of "Eastbourne" cut the present channel.

The interrupted Cricket Grand Final.
The first camping at Rosebud was on the Clemengers' "Parkmore". The mansion was built in 1896 by Albert Holloway and accommodation was at first within the building before the Clemengers bought Parkmore in 1908.
SEASIDE -MANSION HOME paying guests,every comfort, fishing, shooting, bathing."Parkmore" Rosebud near Dromana.
(P.12,Argus, 11-2-1903.)

Robert Henry Adams' Hopetoun House (McCrae Car Wash site) offered similar accommodation.

Based on crown allotment 17 subdivision information, Parkmore was on 10 acres of grounds so there would have been plenty of room for campers.
ROSEBUD.-"PARKMORE," excellent TENT Accommodation, every convenience. Mrs.Clemenger, Central, 3138._Write for particulars.(P.23,Argus,22-10-1910.)

Because of the 1890's depression and its after-effects, and inadequate descriptions of properties, the shire of Flinders was almost bankrupt by 1912. Seeing Parkmore's success,the shire must have sought government approval for camping on the foreshore. The only problem would have been a lack of cleared areas to pitch tents.

SEASIDE CAMPS
Inquiries as to seaside camps come from "K.McD. (Clifton Hill) Camping in Mornington Shire is I understand, not encouraged, but Flinders shire, farther south, has no objection to campers, rather encourages them. There are good sites from Dromana on past Rosebud, to Portsea, and permission should be sought from the secretary of the shire or the local constable who supervises the camps. A small fee is charged, so that camps may be supervised and sanitary precautions imposed. (NOTES FOR BOYS. P.7,Argus,12-11-1918.)

The progress association would soon take care of that. You can't have trees on a sports ground!
There is marked evidence of progress in this line seaside resort on the eastern shores of the bay. An active progress association is helping considerably in the scheme of development, and much useful work will have been accomplished within the next year or two. Some of the ideas of practical value which will then have come into existence include a boat harbour for the shelter of yachts and fishing craft, the forming of an ornamental promenade running parallel with the foreshore, and the acquirement of a sports ground.
(P.11, Argus, 10-11-1927.)


ROSEBUD.
The final cricket match of the S.P.C. Association, between Dromana and Red Hill, being played on the Rosebud Recreation Oval, has reached a most interesting stage. It now looks as if Red Hill may win the premiership. The game was well patronised by the public, again showing how popular cricket is down this end of the Peninsula, although the only admission fee asked for has been a silver coin to cover expenses, just on £35 has gone into the funds of the S.P.C.A. for the semi-final and final played at Rosebud. The ground was in perfect order. Scores-Dromana, 2nd innings, all out, 196; Red Hill, 2nd Innings, 1 for 91. This leaves Red Hill about 63 runs to win. On account of next Saturday being Easter Saturday, no play will take place on that day.
The local football club is rather anxious to see the end of the cricket match at Rosebud as they cannot get full use of the oval on account of the cricket pitch not being able to be covered. (P.6, Standard, 17-4-1946.)

Just in case you thought the game wasn't continued on Easter Saturday because of religious reasons, I'd better add this.
As the Oval at Rosebud will not be available on Easter Saturday, play will not be resumed until April 27.
Red Hill correspondent (same page,same paper.)

ROSEBUD FORESHORE COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT.
Rosebud residents asked the shire to transfer control of the foreshore to a local committee (article probably in my shire of Flinders journal)which was first mentioned in 1944.
ROSEBUD FORESHORE COMMITTEE .
The following is the audited statement of receipts and expenditure for the Rosebud Foreshore Trust for the
year ending 30/6/44:
Receipts: Balance at 1/7/43, £21516/2; fees, camping, £1434/3/; bathing boxes and boat houses, £190/4/3;
recreation ground, £14/14/; tennis court, £91/16/; -residential, £10; sale of bathing box, £1/10/; sale of
firewood, £10/5/; deposit firewood,£10; total, £1978/8/5.,
Expenditure: Permanent works conveniences, water, etc., £601/5/; maintenance materials, £70/5/10; salaries and.wages, £300/7/5; lighting, £45/14/; sanitary and garbage,.£117/4/6; loan redemption, £1431/6; water rates, £36/12/6; printing and stationary, £4/10/7; petty cash,£7; insurance, £4/19/6; bank charges, £2/4/9; miscellaneous, £211/6; . balance, £433/11/4; total,£ 1978/8/5. (P.2, Standard, 7-9-1944.)


It is likely that foreshore camping had first been on the footy ground but the ground was most likely reserved for sporting use by the campers in 1946, rather than being full of tents as I initially thought. The public works department was doing its part in spreading the campers out.

ROSEBUD.
ROSEBUD FORESHORE.
The Public Works Department is now carrying out certain works on the foreshore. The Foreshore Committee has found £500 towards these Works. They consist of lavatories containing the usual conveniences, showers and wash basins, laundry blocks, fire places and office buildings. Cement (colored amber), bricks on granite stone is the material used, and give quite an imposing appearance. The laundry blocks, of which one is nearing completion, are of doubtful blessing, and are, in fact,not favored by the committee, but the Tourist Bureau is warm about them. Why the committee is dubious is the possibility of destruction of timber for firewood. As it is, the danger of extensive destruction to the existing timber, through the campers, has to be most carefully guarded against. The erection of two lavatories ,between the township and McCrae should spread the campers, also another is to be erected some 200 yards west of Boneo Road.

The next, and just as urgent, need is for the local butcher to institute a better method of meat distribution.
To force campers spread over three miles to congregate at one shop in Rosebud, at the same time refusing to
supply orders for the local inhabitants, is a matter that will require the attention of the committee and the
two councillors. (P.5, Standard, 15-6-1944.)

Scout Hall dressing rooms.
I have been told that the scout hall was originally the change room for the footballers.

Footy 1929-two blues.
Photos in the Olympic Park clubrooms show that Rosebud's first footy team, in 1929, wore the present jumper modelled on the Carlton jumper,the suggestion of fisherman Tom Alderson, an enthusiastic supporter of the Blues. Shortly afterwards,apparently just for one season,the club wore a jumper with dark blue at the top and light blue on the bottom. This was the result of old Mr Dark complaining that the Rosebud players were too hard to see in the last quarter. The photo showing this jumper is in black and white but match reports refer to Rosebud as the Two Blues.

Road widening. Pt Nepean Rd was widened in 1963*. The foreshore ground was so reduced in size that the football and cricket clubs had to move to the new ground at Olympic Park. An aerial photo of the foreshore ground is on Steve Burham's website.
(*rosebud activity centre urban design framework august 2012
www.mornpen.vic.gov.au/.../Rosebud_Activity_Centre_Urban_Design_...)

3. ROSEBUD FISHING VILLAGE.


LOT 20, WEST SIDE OF DURHAM PLACE.
LACCO.—On the 6th August passed peacefully
away at Rosebud, Elizabeth, wife of the
late Fort Lacco, beloved mother of Mary, John
(deceased), Christie (deceased), Annie, Emily,
Mitchell, Margaret, grandmother of Bobby,
Lucy, Edna, Kenneth, Harold, Alick, George,
and Gwen, great-grandmother of Douglas aged
[?] years, a colonist of 77 years. —At rest.

LACCO.—On the 6th August, passed peace-
fully away, at Rosebud, Elizabeth Lacco, dearly
loved sister of Emily, Ellen, Clara and the
late William King. —Peace, perfect peace. (P.1, Argus,7-8-1934.)

LOCCO Fort married Elizabeth KING 1872
Journal by tonkin

Groom: Fort LACCO.
Birth place: Given as Greece.

Bride: Elizabeth KING.
Birth place: Given as London.

Year married: 1872.
Place: Victoria, Australia.

Marriage note.
LACCO recorded VMI under TELO.
I have used the correct spelling for this family record.

Fort died 1915 in Dromona, Victoria.
Age: 72 years.
Parents named as John LACCO and Mary COMEO.

Elizabeth died 1934 in Dromona, Victoria.
Age: 79 years.
Father named as John KING. Mother unknown.

Seven children located Victorian records for Fort and Elizabeth.
Fort also recorded as Forte.

[1]

Mary Helen LACCO.
Born: 1874 Dromana, Victoria.
Birth recorded under LAVCO.
Died: 1952 Williamstown, Victoria.
Death recorded as Mary Ellen LACCO.
Age: 79 years.

[2]

John William LACCO.
Born: 1875 Sandringham, Victoria.
Birth recorded under LAOCO.
Died: 1875 Sandringham, Victoria.
Death recorded as John William LAOCO.
Age: 10 weeks.

[3]

Christi LACCO
Born: 1876 Dromana, Victoria.
Birth recorded under LAOCO.
Died: 1880 not recored, Victoria.
Death recorded as Christa LAOCO.
Age: 03 years.

[4]

Annie Athena LACCO.
Born: 1879 Queenscliff, Victoria.
Died: 1967 Mentone, Victoria.
Age: 88 years.

Married: James George ELLIS.
Year: 1901.
Place: Victoria.

James died 1961, Williamstown, Victoria.
Age: 83 years.
Parents named as James ELLIS and unknown HOOPER.

Birth note.
James was born 18 November 1877 in Adelaide, South Australia.
Parents named as James ELLIS and Emma HOOPER.

Two children located for James and Annie.

1.
Clara Emma ELLIS.
Born: 1902 Carlton, Victoria.
Died: -

Married: Ronald Charles ELLIS.
Year: 1925.
Place: Victoria.

2.
Grace Evelyn ELLIS.
Born: 1904 Dromona, Victoria.
Died: 1911 Clifton Hill, Victoria.
Age: 08 years.

[5]

Emily Christina LACCO.
Born: 1880 Dromona, Victoria.
Died: 1947 Mont Albert, Victoria.
Age: 64 years.

Married: Henry Ernest ELLIS.
Year: 1909.
Place: Victoria.

Birth note.
Henry was born 28 December 1879 in Goodwood, South Australia.
Parents named as James ELLIS and Emma COOPER.

[6]

Patrick Mitchell LACCO.
Born: 1883 Carlton, Victoria.
Died: 1974 Dromona, Victoria.
Age: 74 years.

Married: Lucy Marie WICKHAM.
Year: 1907.
Place: Victoria.

Lucy died 1947, Dromona, Victoria.
Age: 63 years.
Parents named as John WICKHAM and Mary Ann KING.

Birth note.
Lucy was born 12 April 1884 in Queensland.
Parents named as John WICKHAM and Mary Ann KING.

Six children located for Patrick and Lucy.

1.
Lucy Marie LACCO.
Born: 1909 Sandringham, Victoria.
Died: -

Married: William Alfred HURST.
Year: 1939.
Place: Victoria.

2.
Edna May LACCO.
Born: 1910 Dromona, Victoria.
Died: 1971 Rosebud, Victoria.
Age: 61 years.

Married: Adam Edward DUNK.
Year: 1934.
Place: Victoria.

3.
Kenneth Mitchell LACCO.
Born: 1914 Dromona, Victoria.
Died: -

Married: Betty McMaster HARDY.
Year: 1936.
Place: Victoria.

4.
Harold LACCO.
Born: 1917 Queenscliff, Victoria.
Died: -

Married: Eileen May Miller DEAN.
Year: 1942.
Place: Victoria.

5.
Alexander LACCO.
Born: 1919 Queenscliff, Victoria.
Died: 1978 Mornington, Victoria.
Age: 59 years.

6.
George LACCO.
Born: circa 1922.
Died: 1983 Mornington, Victoria.
Age: 61 years.

Married: Mary Jean ELLIOTT.
Year: 1942.
Place: Victoria.

[7]

Margaret Elizabeth LACCO.
Born: 1886 Carlton, Victoria.
Died: 1968 East Melbourne, Victoria.
Age: 83 years.

Married: Walter STOREY.
Year: 1910.
Place: Victoria.

Walter died 1957 in Dromona, Victoria.
Age: 68 years.
Parents named as Henry STOREY and Ellen KING.

Birth note.
Walter was born 1889 in Collingwood, Victoria.
Parents named as Henry STOREY and Ellen KING.

One child located for Walter and Margaret.

1.
Gwendoline Betsworth STOREY.
Born: 1915 Dromona, Victoria.
Died: -

Sources:
Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages Victoria.
Registry of Births, Queensland.
Registry of Births, South Australia.

Updated 09 August 2014.
With my thanks to itellya for the information appearing in the comments section below.

JN 54192
Surnames: 54192 COMEO DEAN DUNK ELLIOTT ELLIS HARDY HOOPER HURST KING LACCO LAOCO LAVCO STOREY TELO WICKHAM
Viewed: 1196 times

by tonkin
on 2013-03-18 03:33:39
TONKIN lives in Victoria, Australia.
Please note.
Journals are intended to assist new researchers locate family lines in Australia and should only be used as a guide for follow up research and record searches as intended.
Due to spelling and informant errors appearing in the records, typo errors and my misreading of the records mistakes must be expected. Errors will be corrected when detected.


Comments
by itellya on 2014-08-08 00:01:48
While trying unsuccessfully to find the correct spelling of the surname of the first husband of Emily Durham (nee King), I came across this website which gives details of the marriage of Emily's sister Elizabeth. See bold type below.Given the varied spelling of Lacco below,it is not surprising to see such wildly different versions of Tony Durham's original surname. (Tony's surname was given as Paniocta in Emily's death notice while her other two sons were recorded as Durhams.)

RootsWeb: GENANZ-L Re: A lookup please on the Vic Cd's
archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com GENANZ 1999-10

Children
Annie LACCO to Fort LACCO and Elizabeth KING at Quee Vic Yr 1879 / 4775
Emily Christina to Fort LACCO and Eliz H KING at Dromana Vic yr 1880 /
15122
Margaret Elizabeth to Fort LACCO and Elizabeth KING Carlton Vic Yr 1886 /
24538
Patrick Mitchell to Fort LACCOand Elizabeth KING Carlton Vic yr 1883 /
7534
Christi LAOCO to Fort LAOCO and Elizabeth KING at Dromana yr 1876 / 22460
John William LAOCO to Forte LAOCO & Elizabeth KING at Sand. Vic yr 1875 /
19331

Marriage
Fort LACCO to Elizabeth KING Victoria 1872 / 1453R

Death
Christa LAOCO age 8 birthplace unknown year1880 / 3983
John William LAOCO Sandringham Vic Year 1875 / 15109

Hope this helps. Info. from AVR
by tonkin on 2014-08-09 02:50:38
Thank you itellya, I appreciate you taking the time to pass on the above details. Did a few searches today and located the marriage for Fort and Elizabeth. Fort was recorded under TELO which explains why I did not locate the marriage. Also located the missing children recorded under different spellings. The family record has now been updated. Hope it helps other LACCO researchers. Cheers.

THE OLD WHALER.

THE CONVICT'S KIDS.

THE LORD MAYOR OF MELBOURNE.

THE HERO OF THE LA BELLA WRECK AND THE TREE PLANTED IN HIS HONOUR. william and mitch move to queencliff and mitch's mum minds the ferrier kids. was this when sorrento poached rosebud's star,ken lacco?





PARKMORE.(CROWN ALLOTMENT 17 SUBDIVISION MAP. ISAAC WHITE AND CAPTAIN ADAMS.)

MITCH LACCO STATUE rosebud's ship building industry??? {heritage study). WOODEN BOATS SITE.

CNR JETTY RD (WANNAEUE MAP 20-14.ROBERT WHITE (Blooming Bob) AND LOT (86?)-JACK JONES& LEAK BROTHERS. WOOLCOTT'S (PEATEY,McDOWELL, SCHOOL.)

SCHOOL.

EDNA DUNK MEMORIAL CLOCK

FORMERLY ON SAFEWAY CAR PARK SITE.(PRES. CHURCH BUILT IN A DAY,patterson's garage)



other wooden statues

DAIRY.

BROADWAY THEATRE.
When viewing the holiday food-buying queues, wrote one observer, it was hard to believe that
Rosebud had once been a tiny sleepy hamlet. In December 1928 the new Broadway Theatre
was opened at Rosebud as a Picture and Dance Palais. The building was designed by H Vivian
Taylor and Soilleux. This firm of architects and acoustic consultants were notable picture
theatre designers of the period. (PAGE 165
MORNINGTON PENINSULA SHIRE HERITAGE REVIEW ...
www.mornpen.vic.gov.au/.../Volume_1_Themoatic_History_for_Whole...)

ROSEBUD HOTEL.
Wooden Statue.

BACHLI.
In 1937,Doug Bachli's father was offering accommodation in Canberra.
Canberra. BRASSEY HOUSE -All mod. convs. H. and C.water all rooms Tariff £3/3/, 12/ day.J.P. BACHLI Proprietor Tel B13. (P.31, Argus, 23-10-1937.) He seems to have moved there from the Shepparton area where he ran the Victoria Hotel.

TENDERS are invited until 1st September for Painting and Paper hanging at Victoria Hotel, Shepparton.
Specifications may be inspected at the Hotel. The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. P. BACHLI.(P.4, Shepparton Advertiser, 27-8-1932.)

Mr. and Mrs. P. Bachli who are living in Canberra now, revisited friends in Shepparton yesterday.
(P.4, Shepparton Advertiser, 9-7-1937.)

Doug was already a good golfer by 1938 when he was second,by three strokes in Canberra's Federal Cup.

If my memory serves me correctly, Peter Wilson said in ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD that the Rosebud Hotel opened in 1941 so Doug's father, who obviously preferred his second given name, must have been the first licensee. Being able to indulge his love of the Sport of Kings may have been the clincher in bringing the family to Rosebud,but having the footy ground directly across the road from the pub for Doug to practise his golf would have been another powerful argument.

HOTEL ROSEBUD.-First class accommodation. H. and C. water bedrooms. Phil Bachli. licensee.
(P.11,Argus,16-4-1941.)

THEIR CUP WAS FULL.
Celebrations at Patron Park Stud, Rosebud, on Saturday, had nothing to do with Peshawar. Caulfield Cup day just
happens to be a pretty good day for the stud. For instance, the brood mare Standsure had a filly foal by Carbon Copy on Saturday. The last foal she had was on Caulfield Cup day in 1948. Patron, the stud's sire, was presented with his first foal on Saturday and On Caulfield Cup day in 1948, Doug Bachli, owner of the stud, won the Australian amateur golf championship. -JIM SHANNON. (P.9, Argus,22-10-1952.)

IF DOUG BACHLI had not been a great golfer he might have been an Olympic swimmer or a champion footballer.
Not one of his family had ever been interested in golf. As a boy Doug lived in Sandringham, and it was not surprising that he became a swimmer. When he was only 12 he won a Victorian championship in record time at the Brunswick Baths.

The family later moved to Canberra, where Doug continued his swimming successes, which included records in the combined high schools of NSW and the junior and senior backstroke records at Canberra when aged 14 and 15.
In 1936 Doug shone at football. He was a member of the Canberra team that played in the Australian schoolboys' carnival in Adelaide, where he gained the honour of best and fairest player.

He started golf when he was 14, only because he had heard men talking at his home about the game. It was not long before he came home to tell his father that he had broken 100. "Dad said that he would have to see me in action," said Doug. "He then arranged for me to take lessons from Jim Tetterson, then, and still,professional at Royal Canberra. While I was still 14 I won the Canberra Cup with a handicap of 20, and with off-the-stick scores of 86 and 83. Next year I won it again, but then I was down to a handicap of nine, and had scores of 76, 76."

Doug returned to Victoria when 17, and joined Victoria and Sorrento clubs, playing pennant with Victoria
off scratch. Later he went out to plus 2. After winning various club titles with record figures, Doug entered for the Australian championship at Metropolitan last year, and, with a seven and six margin in the final, took the title. He and Bob Brown also won the Australian foursomes with a record 69 at the same course. The
Victorian championship followed, but Peter Thomson beat Doug in the final at Woodlands. Early this season Doug won the Sorrento open with a record 69-66, cracking the record that had been held for 10 years. He has not been
so conspicuous in recent months, being unable to practise because of the illness of his mother and father
at their hotel at Rosebud.
The next item is the Victorian title, to be played this month, and Doug is out to regain it. Still in the early 20's, he should be a power in the golf world for years. (P.5s, Argus,15-10-1949.)

BIG CHANCE IN BRITISH TITLE
By JACK DILLON
THERE is something exhilarating about a fellow who can step back and look at himself with the same unstinted pleasure he would display if his best friend was as worthy of commendation as he is himself. Such a one is Douglas Bachli, 32-year old refrigeration sales manager, former school star swimmer and footballer, who
today at Muirfield meets American "Big Bill" Campbell in the final of the British amateur golf championship.
I believe, despite the strong opponent, that Bachli has at least an even chance of bringing the title to
Australia for the first time.

Bachli won the Australian amateur championship in 1948, the Victorian title 1949, 1950 and 1953,the
Queensland championship 1948, the A.C.T. amateur title twice and dozens of open and club competitions. But
31-years-old "Big Bill" Campbell is a formidable opponent. He won the "world's" amateur championship at
Chicago 1948 and 1949 and was runner-up 1952. Thrice he has reached the British amateur sixth
round, and semi-finalist in the U.S. amateur of 1949 and in the past three Walker Cup internationals
has represented America against Britain.

There are no pawky inhibitions about Doug. He looks you fair in the face to talk or tell, and he loves talking
about the things he likes best—work, racing, football, swimming, his pals, his and their golf,and. of course.
Doug. As far as I know no one else in these parts has won as many trophies in golf—plus quite a few in other
parts. Like the human being he is, Doug is properly proud of that collection.

Before his father's death, when they had a hotel in Rosebud, there was a huge display case in the dining room—and those rewards for play prowess were there for all to see. Among Doug's many friends is a prominent poster
artist. No difficulty was placed in his way when he sought to make a life-size painting of his friend. There's nothing of the exhibitionist about Doug. If there was he wouldn't have the army of admirers he has. But he is a realist and with equal ease can reel off his own plus and minus points with the facility he summarises his
latest round of golf. Bachli goes at his golf as he does for everything else, directly, cleanly, determinedly,
efficiently and without any trimmings of style, mannerisms or temperament. You cannot fault his shot-making
methods in detail or over-all, for they are quite orthodox.(etc.)(P.9, Sporting Globe, 29-5-1954.)

Phil's father, William, died in Canberra in 1938.
Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 5 April 1938 p 10 Family Notices
BACHLI.—On the 3rd April, 1938, at Canberra, late of Dundas place, Albert Park, William, relict of the late Agnes Bachli, and loved father of Alfred, Violet (Mrs. H. H.Hoare), Phillip (Sib), and Adolph (Deed), aged 80 years. -R.I.P.

FROM COUNTLESS ARTICLES READ BUT, IN MOST CASES, NOT COPIED.
After his father's death, Doug sold the hotel and stud. When the stud was being established Doug was rarely on a golf course* which made his progress even more remarkable; perhaps he kept in form on the footy ground a stab kick away from the Rosebud Hotel.Phil transferred the licence for the Rosebud hotel to the Bakers only months before his death. When he beat Campbell for the British Amateur title, he was a refrigeration sales manager but by 1956 he had returned to hotel-keeping. His wife, Dorothy, was from Camberwell and three years after they wed she was still only 5 minutes by train (on the Lilydale line)from her old home. I believe Frank Bachli of Ararat circa 1916 was William Bachli's brother. I couldn't re-find the article but I think Frank called one of his sons "Deed" as well, as did a K.Bacchli later; what a strange pet name!

(*Also when Phil became ill.
Bachli, who has been working on his father's stud farm this year, was playing only his fourth competitive
round for the season,(but was equal leader with Peter Thompson on 68 strokes.)P.10,Argus,5-10-1951.

Mr. DOUGLAS WILLIAM BACHLI, former Australian Amateur Golf Champion, and Mrs.Bachli (above), at the reception last night after their marriage in Our Lady of Victories' Church, Camberwell. The bride, Dorothy May, younger daughter of the late Mr E.E.Wearne, and Mrs.Wearne, of East Camberwell, wore a white French embroidered organdie frock. (PHOTO. P.18, Argus,10-4-1953.)

APPLICATION for TRANSFER of LICENCE. - I, Michael McCarthy, the holder of a Victualler's licence for the Carlton Hotel,at Bourke street, Melbourne, in the Central Metropolitan Licensing Area, and I, Douglas William
Bachli, of 59 Warrigal road, Surrey Hills, hereby give notice that we will APPLY to the Victorian Licensing Court at Melbourne on Tuesday, the fifth day of June, 1956 for the TRANSFER of such LICENCE to the said Douglas William Bachli.
Dated the 18th day of May, 1956,M. MCCARTHY,D. W. BACHLI. ;
Mcinerney, Williams. & Curtain,90 Queen street. Melbourne, solicitors for the transferor.
(P.16, Argus, 19-5-1956.)

