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HOW DID SARAH WILSON LEAD ME TO HENRY TUCK? SHOREHAM & FLINDERS, VIC., AUST.

A few short weeks ago, all I knew about Sarah Wilson was that she and her sons,George and Robert, lived on Jamieson's Special Survey before the Kangerong Road Board's first assessment of 1864,and that the three of them were honoured on the DROMANA PIONEER PATHWAY and all of them signed a petition in 1861 requesting that Quinan's school be chosen instead of Nicholson's to become the Dromana Common School.

It was during my attempt to discover information about the Simpsons of Red Hill that I made contact with Margaret Connell (nee Simpson) through the assistance of Keith Holmes and was shown Connell genealogy compiled by Dot Watt (nee Connell.) Marg. and Dot told me to read Petronella Wilson's GIVING DESTINY A HAND.

Having read this book, I kept part of the Mornington News 2013 Anzac Edition because it related to a fascinating name change mentioned in the book. It was an article about Christie Johnstone who happened to be the grandson of Henry Tuck Junior, the fantastic bush poet, whose works are available from the Dromana Historical Society museum, and no doubt most local historical societies.

In A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, Colin McLear gave details of all the children of councillor John Calvin Griffith of Dromana and Mary. Mary Who?

Having all the details of Christie Johnstone's descent from Oliver and Sarah Wilson, I entered "Henry Tuck, obituary" and got what seemed at first hand to be a useless response. But it wasn't, despite the journalist's usual error of rendering Griffith as Griffiths. Mary must have been Mary Dowling!

OBITUARY. DEATH OF MRS. C. DOWLING, By the death of Mrs Catherine Dowling, as mentioned in our last issue, another very old resident of the Mornington Peninsula has been removed from our midst. Mrs Dowling had reached the ripe old age of 86 years at the time of death. Although she was not suffering from any painful illness, she had been gradually failing under the pressure of her advanced years for some considerable time, and her death was not unexpected. She was possessed of an exceedingly kindly, warm hearted disposition, and very many old residents of the district, as well as the younger generation, will remember her as a true friend who had always a kindly word, and was ready to do a kindly action for anyone with whom she came into contact. The deceased lady was born in County Wicklow, Ireland, and reached Melbourne with her husband-who predeceased her by some nineteen years-in the ship " Marco Pauls " on Christmas Day, 1852. She was thus a colonist of nearly 59 years. After spending eight years, in other parts of Victoria, the Dowlings came to Stony Creek, now known as Shoreham, in the year 1860, and they were the first settlers to actually reside on their own holding in this locality, which was a portion of Tuck's Old Manton's Creek run. The country was, at the time of their acquiring the land, in a very rough state, and Mrs Dowling had many interesting incidents of hardships to relate. Her quaint sense of quiet humor always made these reminiscences pleasant to listen to. Their first homestead, a slab erection on the banks of the Creek, was totally destroyed by the collapse of a giant gum tree one very stormy night. In this instance Mr and Mrs Dowling had a very narrow escape from death. A large fork of the tree came down on each side of the bed upon which they were sleeping. Upon another occasion Mr Dowling, when some little distance away from the homestead, was forced by the ferocity of the dingoes to take refuge and spend the night up in the branches of a tree. Of Mrs Dowling's family three daughters and one son, all of whom are well known throughout the Peninsula, are surviving. These are Mrs J. C. Griffiths of Dromana; Mrs.Joseph Stanley of Balnarring; Mrs West, and Mr Christy Dowling, who was living at "The Glen" with his mother at the time of her death. The recent demise of one daughter, Mrs Henry Tuck, of Flinders, is sadly re- membered by her friends, as is also that of another daughter, Mrs J. West. A son, Mr Thomas Dowling, died some years ago, and another son expired in infancy. The remains of the deceased lady were interred in the Flinders general cemetery, when a very large number of people attended the funeral to show their last respects.
(P.3, Mornington Standard, 5-8-1911.)

My journal FAMILY CONNECTION ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA is now dwarfed by the information available in my other journals. No doubt a Tuck family history has been written so I don't intend to write one. One of my aims in family connections was to explain geographically how the two families became acquainted; usually, apart from during war time and, to a much lesser degree during the 1890's depression when many peninsula lads headed west in search of gold, the families were at least near-neighbours. Robert Rowley and Christine Edwards caused me months of wasted time until I found the neighbourly connection had been at Longford, Tasmania before Robert joined Henry Cadby Wells in a lime-burning venture near Sorrento, circa 1841.

How then would the Jennings family of Rye be related to the Tucks? Before settling at Rye in 1914, George Dodd and Hannah (Wiffen)had spent time farming at Flinders, Cranbourne and Camperdown. Their son,Cecil, married Catherine Tuck. (JENNINGS:A PIONEERING RYE FAMILY by Linda Berndt,P.20, Southern Peninsula News, 13-7-2010.)