APPLICATION for TRANSFER of LICENCE - I John Phillip Bachli the holder of a Victualler's licence for Rosebud Hotel at Rosebud in the Mornington Licensing District and we Sydney Alfred Baker and Ethel May Baker both
of Continental Hotel Sorrento hereby give notice that we will APPLY to the Licensing Court at Melbourne on Monday the 12th day of May 1952 for the TRANSFER of the LICENCE to the said Sydney Alfred Baker on behalf
of himself and the said Ethel May Baker, trading as S.A. &, E. M.Baker.
Dated 2nd May 1952 J P BACHLI S A BAKER E BAKER
Messrs Luke Murphy &. Co 423 Bourke street Melbourne solicitors for the transferees.
(P.15, Argus, 3-5-1952.)

DEATHS
BACHLI, John Phillip-On September 24 at his home, Patron Park, Dromana, beloved husband of Edith Bachli, loved father of Doug.
BACHLI, John Phillip-On September 24 loved brother of Deed * and Alf and Violet (Mrs Hoare ).
(P.11, Argus, 25-9-1952.) (*Adolph.)

BIRTHS.
BACHLI —On the 2nd April, at "Fortuna", 18 Dundas place, Albert Park, to Mr. and Mrs.Phil Bachli —a son (Douglas William).(P.13,Argus,22-4-1922.)

WHERE WAS PHIL AND DOUG BACHLI'S PATRON PARK STUD?
The stud,variously described as being at Rosebud and at Dromana, was sold to the Doody family (rendered as Doodie in one article but confirmed as being Doody by stud and racing articles.) This family also had a stud at Diggers Rest. A Doody descendant and Doug's son,Paul*,may be able to help me establish the exact location of the stud but it has been found that the stud was in Harrison Rd, Dromana. It was sold, probably by the Doody family, in 1964, and consisted of lot 1,(36 acres 3 roods 33 perches,with 10 paddocks,stabling, a delightful 6 roomed house and, probably for the trainer,Dell, a self-contained 3 roomed flat and lot 2 (vacant land, 12 acres divided into four paddocks but also with reticulated State Rivers water.)

Full text of the advertisement (below) will be given in a new journal: DOUGLAS WILLIAM BACHLI'S PATRON PARK STUD IN DROMANA,VIC., AUST.
("patron Park" .Harbison .Road Dromana Stud .Farm, Freehold.
news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1300&dat=19640610&id...)

*Paul is mentioned in the following which has a great photo of Doug with his British Amateur trophy in 1954.
pdf 525kB - Golf Society of Australia
golfsocietyaust.com/pdf/LongGameNo10-Mar2000.pdf
Mar 10, 2000 - Douglas Bachli MBE with the 1954 ... 13th November Doug Bachli Trophy and AGM at ..... Vale - Douglas William Bachli - (1922 - 2000).

POSTSCRIPT. The homestead area of the Patron Park Stud,including the stables, is now the five acre 59 Harrisons Rd, Dromana. See details in my journal:
DOUGLAS WILLIAM BACHLI'S PATRON PARK STUD AT DROMANA,VIC., AUST.
by itellya on 2015-04-19 01:38:37. page views: 92, comments: 0

My thanks to Doug Bachli's youngest son,Paul for supplying the vital clues.

ALDI SITE: OUR LADY OF FATIMA.
NEW CHURCH AT ROSEBUD
Erection of a new church at Rosebud—in the Sorrento parish—commenced this week. It is being built to provide for the growing holiday population which concentrates at this favourite seaside resort during vacation periods. A strong committee has been working for some considerable time to raise funds for the project which is to be undertaken by a local architect and builder. Up to now Mass on Sundays has been celebrated in the Mechanics' Hall. (P.23, Advocate,22-10-1953.)

CONCERT TO AID NEW CHURCH AT ROSEBUD
To aid in the building of a new church at Rosebud, a variety concert, compered by Dick Cranbourne,of 3DB, will be held in the Philip Ballroom, Rosebud, on Sunday, 6 September, at 2.30 p.m.(P.19,Advocate,27-8-1953.)

Our Lady of Fatima Church, Rosebud
Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954) Thursday 26 November 1953 p 14 Article Illustrated
... Our Lady of Fatima Church, Rosebud This is an architect's design of the new church of Our Lady of ... Faiima which is in course of erection at Rosebud to meet the needs of the hundreds of holidaymakers who


SOUTH CORNER OF BONEO RD AND McCOMB* ST.(*I'm sic and tired of pointing out the wrong spelling!)
See photo of Hindhope Park billboard and Burnham fish shop on the original RED ROOSTER site on the ROSEBUD MUSEUM website mentioned at the start of the journal.
This photo and the Hindhope Park interior photo to go on the history board along with a map of Hindhope, The Thicket and the Wannaeue Estate transposed on Melway.

HIGH SCHOOL.
New school for Rosebud by 1953?
Plans for an ultra-modern multi - purpose secondary school at Rosebud will be approved by the Education Department within two weeks. Mr. Inchbold, Education Minister, said this yesterday.
He was hearing a deputation from Flinders Shire and Mornington Peninsula State schools.The deputation said that the Government had bought a 14 acre site for the school in 1944, but nothing had been done.Mr. Inchbold said the proposed new school should be finished by January, 1953.It would have 38 classrooms to accommodate 400 children, and would cater for all branches of high, technical, and commercial education.(P.7,Argus, 21-7-1950.)
ROSEBUD SECONDARY CELEBRATED ITS 60TH ANNIVERSARY ON 21-3-2015.

LOTUS LODGE.
STATE BUYS "MOTEL" FOR AGED
Seaside village will be home of 250 old Victorians
VICTORIA'S first self-contained community settlement for the aged will be established at Rosebud; the first of 250 tenants will probably move in in July.

The settlement will be at Lotus Lodge, an ultra-modern "motel," which the State Government has bought for £61,000.This completely new approach to the problem of housing the aged was announced last night by Mr.Fulton, Health Minister. He said Lotus Lodge would provide accommodation in two-room flats and bungalows.A set scale of fees would be charged. At first the accommodation would be self-contained, allowing all residents to have an independent existence. Ultimately central services would probably be available, but accommodation would still be independent.
No delay
Mr. Fulton said that the Hospitals and Charities Commission had assured him that there would be no delay in opening the settlement, which should be largely self-supporting.Mr. Fulton added: "This marks the beginning of a new era for the aged. "I am sure it will be welcomed by all members of the community."

Lotus Lodge is on about 21 acres of land with a frontage to the Nepean Highway, on the Sorrento side of Rosebud. The sale, which is on a walk-out, walk-in basis, was made on account of Mr. A. E. Stanton by
E Jacobs and Lowe, of Mornington.

Prefab, hospital
A second State Government project for Rosebud is a pre-fabricated hospital that it will build at Rosebud to serve the Mornington Peninsula. Mr. Fulton said last night that the hospital would have 20 beds at first, and should be completed within three years. It would be made of trussed steel and concrete, and would be imported in sections from Britain. The hospital would be built on eight acres at present owned by the Alfred Hospital.
As it was within a few yards of Lotus Lodge it would cater for residents at the old-age settlement.
(P.3, Argus, 21-4-1951.)

4 comment(s), latest 6 months, 2 weeks ago

HERO WEEK, NOVEMBER 2015- A WORKSHEET FOR SCHOOLS IN VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA. (WILLIAM FERRIER.)

FOR THE TEACHERS.
It will be the 110th anniversary in November, 2015, of William John Ferrier's heroic rescues of crewmen from the La Bella at Warrnambool. Ferrier became an OVERNIGHT NATIONAL HERO with tributes being sent by the Governor General and the Federal Parliament,the Governor and Premier of Victoria, several interstate organisations and even the King.There were hundreds of articles in newspapers all over Australia in 1905 and again when Ferrier died at Queenscliff in 1937. William John Ferrier was a resident of Warrnambool, Rosebud and Queenscliff and I have proposed a joint celebration of his heroic deed in those three places. Schools, councils,historical societies and newspapers in each area have been contacted and most have been keen but not one response has yet been received from a school.

This lack of response is probably because Principals are so busy and the curriculum is so crowded. History is no longer a subject. However the Dromana Primary School had its pupils very excited about the threatened Dromana Pier, so history projects can be done. Now, not all schools might share Dromana's enthusiasm, but their pupils do not have to miss out on celebrating Ferrier's heroism entirely. That's why I am producing this worksheet. Through literacy activities,the children can gain and pass on civic pride and appreciation of heritage as they learn about one of Australia's greatest peacetime heroes.


FOR THE CHILDREN.

WILLIAM JOHN FERRIER.
From 10:30 p.m. on 10 November, 1905 until daybreak the next morning, a young Warrnambool fisherman suffered terrible agony. He had a poisoned arm and even children know the pain caused by a splinter or rose thorn in a finger or thumb, so you could imagine how much more a poisoned arm would hurt. And yet he managed to become a national hero! Until just before your parents went to school, children only had two things to read in class,the grade reader and the monthly schoolpaper. The Education Department thought that William John Ferrier was so important that the story of his rescue was included in the Schoolpaper in 1907.


ORIGINAL VERSES.
A MODERN HERO.
Off Warrnambool on the night of November the 10th, 1905, occurred a pitiful tragedy, calculated to evoke the sympathy of the whole Commonwealth. The barquentine La Bella struck the reef, half a mile from the breakwater, and soon became a total wreck. Out of a crew of eleven men and a boy, only five men were saved. Sombre as is the cloud of grief overhanging the dismal catastrophe, that cloud has its silver lining. The redeeming feature consists more particularly of the self sacrificing bravery of the young fisherman, William Ferrier, which is depicted and commented upon in the following poem from the pen of Mr. S. H. Remfry,of Heywood, retired State school teacher. It will be noticed that the poem takes up the story at that point where our hero puts off in the dinghy by himself:
1.
Young William Ferrier, fisherman,
Into his dinghy flew,
And vig'rous sculled his little craft,
To save the hapless crew.
2.
The pilot, deeming it unsafe
The breakers to defy,
Two hundred yards' space from the wreck
Held off, and there stood by.
3.
One hundred yards, the distance now,
Two men leap off the deck,
And through the seething waters swim
For the lifeboat, from the wreck.
4.
That moment William Ferrier
His efforts did renew.
Quick flies his dinghy right ahead
And saves one of those two!
5.
By dint of dext'rous seamanship,
Presence of mind as well,
His boat around he quickly turns,
And saves it from the swell.
6.
In recognition of his pluck
And noble self-denial,
The admiring crowd upon the shore
Give lusty cheers the while!
7.
And hearty cheers again are heard,
When, in the waters calm,
They see his guernsey, taken off,
Put on the rescued man!
8.
The other man the lifeboat saves,
And yet another one.
Brave Ferrier outward plies again,
His work is not yet done.
9.
Two men are yet upon the wreck.
The billows milder heave;
The lifeboat makes a slight advance,
And waits to see them leave.
10.
To give these men the pluck to leap,
The wreck the lifeboat nears;
And Ferrier now the captain lands
Amidst vociferous cheers!
11.
One of the two remaining men
Has jumped into the waves,
And after swimming eighty yards,
This man the lifeboat saves.
12.
Young Ferrier's off again.
The lifeboat, scarce advancing now,
Does near the wreck remain.
The captain safe upon the land.
13.
The last man, is afraid to quit
His station perilous;
Though surging seas diminish now,
Delay is dangerous!
14.
The lifeboat throws the man a line;
The rope by him is caught.
But still he fails to leave the wreck;
The line avails him naught!
15.
In rope entangled, he is "done!"
Oh! saved, how can he be?
Lo! Ferrier's at the vessel's stern-
He cuts the prisoner free!
16.
Into the boat the sailor drops,
Our hero sculls away;
The man's soon in the lifeboat safe,
The waves robbed of their prey!
17.
A ringing cheer his triumph greets;
This last trip now complete,
Cheers upon cheers burst from the crowd,
Their hearts with joy replete!
18.
The efforts of this gallant man,
For those poor sailors' sake,
The noblest feelings must excite,
His fellows nobler make!
19.
Whilst many daily hurry men
To a dishonored grave,
All honor be to such as he,
Who mankind nobly save!
20.
Not for applause of fellow men,
Did he this loving deed,
Though this, and e'en emolument!
Full well may be his meed!
21.
Long life to his and heroes all,
By noblest impulse stirred;
They emulate The Christ Himself;
In Heav'n, their praise be heard;
22.
God grant that he never wrecked may be,
But his life 's voyage o'er,
The Heav'nly Pilot may conduct
Him to the golden shore.
(P.3, Portland Guardian,11-12-1905.)

FIRST HALF HOUR LESSON.
CLASS ACTIVITIES. (Memorising the poem,rhyme and rhythm.)
1.Teacher reads the whole poem to the class. 2. Children are asked to find the pair of rhyming words in every verse. 3. The teacher reads the poem again but the class reads the last word of every verse. 4. The teacher, after explaining what syllables are, claps the rhythm of the first verse but stops suddenly and asks for the next word. 5.A volunteer is asked to clap the rhythm of the second verse, stop part of the way through and ask what the next word is. 6.Children are asked to find words, in the verses indicated, meaning: even(20),over (22). The teacher explains that e'er can mean before as well as ever. 7.Children are asked to think of a short sentence including before or ever,but using e'er instead; classmates put up one hand if it means ever and two hands if it means before. 8.Children are asked to find words written with an apostrophe and explain why (regarding syllables) the normal way of writing the word would not fit the rhythm. e.g. Heaven is two syllables but heav'n is only one syllable.
9.POETIC LICENCE. The teacher asks children if they can correct "He ran quick." Then the teacher gives more examples and the class corrects them together: e.g.Pat the cat gentle; Drive careful; We ate hungry. The teacher explains that poetic licence allows normal rules of grammar to be broken for a good reason in poetry. The children are asked to find an example in verse 1, what the correct adverb would be and why the adjective was used instead.
10.A child is asked to google "meed" and read out what it means. Children are asked if there are any other words that they don't understand and these are discussed.
11. Pairs of children are allocated two lines each so that serial reading of the poem can be done. As there are 44 segments,most pairs will get two segments to read. Rehearse quietly with your partner for one minute. Serial recitation. 12. The whole class reads the poem together, but slowly in time with the teacher.

SECOND LESSON.
The class reads the poem together. It is read a second time but children may volunteer to read an even-numbered verse on their own or with a partner.
COMPREHENSION AND VOCABULARY. (Children are allowed to discuss these with a partner or parent. Can be done at home.)
1.Which words in verse 1 both mean boat? 2.Which word in verse 2 has this meaning? [adjective(especially of a person) unfortunate. "the xxxxxxx victims of the disaster"; synonyms:unfortunate, unlucky, luckless, out of luck, ill-starred, ill-fated, jinxed, cursed, doomed.] 3. Which word in verse 2 means "a person duly qualified to steer ships into or out of a harbor or through certain difficult waters"? 4. Which word in verse 1 is an example of poetic licence, as well as abbreviation,turning four syllables into two? 5. Which word in verse 3 means angry or (of a liquid) boil or be turbulent as if boiling? 6. Dexterous (verse 5) and Sinister come from Latin words meaning right and left. A left-handed person was thought to be clumsy (and evil!) Which word do you think means skilful? 7. Find adjectives in verses 6, 7 and 10 that could be replaced with "loud".(They are all followed by the same noun.) 8. Was the rescued man in verse 7 dead, shivering or hearty? 9. Which line in verse 9 means the waves were not as rough? 10.Which rhyming adjectives in verse 13 both mean risky?


LESSON 3 (WHOLE CLASS.)
Each child is allocated a verse to read in a serial recitation with boys and girls alternating on the remaining verses. Whole class correction of lesson 2 answers.

Partner work on the following.
1. Which three consecutive words in verse 14 mean "does not help him at all"?
2. Verse 15 explains that the line was of no use because the man was t------.
3.Which words in verse 20 mean: (a)reward (b)a person's deserved share of praise, honour, etc.?

In groups of four,children help each other find rhyming pairs of words so that each can write a two line poem.
e.g. wave, brave; reef,belief; mountainous,dangerous; new ,rescue; brave,save; heck,wreck; etc. Each child's poem is typed by its author,printed and then illustrated by the author. These pages are then bound into a class book. Children may do more than one poem and try a four line poem if they wish or they could rewrite Mr Remfry's poem as a story.

Imagine the child with literacy problems, as a 90 year old,proudly showing his great-grandchild that poem he wrote in 2015:
It was risky, but what the heck,
Ferrier bravely sculled out to the wreck.

and telling the tale of a great Australian hero.

LESSON 4.
COMPUTER RESEARCH.
A trove search for "Ferrier, Warrnambool, 1905" or Ferrier,Queenscliff,1937" will reveal a host of articles in newspapers all over Australia paying tribute to its hero as well as photos. One photo,showing William Ferrier and survivors the day after the rescue, is fairly rare but can be seen online at:
Postcard Victorian Collections
victoriancollections.net.au/items/521606f819403a17c4ba1311

If you need guidance on using trove,private message me and I'll give you my phone number so I can talk you through it. I can also attach an image to an email showing ship paintings that William John Ferrier did on the bedroom wall of "Rosebud" in Beach St,Queenscliff. His paintings executed inside the South Channel Pile lighthouse can be found on:
William Ferrier Ship Paintings - Queenscliffe Maritime Museum
www.maritimequeenscliffe.org.au/SouthChannelPileLight_Web_23-04-2...

The children's parents may be inspired to read my journals which detail Ferrier family history but also mention many other heroic rescues performed by members of the Ferrier family near Warrnambool,Rosebud and Queenscliff.
Extensive detail about William John Ferrier is available in the following journals:
LEW FERRIER AND PAT HUTCHINS, PISCATORIAL PIONEERS NEAR THE HEADS (NOT FINISHED YET.), VIC., AUST.
AUSTRALIA-WIDE HERO IN 1905: William John Ferrier of Warrnambool, Queenscliff and Rosebud.
MELBOURNE BRINDLE, FERRIER, LACCO AND McLEAR SAVE ERNIE RUDDUCK'S LIFE, DROMANA, VIC., AUST.

HILL HILLIS, PIONEER OF RED HILL NEAR DROMANA, VIC, AUST AND HIS RELATIVES (THE TWO BOB WHITES ETC.)

HILL HILLIS AND HIS RELATIVES, INCLUDING THE TWO BOB WHITES.
According to Colin McLear in A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, Hill Hillis settled at Red Hill in 1855. His wife, Sarah, was a sister of James McKeown, a pioneer of Red Hill and Dromana. His son, William James Hillis,was a grantee
in the parish of Wannaeue and his sisters, Margaret and Hadassah, both married Blooming Bob White. Blooming Bob's sister Janet had a child by a James lad and because he was born before they could get a minister to marry them, the boy's birth certificate gave his name as Robert White.He grew up as Robert James and was granted land under that name. When he was to marry Hannah Roberts, he discovered his birth name and, probably
angry about being kept in the dark, became Robert White. To prevent confusion with his uncle, he became known as Bullocky Bob White.It seems that William James Hillis moved to Trafalgar in late 1898, three years after his father died.

HILL HILLIS

Hillis, Hill b. 1817 d. 1895 Dromana Victoria Gender: Male
(Parents: Father: Hillis, Frank Mother: Collins, Margaret)

Spouse: McKeown, Sarah b. 1822 d. 1900 Dromana Victoria Gender: Female
(Parents:Father: McKeown, William Mother: Collings, Mary Ann )

Children: Hillis, William James; Hillis, Mary Ann; Hillis, Sarah Jane; Hillis, Odessa (b. 1864 Victoria
Gender: Female); Hillis, Hadassah


Hillis, Frank Spouse: Collins, Margaret Children:Hillis, Hill

McIlroy, Joseph Marriage: 1877
Spouse: Hillis, Sarah Jane b. 1857 Belfast d. 1898 Dromana Victoria
Parents:Father: Hillis, Hill Mother: McKeown, Sarah


Davey,
Spouse: Hillis, Mary Ann b. 1846 d. 1920 Malvern Melbourne
Parents: Father: Hillis, Hill Mother: McKeown, Sarah


White, Robert
Marriage: 1899
Spouse: Hillis, Hadassah b. 1864 d. 1927 Prahran Melbourne
Parents:Father: Hillis, Hill Mother: McKeown, Sarah

SOURCE:LUGTON FAMILY AND CONNECTIONS.) Thank you Tony Lugton!

The geographic reason for the marital relationship between the three Hillis girls and the McIlroy, Davey and White
families will be explained under the heading THE HILLIS LAND.

Colin McLear throws more light on the Hillis-McKeown connection but the name of Hill Hillis's wife will need to be checked.
( A spiral-bound book containing information about Dromana families in the Dromana Historical Society museum states that
James McKeown married Catherine Townsend Hill who was born in 1843. Her parents details are given and, if I remember
correctly,she was born at Tower Hill. This meant that she was about 20 when she married.)


On page 86 of A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA,Colin stated:
James McKeown migrated to New Zealand in 1853 and then to Warrnambool in 1856. His sister, Mary,had married
Hill Hillis in Ireland in 1846 and migrated to Red Hill in 1855 and taken up farming.


The following were found in a search for the death notice of Hill Hillis's wife/widow (to ascertain whether her given name
was Sarah or Mary.)
HILLIS- WISEMAN.---On the 1st November, at tho Presbyterian Church, Dandenong, by the Rev. H. A. Buntine,
George P. third son of W. J. Hillis, Trafalgar, to Ethel D., only daughter of the late James Wiseman, Ascot Vale,
and sister of T.B . Wiseman, Bass.(P.59, Leader, Melbourne, 8-12-1917.)

HILLISWISEMAN. Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Hillis announce with pleasure the 25th anniversary of their marriage,
celebrated on November 1, 1917. (Present address, 3 Hastings street, Burwood.)
(
Although there seems to be no connection to the Red Hill area, I am extremely confident that there is!James Wiseman might
have been one of the Wiseman brothers who built the mirror-image mansions in Glenroy circa 1890 to give prestige to the
"Toorak of the North" but it is more likely that he was the Red Hill blacksmith who had lived across the road from Hill
Hillis over half a century before this marriage.Unless my transcription is faulty, William James Hillis (Hill's oldest
child) was no longer occupying his grants (23AB, Wannaeue) in 1900 and the first mention in trove of Hillis in Trafalgar
was in 1899.

THE HILLIS LAND.
The Kangerong Road Board had jurisdiction over the parishes of Kangerong ( basically the area between Port Phillip Bay
and Arthurs Seat/Red Hill Rds) and Wannaeue, Fingal and Nepean to the west of Mornington-Flinders Rd/south part of Main
Creek.To the east and south of Kangerong was the parish of Balnarring which was part of the Flinders Road District, formed
about five years later, with residents first assessed on 8-6-1869.

William J.Hillis was assessed on 60 acres, Dromana in 1872. This was a very poor description of the land by the Kangerong
Road Board rate collector because the land was near the corner of McIlroys and White Hill Rd,(Melway 190K1) crown allotments
18B and 18D Kangerong, of 59 acres 3 roods and 14 perches, granted to poor noseless Briant Ringrose.The battle axe block was
south of Henry Dunn's "Four Winds"of 60 acres at the south corner of McIlroys and White Hill Rds. Although it had a small
frontage to White Hill Rd, it had a northern boundary of 564 acres and adjoined Arkwell's land to the south.

This was the land on which William Hillis operated as Red Hill's first butcher as mentioned in THE BUTCHER, THE BAKER, THE.
At this time, William's sister,Sarah Jane, was about 15 and was no doubt taking interest in the opposite sex, especially
Joseph McIlroy, a neighbour whom she married five years later.
(Incidentally, Tony Lugton's genealogy shows that Sarah Jane was born in Belfast in 1857 so Colin McLear's claim
that Hill came to Red Hill in 1855 is wrong; he may have immigrated soon after Sarah's birth in 1857.Colin's information
probably came from an elderly pioneer rather than documents so Hill's wife was probably Sarah McKeown rather than Mary.
N.B. cOLIN COULD HAVE BEEN RIGHT AFTER ALL,AS EXPLAINED BELOW.)

The Ringrose grant was occupied from 1873 by Francis Hirst, William possibly selecting land in Wannaeue at that time.
The Kangerong and Flinders Road Boards merged to form the Shire of Flinders and Kangerong, Shire Secretary, Peter Nowlan's
first assessment in late 1875 being a model of calligraphy and detail, which few others emulated.Hill Hillis was assessed on
54 acres and two-roomed house, Balnarring,and William Hillis on 153 acres in Wannaeue,leased from the Crown. Although Hill's
farm was the first farm held by the family, I will deal with it last because of its probable influence on James McKeown's
move from Warrnambool to Red Hill.

William Hillis was granted his 153 acres and 36 perches, Wannaeue on 10-12-1885.Fronting Whites and Main Creek Rds, and
indicated by Melway 171 J-K 5-6, this was crown allotment 23B.His neighbour across Main Creek Rd (Melway 190 part A, B 5-6)
was James Davey Jnr, who was probably the husband of William's sister, Mary Ann. On 12-11-1888, William Hillis received the
grant for the adjoining crown allotment 23A of 59 acres 3 roodsand 34 perches(Melway 171 H6) between 23B and Wilsons Rd,this
road giving access at the south west corner.

The name of Whites Rd possibly indicates that Robert White, who married William's sisters,(Margaret and) Hadassah, may have
occupied William Hillis's farm in about 1920 but it could have received the name because the Whites(Ernest V., Robert, Robert
G, Albert C.) used the road as a short cut from Purves Rd to their farms on JAMES DAVEY JNR'S grant(28A Wannaeue) across
Main Creek Rd.

Robert White Jnr (who married two Hillis girls) had owned crown allotment 18,Wannaeue at Rosebud, bounded by Pt Nepean Rd,
Adams Ave, Eastbourne Rd and Jetty Rd, from 1875 until 1892. Robert's sons,Robert and William, (possibly named after his
mother's brother) were among the original pupils enrolled at Rosebud State School on its opening day in September, 1884,
according to P.15 of Peter Wilson's ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD.Robert's father, Robert had owned a Rosebud Fishing Village
allotment across Pt Nepean Rd from crown allotment 18. It was crown allotment 11, the second block east of the access road
to the Rosebud jetty.

Toolaroo is the great grandson of Robert and Hadassah White's daughter, Vera Florence. Here are some of his findings.

On 26-7-1877, Robert White Jnr (who owned crown allotment 18, Wannaeue at Rosebud) married Margaret Hillis, daughter
of Hill Hillis and Sarah McKeowan (sic), aged 25, at Mornington. Margaret had been born in Antrim, Ireland.

Margaret died in 1888 and on 15-3-1899 Robert Jnr married Margaret's sister, Hadassah at Red Hill. Notice that Margaret
Hillis is not included in Tony Lugton's list of the children of Hill Hillis and Sarah (McKeown.)

Robert White senior, a shoemaker, was born in Clackmannon,Scotland on 31-8-1804 and married Elizabeth Russell in 1829. With
his children, including Robert Jnr, he arrived in Australia aboard the John Linn on 20-6-1859. Robert Snr died on 25-4-1881
at Menstrie Hill, Rosebud.It is possible that Robert Snr had spent a few years at Robert, David and Alexander Cairns'
"Little Scotland"(Melway 170 B11) at Boneo, renting a hut from them and helping them to quarry and burn lime; the Cairns
family was also from Clackmannon and a Robert White was assessed on a hut owned by the Cairns brothers on 3-9-1864.
(I had initially thought that this Robert White was a member of the pioneering Irish Sorrento/Rye limeburning family but
it is just as likely that Robert White Snr had known the Cairns brothers in Clackmannon and they provided him with a dwelling
and job.Toolaroo has mentioned a connection between the White and Cairns families in Scotland.)


One of the reasons my journal about the Whites of Sorrento, Rosebud and Red Hill came to a screaming halt was the discovery
that the early Sorrento pioneer limeburners were Irish and Toolaroo's Whites were Scottish. To further confuse the issue,
Red Hill had two Bob Whites,Bloomin' Bob and Bullocky Bob.The jigsaw pieces are slowly starting to fit together and it
appears that Bloomin' and Bullocky were both descendants of the Scottish Robert White Snr (31-8-1804.)
Toolaroo says that in about 1860, Janet,(elder sister of Robert White Jnr who married two Hillis girls), gave birth to Robert
White of Main Ridgewho married Mary Hannah Roberts.

(The father of the child was (Charles?) James and because of the difficulty in getting a minister to marry them, the birth
took place before the wedding so the child's name was registered as Robert White. However he was brought up as Robert James
and it was only when he obtained a birth certificate to get married that he discovered his real name. He then changed his
name to Robert White. This caused confusion with his mother's brother (Robert White Jnr) so Robert James/White was called
"Bullocky Bob" and the bloke that married two Hillis girls was called "Bloomin' Bob". (Source: Jean Rotherham.) Toolaroo
told me some time ago that Janet's brother, Robert White Jnr,(who never swore) had been known as "Bloomin' Bob" because he
frequently used this word as a substitute.
On 23-3-1927, Hadassah White (nee Hillis) died at Crib Point. Her husband Robert White Jnr died in 1930.Bob White of Main
Ridge, husband of Mary Hannah (nee Roberts), died in May 1941.

WHY DID JAMES McKEOWN MOVE FROM WARRNAMBOOL TO RED HILL?
As I prepared to answer this question, I recalled Joseph Hillis down Warrnambool way and how that area had been a magnet
for Irish immigrants. Then a thought struck me about Belfast, the birthplace of Sarah Jane Hillis in 1857. Perhaps Colin
McLear was not wrong in stating that Hill Hillas had come to Australia in 1855 and only erred in inferring that he had gone
straight to Red Hill.

The following comes from the wikipedia entry for Port Fairy.
John Griffiths[3] established a whaling station in 1835 and a store was opened in 1839. In 1843, James Atkinson, a Sydney
solicitor, purchased land in the town by special survey. He drained the swamps, subdivided and leased the land, and built
a harbour on the Moyne River. He renamed the town 'Belfast' after his hometown in Northern Ireland. The Post Office opened
on 1 July 1843[4] as "Port Fairy" but was renamed "Belfast" on 1 January 1854 before reverting to the original name
20 July 1887.

Was Sarah Jane born in Belfast, Victoria, in other words, Port Fairy?

Family Notices
Warrnambool Standard (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Wednesday 4 November 1914 Edition: DAILY. p 2 Family Notices
... DEATH. HILLIS.- At Koroit, on 3rd November, Jane, relict of the late Joseph Hillis, aged 71 years.
(The funeral will leave her late residence. Koroit, at Two o'clock This Day (Wednesday) for the Tower Hill Cemetery).
RUNDELL &SON, Undertakers..

Was Joseph Hillis a relative of Hill Hillis? The interesting thing is that James McKeown went to Red Hill in 1862 but
returned to Koroit to marry his wife, Catherine,and returned to Red Hill with her in 1863 by bullock cart
(P.86, A REAMTIME OF DROMANA.) Colin McLear did not give Catherine's maiden name but I wouldn't mind betting that she was
a Hillis.
(POSTSCRIPT.I've changed my mind. Now I'd prefer to bet that she was christened Catherine Townsend Hill. Ah well,you can't
win 'em all!)
James McKeown had gone to New Zealand in 1853 and moved to Warrnambool in 1856, perhaps because his sister, Sarah,
(Mrs Hill Hillis), had relatives there.

James McKeown's move to Red Hill was likely influenced by the presence there of his sister, Sarah,.Hill could have selected
land at Red Hill in 1855 and taken Sarah to relatives near "Belfast" when she was expecting Mary Janein 1857.It is likely
that the land Hill selected at Red Hill was part of land eventually granted to James McKeown. He probably fattened cattle
or sheep,more likely the former because of the heavily timbered land, but most of his income, in common with other residents
on Arthurs Seat,would have come from providing timber for the construction of piers, sleepers for the railways to
Williamstown, Castlemaine and so on.

The first Flinders Road Board assessment of 8-6-1869 listed ratepayers geographically rather than alphabetically
as the Kangerong road board had done since 1864.Because of this,with the parish map in hand,I can follow the rate collector
as he proceeds through the parish. We start east of the north end of Tucks Rd at about Melway 190 G10 where Marquis had 70B
of 89 acres, later granted to William Hopcraft, and heading north, Hopcraft 70A of 89 acres, Alf Head 130 acres of his 200
acre grant straddling Stony Creek Rd (71B and 71A1), Joseph Pitcher 72B of 140 acres north to Mock Orchards, and Robert
Holding, the 140 acre corner block,72A, which extended east to a point opposite the Sheehans Rd corner,and was later William
Henry Blakeley's.

Next listed were Hill Hillis 50 acres and a house and James McEwan (sic) 165 acres.Together they add up to the 215 acres
of James McKeown's grants, 73A and B, which extend east to include The Stables conference centre (190 J 5.) The next
ratepayers, the Wightons, were way down Pt Leo Rd near Frankston-Flinders Rd.

In 1870, Hill's land was amended to 54 acres and it remained the same in the first shire assessment of 1875, by which time
Hill was about 68 years old.It may have been soon afterwards that James McKeown took over the wole 215 acres.

In THE RED HILL, Sheila Skidmore states that Joseph McIlroy and Sarah (nee Hillis) had nine children. Joseph's diary,
excerpts of which are included in the book, show that Joseph and Sarah were married in Dromana at the Mechanics' Institute
at 12:30 by the Rev. James Caldwell of Mornington. Guests at the reception at Joseph's father's place were the McIlroy,
Simpson, Cleine,White,Ault and Hillis families, as well as Misses Kemp and Hopcraft who were probably friends of the bride
and groom.

Joseph's McIlroy's older brother, William John, married Elizabeth Hillis when he was 32 and they lived at Littlebridge,
which was named after the place in Ireland from which the family came.
There is a list of their children in the book.
(P. 14, THE RED HILL.)


William Hillis Jnr applied to the Shire of Flinders and Kangerong for the position of rate collector in 1897.
(P.3, Mornington Standard,30-9-1897.) There are several other mentions of "Hillis, Red Hill" on trove in 1897, in regard
to the BAND OF HOPE mainly, but none thereafter. The first mention of "Hillis, Trafalgar" was in 1898, which increases the
likelihood that W.J.Hillis moved from Main Creek to Trafalgar soon after W. Hillis Jnr applied for the job of rate collector.

A close examination of the rate books is called for to determine (a)if W.Hillis Jnr got the joband (b) the year of William
Snr's last assessment.

BACK TO THE RATEBOOKS!
I didn't hold much hope that the rate records would name the rate collectorso the fingers were crossed. The 1898 estimates
bore the signatures of councillors, mentioned the President's allowance,cost of planned works, office expenses, and so on but
there was no detail to reveal whether W.Hillis Jnr got the job.

The 1880 rates revealed that James McKeown had the whole 215 acres of his grant between Blakeley's land (Holding's grant) and
the future Red Hill Village Settlement straddling Prossor's Lane. Hill Hillis, the brother in law, had earlier occupied 54
acres of it.(See the Wiseman-Hillis wedding notice and commentary.) William Hillis was again assessed on only the 153 acres
of 23B, Wannaeue.

In 1881, George White, The Irish lime burner was assessed on 103 acres, Wannaeue (Melway 168 K12). The occupant was
not recorded for the next assessment detailed as 1 allotment Wannaeue, but the owner was R.White. This was crown allotment
11, Rosebud (Fishing Village.) I had earlier assumed that George White had been assessed on this block and the rate collector
had forgotten to write .. (ditto.)This had led me to believe that the Irish Whites had invaded Rosebud. William Hillis had
again been assessed on 23B.

Forgetting that I had wanted to find out when William Hillis had settled (occupied) 23A (accessed via Wilson Rd), I next
inspected the 1889 rates.William Hillas (as his name was invariably written) was assessed on 60+213 acres, 273 acres,
Wannaeue and Kangerong. Oh dear me, I just knew what was going to happen.And sure enough it did! By this stage I had
decided to sort out the two Robert Whites once and for all.
209. Robert White, farmer, 27 acres Kangerong.
210. Robert White, farmer, 290 acres, Wannaeue.

In 1890, William Hillis was assessed on 60+213acres, 273 acres Wannaeue and Kangerong, but the 60 and the 273 were crossed
out. William had probably lost 23AB Wannaeue (213 acres and 30 perches) to creditors.Therefore the record stated that the
60 acres were in Wannaeue AND Kangerong. Therefore in 1891, the 60 acre block was recorded as being in both parishes.The
details for the two Robert Whites were exactly as in 1889.

In 1893, occupations were given.
294. William Hillis, CARTER, Red Hill, owner/occupier of 60 acres, Kangerong and 2 allotments, Kangerong.
416. Robert White, LABOURER, 27 acres, Kangerong.
417. Robert White, CARTER, 290 acres, Wannaeue.

The 27 acres had to be part of the original Red Hill Township, which was at the corner of White Hill and McIlroys Rds.Someone,
probably Sheila Skidmore in THE RED HILL, stated that only one township allotment was sold (meaning at the original sale),
the Post Office block. Jean Rotherham has been told by older members of her family that the 27 acre block was near the post
office (710 White Hill Rd, Melway 160 K12) so it could have been on the west side of White Hill Rd between Harrisons Rd and
Tumbywood Rd or on the north side of McIlroys Rd west of Bowring Rd.

The 60 acre block owned (if we can trust the rate collector) by William Hillis was most likely the grant of Brian Ringrose,
18B of 59 acres 3 roods and 14 perches,previously occupied by William until 1872. William seems to have been a good friend to
the poor disfigured ex-goldminer,paying his rates for him on one occasion, which I think I mentioned in thE RINGROSE entry in
my family tree circles journal DICTIONARY HISTORY OF RED HILL. (See paragraph 2 of THE HILLIS LAND.) It could have been Henry
Dunn's grant "Four Winds" (see next paragraph.) In 1900, 18B belonged to ArthurE.Hill of St Kilda, who still had not moved
onto the property by 30-8-1902 when AROUND RED HILL was on page 2 of the Mornington Standard. Hill's property was described
as being up the hill from Wheelers (the post office.) Mr White, mentioned between James Davis(5 acresunder fruit) and the
Wheelers (who had run the post office for over 30 years) had a good view of the bay, some fruit trees and a small crop.This
would be on the 27 acre block.

In 1900, Mrs Maude Strong was assessed on 60 acres, Kangerong. She was obviously a widow, otherwise her husband's given name
would have been used, and she wasleasing from Trustees. In 1902, Jon Davis (40 acres facing Port Phillip Bay with 6 acres
of young trees), who was mentioned before James Davis,was dairying on 60 acres leased from Mrs Strong. Whichever 60 acre
block William Hillis had in 1893, he was not there in 1900, supporting the belief that he had moved to Trafalgar circa 1898.

Details re Hillis and White remain unchanged in 1894.

In 1896,William Hillis was assessed on the 60 acres and 2 allotments; Robert White, labourer, still had the 27 acres.
Robert White,carter, now had 160 acres, Wannaeue.The missing 130 acres adjoined this 160 acres to the south being crown
allotment 27A, Wannaeue, granted to John Cain on 6-4-1897. (Melway 190 A-B, part8,9.)

In 1897, the rate collector actually gave some detail of land assessed. (I'd forgotten this when I debated which 60 acre
block William Hillis had in 1893 but it hasn't been too painful finding out about Mrs Strong and Jon Davis, has it?)
Robert White, labourer, still had the 27 acres near the Red Hill post office.
Robert White, carter, Dromana??, was assessed on 160 acres,27A1, Wannaeue.
Charles James Snr had 105 acres , 19A Wannaeue.
William Hillis, carter of Red Hill, still had the 60 acres and two allotments.

The reason for the inclusion of Charles James here will soon become apparent.19A of 105 acres 2 roodsand 13 perches was
granted to D.James on 21-1-1878. Located at Melway 254J2, it is bounded by Old Main Creek Rd, the tributary of Main
Creek and Barkers Rd, which originally met Old Main Creek Rd not far east of Splitters Creek.Not far east (Melway 255 B1),
bounded by Main Creek, ShandsRd and Roberts Rd (on east and south) is crown allotment 1C, parish of Flinders, consisting of
46 acres 3 roods and 8 perches, and granted to C.Robertson 21-7-1890.It is easy to see how Janet White's son Robert, brought
up as Robert James, bullocky Bob White, met his future bride, Hannah Roberts.

The assessment of 30-9-1899 shows that Robert White of Red Hill still had 27 acres and Robert White of MAIN CREEK, DROMANA,
still had 160 acres, 27A1, Wannaeue. So do you know which was Bloomin'Bob and which was Bullocky Bob? Neither did I until I
looked at27A1 on the Wannaeue parish map.

Crown allotment 27A1 Wannaeue, of 160 acres 1 rood and 39 perches, indicated by Melway 190 A-B 7, part8, extended east almost to
Main Creek.It was granted on 6-4-1897 to ROBERT JAMES. I have actually seen a rate record where Robert James was assessed
but the surname was crossed out and replaced with WHITE.(I'm sorry I teased you by leaving the grantee's name until last but
I always wanted to do the "and the winner is" routine!)

Therefore, the 27 acres near the Red Hill post office was occupied by Robert White Jnr,Bloomin' Bob White,(son of Robert
White Snr born in Clackmannon in 1804),who owned 18B Wannaeue between Adams Avenue and Jetty Rd as well as Crown Allotment
11,Rosebud Fishing Village from 1875 until about 1892. Like William Hillis, he probably lost his land because of the
1890's depression.

Bloomin' Bob struggled on as a laborer,perhaps doing roadworks for the shire,until at least 1910. It is unclear which Robert
White had James Davey Jnr's grant, 28A, Wannaeue in 1910. Bullocky Bob White, son of Janet, (the sister of Bloomin' Bob)
still had 27A1 of 160 acres.

In the Dromana Historical Society museum is a spiral-bound book with record of enrolments at Main Ridge State School,which
closed when the Red Hill Consolidated School was built.Many pupils had the WHITE surname and I presume they were the
offspring of Bullocky and Hannah (nee Roberts.)

In 1919 (the last raterecord available on microfiche), the following were assessed. Iwill leave it to family historians to
work out whether they were Bloomin' or Bullocky's mob as the aborigines would say.
Ernest V.White, Main Creek, 53 acres(part 28A), 30 acres (part 22B).
Robert, Robert G, Albert C. White 53 acres (part 28A), 53acres (part 28A), 160 acres and buildings(27A1.) The second entry
would seem to be connected with Bullocky because of 27A1.
22B, of almost 142 acres fronted the west side of Main Creek Rd and is indicated by Melway 171 J-K 7-8.

R.G.White of Main Creek also had 13 acres and buildings, being lot 9 of the Billingham Estate.
Eden White of Main Creek had 36 acres and buildings, part 20B, section B, Wannaeue.
Florence A.Bellingham was assessed on 147 acres, part 9A, 24B Wannaeue; this is presumably unsold land in the Billingham
Estate.Crown allotment 9A, a battle-axe block, fronted the east side of Greens Rd and includes the Main Ridge Pony Club and
Melway 254 D 5-6 roughly. ,Crown allotment 24B consisted of 145 acres and was a queer shape wth frontages to Heath Lane/Main
Creek Rd and the north side of Whites Rd. The estate obviously included Peter Watson's 25A of 83 acres, as Bellingham Rd
extends about another 300 metres to Arthurs Seat Rd.

Ignore the details about 9A; I just realised I've been caught by the rate collector's joke again.c/A. Imagine the slash
being so close to the C that it touches and going lower and c/a become 9a.

HEC HANSON AND THE WHITES.
Hec Hanson was a descendant of Peter Purves, the real* Purves pioneer of the Tootgarook run. Peter, a mason, had left for
Van Dieman's Land with his architect brother, James,when his wife Barbara died only a month after giving birth to their son,
James, on 29-9-1835.Heart-broken, Peter left little James with an aunt and spent some years building bridges in Tassie with
his brother. At 18, the boy travelled to Australia to be with his father, arriving in 1852 aboard the Thomas Lowry. The
brothers had been managing Tootgarook for some time for Edward Hobson who had been busy managing a station near Traralgon
(to which the later owner of the"Rosebud" gave its name.) The Purves bought Tootgarook in 1850. Peter died in 1860. His son,
James, married the daughter of Robert Dublin Quinan,the Dromana teacher who committed suicide over an error in the shire's
book, as detailed in A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA. James established Greenhills in Purves Rd, apparently between 1883 and 1885.
(*James spent as much or more time at his Chinton Station, east of Mt Macedon ,and living the high-life in Melbourne.)

Hans Christan Hanson, Hec's other grandfather, had been building bridges but settled at the north end of Tucks Rd in 1887.
His son, Alf, married Frances Purves in 1906 and Hec was born on 14-2-1913. Jim Wilson,of "Fernlea" after whom Wilson Rd
(entry to Hill Hillis's 23B) was named had married Barbara, another daughter of James Purves in 1915.

In MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN, co-written with Petronella Wilson, Hec discusses George White, who seems to have been a descendant
of Bullocky Bob rather than Blooming Bob. On 15, Hec who won many prizes for show riding, states that George White had a
dapple grey pony which won 1st prize for a pony in harness in Hec's last Show entry,presumably before 1931 when he headed
for Quuensland looking for work.

P.38. 'The Whites lived just up the road from uncle Jim Wilson's (Fernlea) and always had horses. Things were improving a bit
and George White bought an International truck that had pride of place in the shed. Cocko (Harold Wilson) and I got a couple of
shovel fulls of horse manure and placed it behind the back wheels of the truck. When George came out in the morning and saw
what had been done , he roared like a bull and said:"Christ Almighty, I thought I was finished with horses!" We never let on
who did it. What a temper he had!'

I have scribbled a note in my copy of Hec's book: "See Mornington Standard 19-4-1902 P3, Thanks (Laurrison/White
relationship.)"
THANKS, TO THE EDITOR SIR,-Will you kindly allow me space in your valuable columns to thank Mr Hoskins, who so kindly lent
his horse and trap and drove my brother-in-law, Robert Wilson, to Mornington in a very short space of time on the occasion
of his recent serious accident. Also great credit is due to Dr Somers, who performed such a successful operation and pulled
such a dangerous case through. I must likewise thank Mrs Edwards for her kind attendance to him.-Yours truly,
C. H. LAURRISEN. Shoreham, April 14, 1902.

My note was wrong and has been amended to Laurrisen/Wilson but I'll leave this entry here as it involves quite a bit of the
area's history. The Laurrisen family arrived in Balnarring parish about early 1870 and Bev Laurissen has been a hard-working
member of the Dromana Historical Society for Years.

The Hansons lived in Alpine Chalet (Melway 190 F9) and across Stony Creek's gully were the houses belonging to Bob and Esther
Wilson and the Laurissens. (P.9.) They were probably on W.Baynes's grant (i.e. Webb Rd.) Alf Hanson,Jim and Bob Wilson were
cutting a branch from a tree to get a hive on 9-3-1902 when Bob fell into the path of the axe-swing and his head was split
open. Constable Edwards of Dromana asked Hoskins to help convey them to Mornington. (After Edwards was promoted up north, he
was forced to retire due to injuries received while arresting two fiends and developed a farm near Flinders.) A report of the
incident can be found in the Mornington Standard of 15-3-1902.


POSTSCRIPT ON WILLIAM HILLIS.
William had occupied his second grant in Wannaeue, 23A of almost 60 acres (accessed via Wilson Rd) by 1883. By 1889, he also
had the 60 acres Ringrose grant in Kangerong.By the 1890 assessment he had lost his Wannaeue land and was occupying only the
Ringrose grant (18B Kangerong.) In the assessment of September 1898, his name was crossed out and replaced with that of
Arthur E.Hill of 353 High St, St Kilda as occupier of 18B and 2 lots,Dromana.(He still owned the lots in Dromana!) William
Hillis was still assessed on 2 lots, 13 1 Kangerong until 1902, his assessment being between those of Hill and Hillyard. His
name did not appear in 1903 or thereafter.

Tommy Bent was an enthusiastic minister for Railways in the boom of the late 1880's. The line to Mornington opened and
shortly after, Tommy's mate, Henry Gomm, saw the Somerville station commence just over the road from "Glenhoya" at
Somerville. A railway to the fort at Portsea seemed a necessity, the only argument being whether it should go through Red
Hill or Moorooduc. A route had probably been surveyed through Dromana, most likely along the flat Palmerston Avenue, and
the 36 acre crown allotment 13, section 1, bounded by Jetty Avenue, Boundary Rd, and Palmerston Ave was subdivided (possibly
by Peter Pidoto's widow) as the Railway Estate.The 1890 depression halted the railway plans and the estate housed part of
Dromana's first golf course, as shown on Melbourne Brindle's fantastic map (available for purchase from the Dromana
Historical Society.) William had probably paid a good price for his two lots but had cut his losses by mid 1903.