CHRISTIE JOHNSTONE'S DESCENT FROM OLIVER AND SARAH WILSON.
Olver Wilson, a staunch Presbyterian, (1791-1851) and Sarah Spence (1811-1870) married in 1832. Their third child, Matilda (1837-1878) was born in Lifford,Ireland.With her parents and siblings, George (1833-1905)and Jane (1834-1863), Matilda came to Australia aboard the Argyle, landing at William's Town on 13-4-1841. Robert (1843-1894)was probably born in the Flinders Lane house. Oliver had become established as a shoemaker but after his death in 1851, rents rose dramatically because of the gold rush and George suggested a move to Jamieson's Special Survey (the Safety Beach area, east to Bulldog Creek Rd.)

On 18-4-1855, a double wedding was celebrated in Sarah's house on the Survey. Matilda married William Johnson(1832-1875) and her sister Jane, married George Young. When Jane died six days after the birth of her fifth child, Sarah (b.12-8-1863), the baby was brought up as one of Matilda's family.

William and Matilda had eight children of their own:
William (1855-1905) who never married;
Matilda(Tilly,1858-1936) who never married;
William Henry (1860-1860);
Robert Henry (1863-1936)who married Catherine Tuck in 1915, their children being William Henry, Christopher James, Margaret and Mary. N.B. THE CHRISTIE JOHNSTONE ARTICLE CALLS HIM ALBERT HENRY!
Rebecca Sarah (1866-1922) who never married;
Mary Jane (1869-?);
Sarah (1871-1927)who married W.G.J.Coulter in 1903, their children being Ruby and William George;
Charles Oliver (1875-1963) who never married.

JOHNSON BECOMES JOHNSTONE.
The first-born, Billy acted as head of the family when his own father died ten weeks after the birth of Charles Oliver.The family had been living on a 5 acre portion of 67A* Balnarring. Billy kept on receiving demands for payment of bills but they were not his debts. A member of another Johnson family was responsible for them,possibly the family which lived near Warrawee (Vansuylen's grant.) This so annoyed Billy that he changed the family name to Johnstone by deed poll.
*It seems that this is a mistake and that that the 5 acre block was on 67B. i.e.The 20-10-1913 assessment records that Christopher Oliver Johnstone, Red Hill farmer, was rated on 5 acres and buildings, part crown allotment 67B,Balnarring.

TO BE CONTINUED 67A LOCATION , 20 WANNAEUE.-SEE COMMENT 1.
Crown allotment 67A in the parish of Balnarring is between Shoreham Rd and Stony Creek with its north east corner being exactly opposite the Oceanview Ave corner. It is roughly indicated by Melway 190 J11. In the 1860's William Johnson and Matilda settled on 5 acres of it with the Wilsons. Petronella Wilson stated that 67A was granted to Robert Wilson in 1871 but the parish map indicates that 67A and 67B were both granted to Edward Gray.

INQUESTS.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 29 September 1874 p 7 Article
... INQUESTS. Mr Candler held an inquest on the 25th inst, at Dromana. on the body of Edward Gray, aged 60 years, a farmer at Balnarring. On the 24th inst. the deceased and his son were burning trees, to clear a paddock, and i the son hearing a tree fall near the deceased I went up and found the ..

The farmers south and east of Arthurs Seat/Red Hill roads were not in the Kangerong Road District and their first assessment by the Flinders Road Board was on 13-6-1869. Ratepayers were listed geographically and the following excerpt starts in Tucks Rd near Shands Rd. Thomas Bullock 59 acres (west side where almost 97 acres were granted to F.Bullock in 1875), Hamilton Allen 115 acres(east side where 115 acres 2 roods and 30 perches were granted to A.Allan), George Young 16 acres, William Johnson 5 acres, George Wilson 32 acres,Edward Gray house and 53 acres, William Bayne 2059 acres (76AB of 208 acres between 67A and McConnell's 75AB, plus 630 acres granted across Shoreham Rd and obviously a lot leased.)

By 7-6-1870 George Young had gone, probably to Moorooduc on Andrew White's grants south of Vineyard Lane and on the west side of three chain (Old Moorooduc)road.After Jane (Wilson) had died in 1863, George had married the orphaned Janet White of "Mt Martha" in 1866 and through her George had probably come into ownership of the property or part of it. His address was certainly three chain road.

In 1870, George Wilson had 48 acres having occupied Young's 16 acres. William Johnson was not assessed on his 5 acres and may have been in Moorooduc; at about that time a William Johnson was considered ineligible to be on the electoral roll for the Mornington Division because he had sold his freehold land in the parish of Moorooduc. If this was so,George Wilson should have been assessed on the whole 53 acres of 67B but such logic usually escaped rate collectors who were too busy to worry about such details.



OH NO! MORE CONFUSION.PARISH OF WANNAEUE.
When I read the amusing tale of George and Ollie Johnstone in Hec Hanson's MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN, I assumed that George was related to the grantee of 20C Wannaeue but he wasn't! I have written a separate journal about George and Ollie.

Billy and his uncle George (Wilson)obtained a lease from the Crown in 1882 for crown allotment 20B (of section B)in the parish of Wannaeue. This consisted of 191 acres according to GIVING DESTINY A HAND but an 1872 Wannaeue map gives its area as 172 acres 2 roods and 2 perches. A later map shows that 20B was later split into 20B of 34 acres (granted to John Shand in 1905)and 20C of 130 acres (granted to W.Johnstone on 19-7-1902.) The reason for the splitting of the original 20B and the apparent loss of 8 acres was Roberts Rd, separating 20B on the west side from 20C, which was bounded by Shands, Roberts and Mornington-Flinders Rds.

Alexander Shand, who died during his son,John's term as President of the Shire of Flinders and Kangerong, had established an early steam sawmill beside Main Creek,which had the most constant supply of water in the area and William Johnson/Johnstone must have raised no objections to Alexander's waggons taking a short cut through his selection on the way to Red Hill. Eventually the shire declared his track a shire road.

My transcriptions of rate records only provide a snapshot of occupancy and of course the 1879 assessment does not mention William Johnson, George Wilson or any landholding of 172 (or 191) acres in the parish of Wannaeue.
This part of the parish, with Flinders, Red Hill (west of Red Hill Rd) and Dromana, was in the Central Riding.

1900.William Johnstone, 126 acres, c/a 20C,Wannaeue.
1910. R.H.Johnston,Shoreham farmer,80 acres, 20C, Wannaeue. Joseph Smith,farmer,Red Hill,50 acres,part 20c, Wannaeue.
1919 (the last assessment on microfiche)Robert Henry Johnstone (Billy's son and Christie Johnstone's father),38 acres and buildings,part c/a 20C, Wannaeue. Mrs Mary Cleave,Red Hill,24 acres and buildings,part 20C, Wannaeue. No other identified parts of 20C were assessed.


R. H. Johnstone, Red Hill, offering to purchase wood on Cape Schanck fronting his property, and calling at- tention to culvert near Dumbleton's as it is dangerous.- Tenders to be called for timber, and culvert to be at-tended to.(P.2, Mornington Standard, 6-6-1914.)

In referring to the timber/property on Cape Schanck, Robert Henry Johnstone was almost certainly discussing 20C Wannaeue. The above excerpt from a report of a Shire of Flinders and Kangerong meeting is the only article linking Johnstone and Cape Schanck and the only mention of Dumbleton in the area. It illustrated how vague locality names were in those days. The Johnsons were living on their 5 acre block on 67B, which was described (above)as being in Shoreham in one instance and and at Red Hill in another. None of the roads had names! How could Robert Henry say "the wood near Shand's Rd?" I can assure you that the following tender was for Limestone Road but very few people would know it.

No. 7-Metal, Main creek to Black's camp. (Black's Camp was on Boneo Rd halfway between Browns and Limestone Rds but there was another Black's Camp near the corner of Boneo and Long Point Road where the second Boneo (or Blacks'Camp) school was situated. Therefore Black's Camp described the general area.)

AND NOW FOR CHRISTIE JOHNSTONE'S STORY.
Christie Johnstone's story was in a Mornington News special Anzac Edition 2013, which also has an article about three Tuck boys. There was also a Southern Peninsula News Anzac Edition with exactly the same content. As I have had trouble finding this special edition online, and readers might too, I will reproduce Christie's story verbatim. There are three photos with the article (young Christie in uniform,the derelict 1877 Mantonville homestead and Christie outside his farm gate.) If family members would like copies of these, send me a private message.My comments are in brackets.

CHRISTIE CARRIES ON TUCK TRADITION by Peter McCullough.
Christie was born on 17 February 1920 at Main Ridge. His parents were Albert* Henry and Catherine Johnstone, and he had a brother,William Henry,and a sister. (His father was Robert Henry Johnstone.) His father was born in Dromana and the Johnstone family lived in Red Hill (i.e. 5 acres of 67B Balnarring.)"They were bushmen-splitting timber and that sort of thing." His father worked in Gippsland in his younger days, later moved to Main Ridge where his parents* had an orchard and grew strawberries. (Robert Henry was born in 1863,his father, William Johnson, died in 1875 and his mother, Matilda,nee Wilson,died in 1898. The orchard would have been on the 5 acres at RedHill/ Stony Creek/Shoreham and as his father died in 1875, it would have been more accurate to say that Robert's family had the orchard,with Robert's brother , William (1855-1905), who changed the family name to Johnstone, and was granted 20C Wannaeue, running the small farm with the assistance of his youngest brother, Charles Oliver (1875-1963.) C/A 20C would probably have been used for cattle grazing and getting wood for timber or firewood. Robert Henry must have returned shortly after his brother, William, died in 1905 and settled on 20C Wannaeue; he was assessed on the property in 1910, and probably earlier.)