From W. J. Hillis, Trafalgar South, offering to remove logs and repair culvert on road below Miller's for 2.
-Cr. Crisp explained that the work was on Kitchener's block, and Mr. Hillis was anxious TO GET HIS FURNITURE INTO HIS HOME.
He was a very straightforward man, and had made the Council a very reasonable offer which he (Cr. Crisp) thought should be
accepted.-Agreed to. (P.7, West Gippsland Gazette, 15-11-1898.)

I think I can now be fairly certain that W.J.Hillis of Trafalgar, first mentioned in 1898, and waiting to get his furniture
into his house in November was William James Hillis, son of Hill Hillis, who had left Red Hill by September 1898.

DIED OF WOUNDS
Pte J.E. HILLIS, Trafalgar, Vic. Pte A. KELLEY, England.(P.5, Bendigo Advertiser, 19-7-1915.)



HILLIS-YOUNG On the 23rd October, at Methodist Church, Trafalgar, by the Rev W E Lancaster, Henry Collins (late AIF) third
son of Mr W Hillis, "Ingleside" Trafalgar South, to Olive, only daughter of Mr and Mrs J.C. Young, Malvernia," Trafalgar,
Carlisle, Traralgon.(P.13, Argus, 13-12-1919.)


POSTSCRIPT ON ROBERT WHITE.
When transcribing all ratepayers in my area of interest, I usually only do about every ten years or so, as it is a very
time-consuming task. One of the Robert Whites seemed to have disappeared between 1910 and 1920 (as well as occupancy of the
27 acre block near the Red Hill post office, so I hit the rate books again. I decided to re-examine the 1910 assessments in
detail first.

718. White, Robert, Main Creek, Dromana,farmer, 159 acres and buildings, 28Ac W.(sic, 28A) NAV 16 pounds, paid 19-6-11.
719. .. .. .. .. .. .. , 160 acres and buildings,27A1 Wannaeue, NAV 25 pounds, also paid 19-6-11.
720. .. .. .. .. .. .. , 27 acres and buildings, Kangerong,NAV 25 pounds, not paid and the arrears of
2 pounds 16 shillings and 3 pence (obviously accumulated over several years) were more than half of the arrears for the
whole of the Centre Riding. Robert was in danger of the shire selling the land to get the owed rates!

As the rates for 28A Wannaeue and 27A1 Wannaeue were paid on the same date and 27A1 was granted to Robert James (Bullocky
Bob White), it can be assumed that Bullocky also had James Davey's grant as well.

In 1911, Bullocky paid the rates for 28A and 27A1 on 5-6-1912 (aSSESSMENT NUMBERS 771 and 772) while Blooming Bob (AN 773)
paid 12 shillings and 6 pence on his 27 acres, Kangerong, near the Red Hill post office, on 11-6-1912 and a further 18
shillings and 10 pence on 27-6-1912.

In 1912, Eden White's name appears before those of the two Robert Whites at assessment 849. He had 36 acres, part crown
allotment 20B, Wannaeue.No wonder Cr Terry demanded better descriptions of properties! One would assume from "part 20B"
that this crown allotment had been subdivided but it hadn't. At this stage, I will predict that Eden White was the son of
Robert James/White and Hannah (nee Roberts.) You will recall that C.Roberts was granted crown allotment 1C, Flinders,
bounded by Main Creek, the south side of Shands Rd and Roberts Rd, the turn to the west being its southern boundary, on
21-7-1890. A member of the Roberts family, John, was Rosebud's first postmasterby 1900, who used to check his watch at noon
on the Rosebud foreshore every day at noon (ROSEBUD:FLOWER OF THE PENINSULA, Isobel Morseby.) His daughter, Rose, married
William Brady, and they ran the post office until William died, after which Rose moved to the Brady farm, Mt Evergreen,
(21C Wannaeue of 121 acres, Melway 171 south half of K9 and Morning Sun Vineyard halfway to Mornington-Flinders Rd.)
John Roberts had two blocks in Woolcott's subdivision of Crown allotment 17 Wannaeue (between Jetty Rdand Norm Clark Walk,
extending south to Eastbourne Rd. He also received the grant in February 1908 for 18A2 Wannaeue of 58 acres, Melway 170 F10.)
John Roberts, perhaps not the postmaster, was in 1919 occupying 19 C Wannaeue (Melway 254 Parts JK3) between Barkers Rd and
Main Creek for which he later received the grant (Tiyle from the Crown.) consisting of almost 30 acres, this land is possibly
all part of 291 Barkers Rd today.

Immediately south of Mt Evergreen was 20A of 175 acres granted on 16-6-1903 to John Shand, and occupied by 1919 by William
G.C.Roberts, bounded by Main Creek and Shands Rd (Melway 171 K11 to the left half of 190B 11-12.) This was across Shands Rd
from the Roberts grant at the north east corner of the parish of Flinders.Between 20A and Roberts Rd (Melway 190 right half
B11-12) was crown allotment 20B Wannaeue,of 36 acres and 14 perches, granted on 6-7-1903 to William Shand. This was the land
occupied by Eden White in 1912, the WHOLE OF CROWN ALLOTMENT 20b, NOT PART OF IT. As the land to the west, north,and south
was occupied by William G.C.Roberts,the Bradys including Rose (nee Roberts) and C.Roberts or descendants on 1C, Flinders and
20B Wannaeue was only 600 metres upstream along Main Creek from David James' grant, 19A, Eden White would likely be the son
of Robert White (JAMES) who married Hannah ROBERTS.

In 1912 (assessment numbers 850, 851), Robert White (Bullocky), described as a CONTRACTOR,was assessed on 28A and 27A1
Wannaeue.Robert White, labourer was assessed on 27 acresand buildings, PART CROWN ALLOTMENT 19, KANGERONG, but his name was
crossed out and E.Bowring substituted. This leads me to believe that the 27 acre farm was at 161 A11, east of Bowrings Rd.
The Bald Hill Reserve is part of Appleyard's 20C which was north and west of crown allotment 19.

Who was this fellow that followed Robert White on the 27 acres?
EXTRACT FROM DICTIONARY HISTORY OF RED HILL ON FAMILY TREE CIRCLES BY itellya.
Edward Bowring, the father of Red Hill's Eddie Bowring lived in Mt Alexander Rd, Essendon and it is possible that an uncle
had run the Coburg Electrical Service with a Mr Stubbs. Eddie must have arrived in Red Hill in about August 1901 as "Around
Red Hill" on page 2 of the Mornington Standard of 30-8-1902 stated that he had been on his Village Settlement block for
twelve months. Why was Thomas Harvey building a house on his block? The details of his crops are in the Village Settlement
journal.

Eddie Bowring was no slouch as a cyclist. He had ridden his bike to Melbourne, probably to visit his parents in Essendon,
and decided to "open her up" on the way back to Red Hill. He made it in just over three hours!
(Mornington Standard 26-4-1902 page 2.)

March 1903 was a busy month for Eddie. Firstly he was best man in the wedding of Fred Wheeler and Miss Goodman at Brunswick
on Friday 6th and then he married Emily, the eldest daughter of Mr T.Harvey "Fernside" Red Hill on the 11th. Eddie was the
eldest son of Edward of Essendon. His best man was Will Bowring, late of Red Hill and his groomsman was Mr E.Harvey. The
bridesmaids were Sophie Harvey and Gertie Bowring. (Both items, M.S. 21-3-1903.)

Back to Bullocky Bob White. In 1913, he was assessed on 27A1 of 160 acres, granted to him in 1897 in the name of Robert
James.The James Davey Jnr grant, 28A of 159 acres had been broken into three parts of 53 acres with the portions of
Robert George and Ernest V containing buildings (probably meaning houses) but not that of Albert C.White.From this
information, I conclude that Ernest V., Robert G. and Albert C. were sons of Bullocky Bob White and grandsons of the Roberts
and James families, as was Eden White. I believe that Robert George White would have called George White to avoid confusion
with his father and great uncle Blooming Bob White. It is likely that he was the George White whose temper produced the
desired result about 14 years later for the 14 year old Hec Hanson (born 1913) and his cousins, the Wilson lads.

Today Iwas on Museum duty, with Jean Rotherham again. Jean, who is a descendant of Bullocky Bob White, found a White family tree for me. You will remember that toolaroo had mentioned a Cairns connection in Clackmannon, Scotland. Henry Whyte* married Margaret Cairns on 10-12-1803.(*SPELLING OFTEN VARIED ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL OR CLERGYMAN FILLING DOCUMENTS FOR ILLITERATE PEOPLE. THE DAVIES FAMILY OF BALNARRING WAS WRITTEN AS DAVIS AND DAVIS OF RED HILL AS DAVIES IN RATEBOOKS!)

Their only child mentioned in the family tree is the ancestor of both Toolaroo and Jean. (Robert White Snr, as I have called him here, was born in Clackmannon on 31-8-1804 according to Toolaroo's information.) The tree states that he married Elizabeth Russell; Toolaroo adds that the marriage took place in 1829.

Their children were:
Jean (9-3-1830), Margaret (b.25-7-1832), Henry (b.11-11-1836), Janet (married Charles James), Ann (married Henry Bucher), Robert (married Margaret Hillis), Elizabeth.Robert Jnr was Blooming Bob; Margaret Hillis died in 1888 and he married her sister Hadassah in 1899. Henry Bucher was a pioneer of Rosebud Fishing Village; more about him later.

The children of Janet (nee White) and Charles James were:
Robert (JAMES/WHITE), Elizabeth (MrsHobley*), Donald (D.James,who received the grant bounded by Barkers Rd and Main Creek), Janet (Mrs Vivash), Charles, George, Harry.
*See Hobley wedding notice below.

The next line of the tree concerns only the children of Robert James (who started and ended his life as Robert White, Bullocky Bob White)and Mary or Hannah (nee Roberts.) They were:
Robert George, Albert Christopher, Eden edward, Ernest Victor, Frederick, Lillian Janet, John Gilbert and Sidney William.

HOBLEY.SEE COMMENT 1.

BUCHER.
BUCHER.
FROM PETER WILSON'S "ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD".

Henry Bucher was granted crown allotment 17 of the Rosebud Fishing Village,which was on the west side of Bucher Place
(Melway 158 E11.) (The Wannaeue parish map has no date for the issue of the grant but I'm sure he would have been one of
the first grantees in 1873.) Henry busher and his wife , Ann (nee White), settled on the foreshore in 1863 where Henry built
"Modesty Cottage" (pictured in the book) on the west side of today's Bucher Place. Henry came from Boston, Massachusetts and
Ann came from Scotland with her parents.Ann came from Clackmannon in Scotland,as did the Cairns. Their eldest daughter, Rose,
was the first child born in Rosebud.

FROM ROSALIND PEATEY'S "PINE TREES AND BOX THORNS".(A copy of this book is archived at the Rosebud Library and another copy
is available for perusal at the Dromana Historical Society museum in the Old Shire Office.)

George Peatey's wife, Sarah was one of the midwives on Jamieson's Special Survey (Safety Beach area east to Bulldog Creek Rd)
and oversaw the birth of children in the pioneering Clydesdale, Morgan, Thompson, Watson and Gibson families. (Morgan was a
stonemason, who in March 1864, had probably come by ship to the Dromana pier with his heavily pregnant wife to work at
constructing more substantial buildings at the eight year old quarantine station at The Heads.I hope he didn't ask Rosebud's
Maori fisherman to sail him, his wife and baby to Portsea as four other unfortunate masons did!The others were Survey
residents.)
(Susan's reputation must have spread to the other side of Arthurs Seat where there were only a handful of farms, some
probably vacant, between the Burrells on Arthurs Seat and Boneo Rd. Captain Henry Everest Adams had part of Wannaeue Village
based on today's Wattle Place, with his house on the car wash site, plus Isaac White's grant between Parkmore Rd and AdamsAve
by 5-9-1865. Warren was paying rates on his 152 acres between Adams Ave and Jetty Rd but may not have been living there.
The first certain occupant of this land was Blooming Bob White from 1875 to about 1892. By 1865,Woolcott,a speculator, had
bought the land between Jetty Rd and Norm Clark Walk. Hugh Glass of "Flemington" owned his grant between First Ave and Boneo
Rd and the land between Norm Clark Walk and about Fifth Avenue;the 101 acres between Fifth and First Avenues had probably
been lost through insolvency.

South of Eastbourne Rd were pioneers such as the Fords on Wannaeue Station,the Cairns on Little Scotland and Robert White
who was renting a hut from them, the Purves near Boneo and on Greenhills on Purves Rd, Tweedale, Catherine Sullivan, George
Barnaby and CHARLES JAMESwho was assessed on 272 acres on 3-9-1864 but only 2.5 acres and a house on 5-9-1865.As you
can see, the hinterland was far more lively than "The Rosebud". But there were some residents living on the foreshore,or,
should I say, squatting.There were fishermen doing the same thing all round the bay. If a rate collector tried to extract
money from them,they'd just move to a different place and build another hut. The Kangerong Road Board may have influenced
the Government to declare the fishing village in 1873 to expand its inadequate rates base.

You will see why Rosebud's birth rate was not breaking any records and why Rose Bucher was the first white (not White!!)
child born there.) With the assistance of Susan Peatey, Rose Ann Bucher was born on 8-9-1867.

By 1879, Rosebud fishermen such as Henry Bucher, Antonio Bosina,William Gomm*, William Jamieson (former whaler), Antonio
Latross, John Jones (store keeperin an upturned boat who later built a store on the FJ's site) and Fred Vine were paying
rates.

*William Gomm later moved to Hastings where he died in 1915 (probably because of the effort keeping up with his 20 year old
second wife and was followed on the Jetty's Cafe site by his brother Henry, one or both in charge of the safety light on the
jetty and being described as harbour master in rate records. Their brother died in about 1896 at Dromana not long after
giving evidence at the hearing concerning Alf Downward's disputed election victory.They were sons of a convict, Henry Gomm,
and unrelated to Henry Gomm of "Glenhoya" in Somerville.See my Gomm journal.

By 1900, Henry Bucher must have died and Ann Bucher was assessed on lots 17 and 19 Rosebud (a term correctly used only for
the fishing village), as she was in 1910, when Arthur Ernest, Henry and D.R.Bucher were also paying rates. Arthur was
assessed on 30B Wannaeue of 50 acres,(Bayview Ave area, Melway 170 G 6-7), Henry,an inspector living in Brighton, on four
other fishing village lots and four lots in Woolcott's subdivision, and D.R.Bucher on 187 acres, 1A Wannaeue (Melway 170 G12
to 253 G3.) I've also read in the Mornington Shire heritage Study that a member of the Bucher family ran the sea baths at
Mornington.

3 comment(s), latest 3 years, 3 months ago

HINDHOPE ESTATE (PART 3, First Ave, Thomas St, Rosebrook St), ROSEBUD,VIC., AUST.

The land north of McCombe St and east of Rosebrook St was referred to as section A in the 1919 assessments. This was the second stage of the subdivision first advertised in 1914, the 70 "seaside" lots north of McCombe St being placed on sale in 1913 when the Hindhope Villa had 39 acres of grounds remaining. As Section A was the rest of Hindhope except for 14 acres west of Rosebrook St,it can be concluded that the land east of Rosebrook St consisted of 25 acres. Frederick Allan Quinton bought many blocks near the Hindhope Villa block (lot 95 and 96) but Alexander Mackie Younger's first wife bought the 14 acres of grounds, which might account for the absence of lots 19 to 32 on the subdivision plan,which makes no mention of section A.

Those assessed in 1919 on land in section A were:
A.L.Adcock, Red Hill, 6, 7, N.A.V. 2 POUNDS!; H.Cairns 14, c/o Mrs Papper, 433 George St.,Fitzroy; Mace, Wangaratta, 84, 85,86; W.R.Mullens 17, 18, c/o Jennings Rosebud; J.Patterson,Rosebud, 13; Mrs Emily June Ada Nethercote, Hawthorn, 12.
Not all of the above gained title. H.Cairns could have been Harry or Helen, neither of whom died for some time so the partly paid-off block may have been sold because of financial difficulties or an offer that couldn't be refused. The Mullens and Jennings family were related by marriage as shown in part 2. L.Adcock of Red Hill was occupying 42 acres and buildings on crown allotment 20C Wannaeue (at Melway 190 D 11-12) in 1919. I can find no Cairns/Papper connection so perhaps the Fitzroy family was leasing the block. Mr Mace's full name is below.

All lots below were transferred from the developer, Arthur A. Thomas to the buyer.

SOUTH SIDE OF McCOMBE ST.
LOT -- DATE--- TRANSFERRED TO.--- FRONTAGE--- NOW
1 --- 14-9-1923--- Elizabeth Lyng --- 100' 10"--6 First Ave.
2 --- 14-9-1923--- Elizabeth Lyng---- 50'------As above.
3 --- 27-3-1922--- Margaret Agnes Mott--50'------No.1 McCombe St.
4 --- 20-5-1924--- Arthur Nichols ----- 50'------No.3.
5 --- 8-7-1925--- Charles Nichols -----50'------No.5.
6 ---15-11-1916--- Leonard Frank Adcock-50'------No.7.
7 ---15-11-1916--- Leonard Frank Adcock-50'------No.9.
THOMAS STREET------------------------------------------
8--- 25-8-1924 --- William Alderson *1--50'------Unit 1 and 2, No.11 McCombe St
9 ---25-11-1937---Harold Thomas Devine--50-------No.13.
10-- 7-8-1921 --John Forrest Kilpatrick-50'------No.15 west to middle of drive.
11-- 7-8-1921 --John Forrest Kilpatrick- 50'-----No.17 and west half of drive.
12--16-4-1920-Emily Irene Ada Nethercote- 50'----No. 19.
13---27-4-1921--- James Kilgour Rae --- 50'------1/21 McCombe St (west to pillar between carports), and 5 and 6 of 1A Rosebrook St behind.
14---18-11-1921--Alfred Freeland Gibbs---50'-----2/21 McCombe St (east to pillar between carports),and 3 and 4 of 1A Rosebrook,fronting Rosebrook.
-------------ROSEBROOK STREET (THE NORTHERN 160 FEET TO THE BEND)-----------
15--- 9-3-1921 ---Gladys Iris Jennings---50'-----Plaza Car Park to east kerb of entry/exit separator.
16--- 9-3-1921----Gladys Iris Jennings---50'-----to diagonal crack in footpath west of entry/exit.
17---19-12-1923---Edward Adolph Mattner--50'----west to pedestrian crossing sign.
18---19-12-1923---Edward Adolph Mattner--50'----west to double veranda pole outside post office.


*1. William Alderson lived on a Rosebud Fishing Village block, and being a Carlton supporter, wasresponsible for the colours of the Rosebud Footy Club jumper. It was changed to incorporate a light horizontal panel for one year because old Mr Dark had trouble spotting the players in the late afternoon but a return to the Alderson design was demanded.
*2.The Jennings family's background is discussed in my journal about connections between the Rosebud and Geelong areas.

As mentioned previously,lots 18-32 were probably allocated to the 14 acres of "Hindhope Villa" grounds transferred to Elizabeth May Younger on 17-8-1918.This eventually became "Hindhope Park" on 5 acres (now the Plaza), and house blocks on Boneo Rd, Maybury St, Donald St and the west end of Hope St.

It is possible that lots 18-32 were intended to front the west side of Rosebrook St with lots 19 and 20 fronting McCombe St west of lot 18, each with a frontage of 50',between points 200 and 300 feet west of Rosebrook St. Lots 21 to 31 would have run uphill from the bend in Rosebrook St with frontages of 50 feet and depths of 160', except for lot 21 which would have had a frontage of 100' because of the angle of the south east boundary of lots 15-18.

The reason for the above assumptions is that the sketch of title for Elizabeth May Younger's purchase on 17-8-1918 indicates that Hope St extended 160 feet west of Rosebrook St and that a lane 550' long went due (magnetic) north almost to the rear boundary of lot 18, with another lane veering left 191 feet from the end for 213 feet until it reached a point 100 feet west of the south west corner of lot 18, from which it ran parallel to lot 15-18 boundaries to meet McCombe St at a right angle.

No such lanes were planned for the first stage, north of McCombe St, or the second stage, east of Rosebrook St; they would have been intended for the purpose of a sanitary service.Postscript-There do seem to be back lanes in the other areas mentioned. In residential areas without sewerage, the toilet was built on the back fence line and the nightman would drive along the back lane and replace the full pan with an empty one.It would be interesting to find out where the shire of Flinders dumped its "fertiliser".
Essendon's was dumped on Cam Taylor's "St John's" which became the original (north) part of Essendon Aerodrome.
I wonder if trove will tell me when a sanitary service commenced in Rosebud.

It hasn't but by 1910 Dromana and Sorrento had a sanitary service and Portsea was demanding one. This may have influenced Thomas to include the lanes west of Rosebrook St, but the influence may have come from Miss Alice Currie.

WOMEN TO WOMEN A FAMILY HOLIDAY BY THE SEA Summer Respite for Country Folk PRO VESTA.
It was just before war broke out in 1914 that Miss Alice Currie put before the public a plan providing seaside holi days for country folk on the most economical basis possible, in the hope of raislng funds to bring that plan to fruition. There was every possibility that she would have received the support she asked for but the war intervened and, as with many ...etc.

In a letter which appeared in The Argus on July Miss Currie outlined the plan upon which it is proposed to
establish residential seaside camps sanitated and supervised and self-supporting by means of very moderate charges...etc.

When Miss Currie made her idea public in 1914 the plan of an organised residential camp with equipment as simple, plain and standardised as possible and consistent with comfort and efficiency was taken up commercially as a business venture at Rosebud with special terms for country people for the last three years.
(P.13, Argus, 10-7-1935.)

A SEASIDE CAMP.
The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 3 May 1932 p 3 Article
... A SEASIDE CAMP. Miss Alice Currie of Toorak, who will be remembered for her advocacy of sea-side camps has had her ambitions realised In the organised permanent model camp at Hindhope Park, Rosebud, Victoria. The camp has been established by private enterprise and last summer it accommodated ...etc.



EAST SIDE ROSEBROOK ST DOWNHILL FROM HOPE ST.
LOT ---- DATE ----TRANFERRED TO ----- FRONTAGE--- NOW
33 ---11-3-1924 --Frederick Allan Quinton 50' --- 25 Rosebrook with 8 Hope St in eastern half.
34 --- As above ------------------------- 50' --- 23 McCombe.
35-- Application in 1993, Woodward -----50' --- No.21.
36---19-6-1925- Margaret Jennie Edwards --50' --- No 19.
37 --- 13-5-1927-- Harold Liversidge -----50' --- No.17.
38 --- 18-6-1924--Harold John Corry ------50' --- No 15.
39 --- 23-5-1923--Edgar George Hughes ----50' --- No.13.
40 --- 8-3-1923 --James Kilgour Rae ------50' --- No.11.
41 ---As above ---------------------------50' --- Southern 50' of No. 7 to peg near brick wall.(Could be number 9 but no number is displayed.)
42----As above ---------------------------50' --- Northern 33 feet of No.7 and north to middle of 1/5 gate.
43 ---As above----------------------------50'---- Remainder of No.5.
44 ---As above----------------------------50' --- No.3.
45 ---As above but 46' 4.5" frontage and 3' easement on north side. No. 1 Rosebrook St.

THOMAS ST (UPHILL WEST SIDE)
LOT-----DATE----TRANSFERRED TO ------FRONTAGE --- ----------NOW
8 McCombe side boundary 146'3.5' to bend and another 36'3". Paced out correct.
46 --- 25-9-1923---Ethel Corinth Stewart--128'3"------ No.2,opposite 1, 3, 5.
47 --- 24-3-1918---Walter Burnham --------50'--------- No.4,opposite north part of 7.
48 --- 24-3-1918---Walter Burnham --------50'--------- No.6 opposite south part of 7& No 9 drive.
49 --- 12-8-1927---Ethel Corinth Stewart--50'----------No.8 opposite No.9 between drive and south boundary.
50 --- 8-4-1925----David Brownhill Bruce--50'----------No.10 opposite No.11.
51 --- 16-4-1925 --Mary Jane Hill --------50'----------No.12 (new double storey at front) opposite No.13.
52 --- 21-6-1920 --Lily McBean------------50'----------No.14 opposite north half of 15-17.
53 --- 21-6-1920---Lily McBean------------50'----------No.16 opposite south half of 15-17.
54 --- 11-3-1924---Frederick Allan Quinton-50'---------No.18 opposite No.19.
55 --- Ditto------------------------------50'----------No.20 opposite No.21.
56-----Ditto------------------------------50'----------No.22 opposite 23.
57 --- 15-4-1921--Minnie Irene Waterhouse-50'----------No.24 opposite 25.
58 --- 4-3-1924---Frederick Allan Quinton-50'----------No.26 opposite 27.
59 ----Ditto------------------------------50'----------No 28 (and Hope St back unit) opposite 29.
HOPE ST-----------------------------------------------------------------

LOT 95.
The title for the Hindhope Villa block of 1 acre 1 rood and 39 perches was for lot 96 (now 46, 48 and 50 First Ave)and lot 95 whose north and south boundaries were the same as the front and back fence lines of the houses on the south side of Hope St. The southern boundary adjoined lot 60 (which was directly opposite the east end of Hope St) but went west another 20 feet so the Hindhope Villa residents could access the 14 acres of "grounds" west of Rosebrook St via Hope St.

The north west corner of was in the middle of Windella Ave and from this point I followed the line of Thomas St south for 180 feet (60 paces.) I came exactly to the bend in Windella Avenue. Bends in an otherwise straight road can only mean two things: (1)dodging an obstruction such as a boggy patch or a too-steep gradient or (2)a boundary between two subdivisions (i.e. Hindhope and The Thicket.)

Windella Avenue to this bend (the southern boundary of numbers 5 and 2 Windella Ave)is wholly on lot 95 as are 1, 3, 5 Windella and the front lawn of No.2 in front of the carport.

THOMAS ST (DOWNHILL EAST SIDE.)
60 ---11-3-1924--Frederick Allan Quinton--50'-------------No.31 opposite Hope St.
61---Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------No.29 opp.28.
62 --Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------No.27 opp.26.
63---Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------No.25 opp.24.
64---Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------No.23 opp.22.
65---Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------No.21 opp.20.
66---Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------No.19 opp.18.
67---Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------No.15-17 (vacant part from northern boundary to north side of gate),opposite No.14.
68---Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------Southern half of 17 including driveway and house, opposite No.16.
69---8-7-1925----Bell Frances Hill--------50'-------------No.13,opposite No. 12.
70---6-8-1925---Robert Percival Wall------50'-------------No.11,opposite No. 10.
71---25-2-1929--Elsie Bowerman Leigh------50'-------------No.9 south of its driveway,opp. No.8.
72---2-6-1947---Roy Marcus Dark-----------50'-------------No.7 south from said part of tree to south side of No.9's driveway),opposite No.6.
73---23-8-1926--Lucy Alice Thompson-------50'-------------northern part No.7(south to northern edge of nature strip tree), opposite No.4.
74---23-3-1926--David Hamilton -----------50'---------------No.5 opp. south part No.2.
75--29-9-1924-QUINTON(Allen Lawrence,Norman Frederick)-50'--No.3 opp. central third No.2.
76--22-1-1926---William Alderson----------47'10"-----------No.1 opp. north (almost) third No.2.
Side boundary of 7 McCombe,155'9" to bend and another 26'1"the present garage) to William's block.

FIRST AVENUE (WEST SIDE UPHILL FROM McCOMBE ST.)
Side boundary of lot 1 (McCombe St)----- 101'10". Now 6 First Avenue.
77---11-6-1928---James Nichols ----------125'7"--- 8 First Ave (75 feet)and No.10 (50 feet.)
78---15-4-1925---Gertrude Espie----------50'-------No.12.
79---30-6-1927---Hugh John Parkes------- 50'-------No.14.
80---30-6-1927---Hugh John Parkes------- 50'-------No.16.
81---23-8-1926---Lucy Alice Thompson---- 50'-------No.18.
82---7-4-1926----Albert Woolley Craig----50'-------No.20.
83---15-6-1926---Janey Isabella Watts----50'-------No.22.
84---19-2-1919 --Arthur Reginald Mace----50'-------No.24.
85---Ditto-------------------------------50'--Part 26-8 south to .5 metre past power pole.
86---Ditto-------------------------------50'-----south half of 26-8.
87---11-3-1924---Frederick Allan Quinton-50'------No.30.
88---Ditto-------------------------------50'------No.32.
89---Ditto-------------------------------50'------No.34.
90---Ditto-------------------------------50'------No.36.
91---Ditto-------------------------------50'------No.38.
92---Ditto-------------------------------50'------No.40.
93---Ditto-------------------------------50'------No.42.
94---Ditto-------------------------------50'------No.44.
95---(9-1-1923 Annie Cameron,(12-3-1926 Keith McGregor)Mortgaged to Alex Mackie Younger 30-12-26 and discharged on 31-3-1927, (31-3-1927 Gilbert Livingstone Culliford), (31-3-1927 The National Permanent Building Society).
These transfers also involved lot 96 to the west,lots 95 and 96 comprising the homestead block of one acre one rood and thirty nine perches,virtually one and a half acres.The frontage of lot 95 was 180 feet. Numbers 46, 48 and 50 each havea frontage of 60 feet with the southern fenceline of No.50 indicating the boundary between Hindhope and The Thicket. No. 50 First Avenue is the Hindhope Villa.

LOT 96 AND THE NORTH SIDE OF HOPE ST.
96---- (See lot 95 above.) The western boundary is virtually on Windella Ave running 170 feet south from a spot 20 feet across Thomas St which I just realised is named after the developer, Arthur A.Thomas)in line with the front fence line of houses on the south side of Hope St to a spot level with the back fence line of those houses. Details re occupancy of lot 96 are given before the start of THOMAS ST,EAST SIDE.


97----11-3-1924--Frederick Allan Quinton--50'--- the western 30 feet of Windella Ave, 1 Hope St west to the middle of the third fence panel, and most of No.2 Widella Ave to the south.
98----3-7-1954---Denzal Victor Victor Purser-50'---- The western part of 1 Hope St.
99----11-3-1924----Frederick Allan Quinton---50'-----3 Hope St
100---Ditto----------------------------------50' ----5 Hope St
101---Application 1993,Woodward--------------50'-----7 Hope St.(The application would have been to create dual occupancy for 7A,also on lot 101,at the back. Includes the 7A driveway.)
102 and 103? --11-3-1924---Frederick Allan Quinton---- 150' (to about 10 feet past the line of west side of Rosebrook e.g. the Plaza fence.) Nos. 9,11 and 13 Hope St, all with 50' frontages. 103 is confusingly written straddling the line 10 ft west of Rosebrook St[ rather than within a block as all the other lot numbers were.

LYNG, MOTT, NICHOLS,ADCOCK, ALDERSON, DEVINE, KILPATRICK, NETHERCOTE, RAE, GIBBS, JENNINGS, MATTNER, CAIRNS, DARK, QUINTON, WOODWARD, EDWARDS,LIVERSIDGE, CORRY,HUGHES, RAE, STEWART, BURNHAM, BRUCE,HILL,MCBEAN,WATERHOUSE, WALL,LEIGH, DARK, THOMPSON,HAMILTON, ALDERSON, NICHOLS, ESPIE, PARKES, CRAIG, WATTS, MACE, PURSER,

3 comment(s), latest 2 years, 9 months ago

HINDHOPE ESTATE ROSEBUD (VIC. AUST.) PART 2- NTH SIDE McCOMBE ST.

Information about crown allotment 14, section A,Wannaeue, the farms (Hindhope, The Thicket) and the subdivision of Hindhope can be found in my EARLY ROSEBUD and HINDHOPE ESTATE (Part 1) journals.

The dates below come from title documents and addresses from the 1919 assessment.

Lots 36-39 fronted Boneo Rd,each having frontages just over 50 feet. They now comprise the car park over McCombe St from Red Rooster and Gloria Jeans. Much of Charlie Burnham's lot 39 has been taken for the left turn lane from Boneo Rd,obviously the reason Red Rooster relocated from that site.

Lots 36 and 37, adjoining the fishing gear and furniture/giftware shops, had a frontage of 107 feet 4 inches and the title was transferred from the developer,Arthur A.Thomas to Norman Pern of Fairfield, N.S.W. on 14-1-1915.
Norm also bought lots 30 and 31 (discussed in part 1) and was assessed on all four lots in 1919.

Lot 38 had a frontage of 53 feet 8 inches,practically to the McCombe St kerb where cars turn left. The title was transferred to William Thomas Charge (whose address in 1919 I forgot to record)on 16-5-1916.

Lot 39 had frontages of 53 feet 5 inches to Boneo Rd and 220 feet 10 inches to the north side of McCombe St. Charles Burnham gained title to this block on 31-3-1926. Charles and his brother, Walter, were fishermen who moved from Sorrento to Rosebud in about 1913. Walter built a house on the foreshore at the end of Boneo Rd and the brothers built a jetty from ti-tree nearby. This jetty appealed to a teenaged Arthur Boyd, who became a famed artist and the 1995 Australian of the Year. Arthur painted the jetty from the east and from the west. Photos of the jetty can be seen in Peter Wilson's ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD which is available for loan. One shows Arthur's painting and the other Lois Burnham (Walter's daughter and Peter's mother) sitting on the jetty as a youngster.

Steve Burnham's website contains Vin Burnham's recollections of Rosebud in the early days. Click on ABOUT THE FAMILY.

McCOMBE ST BLOCKS (North side.)
All blocks to First Avenue have frontages to McCombe St of 50 feet except for lot 70 which was only 32 feet 9 inches wide. Many blocks are now part of the car park so I will describe what they adjoin in lots 1-33, such as the Op Shop etc.

LOT DATE (TITLE) BUYER 1919 ADDRESS BUILDINGS/CHANGES IN 1919.
40 7-9-1915 David Phillips Brunswick
41 7-9-1915 David Phillips Brunswick
42 9-1-1948 Jessie Elizabeth Lightfoot ---
43 9-1-1948 J.E.Lightfoot ---
44 Perhaps trans. to Denzal Clyde Victor Purser 3-7-1954 and sold 13-8-1958./ Chas Cairns,Boneo 29, 45.
45 1-3-1916 Robert Cairns the Younger / Forsyth and Sons lots 28,45,46.
46 8-2-1915. Annie Cath. Anderson / Forsyth and Sons
47 9-8-1923 Ethel May Short --- /Not assessed
48 3-7-1918 Mary Ann Peatey *1 /Not assessed
49 12-2-1937 Margaret Emma Price Stone*2 /Mrs S.R.Stone, Richmond,49,50
50 12-2-1937 M.E.P.Stone /As above.
51 18-6-1946 JENNINGS (Gladys Iris, Fred Rowland,Walt. Herb., Gord. Rob.) / Not assessed
52 10-8-1923 Lily McBean --- / Not assessed
53 10-8-1923 Lily McBean --- / Not assessed
54 11-5-1920 Charles Roger Marsh /J.N? Marsh,Pt Ormond>Brighton Nth, 54, 55, BDS.
--------------------ROSE ST. ---------------
55 16-9-1920 William Dixon Marsh /As above
56 18-8-1941 Georgina Emma Saunders --- / Not assessed
57 Probably unsold and transferred to executors of A.A.Thomas on/after 5-2-1945.No.on plan but not on transfer details.
58 7-2-1922 Margaret Agnes Mott --- / Not assessed
59 27-7-1929 Benjamin John Forsyth --- / Not assessed
60 27-7-1929 Dorothy Pretoria McAlister --- / Not assessed A sis.of Ben and Norm?
61 27-7-1929 Norman Forsyth --- / Not assessed
62 6-6-1950 John Hector Beattie --- / Marg. Ethel Beattie,Brunswick.
63(& 10) 4-9-1915 Harriet Harvie --- / Margaret Harvey, Northcote, 10,63
64 18-12-1917 Annie Catherine Sampson --- / E.Martin*3, Coburg> Rosebud, 7, 8 &BDS, 64,65
Annie Catherine Sampson of St Kilda was assessed on 9 and 64!
65 8-6-1924 John McGregor Dawson --- / E.Martin above
66 8-6-1924 J.McG. Dawson --- Due to the duplication re 64,E.Martin probably had 65 & 66.
67 10-12-1919 Susannah Hansford Canterbury (Could mean in Melb. but possibly Blairgowrie.)
68 23-2-1921 Gladys Ethel Morton --- / Not assessed
69 23-2-1921 Gladys Ethel Morton --- /Not assessed
70 1-9-1916 James Dunstan Page Armadale Frontage of only 32 feet 9 inches.

The distance between Pt Nepean Rd and McCombe St was 400 feet so the depth of blocks fronting each was 200 feet. Some Pt Nepean Rd lots seem to have been re-subdivided with some buildings straddling allotment boundaries. As many of the McCombe St lots are now car parking, I will describe what I can see 200 feet away at the back of the Pt Nepean Rd blocks in order to describe their locations. I will start from Rose St and work west and east to determine the 50 foot frontage blocks, the eastern end of Charlie Burnham's lot 39 and the western boundary of lot 70. Apart from those at each end, the lots have 50 foot frontages (roughly 17 paces); this might help if you have difficulty finding some of the boundaries, such as wall joins in the Safeway building.

LOCATIONS OF LOTS.
Boneo Rd.
Lots 36 to 39, each with a frontage to Boneo Rd of about 53 foot, had side boundaries from 142 feet 11 inches (at the boundary with Total Tackle, Jepara and Panini) to 220 feet 10 inches (the McCombe St frontage of lot
39.)The increase in depths was due to the differing angles of the lot boundaries and Boneo Rd. Lot 39 is now the left turn lane (W) and the east-west section to the bend near the car park entry (E). The eastern boundary of lots 36-9 backs onto the Panini building 10 feet west of its eastern corner.

40. Backs onto the car parking outside the chemist etc and goes west 10 feet past the Panini corner.
41. Backs onto car park two way road (W)and plantation east to no entry sign (E).
42. Backs onto western 2m of Safeway building and entry drive from Pt Nepean Rd, to the NO ENTRY sign.
43. Backs onto Safeway wall from redundant air conditioner downpipe (W) to wall join under floodlight(E).
44. Backs onto Safeway building between two wall joins under floodlight (W)and 24 feet (8 paces)west of loading dock yellow pole (E).
45. Backs onto Safeway loading dock ramp (E) and the dock building to bend in wall (E).
46. Backs onto loading dock building from wall bend/join (W) to east end of Safeway.
47. Backs onto Op Shop (W)and the (Nepean) arcade (E).
48. Backs onto Rosebud Discounts (W) and shop 2, 1395 Pt Nepean Rd (presently vacant) (E).
49. Backs onto Rosebud Homemakers and entry drive to east kerb.
50. Backs onto east kerb of entry drive (W) and Paint Place yard (E).
51. Backs onto yard with David Short signs on fence.
52. Backs onto Roller door (W) and Founds shop front. (E). The roller door part was formerly a separate shop.
53. Backs onto yard full of containers and mattresses, obviously the part of Founds rendered at the front.
54. West corner Rose St, backs onto Cash Deal.
--------- ROSE STREET -----------
55. East corner Rose St, contains Bermuda Bar, and Rose St shops (all vacant.)
56. Barry Plant and car park.
57. Sportspower and car parking.
58. Aldi loading dock.
59. Rest of Aldi building east to line of spouting.
60. East to drain pit cover in nature strip 2m west of Aldi entry/Exit drive.
61. The eastern quarter of the Aldi property to the boundary with First Choice.
62. Adjoins back of western part of First Choice.
63. 14 McCombe St (Rosebud Chiropractic Centre.)
64. West half of vacant land behind Rosebud Square.
65. East half of vacant land behind Rosebud Square.
66. 8 McCombe St to middle of driveway between it and a line of 4 flats.
67. The four flats.
68. Barkies entry drive and the western 3 parking bays.
69. The next six parking bays,perhaps another half bay.Contains telecommunication tower and enclosure.
70. First Avenue corner. Roughly the 4 eastern parking spaces, Nepean Autos and Hotline Electrics.


*1. Mary Ann Peatey married Jack Peatey on 4-11-1884. Their children, John Edward,William Henry,Susan and George were all born in Gippsland and shortly after they returned to Rosebud to live on the beachfront in 1894, twins Mary and Ann were born. They called their house Beachside; it was on the east side of Peatey's Creek which is now a drain running under Murray Anderson Rd. As Jack was almost an invalid,using a walking stick carved for him by Fred Vine, it was mainly Mary Ann who established Rosebud's first produce supply on the Rosebud Fishing Village block. Jack's health improved and he took out fishing parties in his huge coutta boat, one of his best customers being Edward Campbell a Melbourne City Councillor who served as Lord Mayor and had a holiday house on former Lacco land where the Banksia Point development is proposed. Jack and Mr Wong perpetrated a hoax on the Rosebud folk according to Jim Dryden. He pretended his eyes were turned and Mr Wong of the Chinaman's Creek market-gardening family made a hood with slits where his eyes should focus, effecting a miraculous cure.

Jack's parents, George and Susan Peatey, had been settlers on the Survey (Safety Beach area)by 1858 and later bought 100 acres at the east corner of Harrisons Rd (Melway 160 K6) now occupied by wineries. It proved too wet for farming and with a loan from Nelson Rudduck they purchased lot 76 of Woolcott's subdivision,just over 2 acres at the south corner of Jetty Rd and McDowell St. Here they grew onions and spuds from 1888 after repaying the loan.The house burnt down in 1912 and Susan moved to Beachside where she died in 1914.Susan was involved as a midwife in what was thought to be the first birth of a white child in Rosebud, delivering Henry and Ann Bucher's Rose Ann on 8-9-1867. ("Pine Trees and Box Thorns" Rosalind Peatey; Jim Dryden.)

Mary Ann would have bought the Hindhope Block as the best way of utilising the profits from Beachside about which an unknown pioneer (possibly Isabelle Moresby)has noted on the map "Peatys, cows:dairy,poultry slept in trees". Now that's what I call free-range!

*2. The Stones of Richmond may have been related to Fred Vine's wife and daughter. Fred's loyal missus was obviously a widow with a young daughter when Fred married her. After her death Fred moved to a fisherman's hut on the foreshore at Dromana, roughly opposite Seacombe St. The stepdaughter answered to Mary Stone or Mary Vine and Peter Wilson devoted a chapter of ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD to "Polly" Vine, including an excellent photo of her. Fred's move and Mary using Mary B.Stone as her official name probably both arose from the same cause, which is better left unsaid but can be discovered on trove. Some wonderful photos of Dromana fishermen in Colin McLear's A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA include Fred.

*3. E.Martin was probably the proprietor of a shop on the west corner of Boneo Rd (which became known as Martin's Corner.) He probably bought the 5 acre site which now includes the Blue Mini Cafe,a couple of shops to the west and possibly south to the Super Clinic. He may have sold the Hindhope blocks soon after the 1919 assessment to buy the Martin's Corner Land and build his shop which was established in about 1920 according to the late Ray Cairns.

The photo from Steve Burnham's website was taken from the west side of Boneo Rd, probably from near the site of the present Super Clinic. It shows Charlie Burnham's house fronting Boneo Rd and the fish shop behind it on the north side of McCombe St. Red Rooster later occupied the site but was moved to the present location so the left turn lane could be built. On the right hand side of McCombe St is a Hindhope sign.


1 comment(s), latest 2 years, 9 months ago

HINDHOPE PARK AND OTHER ROSEBUD MEMORIES FROM RAY WOOLRIDGE etc., VIC., AUST.

Nothing lasts forever! This is especially true regarding Rosebud which has lost so many of its historic buildings, and far-less so overseas where the Pyramids, Colloseum, Panthanon, quaint villages, ancient cathedrals etc. draw huge numbers of tourists. Aborigines had an incredible connection with "place" and family historians have caught the bug. In today's DESPERATELY SEEKING, one wanted to find out the sites of a hotel and a house in Bendigo. That is why I try to provide precise locations of farms etc, even if it makes for boring reading.

As well as acknowledging and providing details about pioneers, I also aim to raise public awareness of an area's heritage so that people can experience the feeling of "place". To this end, with the assistance of Frank Thom of Rosebud Plaza, I am producing a series of one-page histories of the Rosebud area. The first is about Hugh Glass, The Thicket and Hindhope farms and Hindhope Park, with a photo and newspaper article about Hindhope Park. It is on the noticeboard near Baker's Delight.

This morning while I continued the 1954 Mornington Peninsula souvenir journal, I received a phone call from Ray
Woolridge. This is what he told me.

Hindhope Park was managed by Bill Woodward and his wife, Marge,in 1955-7 and they were followed from 1957 into the 1960's by Fred Parker. Fred's son, Dick, married one of the girls who had holidayed at the Park. (Dick was one of the stars of the Rosebud Football Club and a very good cricketer for years at Boneo. He was the one who suggested that I interview the late Ray Cairns,the Boneo Bradman.)

Ray's family lived in the Preston area and there was a group of families from there that spent their summer holidays at Hindhope since the late 1940's. Ray knows the exact site occupied by Bert Deacon's 21 person "colony" on the foreshore that is mentioned in my 1954 Mornington Peninsula Souvenir journal. Bert, a Brownlow Medalist and Carlton great, was captain-coach of the Bullants and most of his colonists were Prestonites.

At Hindhope there were three good kitchens and eating areas and visitors could use the cabins or provide their own camping (as was the case with the Clemengers' Parkmore near McCrae many decades earlier.) Every summer there would be a golf tournament at Carrington Park (Rosebud Public Golf Course)and the "Hindhope Gift" on New Year's Day.

Later on Ray Woolridge spent his summers at Netherby, now full of home units with entries in McDowell St and Jetty Rd. This was a caravan park run by Don Miller which closed in the mid 1980's. It consisted (wholly or partly) of the 2 acre lot 76 of Woolcott's subdivision of crown allotment 17 Wannaeue,purchased in 1878 by George and Susan Peatey and occupied by them from 1888 when they had repaid Nelson Rudduck's loan.

The closure of Netherby resulted in Ray holidaying at Heather Lodge, situated where Kentucky and the mini golf
are now. It was run by Jack and Audrey Hetherington and closed down in the early 1990's.

Deserting trove, I did a google search for Hindhope Park and found this treasure.
Hindhope Caravan Park | Five Little Lady
janettebruckshaw-healthykids.blogspot.com/.../hindhope-caravan-park.ht...‎

Hindhope Caravan Park
Without Prejudice

On the first night we arrived at Hindhope,for a months long stay, I woke in the middle of the night with an urgent request from Yvette to take her to the toilet block.

We had arrived in the darkness not knowing what to expect. Home left behind in Melbourne for the Summer shores of camping at Rosebud. the cabin was tiny and airless but was adequate for our needs it was more or less a glorified tent.

An enamel sink in one corner and bunk beds, old drawers and a wardrobe. Unbearably hot during the day but we intended to spend all our time outside of it.

My husband had stayed back in Melbourne to work and we had fled a boring old house in Keysborough for the wilds of Rosebud. The traditional Aussie break coming to us at last, a summer holiday on the safe foreshore of the Bay.

I grabbed Yvette's hand and a torch and we walked out into the night sky. Once we reached the bright lights of the toilet block I could see why Yvette was agitated. She was covered from head to toe in Measles. And we were there amongst families for the entire month, no thought of going home entered my brain.

So the next day I told all the people in the communal kitchen at breakfast. we had our own table, a distressed timber construction with long bench seats on either side. The seats were given to be a bit rough and had to be carefully navigated to avoid lethal splinters to the unwary.

We had our own fridge with a tiny freezer and in the massive kitchen there were enough cookers to feed 24 families. I gave all the families the information about Yvette's condition and they all agreed it was fine for her to come in with their children.

She didn't leave the cabin for days and I had to nurse her sore eyes and bathe her head with water from the sink but she was fine again after a few days. Then Debbie went down with it and Alena and Lauren didn't as they had had the measles injection. It was a disastrous start to what would become a regular holiday for us, always just us. No hubby.

By the following week we were really into the swing of things. Fun coming from the other families and their kids and every night at dinner we met up and compared the days happenings.

I took out other kids my girls had befriended and other Mums and Dad took mine with them to Arthurs seat or the Carnival with its swinging Pirate Ship. Coming back hot and sticky with pink and green fairy floss.

From then on we did everything, exploring the foreshore, swimming in the warm water that was almost bath like in its temperature and it was always safe as it was mostly shallows with little ripples that could be body surfed by a 10, 9, 5 and 3 year old child.