Christie's mother, Catherine, was the eldest daughter of Henry Tuck Junior and the family moved to Flinders in 1924 to look after her father, who was almost 80 and to help him run the farm. His wife, Margaret had died in 1910. (The obituary of Mrs C.Dowling in 1911 -sixth paragraph of this journal- reveals that Henry had married Margaret Dowling.)

Christie went to school in Flinders, starting the same day as Eric Lucas who died just recently. It was a two mile walk to school and in those days he could walk to school and home again without seeing a car. He had more rides in a horse-and-buggy than he ever got in a motor car. As soon as Christie turned 14 he left school to work on the farm.

"Mantonville" was a dairy farm of 150 acres and all the milking was done by hand in those days. The family only milked about 20 cows as that was all they could handle.After the war, with machines, they were milking 50 cows. Kinross Dairies would collect the milk and take it to Edithvale. Christie milked cows for about 50 years and never took a holiday for 25 years. With a milk contract he had to be there every day. About 30 years ago he went out of the dairy business and has been running beef cattle ever since. However only 80 acres are left out of the original holding.

After Christie left school he did a lot of other work as well as milking cows twice a day: fence contracting, ploughing, wood cutting, and splitting posts. Just before he joined up in 1941 he worked at the Flinders Golf course for 12 months but he never hit a golf ball;"Working there five-and-a-half days a week,I reckon I saw enough of the golf course! Besides,I was still milking cows before and after work."

(I wonder if Christie knew the magnificent golfer in the surgical boot was related to him. Jane Darley,nee Wilson, was the daughter of George Wilson and niece of Matilda Johnson, nee Wilson.

William Edward Darley (born Jamieson's Special Survey, 1859-1938) and Jane's children were:
1. Florence Mary (1892-1943), spinster.
2. Annie Maude (1894-1967) who in 1937 married Joseph James Kay but had no children.
3. Kate Evelyn (1896-1981.) No issue. There may have been marriage detail which I neglected to record in my rush.
4. William George (1899-1971) bachelor.
5.Saville Maude (1910-1987)who in 1944 married Patricia Marie O'Donnell and had five daughters.
6. Lionel Edward (1913-1987)who in 1943 married Faye Chitts and had one daughter.

William George Darley,the fourth child and oldest son of Willam Edward and Jane (Wilson) was an outstanding golfer. He had a physical disability. When I googled "Darley, Flinders, Golf", I did find confirmation of this. He had to wear surgical boots as a result of being gored by a wild boar when he was seven.

Flinders Golf Champ Dies; 72 . - Google News
news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1300&dat=19710825&id...
Flinders golf champ dies; 72 . Bill Darley, of Flinders, one of Victoria's best known golfers died in his sleep early yesterday,aged 72. He played his last round of ...

There should be a spate of "aces" down Flinders way in the next few weeks. The club recently staged an exhibition match between Eric Lucas and Bill Darley against Ken Lucas, and Heidelberg professional Al Whykes.
Bill gave the gallery a perfect demonstration of how to hole out in one. He did the trick at the 15th-and what a reception he received! Of course, it was no trouble for Bill and Eric, to go on then and win the match 2 and 1. (P.14, The Argus, 12-1-1954.)

What a coincidence that Christie's lifelong friend, Eric Lucas, was Bill's partner in that contest!)

NEXT PAR WON'T SUBMIT- PASTED ONTO JOHNSON-JOHNSTONE FILE
Farmers were classed as an "essential trade" and were barred
TO BE CONTINUED IN COMMENTS BOX.

6 comment(s), latest 6 months, 3 weeks ago

I WISH R.S. HAD BEEN THE PREMIER OF VICTORIA IN 1946.

This bloke was a genius!

Dead or Alive
Standard (Frankston, Vic. : 1939 - 1949) Thursday 5 December 1946 p 12 Article.

1 comment(s), latest 2 years, 1 month ago

IAN KENDALL'S SCOTTISH PLACE NAMES IN MELBOURNE.

EMAIL TO IAN KENDALL.
I found your website when I was looking for something else. You've put a lot of work into it; well done!
I mainly looked at Melbourne's north west, whose history I have been researching since 1988 and the Mornington Peninsula (since August 2010) and have only commented on these. I have not worried about street names, although I might mention some in the following.