We went to the hot concrete pool and the girls didn't like it and we left preferring the sea and sand and the parks with their swings and see saws. But the nights were the best when the kids were sent to faraway tables to play cards and the adults would play Trivial Pursuit or cards and get merrily drunk.

My drink de jour, Spritzers of white wine and soda and ice. I smoked then as did all the others and puffing away and drinking we would endeavour to answer the questions seriously. we would retire to the cabins we all had as late as possible and as tipsy as possible so we could sleep in the hot boxes.

The kids never had a problem sleeping, however, worn out from helter skelter during the day, wind, sun and sea burning their cheeks and then turning them mahogany brown. their Father having olive skin and the girls lucky enough to inherit it.

HISTORIC ORIGINS OF STREET NAMES ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.

The following is an extract from my Peninsula Dictionary History, which I have not touched for over a year since I read Leila Shaw's THE WAY WE WERE and got sidetracked into Henry Gomm, Joseph Porta etc. The Mount Martha section is based on much speculation and should be taken with a grain of salt.Irvine St has no connection with the Coburg pioneering carpenter. The street names that are simply listed have definite historic origins and I'll have to take a holiday from family tree circles soon (with the occasional visit only) in order to continue with PENINSULA DISTRICT HISTORY and DROMANA AND ROSEBUD ON TROVE.

Other speculation, such as the origin of Hope St in Rosebud, has since been disproved. Hindhope was the original name of the farm including all Hope St house blocks and bounded by Boneo Rd, Point Nepean Rd and First Ave.I will edit this when I have time to read it through. It was Peter Young who was granted Nairn but Airey's did become part of Patullo's Craigbank.


HISTORIC STREET NAME ORIGINS
Co-ordinate given is where the street name is written.
MOUNT MARTHA.
I was tempted to start with Mornington (where I have a relationship to the Harraps dating from 1861) and Green Island where Sam Sherlock settled after working at many occupations and places in and near the parish of Wannaeue. That will have to come later as my original intention was to start with Safety Beach and if I dont control myself, Ill be telling you that the family of Thamer Burdett (H.W.Wilsons wife) might be connected with the naming of a street in Frankston North.
Therefore I will start at Balcombe Creek with what I like to think of as Essendon By The Bay. It is possible that John Thomas Smith (seven times Mayor of early Melbourne and builder of the lovely Ascot House, which still stands in Fenton St, Ascot Vale) started the annual summer migration; a book I read yonks ago in the old Rosebud Library called him a pioneer of the area.
WELLS RD.
I know Wells Rd is nowhere near Mt Martha but Henry Cadby Wells daughter was probably the first white child born on the Southern Peninsula. Robert Rowleys mother and stepfather, Richard Kenyon, along with Captain Adams at McCrae, were the first permanent settlers in the area. Shortly after, Robert arrived and within months, he and his friend, Wells had started a limeburning venture and Polly Wells had been born (7-6-1841).
By 1846, the depression caused a slump in demand for lime and many limeburners had departed while others turned to timber-getting or fishing. In about 1849, Wells, (a bootmaker by trade), returned from Melbourne to launch a crayfishing venture with Robert. It was hugely successful but wishing to see their families for a few days, they anchored in Westernport. The vessel was destroyed because of the huge tidal variation
In 1859, Wells planted a vineyard at Ranelagh in Mt Eliza but before long it was wiped out by a disease that destroyed almost every vineyard in the state. Wells retained his interest in the limeburning industry and visited the Sorrento area many times, probably staying with the Rowleys. (Google The Wells Story.)
MELWAY P.150-1
There are just so many names associated with the history of the area near Essendon found on these two pages that I feel justified in assuming that there was a summer exodus from that area to Mt Martha similar to that from Toorak to Portsea in slightly later times.
KILBURN GR. 150 H1.
See Fairview Ave.

ELMIE TCE. 150 H1
This was possibly the location of the holiday home of a prominent citizen of early Coburg. See Between Two Creeks Richard Broome.

AILSA ST 151 A1
This was possibly the site of a holiday home owned by Robert McCracken of Ailsa on Flemington Hill where Essendon Football Club played its first few seasons.

TAL TALS Cres. 151 C3
This was a name given by early settlers to a local aboriginal group.

CUMBERLAND DR. 151 C1
This was possibly the site of a holiday home of Alex. McCracken who lived at North Park in Woodlands St, Essendon and owned Cumberland which is part of Woodlands Historic Park near Tullamarine Airport.

SINCLAIR ST. 150 K1
This was possibly the site of a holiday house of Mrs Sinclair who had a farm fronting Rosehill Rd in West Essendon. The origin of the name could also have something to do with the family of Peter S.Sinclair, a grantee in Rye Township, after whom Sinclair St in Rye was obviously named. Peter only owned his land fronting Weir St for a decade so he might have been a speculator. If so, Sinclair St in Somerville might also be named after a member of his family.

LEMPRIERE AVE. 150 G2
HERE I WILL DISCONTINUE USING This was possibly the site of etc.
Lempriere at one time owned St Johns, a farm granted to Major St John who was famously libelled by J.P.Fawkner. This property became Essendon Aerodrome.
A member of the Lempriere family with very French Christian names was assessed on land in Sorrento in about 1880.
PRESCOTT AVE. 150 H2
Prescott was probably a developer who subdivided land here and at Safety Beach. He may not have been a resident of Sorrento but he was a guest at a wedding there. The newspaper account of the wedding of Florence Maud Dark and George Sutton is reproduced on page 77 of Jenny Nixons FAMILY, CONNECTIONS, SORRENTO and PORTSEA. Unfortunately, no date is given for the article but it may be from about 1920. My hunch is that Sutton and Prescott were friends from Mornington. One day, while walking in Mornington, I inspected an old house called Sutton Grange. Always on the lookout for historical connections, I wondered if it had any connection with the place east of Castlemaine and Faraday. This fine house might have been where George Sutton lived.

IRVINE AVE. 150 H2
Irvine was a prominent carpenter in Coburgs early days. Notice the proximity to Elmie Tce. See Broomes history.

RAMSAY CT. 150 J1
Ramsay built Clydebank in West Essendon, which now serves as a Catholic College.
From New Zealand, he invented a boot polish and named it KIWI.


FAIRVIEW AVE. 150 K2.
There were two farms in Tullamarine with this name but a nearby street makes it clear which one is associated. The Kilburns received land grants in Keilor Rd in what is now called East Keilor and Keilor Park, and also bought part of the subdivision of Thomas Napiers land at what is now Strathmore. Mrs Kilburn also owned 400 acres bounded by Sharps and Broadmeadows Rds at Tullamarine; this farm, which she called Fairview, was later split into Brightview and Dalkeith.

DURHAM CT. 151 A3.
Durhams owned and possibly subdivided McMeikan land at Kensington in the 1880s. Perhaps he found Mt Martha too hilly and moved to the very flat Durham Pl. in Rosebud.

DEAKIN DR. 150 F2.
Although the street may have been named by others to honour his contribution to Federation, he did defeat Alexander McCracken for the seat of West Bourke and represented the area from which these prominent holiday makers came, and he might have shared their summer relaxation at this watering place as promoters such as Dromanas Spencer Jackson so quaintly put it.

PENLEIGH CRES 151 A2.
You might have noticed that many of the families mentioned are Scottish. Some of their daughters would have been educated at Penleigh in Park St, Essendon.

SHERWOOD CRES. 151 A3.
Alexander McCracken was heavily involved in the Oaklands Hunt Club and many of the post hunt get-togethers took place at Cumberland and the Inverness Hotel (near the north end of the runway). Eventually the hunt club established its own headquarters on a property called Sherwood. (See 178 D6.) Ref. The Oaklands Hunt by D.F.Cameron-Kennedy.

Another possible reason for the name is that there might have been a family of this name in the area. The 1879-80 Kangerong assessments record that George Sherwood, journeyman, and William Copeland, journeyman, constituting a firm called Sherwood & Co., had 173 acres and a building in the parish. This would have been crown allotment 10 A of just under 173 acres granted to G.Sherwood on what looks like 19-8-1876. This land was bounded by Tumbywood Rd, Eatons Cutting Rd and Mornington-Flinders Rd and extended east to the end of Holmes Rd. It is probable that Sherwood had moved on by 1900 and the property is not even mentioned; it might have been absorbed by Thomas Appleyard or passed into the hands of creditors during the depression of the 1890s. By 1910, it had become the property of Charles Bennett of St Kilda.
No detail of which trade Sherwood was following is given, but readers may wonder what a journeyman was. A tradesman could progress through three stages. Usually an apprenticeship lasted seven years during which a lad would live with his master, receiving little payment other than food and shelter. On successful completion of the term, he would become a journeyman. He could conduct business on his own account but as can be seen, he probably would not have a nest egg to do so. Most likely, he would wander from place to place, working for various master tradesmen, picking up new ideas and techniques that might enable him to submit a piece of work to the guild and qualify as a master. The term journeyman comes from the French word for day and the master for whom he was now working had to pay him for each days work.
Perhaps Sherwoods father was a master tradesman and actually owned the company. Therefore Sherwood and Copeland could obtain equipment and materials, but they could not employ anyone until they reached the status of Master.

McLEOD RD. 150 F4.
The McLeods were pioneers in the parish of Holden. (See 176 A11.)



HALL ST. 150 E4.
The Halls received grants near Lemprieres St Johns and Kilburns Fairview and next to Kilburns grant in Keilor Rd. Joseph Hall had the Tuerong run briefly.

BARROW ST 150 F4.
Jim Barrow was an owner of Gladstone, which makes up the northern 777 acres of Gladstone Park.

SPENCER, JACKSON, PANORAMA 150 G5.
Spencer Jackson did much to promote Dromana. He even wrote a history of Dromana but some of its pages look suspiciously like an advertisement for his Panoramic Estate at Dromana. The history is not for loan but is available at Rosebud Library.


GLENCOE DR. 153 A1.
Glencoe was the Duncan farm just north of the McLeod farm in the parish of Holden. It was on this farm that the famous Sunbury Music Festival was held. Ref. Bulla Bulla I.W.Symonds. (See 352 J5.)

NAIRN PL. 150 G7.
If I remember correctly (this whole work is written from memory as I gave all my maps, notes and the 3500 pages of Dictionary History of Tullamarine and Miles Around to custodians when moving to Rosebud) Nairn was granted to Captain Airey but became part of David Patullos Craig Bank. It was west of Wildwood Rd where it bends near the turn off to the Brannigans St Johns. (See 177 C3.)

HEARN RD. 150 E4, CLARKES AVE. 145 B8, BRUCE RD 150 F10.
Hearn had the Mt.Martha Run and in1865 appears to have built the forerunner or original 4 rooms of Heronswood at Dromana. He also received the grants of extensive property on both sides of Purves Rd on the south side of Arthurs Seats summit. His son, James married a daughter of W.J.T.(Big) Clarke who had bought Jamiesons Special Survey, the property south of Hearns run. Colin McLear said that Clarke gave another son-in-law, (a Mr Bruce of the family that produced a prime minister) part of the survey as a wedding present. This was probably the northern 1000 acres leased by E.L.Tassell. ( Hollinshead stated that Clarke sold it to him at a profit of 600 pounds). Big Clarke was looked after in his last days at James Hearns Roseneath in Woodlands St, Essendon. Woodland St apparently got its name from a huge Clarke property. The Roseneath estate was earlier owned by E.Clarke and later owned by William Salmon who donated Salmon Reserve to the council.
Sources: Wannaeue map, Kangerong rates, Dreamtime of Dromana, Lime Land Leisure, Essendon &Hawstead map, Essendon rates, Lenore Frosts books on Essendon homes and street names.
N.B. Big Clarkes son, W.J.Clarke, built Rupertswood at Sunbury (the birthplace of TheAshes) and named it after his son.


FAIRBAIRN AVE. 150 C7.
The Fairbairn family settled near Ballan very early. Like Hugh Glass, Big Clarke and John Aitken near Sunbury, they bought grants on the way to Newmarket to rest and fatten their stock. Fairbairns was on the south side of Raleighs Punt Road. Today it is Fairbairn Park. Fairbairn owned an impressive house (called Ardoch Towers if my memory serves me right) just north of the Essendon Footy Ground.

DALKEITH HOUSE. Being so far from Essendon on the Bay, this is pure conjecture, but there might have been some connection with Tommy Lofts farm, Dalkeith, at Tullamarine. (See Kilburn and Fairview.) Tommy Loft owned land on the west side of Truemans Rd in 1920, which adds to the possibility of a connection.







Safety beach and dromana now on USB.






BURTON ST 159 C9
There might be a connection with the Burrell or Coburn families.
It might also have been intended to be Burston Ave. I cannot be sure that, in 1919, George Burston of Fitzroy had 368 acres of the Arthurs Seat Pre-emptive Right because the same section and allotment was used to detail land there, and at Boneo. If he did there would be another 272 acres to account for.
Since 1900 and probably the 1890s depression, Catherine Burrell had owned 70 acres and the Coburns 88 acres. The Rudducks Wonga was 25 acres, Judge Higgins had Heronswood on 10 acres, the Hearns nearby had 40 acres and the Cornells had 10 acres where Smythe had built the hut for old Tom who tended his wattles. Charles Wedge of Ringwood had 26 acres taking us to a total of 637 acres, so with a few subdivision blocks the 640 acres are accounted for. Hmmm! By the way Burston also had 709 acres in another riding.


CHARLES ST 159 A10 HENRY ST 159 B10 CATHERINE ST 158 K 12
BURRELL ST 158 K12 COBURN AVE 159 B9 BARTELS ST158 K10.
Charles was the given name of one of the four Burrell brothers who took over the Arthurs Seat estate in 1851 with their sister Kitty. The author of Rosebud: Flower of The Peninsula said that he married Miss Coburn.
Henry was another of the four Burrell brothers. By 1910, he was living in East Melbourne but he was leasing a house and 4 acres from the Coburn family, possibly Killarney.
Catherine Burrell and her four brothers took over the McCraes Arthurs Seat Run in 1851. Brook and Joseph were the two brothers after whom streets were not named unless the author of the book mentioned under Charles St made a mistake. Rate records do little to verify the names of the brothers but they do indicate the shrinking acreage of the Burrell property. In 1864, Charles Burrell had a six-roomed house and a large garden (orchard) on 34 acres and Burrell had an eight-roomed house and large garden on a 42 acre frontage and the remaining 4400 acres of the Run. Edward Burrell was assessed on a slab hut and 15 acres.
In 1865, the rate collector assessed only Joseph Brooks Burrell, on the 640 acre pre-emptive Right. By 1879, Joseph John Burrell, grazier, was assessed on 580 acres, leased from C.Burrell. In 1900 and again in 1910, Catherine Burrell was assessed on 70 acres. I had assumed that she was a widow but she might have been Kitty who arrived with the four brothers. Her next- door neighbour was Caroline Coburn, possibly mother in law of Charles Burrell, living on the 88 acre Springbank.
The first mention of the Coburns that I have transcribed was from the assessments compiled for the 1887-8 year; W.J.Coburn was assessed on 370 acres. He might have been leasing part of the Arthurs Seat Pre-emptive Right of 640 acres. The author of Rosebud: Flower of the Peninsula states that Mr Coburn built several houses including Killarney in 1891 and Springbank in 1894. She says that Springbank burnt down in 1912 but the Coburns must have given the name to another house that he had built, as their address was still Springbank in 1919. The house on the site of the one that was burnt down was built in 1927.
In 1910, Mrs Caroline E.Coburn, a farmer, was assessed on the 88 acres of Springbank while William John Coburn, farmer of Springbank, was assessed on two allotments on Crown Allotment 17 (near McDowell St.)
By 1919, Miss Catherine Burrell had only 40 acres. The remaining 30 acres must have been sold to such as Frank and June Cornell (10). David Cairns Jnr (10) and Back Road (Now Bayview Rd) Bob Cairns may have had the rest. There is no mention of the Coburns in the West Riding, but there is a separate listing for the Springbank Estate.
The lots themselves were of little value and, no matter whether one or five lots were owned, the nett annual value was almost always two pounds. As mentioned before, Springbank consisted of 88 acres. C.W. Coburn was assessed on 44 acres and part of lots 4 and 5. Mrs S.Burrell who was living at Springbank, Dromana (or more correctly Dromana West as McCrae would be called for another couple of decades), had lots 8, 9, and 4 and 5 (of which Coburn had a part.) Charles N.Coburn, of Caulfield, had lots 22-5, 30-32, 22-81, 59, 60, and 87-95. (Thats right; assessed twice on lots 22-25!) E.J.Alexander (Queensland), Edith Anderson (Camberwell), and The Phillips (Murrayville), like the above, had buildings and thus a NAV of ten pounds or above.
The Bartels family from Oakleigh had property with a total NAV of L12.J.Bartels had lots 11, 18, 19 and buildings, while Mrs E.J. and E.C. and A.C. Bartels had lots 61-64. No doubt this family later did their own subdividing.

GEORGIANA PL. 159 A11.
Georgiana Place is named after Georgiana McCrae who supported her husband in his bid to establish a successful Run at Arthurs Seat. A cultured lady, she was asked by Gov. Latrobe to accompany him at the opening of the first Princes Bridge when his wife did not feel well enough to attend. In her famed diary, she recorded life in the infant colony with descriptions of pioneers rivaled only by those of Harry Peck. How else would I have known that Captain Bunbury (granted section 1 of the parish of Tullamarine, and head of the Water Police at Williamstown) had lost the use of his right arm but could paint beautifully left-handed?
Now doubt the walls of the Arthurs Seat homestead displayed some of Georgianas fine paintings. The McCrae homestead can provide a glimpse into the life and times of Georgiana. The artistic tradition at the homestead was carried on by John Twycross, who married one of the Burrell girls; noted as a photographer later, he produced some beautiful paintings, which are housed in display drawers in the new Burrell Room.



A NAVIGATOR THEMED ESTATE? 159 A12 and pages 170-1.
Poole St may be named after Captain J.Poole who commanded a 368 ton barque named the Indus. The Maitland Mercury of 12-2-1853 reported the arrival of the ship from Melbourne.
Parkes St, named after Sir Henry Parkes (the father of Federation whose enthusiasm was caught by Alfred Deakin) seems to be the exception to the theme; perhaps it was a later addition to provide access to the water tower.
Somers Ave seems to be part of the estate too. This was named after Lord Somers, the Governor from 1926-1931 who started a youth camp on Merricks Creek.
Matthew. Flinders, Cook and Bass need no explanation but an examination of the monument outside the Dromana Museum will help to explain the choice of Murray and Bowen. Have a look at it on a Sunday afternoon drive and visit the museum.
Dorothy Crt probably resulted from the subdivision of a homestead block later.

CAIRN (sic) RD 158 K12
This road was intended to be named after Robert Cairns, or Back Road Bob as he was known- as he lived on Cape Schanck Rd, which has been renamed Bayview Rd. He received grants for almost 180 acres on the east side of the back road with the northern and southern boundaries indicated by the extent of streets named after British cars. His northern boundary divided his property from the Arthurs Seat Pre-emptive Right and the southern boundary had bends which are the northern boundaries of the present Rosebud Golf Course. His land extended to Melway 171 A2.


GELLIBRAND ST 158 J11
Joseph Tice Gellibrand was one of the members of the Port Phillip Association on whose behalf John Batman made his purchase of thousands of square miles on the north and west of the bay. Gellibrand, appointed attorney-general of Van Diemans Land, took up his post in 1824 but the despotic Governor Arthur probably conspired to ensure his dismissal within a couple of years.
In 1827, he and Batman applied for a grant in the Port Phillip District (as Victoria was called until it gained Separation) but the request was refused. In 1835 he joined the P.P.A. and devised the treaty. After landing at Westernport in 1836 and strolling to Melbourne and then to Geelong, accompanied by William Buckley, and then towards Gisborne, then Melbourne, then the Plenty River, he went back to Tassie for a well-earned rest. He returned with George B.L.Hesse and, landing at Geelong on 27-2-1837, they set off to follow the Barwon River to its junction with the Leigh River and then cut across to Melbourne. They disappeared and no trace was ever found of them.

PARKMORE RD 158 H11
Parkmore was a comfortable house built in 1896 by Mr Holloway, an architect. A lovely fountain graced the garden. Parkmore was later occupied by Mr and Mrs Fair. The Clemingers bought it in 1908 and introduced tented accommodation. This information comes from Rosebud:Flower of the Peninsula, which as well as being not for loan is no longer kept in the local history room at the library. I have written a summary of its information, with notes, under the same title.
The rate assessments for 1900-1 show that Albert Holloway had 5 acres and a building; it would have been too much trouble to call it a house, let alone give its name!
Wises 1893-4 directory lists Albert Holloway as a resident of Rosebud and gives his occupation as builder, as does their 1895-6 directory. This historic house is still standing although well hidden by a high fence and perimeter foliage and will soon be completely hidden from view by new housing. See details of Parkmore and subdivision of Crown Allotment 19 in ADAMS CORNER by Ray Gibb (available at Dromana Museum.)

LONSDALE ST 158 K12
William Lonsdale was appointed Police Magistrate for Port Phillip District as soon as Governor Bourke received permission to form the new settlement and was hurried off in Captain Hobsons Rattlesnake, arriving on 29-9-1836. Bourke was anxious to impose control on the illegal settlers before things got out of hand. Lonsdale could have been dictatorial, given the additional powers invested in him but he was generally applauded for his even-handed attitude. When Latrobe arrived, he served under him until his boss retired in 1854.

WATTLE RD 158 J 11,12
The road to Portsea (as the highway was known) was called Esplanade where it skirted the foreshore through Dromana and Rosebud. The Avenue at McCrae was the boundary between the Arthurs Seat Pre-emptive Right and Captain Henry Adams grant , allotment 20 of the parish of Wannaeue. I doubt that The Avenue was made to Cape Schanck (Bayview) Road in the early days. The only people that came from the east to ADAMS CORNER before the mid 1860s would have been those calling at the Arthurs Seat homestead before going to the solitude of the Cape Schanck, Boniyong or Tootgarook runs. If they werent stopping at the homestead and did not want to wait for low tide so they could get around Anthonys Nose on the beach, they would enter Cape Schanck Rd at Foote St in Dromana.
However, if they did stop at the homestead, they would take a route that headed west with the least arduous ascent. This would explain the crazy angle at which Wattle Rd (now Wattle Pl.) leaves the beach road. Even before the McCraes settled on their run, Captain Adams had a house on Adams Corner, built from his schooners timber in 1839-40 and it is likely that anyone choosing the beach route around Arthurs Seat instead of the steep climb out of what would become Dromana would enjoy his company and hospitality before proceeding. There was no road along the foreshore and many creeks (Adams, Eeling and Peateys and others before Jetty Rd) as well as the Tootgarook Swamp near Chinamans Creek (with jungles of ti tree) that would deter travelers from taking that route.
When Henry Cadby Wells and his wife were walking to the heads to join young Robert Rowley in a limeburning venture in 1841, it is likely that they stopped at Henry Adams place for the night. As they prepared to leave the next morning they would have seen some of Adams workers heading off in a south westerly direction.
Where are they going in the dark?
Can you see those piles of bark?
They go out in any sort of weather
And strip the wattles for tanning leather.
The demand for wattle bark in Melbourne would lead to this track, made by the earliest travelers, being used by bark gatherers who would have to go further up the mountain each day as they depleted the supply along the wattle road and then at the end of it.

BARODA ST 158 G12 MITCHELL ST, LYON ST 158 F12 MADURA ST 158 H 12
All of these streets seem to have a link with the Maddens of Travancore, which was part of the old Flemington Estate of Hugh Glass.Both Baroda and Madura are street names in the Travancore Estate ((29 A11). The main Madden business was supplying horses for the army in India. Their initial link with the Peninsula was probably through the Purves family at Tootgarook with James supplying heavy horses for hauling and James Jnr breeding thoroughbreds for the lighthorse brigades. If the Maddens did establish a holiday retreat east of Adams Ave., it was not far from Green Hills, near the south end of Purves Rd, where, at his uncle Peter Purves farm, Alf Hansen and others imitated the man from Snowy River.
The Lyon family was prominent in the Essendon area from early days and possibly involved on the council with the Maddens.
The Mitchell name is common in early Peninsula history, and because of the proximity of two streets named after pioneering families, I believe Mitchell St was named after one of them. James Mitchell was one of the early settlers on Jamiesons Special Survey, renting a hut from Big Clarke in 1863.As he did not have land, he was probably fishing at Safety beach or timber cutting. He was also there in 1864, but not in 1865 unless my transcription was faulty. It was probably his daughter who married John Bryan, a neighbour on the survey.. (See Brian St, map 158.) Mitchell might have moved to Rye in 1865 to work in the lime trade. George Mitchell was the postmaster at Rye by 1879. (See RYE PRIMARY SCHOOL 1667 P 60, 72 re the Mitchells.)
If the Madden land extended across Adams Ave, Mitchell St could have been named for Mitchell who ran huge flocks of sheep on Woodlands and Cumberland, which today constitute most of Woodlands Historic Park near Tullamarine Airport. He took over this land after the death of Alexander McCracken in 1915. (See Mt Martha streets such as Ailsa & Cumberland.)
Mitchell and Madden might have been connected through the Oaklands Hunt Club or perhaps marriage.