I agree completely with your origins for Arthurs Seat, Baxter, Calder Park, Campbellfield, Craigieburn (the Robbie Burns was another hotel near the Craigie Burns,shown on a survey map), Dallas, Deer Park, Flemington, Keilor (which I've seen as Keillor in some sources), Kealba, Kingston (see Graham Whitehead's City of Kingston website) McCrae, Meadow Heights, Moreland (which was leased by Michael Loeman for about 14 years before he moved onto Glenloeman on Loemans Rd near Bulla, with the result that the Moreland Rd bridge was known as Loeman's bridge), Newmarket, Rosanna, Red Hill (one of the roads leading to it is White Hill Rd) and Westgarth.

I have listed other suburbs where I doubt some of the sources or additional information might be useful.
WATSONIA. I have seen sources that attribute the name to James Watson, which seems reasonable, given the proximity to Rosanna. While on that area, Janefield owes its name to John Brock who was an early squatter near Bulla until Big Clarke got his special survey and, I think, was a Scot.

WESTMEADOWS.It was originally known as Broadmeadows Township before the railway went through Campbellfield circa 1872, giving that locality the name of East Broadmeadows; when the "East" was dropped the Township was called West Meadows. Westmeadows now includes former farmland near the township such as Kia Ora, Willowbank (many of whose street names were my suggestions) and Wattle Glen.

ABERFELDIE. James Robertson 2 of Upper Keilor is the correct origin. The source proposing a link with a Napier Estate might be correct; Thomas Napier (of Rosebank in Strathmore) might have called a squatting run by this name and his son Theodore (of Magdala in Strathmore) might have been involved in the subdivision of the West Essendon grants (originally known as Spring Hill) and suggested the name of the house for the estate. Strathmore and streets named after Rosebank and Magdala owe their origins to the Napiers. I believe a Napier was involved in the relief of Lucknow and Magdala was also involved with his exploits in India.
As far as I know, Aberfeldie has everything to do with James Robertson and nothing to do with the Napiers. If another Scottish family was involved with naming the estate, it would be far more likely to be the McCrackens, related by marriage.The reference to a Napier estate might have also resulted from confusion between Aberfeldie and Glenbervie; Grant Aldous probably described the origin of the latter name in "The Stopover That Stayed".
(By the way, there were three James Robertson families in the area: 1.Upper Keilor/Mar Lodge/ Aberfeldie; 2.La Rose/ Trinifour and 3.Gowrie Park at Campbellfield. See itellya's journal about the Robertsons on FAMILY TREE CIRCLES.)

BLAIRGOWRIE. Dr John Blair's Blairgowrie House was built by an Irish pioneer and politician named O'Grady who named it Villa Maria. When he bought the house, Blair renamed it Blairgowrie. When the estate was subdivided, it was called the Blairgowrie Estate but was described as being at Sorrento. (See page 1, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 28-3-1923.) It was not until about 1940 when the Cain family's "Tyrone" east of Canterbury Rd was subdivided that Blairgowrie appeared in the newspapers to describe a locality. Incidentally a gowrie website states that Blairgowrie means "field of goats".

BROADMEADOWS. The earliest reference to the Broadmeadows Hotel on trove was in 1855. Just about the only reference to Broadmeadows in 1850, (apart from the proclamation of a township at Broadmeadows, poor attendances at St Pauls and the calling of tenders for its manse) was a much repeated advertisement about a stallion standing at stud at Samuel Thorpe's farm. In November, 1851, Mrs Brodie, formerly of Moonee Ponds (the vast Brodie squatting run, not the suburb, but possibly Harpsdale or Dunhelen) opened a store in the township. A meeting was called by about 5 Scots about the need for a crossing at the foot of Cameron's estate at THE BROADMEADOWS. In 1852, Machell's estate AT BROADMEADOWS (actually the land bounded by Section Rd, Somerton Rd, Mickleham Rd and Swain St at Melway 178 H7-11) was advertised for sale.

The above demonstrates that BROADMEADOWS described a district which consisted of the parish of Will Will Rook, and even den Machell's grant in the parish of Yuroke, and that the hotel was named because of the district, not the other way around.

An article about Kilmore by "The Vagabond" described the 6000 acres of hay at Broadmeadows and said it was an English name. The first large area of wheat in the colony was grown at Campbellfield by John GRANT who was leasing land from the CAMPBELLS. Nearby were the CAMERONS and KENNEDYS on Glenroy,Ruthvenfield, Stoney Fields and Dundonald, the GIBBS and ROBERTSONS on Meadowbank and Gowrie Park, the McKERCHARS on Greenan and Greenvale, and they were the pioneers, SCOTS, who would have coined the apt name for the district. The place was so full of Scots that the trustees of Will Will Rook Cemetery apparently did not feel a need to have sections for denominations other than Presbyterian and John Kingshott was appointed to the school committee so it would not consist entirely of Presbyterians.Do you think that Broadmeadows was coined by Englishmen? I don't!

BURNSIDE. This suburb was named after James Burnside, a pioneer near Deer Park and a grantee in in the parish of Maribyrnong. His son's obituary was on page 1 of the 15-1-1943 issue of the Sunshine advocate; the son may have married a descendant of James Robertson of Upper Keilor.

GLADSTONE PARK. The name derives from the northern 777 acres of Gladstone Park (and the Gladstone Gardens Estate north of Lackenheath Drive on the west side of the freeway.) This was section 5 of the parish of Tullamarine, consisting of 785 acres, 8 acres probably having been lost in the making of today's Mickleham Rd. The parish map records George Russell as the grantee but he bought it for fellow Western District squatter, Niel Black. Black was agent for the firm of Stewart, Black, Gladstone etc back home. Section 5 was called "Stewarton", the same name as another of the firm's farms in the Western District. Black probably wanted section 5 as a holding paddock but it was leased 1846-1855 by Peter McCracken, who moved to his dairy farm on J.R.Murphy's Kensington Park and then to Ardmillan at Moonee Ponds.

Gladstone, a cousin of Disraeli's foe, came into ownership of Section 5 and the farm's name became Gladstone a year after John Cock succeeded John Kerr as the tenant in about 1892. The Gladstones had sold it to G.W.Taylor for 74 575 pounds in mid 1888 but regained it when Taylor could not complete payments in the bust that followed the boom, as Cannon would put it. The Gladstone family owned the property until the 1920's.

GOWANBRAE. This farm was originally named Camp Hill, a name that applied during the tenure of Eyre Evans Kenny, Brown, Lonie, Gilligan, Williamson etc. When Scott, presumably a Scot, bought the farm in the 1930's, he renamed it Gowanbrae. Malvern Ave owes its name to Sir Bruce Small who owned the property and wanted to produce his famous Malvern Star bicycles there but could not get a railway siding on the Albion-Jacana line.

GOWRIE.
Alexander Gibb leased section 5 Will Will Rook for some time and then it was purchased in two halves, each of 320 acres, in 1848. Gibb called the northern half "Meadow Bank" and James Robertson called his half Gowrie Park. Both, of course, were Scots.
Incidentally, most of Melbourne Airport's operational area (except for the Terminal building on Payne's pig farm,"Scone") are on another Gowrie Park, which is today recalled by Gowrie Park Drive at Melway 5 C5.

GREENVALE.
Even if this name was a simple description of the landscape, it was coined by a Scot, John McKerchar, for his farm name (which was renamed "The Elms" by a later owner.) Swain St, off Mickleham Rd, indicated the boundary between Dundanald and Machell's early subdivision but also indicates the boundary between the parishes of Will Will Rook and Yuroke to the north. The name of McKerchar's farm came to describe the part of Yuroke near Somerton Rd and the present school on Hughie Williamson's old "Dunvegan" carries the same number as the one started by John McKerchar on the Section Rd corner!

NIDDRIE. This was the name of Henry Brown Stevenson's farm. See his death notice on page 1 of The Argus of 5-7-1893. The Morgans kept the name when they bought it in (1906?) and owned it for many years. The farm was bounded by the Orange Gr/Bowes Ave midline, the King/Fraser St midline, Nomad-Treadwell Rd and Keilor Rd.

Hadfield should be called Fawkner, but the grantee's named travelled to a nearby area and in the same way, the name of the Stevenson/ Morgan farm travelled south of Keilor Rd. It is possible that Niddrie was named by the grantee, Thomas Napier of Rosebank.

ROXBURGH PARK.
The association with Brunton is correct; he probably did not find the Cameron name of Stoney Field (as in the rate records) very appealing. It was not known as Ruthvenfield; this Cameron property is today bisected by Blair St, east of the railway line.

ST KILDA. I have read that the suburb was named after a yacht owned by the family of Big Clarke; this was one of the theories.I had a pleasure craft in mind but a working yacht makes sense because W.J.T. had little time for pleasure and other pursuits that didn't make money (except the girlies!)

STRATHMORE. See Bruce Barber's Strathmore website. There could be a connection with the Queen Mother but I have seen no mention of this. I quote from page 165 of "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History". "It was not until 1943 that the (North Essendon and South Broadmeadows) Progress Association submitted "Strathmore" (a Scottish name associated with the Napier family) to the Broadmeadows Shire Council." No source is given but I suspect that Andrew Lemon had seen the correspondence. I don't think the progress association would have been aware of any connection between the name and the Queen Mother.

BELL.
It must be 20 years since I read Richard Broome's "Between Two Creeks" the history of Coburg. But I distinctly remember Bell Manor!