ADAMS AVE 158 G12
Captain Henry Everest Vivian Adams first landed at Dromana (which included McCrae until recent times) sometime between 1839 and 1840 on the schooner Roseanne.He received the grant for allotment 20 Wannaeue, which was bounded by Point Nepean Rd, The Avenue, Bayview Rd and Parkmore Rd. By 1865, he had purchased allotment 19, which went west to Adams Ave.
His first house was built from the timbers of his schooner, but with the help of his son, Robert, he built another house on the Wattle Rd corner (Adams Corner), which was named Hopetoun House in honour of the Governor who would stay there on his way to Sorrento. Like many farmers (even today), he had to turn his hand to many things to make a living. It is probable that he carried lime, timber and bark up the bay to Melbourne. He picked up and provided accommodation to tourists when Dromanas pier was built, had a vineyard, and produced bricks. In about 1890, when the construction of St Marks Anglican Church was being organized Henrys son, Robert, donated 10 000 bricks.
Hopetoun House later became Merlyn Lodge guest house, which was being run by Mrs S.A.Adams in 1947. R.W. Adams was running a milk bar in 1950.
Two pioneer families linked to the Adams through marriage are the McGregor and Freeman families. Keith McGregor, who took over Jimmy Williams fish run from Rosebud West to Mornington, married Mabel Adams and later sold his run to Mabels brother, Bill. Another Adams girl married a Freeman according to Ray Cairns.


PATERSON ST 158 F12
CAIRNS ST 158 F12
JETTY RD 158 F12 (3 PIERS).
BUCHER PL. 158 E12
DURHAM PL 158 E12
WANNAEUE PL. 158 E12
McDOWELL ST 158 D12
HEAD ST 158 D12

MAPS 170-171.
SHANDS RD 171 K12
WHITES RD 171 G3
WILSON RD 171 G6
BARKERS RD 171 H 12
PURVES RD 171 E1
BALDRYS RD 171 E12
GREENS RD 171 E12
CAIRN (sic) RD. 170 K1-2
McLAREN CT 170 K4
BRITISH CAR THEME 170 J2
HOVE RD 170 G 3
SHERWOOD AVE 170 G7, FENTON AVE 170 G7

WOONTON CRES& ST 170 F3,G2.
I remember seeing the name, Woonton, in a list of early Mornington residents. The 1919-20 rate records show that James W. Woonton was leasing 152 acres from Edward Wilson. This land, which had recently been vacated by Ned Edmonds, was on the south side of Browns Rd, starting 340m east of Truemans Rd and continuing 940 m towards Boneo. The Sands and McDougall directory of 1950 lists James H.Woonton as a farmer of Boneo. De Garis bought Pottons farm but must have had trouble selling it quickly enough to pay his loans and committed suicide in 1927. Soon after, the depression of the 1930 and the Second World War would have made the chance of selling blocks even less likely. Perhaps the Woontons bought the land for a song shortly after 1950. As the east end of Woonton Cres extends into Crown allotment 19, owned by the Adams family of McCrae, it is likely that they had also unsuccessfully subdivided it or sold to De Garis.

POTTON AVE 170 F3.
Crown Allotment 18 of the parish of Wannaeue is bounded by: the highway, Jetty Rd, Bayview Rd and the line of Adams Ave. It was granted to G.Warren and consisted of 152 acres (and 56 perches that rate collectors never recorded.) It seems to have been leased to a Mr Parr in 1864 but Warren was assessed in 1865. Warren might have been a friend of the Rudducks from Dandenong and the father of Fred Warren who died early leaving his widow (nee Patterson of Fingal) running a store in Dromana for a living.
By 1900, ownership had passed to Mrs Thomas Bamford. The first page of the 1879 assessments is missing from the microfiche and as no property of that size is mentioned that cannot be located elsewhere, Mrs Bamford probably already owned it. Two acres at the FJs corner of Jetty Rd housed Jack Jones store by 1900, leaving 150 acres.
The Pottons bought the land in 1906, according to Peter Wilson in his On the Road to Rosebud, and in 1910, Mrs Potton of Brunswick was assessed on the 150 acres. By 1919, the 2 acre store site had been subdivided into five lots and the buildings, on one acre were owned by Talbot and occupied by Chiltern. Mrs P.J.Potton was now living on the farm and paying rates on three of the subdivided blocks as well as the 150 acres.
S.Potton fought in WW1. In 1950, Warwick A. Potton, carpenter was listed as a Rosebud resident. See the chapter in Peters book entitled Henry Pottons Farm.


NAVIGATOR THEME 170 F 4-5

OLD CAPE SCHANCK RD 170 F6& C11
GIPPS ST 170 E1
BARRY ST 170 E1
GRASSLANDS RD 170 E 11
BROWNS RD 170 D 11

WOOD ST 170 D 1.
I will use this entry to illustrate why I do not often quote sources for my information; to do so would probably double the length of what I write.
On page 52 of On the Road to Rosebud, Peter Wilson stated that in about 1946 Mr F.E.(Joe)Wood and Mr B.P.(Barney)Rogers, seeing that Rosebud needed a new hall, formed a local citizens committee, which conducted a carnival over the 1946-7 summer on the foreshore. In Rosebud: Flower of the Peninsula, Isobel Moresby informed us that Cr Wood was one of the owners of the historic McCrae Homestead after the Burrells.
LIME LAND LEISURE has a list of Flinders Shire councillors. Forest Edmond Wood was a councillor in 1942-3 and from 1945 to 1955. Without doubt Wood St was named after Joe.
BANKSIA PL. 170 C3, CLACTON DIVIDE 170 C2, THE LINK, LEA WAY 170 D2,
First to Ninth Ave were the north-south streets of the Clacton-on- Sea Estate. This estate, named after a coastal resort in Essex, 70 miles north east of London, was put on sale in 1908 and only a few blocks were sold despite later attempts to keep it in the public eye by offering blocks as prizes in radio competitions and raffles on the steamers. By the 1980s the Eastbourne Rd end was still a largely uninhabited wasteland and the council decided to do something about it, as described in On the Road to Rosebud. Closing of most of the avenues at Eastbourne Rd, and construction of internal link roads, was probably prompted by the imminent freeway.

FIRST-NINTH AVENUES.
This entry has been prompted by a history myth passed on to me at the football on 14-5-2011. As the teller knew a bit about Rosebuds history, I was fascinated, but I thought it strange that the tale had not been in Isobel Moresbys history of 1954 or Peter Wilsons books. Jim Dryden has lived in Rosebud since 1932 and confirmed that the story was rubbish.
During WW2 there was a huge tent city to house American soldiers and in the American fashion, the major north-south tracks dividing the area were given numbers as names.
Trove decisively confirmed Jims claim that the street names existed before the war. An advertisement (at the top of the last two columns of page 2 in the Argus of 30-1-1926) refers to blocks being sold in the Clacton-on-Sea estate facing Second Avenue.

ROSE AVE 170 B1
This street and Rosebrook St were probably one street in the subdivision of the Hindhope Estate in about 1920. Traffic management measures obviously led to the one-way section being renamed by dropping the second syllable.


HOPE ST 170 B2
As this was one of the streets in the Hindhope Estate (see Rose Ave entry), I would expect that a Mr Hope was one of the partners in the firm that subdivided it, with Mr Hind being another. Raymond and Alma Guest used a similar naming stategy for the naming of the ALMARAY ESTATE at Tootgarook in the 1950s.

ABORIGINAL THEME 170 B 2-3
MAPS 168-169
ROSEBUD WEST
MARKS AVE 169 K2
R.Marks was granted allotment 13 B of Wannaeue on the west corner of Boneo Rd and the road to Portsea. This consisted of 5 acres and from about 1920 was known as Martins Corner because of a shop built on it by a man of that name. The grant for the other 123 acres of allotment 13 was issued in the name of Benjamin and Co. Marks was obviously a partner in the company because he later had sole ownership of lot 13 whose boundaries are described in the Dalgleish St entry. Marks had a lime kiln that had been built by Edward Hobson before he sold the Tootgarook Run in 1850; it was located near the corner of Marks Ave and Whitehead Grove.


DALGLEISH ST 169 K2
Alexander Cairns was one of the three Cairns brothers who settled at Boneo.
Robert came first, in 1852, with Alex and David arriving two years later. Alex had married Janet Dalgleish in Scotland. David (born 1861) and William (b. 1864) leased and then bought allotment 13 Wannaeue, consisting of 128 acres and bounded by Pt Nepean Rd, Boneo Rd, Eastbourne Rd and a line just east of Miriam St. David built the limestone house, Elanora, that is now part of the hospital and was known as Elanora Davey. Dalgleish St was named after their mothers maiden name, which was also used as a given name for a sister and a brother.

CAIN ST 169 K4
HENRY WILSON DR. K7, THAMER ST 169 K8
JENNINGS CRT 169 K7
Robert came first, in 1852, with Alex and David arriving two years later. Alex had married Janet Dalgleish in Scotland. David (born 1861) and William (b. 1864) leased and then bought allotment 13 Wannaeue, consisting of 128 acres and bounded by Pt Nepean Rd, Boneo Rd, Eastbourne Rd and a line just east of Miriam St. David built the limestone house, Elanora, that is now part of the hospital and was known as Elanora Davey. Dalgleish St was named after their mothers maiden name, which was also used as a given name for a sister and a brother.
CAPEL AVE 169 H2.
This explanation of what I believe to be the origin of this street name will be complicated and long. On 29-8-1895, Alfred Julius Kaeppel of Murrumbeena.bought 10 acres in crown allotment 33A of section A in the parish of Wannaeue. This allotment was granted to Patrick Sullivan in 1874 and consisted of 148 acres. The Sullivans, like many others in the depression of the 1890s had been unable to make mortgage payments and had lost their land to financers. Another 10 acres had been sold to Navioga Gaudevia and 6 acres to William Heron, with 78 acres being occupied by John Pigdon. The Pigdon family, at that time, owned the historic Dunhelen property between Greenvale Reservoir and Dunhelen Lane.
In 1909, the man after whom Browns Rd was named arrived and bought a huge area of rabbit and ti tree infested land at very little cost; he tranformed it into the lush pasture we see today as we drive along Browns Rd. The assessments presented for the Flinders Shire councillors approval in September 1910 show that Patrick Sullivans son, James, had regained 100 acres of 31A and Brown had 35 acres. John L.Morae, a Rosebud farmer, had 10 acres. The rate collector had accounted for all but 2 acres of the land between land now occupied by The Dunes golf course and Peninsula Hot Springs. While James Sullivan was running the Gracefield Hotel (on the site of the present Rye hotel), Antonio Albress was running the Sullivan lime kiln on the remaining 100 acres.
Kaeppel had obviously sold his 10 acres, at a low price but for far more than his purchase price. It would be fair to assume that Kaeppel was a speculator and was keen to reinvest in the same area when the time was right. He had unusual Christian names. Alfred recalls the Saxon King killed by a Norman arrow in 1066 and Julius may have been intended to show the German link to the Heiliges Romisches Reich (Holy Roman Empire). Kaeppel seems to be a German name.
Thousands of Australians changed their surnames between 1910 and 1920, one of them being the popular publican at the Junction Hotel in Tullamarine. He anglicized his German surname because of a groundwell of hatred of all things German during World War 1, and local histories of almost any area could supply similar examples. I believe that Alfred Julius changed his surname to Capel, the C less German than K would have been.
Capel Avenue is on Crown Allotment 53 Wannaeue, between Mirriam Ave and Elizabeth Ave. In 1929 James Sloss bought land and built holiday bungalows to establish Leisureland. By the end of World War 2, a demand for land had arisen, similar to that after WW1 when Ewart Paul bought 4 acres of lot 53, and Leisureland was subdivided in about 1958, creating Capel Ave. Leisureland might have been subdivided by the son of Alfred Julius Kaepell.

CHATFIELD AVE 169 J2

WOYNA AVE 169F3.
The Woyna Estate was one of many subdivision started by 1920. It was probably based only on allotment 51 Wannaeue, bounded by the beach road, Truemans Rd, a line from Broadways west end to Orchid St, and Elizabeth Ave. The street was named after the estate. Some of the earlier purchasers are discussed in my Rosebud West. One of them, E.W.White was running the Mayville Guest House in 1950. The estate was probably a project of the Tootgarook Land Company, which owned 456 acres in allotment 51 and south to Hiscocks Rd, including the site of the Chinamans Creek Nature Reserve.
WATERBIRD THEME 169 K5, F5

TRUEMANS RD 169D5
This road was referred to as the government road between Rosebud and Rye when the Stenniken grant was advertised in 1920. (See TRUEMAN entry.)

BURDETT ST 169 D4
This was obviously another subdivision of land owned by the butchering business started by Henry William Wilson. Burdett was the maiden name of his wife, Thamer, and the second given name of his son, Godfrey. Godfrey Burdett Wilson had married Ben Stennikens daughter and may have been the buyer or seller in 1920. (See Truemans Rd.)

DOIG AVE 169 D6, RONALD ST 169 C5
Poultry farmer, Henry Doig bought part of the Trueman grant in 1939, probably the 56 acres farmed by William Trueman and his son Fred. Ronald St is named after his son.
(See DOIG and TRUEMAN entries.)

GUEST ST, ALMA ST, RUSSELL ST, RAYMOND ST, JOHN ST, VINCENT ST 169 D5-6
Hairdresser, Raymond Guest bought part of the Trueman grant in 1948, most likely the 56 acres farmed by Thomas Trueman, He died in 1925 and I believe the property passed to his wife Matilda briefly and then to a daughter of one of Thomass sisters (Mrs Libbis). I think that it was part of her husbands estate in 1945, and after she had finished her duties as executrix, she sold the land to Raymond.
Alma was Raymonds wife and the other streets are named after their sons.
WOODTHORPE AVE, FIELDING RD 169 H3.
These streets were in the Woodthorpe Estate.It may have encompassed all the land between the subdivision of Slosss Leisureland (based on Capel Ave) and Elizabeth Drive. Edward Fielding purchased about 5 acres, probably in the 1920s. After he sold the land, it was subdivided and Fielding St was made and named. Edward Fielding was an indent agent who lived in East Malvern and had an office in Flinders Lane. He imported fabric, which was used for Holland blinds and furniture. He had one son, Edward, and a daughter. His grandson, alsoTed, supplied this information.
HISCOCK RD 169 E7
MARSHALL RD 168 K4
FIELD ST 169 A 6
Samuel Field was granted crown allotment Wannaeue on 10-11-1880.Consisting of almost 106 acres, this land now houses Moonah Links and The Cups Vineyard down to the southern boundary of the latter. In 1875, Samuel was assessed on 124 acres in Wanneue. The only allotment that makes sense is 13A bounded by Pt Nepean Rd, Boneo Rd, Eastbourne Rd and the western end of Whyte St, and consisting of 123 acres and 13 perches. I would be amazed if Samuel was not engaged in producing lime, like his later neighbours, Page, White and Sullivan. When he obtained his grant, he probably quarried limestone on it to supply Patrick Sullivans kiln near the east boundary of The Dunes links, as LIME LAND LEISURE does not mention him having a kiln. Allotment 13A had a kiln near Marks Ave built by Edward Hobson and later Marks, James Ford and George Hill, so Samuel would have been able to burn his own lime. Also, the lime could be loaded, a stones throw away, onto limecraft, which were sailed in at high tide and propped up on the extensive sandbanks.
GOVERNMENT RD 168 J5
This road was the boundary between the parishes of Wannaeue and Nepean. It is shown on the parish map as running to Browns Rd. A 1954 map confirms that it was called Jennings Rd at that time. Surveyors never drew crooked lines in parish maps and many of their government roads were later deviated around sections of their course that were made impractical for wheeled transport by the terrain. Weeroona St is such a deviation.
WEEROONA ST, HYGIEA ST, OZONE ST 168 H5
These were named afterthe most famous of the Bay steamers that made the Peninsula a tourist destination before and after the 1880s when Edward Williams opened a road around Anthonys Nose. It was only after the road around the rockswas improved by Allnut in the 1920s, and cars became more common, that the steamer trade declined. Most of the passengers stayed in guest houses, some of which continued past the days of the steamers, (See ACCOMMODATION entry.) The Clemengers had tented accommodation on Parkmore for steamer passengers who would have had trouble bringing a tent, unlike motoring tourists who popularized foreshore camping.
WEIR ST 168 G5
GRACE ST 168 G4
HUNT AVE 168 G4



GOLF PDE, GOLF LANE 168 G6, McDONALD RD. 168 H7 PRENTICE AVE 168 F7
On 18-5-1869, F.McDonald received the grant for suburban allotment 2 of Rye Township consisting of just under 33 .5 acres. Its northern boundary was the beach road and it included Whitecliffs Rd and Minnimurra Rd, with its south west corner being the end of Weatherly Court (168 C5). Suburban lots 10,11 and 12 were east of Dundas St, south to about the Golf Pde corner and east to Valley Drive. W.A.Blair bought these allotments from the Crown, a total of 201 acres, as well as allotment 3 (containing the R.J.Rowley Reserve), 9 and 15 (another 105 acres) along Melbourne Rd. (Plus allotments 4,20 and 21 Nepean (376 acres) south to Browns Rd.)
Following Blairs death, it took some time to unravel his financial affairs because of his vast land holdings near Rye, between Truemans and Boneo Rds and near Main Ridge. By 1920, the Tootgarook Land Company had bought his Rosebud West land
and subdivided the Woyna Estate (including Woyna Ave.) It was probably at about that time that the McDonald family bought lots 10,11 and 12.
Ray Cairns was born in 1910 and was probably playing cricket for Boneo by 1925. He remembers playing against Rye on the grassy area near the pier where Australia Day is celebrated. Later Ryes home ground was for a while on McDonalds farm south of the cemetery. Ray also recalls playing on the golf course that Jack and Max McDonald constructed. (TALKING HISTORY WITH RAY CAIRNS by Ray Gibb.)
This course was quite big and must have been in use until about 1960 as a fellow Rye Historical Society member in his 70s remembered playing there.
Between Weir St and Government Rd were allotments 1,2 and 3 of the parish of Nepean, granted to James Purves of the Tootgarook station across Government Rd. By 1900 George Baker, who had bought the present post office site and other lots on section 7 west of Weir St, had bought 67 acres of lots 1 and 2 Nepean. George had died and his executors were assessed on the land. Allotment 3 was probably sold at the same time and later added to old McDonalds farm; McDonald Rd is on crown allotment 3, Nepean.
W.E.Prentice was the selling agent for the Rye-Lands Estate, the former Rye Golf Links, in 1954 and Max was probably running the sales office at the (then) end of Lyon St. Prentice Ave is on the former golf course. (See McDONALD entry.)

NELSON ST , NAPIER ST COLLINGWOOD ST BOWEN ST LYONS ST 168 F4
It is likely that these street names were designated when the township was surveyed. Everyone knows about Horatio Nelson, the Admiral famous for his victory in the Battle of Trafalgar. Napier was an army commander famous for the relief of Lucknow in India.
Now its your turn to supply some information. Who was Tony Shaws vice captain when Collingwood won the premiership in 1990? The reason that I asked was to make you realize that the second in command often misses out on the recognition he deserves.
Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood seemed to spend much of his career taking commands from which Nelson had just been promoted. He assumed command when Nelson was killed at Trafalgar and had a glorious career marked by his bravery. He died of cancer in 1810.
Bowen of course was involved very early in the exploration of Port Phillip Bay. It is likely that Lyons was Chief Secretary (premier) when the town was surveyed.


DUNDAS ST 168 F6
The Dundas name was associated with two areas in the 1800s to my knowledge. One family had a factory on the Swamp Rd (Dynon Rd) between Footscray (Kensington) Rd and the river. (EARLY LANDOWNERS IN THE PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA by Ray Gibb.) The other family was in South Melbourne and associated with the bakery trade. (Dundas St Sth Melb) Most Township street names honoured Chief Ministers (Premiers) and war heroes; my knowledge of the chief ministers is limited but I think that the South Melbourne baker might have been in parliament. The descendant of the Kensington Clan who was put onto me for information would have mentioned political involvement if there had been any.
Dundas St was apparently established by Rye pioneers going to the back beach and returning with plunder. On Page 32 of RYE PRIMARY SCHOOL 1667, Patricia Appleford states that Dundas St was originally called Browns Rd; this claim is confirmed by a plan in an advertisement for the Rye-Lands Estate in 1945. (See McDONALD entry.)

SINCLAIR AVE 168 E5
P.S.Sinclair was granted allotments 4, 6, 7, 8 and 12 of section 7 in Rye Township. As the name Sinclair does not appear in the index that I made for Patricia Applefords Rye Primary School 1667, I doubt that he was ever a resident of the township. Section 7 was sold in 1872, and was bounded by the beach road, Lyons St, the line of Ballabil St and Weir St. G.Baker bought lots 1, 2, 3 and 6 extending 180 metres east from Lyons St and the same distance south in Lyons St. Lots 9 and 10 were granted to G. Ellis. Lot 11, an original school site was across Lyons St from the cemetery. I have come across the names of Baker and Ellis in the history of the area. There is a Sinclair St in Somerville, probably from a subdivision in the 1920s, but the name of Sinclair does not rate one mention in Leila Shaws excellent history of the area, The Way We Were. This leads me to believe that the family was involved in land speculation from early times.
A subsequent search in rate records revealed that he had the five allotments until 1882, in which year he seems to have acquired another two lots, giving him 7 acres. His occupation was given as contractor but no address was recorded. Thereafter, his name is absent from assessments and he did not seem to have been leasing his land to anybody. He seems to have sold his land to Harry Horniman, the teacher at Rye.
A continuing connection with Rye is suggested by the burial at Rye Cemetery of
Arthur G.Sinclair in 1983 at the age of 70 and also Colin Sinclair.

MAORI ST 168 E4
WHITE CLIFFS RD 168 C4
CAIN RD 168 C4
NEVILLE DR 168 B4
Michael Cains wife was a Neville. She and Michael spent time in Gippsland and Adelaide after their marriage; the daughter born at the latter place married Hill Harry Cairns. Each of Hill Harrys three children, all boys, spent their first ten days at Grandma Nevilles place in South Melbourne before travelling by bay steamer to Dromana from where Henry drove them to Maroolaba in Fingal. Thus the Neville family of South Melbourne had links with two pioneering peninsula families and probably had quite a deal to do with ensuring that their offspring were born in near proximity to medical attention; the lack of this resulted in far too many deaths of both mother and child in those days. More details in TALKING HISTORY WITH RAY CAIRNS by Ray Gibb (available at Rye Museum.)
MICHAEL ST 168 A5
It could be said with fair certainty that this street was named after Michael Cain.
GOLF THEME 168 A5-6
FRANCIS ST 168 B9
MAPS 166-167

TYRONE AVE 167 K3
MURRAY ST 167 J4
Anne Murray, possibly the daughter of Margaret Murray, teacher at Dromana Common School from November 1869 to at least 1873, married Owen Cains first son, Joseph, who seemed to have been a resident of Dromana and, like Robert Rowley senior, made his wages there on the bay, which claimed his life in middle age. See FAMILY CONNECTIONS entry.
CANTERBURY JETTY RD 167 H7
FORD ST 167 J3
KILLARNEY ST 167 J2
PACIFIC/SHIP THEME 167 J 2-4
PEARSE RD 167 F6
REVELL ST 167 F3
(Source: Steve Watson, who is not related to the pioneering fishermen.)
This street is named after Harold Revell, who moved to the area in his retirement in 1948. When he was a young man, Harold lived in Poowong and was delivering mail on horseback for his parents who were running the post office there in 1903. Later the family moved to Port Fairy where his mother was the Mayor and Harold worked, until his retirement, as an accountant. The Watson family lived in the area and supplied Harolds daughter, Ilo Beth, with a husband and Steve was their child. Upon his retirement, Harold moved to Northcote where he served for some years as President of the V.F.A. club, Northcote, at whose ground the champion aboriginal footballer, Doug Nicholls, was the secretary and administrator; he was later knighted and became Governor of South Australia.
Steve Watson recalls rabbiting along St Johns Wood Rd during his holidays on Harolds property. Harold bought a 1948 M.G. saloon at about the time he settled in Blairgowrie. Its registration number was PF1948 and Harold used to say that PF stood for Port Fairy. He had a mongrel dog called Tiger that would move into the drivers seat as soon as Harold got out of the car. He was a regular at the Rye and Koonya hotels and Dorothy Houghton, who ran the latter, claimed that the dog used to drive him home.