FINGAL.
Fingal is a parish south of Limestone Rd and south of the parishes of Wannaeue and Nepean, which are separated by Government-Weeroona Rd. Most parish names have aboriginal origins so Fingal and Nepean are unusual. Parish names would have been decided by surveyors or the Lands Department, whose boss was James Grant, presumably a Scot, at the time Fingal was surveyed.Fingal is Irish for foreign tribe according to wikipedia, and if my recollection is correct the Scots were from Ireland, making them a foreign tribe.

MERLYNSTON. I'm sure Richard Broome discussed the name's origin.

OLIVERS HILL. This was originally known as Old Man Davey's Hill.

INFORMATION RE HELEN JANE ANDERSON, NEE McCANN, BURIED AT DROMANA, VIC., AUST., IN 1921.

2+-7-1921. HELEN JANE ANDERSON (nee McCANN.)
Grave photo on ozgen list.
DEATH RECORD.
EventDeath Event registration number9538 Registration year1921
Personal information
Family nameANDERSON Given namesHelena Jane
Father's nameMccann Robert Edward Mother's nameHelen Jane Esdale (Holloway)
Place of birth Place of deathDROMANA Age41

BIRTH RECORD.
EventBirth Event registration number17869 Registration year1880
Personal information Family nameMCCANN Given namesHelen Jane
Father's nameRob Edw Mother's nameHelen Jane (Holloway) Place of birthPLEASANT C

MARRIAGE RECORD.
EventMarriage Event registration number8632 Registration year1907
Personal information Family nameMCCANN Given namesHelen Jane
Spouse's family nameANDERSON Spouse's given namesRobt Jno

Engagement of Helen Jane’s daughter.
Jean Beryl, younger daughter of Mr. R. J. Anderson, of Ardmona, and of the late Mrs. Anderson, of Dromana, to Alan Robert, younger son of Mrs. R. Starritt, of Rosedale, North-west Mooroopna, and of the late Mr. Starritt. (P.10, Argus, 21-3-1939.)

MARRIAGE OF JEAN’S ELDER SISTER, HELEN BOYD ANDERSON, ON 9-9-1939.(P.2, Shepparton Advertiser, 11-9-1939.)
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/186110418

ITELLYA HAS REALLY RETIRED THIS TIME.

Frustration at my edits not submitting caused me to retire twice but my enthusiasm led to resumptions as soon as the situation improved. However now my internet connection is practically zero and has been for weeks. Add this to the frustration of not receiving replies to my emails re the William John Ferrier 110th anniversary (see below) and from schools etc., and the result is that my enthusiasm is as strong as my internet connection, practically zero. When I was having trouble submitting edits,at least I could still research trove etc., but now if I turn on my computer, it is almost certain that the internet will not be connected. That means no trove, no F.T.C., no facebook and no email.

To get a signal,I have to go walkies, a bit like a business owner having to duck home from the office to use the internet. This is the main reason for the almost complete loss of my enthusiasm. This email of May 22 from a council officer,still not followed up almost eight months later, is typical of another factor.

Dear Mr xxxx,

Thank you for your recent letter concerning Ferrier’s 100th anniversary. I have passed your letter on to my Local History Coordinator for advice and will ensure that we reply to you by the end of next week.

Regretfully, my plans for the 110th anniversary of Ferrier's heroism in 1905 and the Back to Red Hill reunion will not be able to be pursued.

As my computer will be unplugged in future, if you send me an email or a private message on F.T.C.,please text your name and F.T.C. to 0438 874 172.
Best wishes to my many history friends and thank you for your help over the years.

ITELLYA HAS RETIRED.

After ten attempts to post a comment on the DICTIONARY HISTORY OF BULLA journal (second prize essay on the history of Bulla),itellya has retired. The essay has been posted on Ray Gibb's Facebook page. It is quoted almost verbatim in I.W.Symonds' BULLA BULLA.

2 comment(s), latest 2 years, 8 months ago

ITELLYA IS A STICKY BEAK: JOSEPH PORTA, THE LADY SURVEYOR AND JAMES DAVEY'S CORAL-COVERED COAL.

ITELLYA DON'T LIKE MYSTERIES
AND READS EVERY HISTORY BOARD HE SEES.
THINGS THAT SEEM LIKE COINCIDENCE
FIT TOGETHER, MAKING SENSE.

Entering the Rosebud West Bowling Club for a Rosebud Rockers dance, I saw an article pinned on the notice board with a picture of a footballer. My wife bought me a jumper years ago; it had "Football is Life" in large letters on it, which showed (a) that my wife understood me and (b)why I just had to look at the article. It was about Ron Porta, who had brought back Somerville Football Club's glory days and had recently died. The bulb lit up. I had seen that surname on my Moorooduc parish map. Ron's wife and brother had never heard of lot 63 Moorooduc but trove proved that Joseph Porta, Ron's ancestor, had been near Somerville a century before Ron coached the side.

I have mentioned the lady surveyor in reference to Bernard Eaton in the RED HILL PIONEER journal. The information on that history board became etched in my memory bank because I knew well the difficulty of just walking in the mountainous terrain near Blackwood. I imagined the difficulty of carrying out a meticulous task like ensuring that levels were spot on so that water would flow for miles, with only gravity to propel it, along races such as the one that the Byers Back Track follows to O'Brien's Crossing. I imagined her tripping over fallen branches and bracken fern, exposed tree roots and protruding reef rock (unseen because of her ankle length dress), which would have been fatal if it happened where the race went around a huge granite boulder about an arm's length from a plunge of a hundred metres into the Lerderderg Gorge. How the author of "Those Courageous Hardy Women" would have loved a story like that to demonstrate how courageous and hardy the female pioneers were near Sorrento. At Greendale, between the Western Highway and Blackwood, there is a Shuter St. I wonder how many Greendale residents know how the street got its name. What a coincidence that there is a street with the same name just south of Puckle St in Moonee Ponds! "Oh really!" as Sam Newman would say. Read about Charles Shuter in Alexander Sutherland's "Victoria and Its Metropolis: Past and Present" (1888.)

The last item was the result of coincidence, just sheer good luck. I usually listen to another station, but on another radio, tuned to 3RPP, the local peninsula station, I heard some good music so as I started the computer, I switched the set nearby to RPP. The next stroke of luck was that I needed to free up some disk space and while that was happening, the next program "Beyond Infinity" commenced. The first discussion in this science program was about a comet that a Professor from Newcastle said crashed into the sea near New Zealand.It caused a giant tidal wave that formed chevrons (spearhead shaped sand dunes)all around the south east coast, 90 metres above sea level and well inland. The theory that aborigines made middens on clifftops was debunked as the same shells were found in cliff faces and buried in concrete-like chevrons. Why was this of more than scientific interest to me? It was only last night while trying to confirm or disprove a theory (that the Davey pioneers of Frankston and near Red Hill were related)that I came across the curious tale of James Davey, son of Mr J.Davey of Balnarring, finding a large lump of coal covered with coral near a creek near "Warrawee" about a mile from the coast. There was great curiosity about how it came to be there. My thought at the time of reading this article was that somebody had found it on the beach but discarded it when his friends displayed a "So? Whatever!" attitude to his unusual find. (See Mornington Standard, 15-10-1896 page 2, 2nd last column.)
Now I think we have an explanation of how the coral-covered coal came to be a mile inland!

1 comment(s), latest 5 years, 4 months ago

ITELLYA'S HISTORY STORAGE BOX.

As I have been unable to submit journals and edits for a week (and many times in the past), I have started a new Facebook group with the above title so that this information can be viewed by family tree circles members until it successfully submits. The link is: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1594310247565466/

THE ENTRY HEADINGS IN THE CHRONOLOGY POST ON THE FACEBOOK PAGE AS OF NOON, WEDNESDAY, 15-6-2016 ARE LISTED BELOW. THEY HAVE BEEN NOTED IN THE ALPHABETICAL INDEX BUT WILL NEED TO BE INSERTED IN THE CHRONOLOGY OF BURIALS AT DROMANA JOURNAL.

CHRONOLOGY OF BURIALS AT DROMANA WITH BIOGS.
16-11-1876. ALEXANDER HALDAN.

Late April, 1884. CHARLES BARNETT, DROMANA.

28-5-1892. ALFRED HERBERT LAWRENCE, AGED 19. Mornington Disaster.

(May/June 1908. MRS FRANCES ELIZABETH NASH, nee WAPLES.
Currently in progress.

(6+)-9-1939. MRS ELIZABETH FOX.
FOX� Elizabeth photo 6/9/1933 89

23-5-1940. TED INGLEFINGER, WICKETKEEPER FOR THE PREMIERS.

12-11-1946. KATHERINE SUSAN GRAY.

24-12-1947. MOTHER OF CR.FOREST EDMUND (JOE) WOOD.

12-6-1951. CHARLES ROBERT BURNHAM.

7-3-1953. JAMES GEORGE CHAPMAN.

28?-7-1956. MRS FRANCES ELIZABETH EDWARDS.
Daughter of Frederick and Elizabeth Nash and formerly Mrs William Davidson.
(See: (May/June 1908. MRS FRANCES ELIZABETH NASH, nee WAPLES.

23-8-1956. MRS MARY LOUISA BROWN.

(11+)-11-1956. RONALD JAMES HIPWELL AGED 4 YEARS 10 MONTHS. Ashes interred.

JUNE, 1996. MRS SELINA McLEAR.
Selina was the widow of George McLear (see burial entry, 28-3-1950.)

2 comment(s), latest 11 months, 2 weeks ago