WILSON RD, GODFREY ST 167 F2, COUTTS CT 167 D2 BENJAMIN PDE 167 E2
The first butchers in Dromana were the McLear brothers. They soon decided to concentrate on other occupations; John took up fishing and George carted timber to Peter Pidotas boat at Sheepwash Creeks mouth (for the construction of piers around the bay) and horse breeding.
Henry William Wilson, a former bullocky, decided to fill the void and did his early slaughtering on the McLear farm Maryfield until he bought a 45 acre block (the Dromana Aerial Landing Ground of 1927 pictured on page 172 of DREAMTIME OF DROMANA). Henry then opened a shop in Sorrento on the advice of George Coppin and probably put Edward Williams out of business, forcing his relocation from his Browns Rd farm just east of Truemans Rd to Eastbourne (Village Glen site). When his son Godfrey took over, the business boomed and much land was needed for grazing. Land was bought at Safety Beach (Coutts St etc) and all over to service their many shops and a more central slaughteryard was established near Dr Blairs Blairgowrie. Godfreys sons, Henry William Burdett Coutts Wilson and Benjamin Godfrey John Ralph Wilson must have hated forms that required them to write their names in full!
The abbatoir land was subdivided when a new one was established in Shergolds Lane at Dromana. The above names plus Thamer and Burdett (from Henrys wife) are indications of subdivisions of former Wilson land.

FAWKNER AVE 167 D2
John Fawkner and his parents and William Buckley could justly claim to be the first permanent settlers of Victoria. It was not the Fawkners fault that the lazy David Collins relocated them from Sullivans Bay to Hobart instead of finding the Freshwater (Yarra) River that Grimes had already explored. Johns father, a silversmith, had been transported for stealing and his mother Hannah (nee Pascoe) did a sterling job bringing up the 12 year old boy among the dregs of humanity to be a literate, hard-working man. On his mothers death, John became John Pascoe Fawkner as a token of respect. I was delighted to have Hannah Pascoe Drive in Gowenbrae named in her honour. Another claim that J.P.Fawkner could make is that he was light years ahead of the government in establishing Closer Settlement. He did it circa 1850 and the government did not finally get it right until the Act of 1904. Fawkners father leased his sons Belle Vue at Pascoeville for a while; this farm featured oak trees, one of which survives, prompting a later owner, flour miller Hutchinson, to rename it Oak Park. The strange thing is that Fawkner never lived in Fawkner, his square mile grant, west of the cemetery was called Box Forest and has been renamed after Cr Rupert Hadfield.

McFARLAN AVE 167 D2
Take a drive to the Sorrento Footy Ground and read the history board about David McFarlan. While youre there have a look at the Sorrento tramway station on the hill above the pier and its terrific history boards and the museum at the Melbourne Rd roundabout. The Op Shop at the roundabout is worth a look too.
LIME LAND LEISURE has much detail about this pioneer as does Jennifer Nixons FAMILY, CONNECTIONS ETC on page 92.

DANA AVE 167 D5
Captain Dana headed the native police. There were many paddocks for grazing their horses, such as Churchill National Park at the end of Police Rd near Dandenong. There was a plan to build a fence From White Cliff to the back beach to protect grazing for police horses and it was opposed by James Ford and James Purves who wanted to continue fattening their bullocks west of that line. It was found that many who signed their petition actually wanted the fence. (See ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD.)
BLAIRGOWRIE AVE 167 D1
STRINGER RD 167 C1.


MAPS 156 AND 157.
FAMILY, CONNECTIONS, SORRENTO and PORTSEA is a history of this area.

Written by Jennifer Nixon and published in 2003, this book details the Skelton family and other families connected by marriage as well as general history. It lacks an index but I have produced one, which indicates people mentioned but only listing page numbers of first and major coverage.
Not all streets listed below are in Sorrento and Portsea and not all streets (possibly) named after those in my index are listed below but there seem to be many streets this side of Frankston whose names may be linked to those mentioned in Jennifers book. My index can be found at the start of the FAMILY CONNECTIONS entry.
As Jennifers book is available for borrowing, each street name is followed only by its Melway reference, and the page(s) on which that family is mentioned in Jennifers history. (P=PORTSEA, S=SORRENTO, BG= BLAIRGOWRIE, R=RYE.) There could be more details later (or earlier) regarding some of the street names.
SKELTON PL S 157 B8 - THROUGHOUT
TAYTON PL S 157A7 - P iii
CLARK CR S 157 C9 - 8, 11, 12-25
NEWTON AV S 157 B8 -8, 11,42-8, 92 (Formerly Cain St-page 49.)
WHITES WAY S 156 K7 -8
WATTS RD S 157 B7 -11, 29-36,56
MORCE AV S 157 A7 -11, 37-8,83, 122
DARK PDE S 157 B9 -11,69-70,76-9,92
KEATING AV S 157 D12 -12, 16-17
LEONARD CRES S 157 A6 -12
MORGAN ST S 157 B7 -12, 19-23
HUGHES RD S 157 F 12 -25,109
EVANS ST R 168 A8 -29
SULLIVAN ST S 156 K9 -90
FARNSWORTH AV P 156 B 4 &5 -42,79-80
KNIGHT BG 167 F4 -42
COKER CR P 156 D2 -49,52-3
FIELD ST R 168 J5 -50
HILL ST S 157 C9 -56
ERLANDSEN S 157 D9 -56
SPUNNER CT S 156 K7 -75
LENTELL AV S 157 A5 -81-2
STRINGER RD BG 157 G 12 -86-9
GRACE ST R 168 G4 -90 This could be named after William Grace or Grace Sullivan.
RUSSELL CR S 157 B 10 -92
McFARLAN ST BG 157 G12 -92
CROAD ST S 156 J6 -76
WILLIAMSON ST TOOTGAROOK 169 A5 -112
KEMP RD P 156 K4 -125
WATSON RD S 157 A9 92
WILSON RD BG 167 F2 -94-5








HUGHES RD 157 F12
COLLINS PDE 157 E10
CALCUTTA ST 157 E10
KINNEIL ST 157 D9
ERLANDSEN AV 157 D9
HILL ST, CLARK CRES, CORSAIR GROVE , WEBSTER ST, RUSSELL CRES 157 C10
WILLIAM BUCKLEY WAY 157 C12
KING ST 157 B11
BOWEN RD 157 B9
DARK PDE 157 B9
HISKENS 157 B8
COPPIN RD 157 A9
CONSTITUTION HILL RD157 B8
HAYES AVE 157 B8
KERFERD RD, DARLING RD 157 A8
SKELTON PL. 157 B8, WATTS RD 157 B7.
WHITES WAY 156 K7, SPUNNER CT. 156 K7.
SULLIVAN ST 156 K9.
CROAD ST 156 J6
DURHAM PL. 156 H8.
STONECUTTERS RD 156 H6
LIMEBURNERS WAY 156 H4.
DUFFY ST 156 H5
CAMPBELL RD 156 H5
WATTLE GR. 156 G 3,5.
FRANKLIN RD 156 F5
WEIR CT 156 F3
BLAIR CT & RD. 156 E3.
FARNSWORTH AV. 156 E4
LATROBE AVE 156 E5
LATHAM DR. 156 D5.
BASS RD 156 C5.
WEEROONA AVE 156 D2
MAPS 251 AND 252.
Somebody wanted to seize a (Caesar) chance to display knowledge of Roman history. Okay, I hear you; one more pun and Im history! 251 J5.

BOAGS ROCKS 252 A11.
It looks as if the interests of the Boag family extended beyond the guest house at Dromana.

LIMESTONE RD 252 A 3.
Limestone Rd was the southern boundary of the parish of Wannaeue, which continued West to the eastern boundary of The Dunes Golf Course (which indicates the boundary between Wannaeue and the parish of Nepean.)
Patrick Sullivan had a lime kiln between The Dunes and Foam Rd. On his death, its operation was taken over by his son, James, but it was managed by Antonio Albress (who had land across Browns Rd from the Moonah Links frontage.) Albress obviously pronounced his name with an accent because oldtimers thought it was Albas. (Hollinshead thought he was Tony Salvas!) It was at Sullivans kiln that William Webster was nearly burnt to death. He either was having a snooze inside when it was lit or fell in while loading it from the top.
North of Sullivan, across Browns Rd, was W. A.Blair (the daddy of them all), and Nathan Page, and to the east were Page, George White, Sam Field, Jenner and Spunner, all having received grants in Wannaeue. Earlier they operated under special licences. It is likely that limestone was easy to obtain here, but it would have been difficult to transport it to the bay from where it was taken by limecraft to Melbourne. If you want an idea what roads were like, try riding a bike on Old Cape Schanck Road south of Browns Rd!

MAP 253
MAXWELLS RD 253 A6.
PATTERSON RD 253 D10


TYABB and SOMERVILLE.
On page 278 of THE WAY WE WERE, Leila Shaw listed 33 streets whose names recall the areas heritage.
To that list, I add the following:
BLACKS CAMP RD 148 D2 This probably led to the lagoon where the bank teller and George Gomm carried out the required quarterly testing of the banks pistols as related on page 202. The Bunerung obviously camped at this lagoon as they traveled between the two bays.
CRAIG AVE 148 G11 William Craig received the Crown Grant of allotment 27 in the parish of Tyabb. This was between Bungower Rd and Watsons Creek as shown in Leilas map on page 6 (about 149 G2-3 in Melway). The family is mentioned several times in the book.
APPLEWOOD RISE 148 H3 Apples were probably the main crop of the famed orchards in the district.
FRUITGROWERS RESERVE 148 E1 Purchased from Henry Gomm, this 6 acre site was the venue of what was described as the biggest show of its type in the Southern Hemisphere. The Somerville Fruitgrowers and Horticulturists Association conducted this show in about March every year from 1895 to 1939, when the war caused its demise. It attracted such crowds that a special train traveled from Melbourne. From 1940, Ghymkhanas were held to raise funds for the Red Cross (averaging 250 pounds, a huge sum in those days) until a bushfire destroyed the pavilion in 1944.
FIRTH RD 147 J1 Although officially residents of Moorooduc, this family was much involved in the affairs of Somerville.
UNTHANKS BUSHLAND RESERVE 107 B12. See page 100 and throughout the book.
ORCHARD CT 107 H12 Although farmers engaged in subsistence farming in regard to dairy, poultry, vegetables and so on, the prevailing land use of the area was orchards and tree nurseries.
BARBER RESERVE 107 G12 See page 281 for one mention of these early pioneers.
TWO BAYS RD 106 B7 See page 99 about the Two Bays Nursery and Orchard Companys 400 acre property at the corner of Jones and Bungower Rds.

2 comment(s), latest 4 years, 2 months ago

HISTORICAL HOWLERS in the area north west of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Histories about the area near Tullamarine have featured several howlers because of: vague locality names in the early days, municipal historians confining their research to their own municipality's rate books, and time limits preventing the development of a vast network of family historians/ descendants to check assumptions.
The description Moonee Moonee Chain of ponds, shortened to Moonee Moonee Ponds and later to Moonee Ponds meant anywhere near the whole length of the Moonee Ponds Creek, not the present suburb of Moonee Ponds.
In "The Stopover that Stayed", a history of ESSENDON by Grant Aldous, a terrific description was given of a farm in the Shire of BROADMEADOWS, John Cochrane's "Glenroy Farm" at "Moonee Ponds. This farm was of course at Glenroy, nowhere near the suburb of Moonee Ponds.
In "The Gold The Blue", A.D.Pyke's wonderful history of Lowther Hall at Essendon, Pyke mentioned Peter McCracken farming "Stewarton" at Moonee Ponds. It was only when researching Broadmeadows Shire rates that I discovered that John Cock moved onto "Stewarton" in 1892 and, that soon after, it was renamed as "Gladstone". This farm was section 5 in the parish of Tullamarine, the northern 777 acres of the present suburb of Gladstone Park.It was bought from the Crown on Niel Black's behalf by George Russell. Black, after whom a street in Broadmeadows Township (Westmeadows) was named, represented a syndicate which included Stewart and Gladstone; the syndicate's land in the Western District was also called Stewarton. Gladstone was a cousin of the British Prime Minister.
In "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History", Andrew Lemon stated that McIntosh had left the district because his name had disappeared from the Broadmeadows Shire ratebooks.That worthy pioneer had merely moved a stone's throw to the west into the Shire of Bulla. Andrew Lemon made another wrong assumption ; he thought that the James Robertson who settled at Gowrie Park (north of J.P.Fawkner's Box Forest, now known as Hadfield after Cr Rupert Hadfield) was a Keilor farmer. Poor Andrew did not have the help of the wonderful Deidre Farfor as I did! The three different James Robertson families and their properties will be the subject of another journal.
Here's an assumption of mine. If I'm wrong, perhaps somebody will let me know. Joseph Raleigh established Raleigh's Punt at Maribyrnong in 1850. ("Maribyrnong:Action in Tranquility".)A few years earlier, he was recorded at living at Mona Vale. I have a feeling that Mona Vale was Westmeadows. When Broadmeadows Township's Church of England was built in 1850, it doubled as a school but as an early (1969?) Westmeadows State School history stated, school was earlier conducted on Mr Raleigh's property and of course the township's main east-west street was called Raleigh St.

HISTORICAL ORIGINS OF NAMES OF TRARALGON, VIC., AUST. AND STREETS AND TOWNS IN THE VICINITY.

Unfortunately, although the names of towns, suburbs and streets can recall much of the history of an area, their origins were never officially recorded. The surveyors of townships often named streets after military or naval heroes, surveyors and politicians or senior bureaucrats. Those who know their area's history well will recognise streets named after pioneers such as Alphabetical Foster and Dr Farquhar McCrae at Dandenong because the surname was used. However if these streets bore a christian name of these two holders of the Eumemmering Run, the names might have been John,Vesy,Leslie or Fitzgerald and Farquhar Streets, making their origins much harder to determine.

It was while I was looking for the following account of Traralgon's early history, The River of Little Fish*, which I had read some years ago while researching Edward Hobson, that I discovered another gem.
(* "The River of Little Fish"
www.traralgonhistory.asn.au/rolf.htm
An historical account of Traralgon, written for the boys and girls of the city. First published in 1970. Contents. Foreword - from the author William J. Cuthill.)

I take my hat off to the journalist who wrote the following in 1914. If only the editors of all local papers had shown the same initiative, there would be no need for the guesswork involved regarding the origins of subdivisional street names derived from christian names. I only know the origins of the street names at Tootgarook such as Alma, Guest, Raymond, Ronald and Doig because a woman rang me to tell me that her hairdresser at Canterbury had owned land there and I managed to get in touch with his son. If only all municipalities had been required to record such details about subdivision streets! That is what the journalist did.

TRARALGON NAMES.
The Historical Society of Aus-
tralia is at present engaged on an
investigation of the meaning and
history of place names which are
used throughout the States. Such
an inquiry is interesting, and will
afterwards be of great value to
future historians. But for our-
selves, it may be interesting to do
the same thing in a small way, and
to enquire as to the various names
which have grown up in connec-
tion with our town, and endea-
vour to find out how they came
into being, and if there is any
meaning which they are intended
to convey.
When and by whom the name
Traralgon was given to this local-
ity, I have been unable to find out,
but it was certainly given at a very
early period in the history of the
State. The earliest spelling of the
name is reported to be "Tarral-
gon," a slight variation of the
present form, and the word itself
(by those learned in these mat-
ters) is said to be a native. name
signifying the "river of little
fishes," while the neighboring and
equally familiar name of Loy Yang
is said to mean "big eels."
The great bulk of names which
grow up around a town are usually
in. connection with street names.
These are necessarily many in
number, usually of local origin,
and are frequently used as a means
of perpetuating the names of citi-
zens who have rendered good ser-
vice to the community, and are
considered worthy to be held in
remembrance. Many items of his-
tory are often gleaned from such
a source as this.
When and by whom the first
streets in Traralgon were named
is another question to which I am
unable to give a definite answer.
The oldest township plan available
is dated 1871. On that plan the
following names are printed: Fran-
klin, Seymour, Hotham Kay and
Grey. Possibly they were given by
the surveyor who laid out the
township many years before that
date. Merely as names, they are
very suitable, but they have no
local meaning or significance. Kay
street, as then applied, extended
from the west to the east boun-
dary of the township, and inclu-
ded what is now known as the
Rosedale Road.
The next christening of streets
took place in the latter part of
the seventies, but by whom the
ceremony was performed I have
not been able to discover. While
recently examining an official plan
of the township in the Lands of-
fice, I noticed that the streets
which are now known as Peterkin,
Campbell and Gwalia were named
on it Black, Moore and Bowen.
This was before the formation of
the Traralgon shire, and it was
not done on any recommendation
from the Rosedale shire. As the
Lands department was selling land
in those streets at the time, possi-
bly these names were also applied
by some official in that office. The
peculiar part of the affair is that
the names were recorded nowhere
but on the official plan of the
township, and as they have
not been published since, the na-
mes have been completely lost, and
at a later date the streets were
re-named by the Traralgon shire
council.
In 1884 the Traralgon council
took up the question of street na-
mes, this being the first time that
any local authority had ever taken
the matter in hand. By resolution
the following names were formally
adopted: Argyle, Mitchell, Church,
Breed, Princess, Peterkin, Mason,
Mill, Berry and Gwalia. Shortly
afterwards, but apparently without
any express authority, the follow-
ing were added: Campbell, Ser-
vice, Deakin, George, John, Munro
Flora and High. About the same
time Mr. Peterkin subdivided Loch
Park, named after the Governor of
that time, and the streets in it
received the names of their daugh-
ters: Ethel, Mabel and Olive.
It may be mentioned that Miss. O.
Peterkin's wedding was recently
reported in your columns. Mr.
Breed followed with the Ben Vue
subdivision to the streets of
which he gave the christian na-
mes of himself, his wife and son:
Henry, Ann and Albert. Henry
and Olive were for different por-
tions of the same street, and as it
soon became evident that to have
two names for one street was very
undesirable, the name of Olive has
been gradually dropped, and the
whole length of the street in ques-
tion is now known as Henry street.
Another subdivision at this per-
iod was the Hyde Park, by Mr.
F. C. Mason, to the streets of
which the names of his children,
Charles, Marie,and Rose were gi-
ven, although these names as yet
have not come into general use.
The Templeton Estate gave us
Bourke, Collins, Swanston and
Morrison, although only Collins
street now remains, the rest hav-
ing reverted into private occupa-
tion.
For a period of nearly twenty-
five years, no further action was
taken. The council then again
took up the matter, and formally
adopted the following: Hickox,
Dunbar, McColl, McLean, Living-
ston, Howitt, Bridge, Shakespere
and Tennyson. The Park subdivl-
sion added to the list: Burns, Gor-
don and Moore. Except for some
private subdivlsion names which
have been given since, this com-
pletes the catalogue.
Now, reviewing this list, and se-
lecting the names of those who
were at one time residents, we get
the following: Campbell, Peter-
kin, Breed, Mill, McLean, Mitchell,
Hickox, Dunbar, McColl and
Munro. Howitt may also be re-
garded as a local name, in recog-
nition of the late Dr. Howitt's long
connection with the district, as
a police magistrate. Mr. Munro,
as manager of the Bank of Austra-
lasia, was not a resident of long
standing, although he was a very
active and energetic citizen when
he was here. With this exception,
all the others are pioneer citizens,
with whom the history of Traral-
gon will ever be associated. Only
one of them, Mr. Mill, is still alive,
but in their day and generation
they well and worthily did their
part in the building up of the
town in which we live, and Tra-
ralgon to-day is reaping the fruit
of their labors. Now that they are
no longer with us, it is well that
their names should be perpretra-
ted in the way which has been
done.
Of political names we have Ser-
vice, Berry, Deakin, Mason and
Livingston, each of whom has ren-
dered the State some service, and
are entitled to remembrance.
Franklin, Seymour, Hotham and
Grey are names of officers in the
Imperial service, but who Kay is
in memory of I am unable to say.
The name has no connection with
E. Kay, who, later on, was a pro-
minent resident.
The number of streets having
christian names is large. We have
the Peterkin names, Ethel, Mabel
and Olive; the Breed names, Ann
Albert and Henry; and Mason na-
mes, Charles, Marie and Rose; and
these we can account for. But
where George, Flora and John
came from is uncertain. The name
Flora was given to the Rosedale
road, and never came into use;
George and John are small streets
on the east side of the creek; and
the names are rarely used.
Several names are descriptive of
the physical features of the streets
—as High, Church and Bridge, and
explain themselves.
Poetry is well represented, as
we have Shakespere, Tennyson,
Burns, Moore, and Gordon.
There are other names which
have no local or other significanice
that I know of, such as Gwalia.
Whence it came, or what it stands
for, I cannot say, but the name
Bowen originally applied, repre-
senting the Governor of that per-
iod, would have been better.
Generally, it may be said that
names have grown up here, as they
have in other parts, in a hapha-
zard and disconnected fashion.
Given at different tlmes, and by
different people, without any com-
mon policy, no other result could
be expected. But it is rather to be
regretted that greater use has not
been made of this means of recog-
nising the services which have
been rendered to the community
by public spirited citizens. Besides
those, whose names have already
been enumerated, there are others
who have taken an active part im
the building of the town, and has-
tening its onward progress. But
they are now fading out of re-
membrance, and their works are
being forgotten. Naming a street
is a very, simple, yet very effective,
way of keeping alive the memory
of those people the community
wishes to honor.
A few references may be made
to the over-use of names, Traral-
gon being one which is very much
overworked. In addition to the
Traralgon township, and Traral-
gon Creek, we have TraraIgon
West, Traralgon South and Upper
Traralgon Creek. The latter is
cumbersome and confusing, and
might very well be replaced by
something simpler. Now that the
district referred to as making great
progress with a school, public hall,
and regular postal communication,
it is worthy of having some dis-
tinctive name, which would be all
its own.
Flynn's Creek and Upper Flynn's
Creek is another instance of re-
petition, which confuses a stran-
ger, and is a frequent cause of
letters being misdirected. The lat-
ter name might well be superseded
by something shorter, and more
euphonious, and more appropriate
to the district.
A further instance is Jeeralang.
Originally, it was the name of a
parish only. Now that settlement
has progressed, and schools and
post offices establshed, we have
Jeeralang North, Jeeralang South
Jeeralang West and Jeeralang,
while Jeeralang road is applied to
several different places. Except to
anyone intimately acquainted with
the locality, it is confusing in the
extreme, and to correctly address
a letter is often a problem. It
would greatly simplify matters if
each separate centre, where a post
office or school has been establi-
shed adopted some separate name
of its own. (P.3, Gippsland Farmers Journal (Traralgon), 26-5-1914.)

HISTORY DISAPPEARS TODAY IN ROSEBUD, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

Today, Thursday, 1-12-2011, the huge pine trees were cut down at 858 Pt Nepean Rd, Rosebud. Who planted them is unclear, but it was possibly George Fountain, who at one time owned number 858 and 854. The pines were planted on both blocks and George, a plumber who was the last Mayor of the Borough of North Melbourne before it merged with the City of Melbourne, called his holiday residence "The Pines".
The house at number 858, possibly built by William John Ferrier (subject of another journal), the nationally famous hero of the La Bella tragedy at Warrnambool in 1905, was probably occupied by George until a newer house was built on number 854. Ferrier's block was then sold to the Archers, who were keen recreational fishermen.
I took a mobile phone photo of the two pines, from which most of the branches had been lopped. Hopefully MUZZA OF McCRAE took a photo of these two very old trees with their clothes on and will be able to post it with his other great photos of historical interest.

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