itellya on FamilyTreeCircles - journals

itellya on Family Tree Circles

sort: Date Alphabetical
view: full | list

Journals and Posts


ITELLYA'S SOURCES AND WHY HE DOES IT.

I apologise for not listing sources in most of my journals. The reason that I do not do so is that sometimes one sentence might be an amalgam of information from four or five sources. Can you even imagine reading a journal littered with footnote numbers and with a list of sources that is longer than the actual article? One thing that irritates me about reading scholarly histories is the need for a ruler, to locate the page on which the sources are listed.

It is often the case that somebody starting family history research, or even somebody that has vaguely considered it (such as Somerville's "Local Footy Hero"), groans, "I wish I had asked mum, grandpa etc more questions." How many old photos get thrown out because the people, buildings etc in them (and the year or date!!!) have not been recorded on the back? DO IT NOW, FOLKS!
I was lucky that I started my historical research when I did. My older brother was doing our family history and wanted me to check the Broadmeadows rates to confirm that our great grandfather had farmed on Gladstone Park. I transcribed every entry for John Cock (Broombank 1867-1882, Springbank 1882-1992, Stewarton/Gladstone 1892-1911.)

Great grandfather had received great coverage in Andrew Lemon's "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History" but I could not help noticing that almost all of the pioneers, whose names my eyes raced past, had not rated a mention.
NOT FAIR, JAN! (For the information of our American and British friends, that's a line in a bank advertisement that has become part of Aussie speech, just like "Tell him he's dreaming" from "The Castle".)

The council elections were coming up and the fantastic rates officer informed me that I could not have access to the strongroom, where the original rate books were kept, until the elections were over. Kindly, he gave me a map "to keep me occupied" until then. It was a map comprising parts of the parishes of Wiil Will Rook, Tullamarine and Bulla that was made to indicate the properties owned by Stanley Korman, a 1950's version of G.W.Taylor. His subdivision of Gladstone Park (with its innovative bullseye road layout) was thwarted by Airport plans and his Stanhill company collapsed, costing many small shareholders their life's savings.

What excited me was that a farm on the map was labelled "A.Cock". That was my great uncle, Alf. Excitedly, I raced to the Tullamarine library to find out more about Alf. I read all the available history of Tullamarine but found no mention of him; not surprising because it consisted of only 1 1/2 foolscap pages! That did it. As it was Australia's 200th year, I decided that as a bicentennial project, I would expand Tullamarine's recorded history.

Tullamarine was in the Broadmeadows, Keilor and Bulla shires, so logically, I needed to transcribe rates information for each and I needed the Tullamarine, Doutta Galla, Bulla Bulla and Will Will Rook parish maps.Later the Maribyrnong parish map joined my collection. How did I get them? The librarians were fantastic: Bev Brocchi at Niddrie, Rosemary Davidson at Tullamarine and Jenny Shugg at Gladstone Park Secondary College.They supplied the maps free because they soon learned that what they gave would be repaid tenfold.

The rest came about because of Gordon Henwood, a cleaner at the school where I taught. I was a fairly dedicated teacher and was always there when everybody else had left, so we became good mates. I mentioned my brick wall about Alf's farm. Gordon knew the Arundel Closer Settlement like the back of his hand; he was a descendant of J.D.McFarlane and had been brought up there. He told me that I was talking about John Fenton's "Dunnawalla" and that I should go and see John. I ignored the "Beware of the dog" sign and my bravery was rewarded. John came out with the usual line of "I'm not a pioneer" although he had been there before Tullamarine was a suburb. (The Drive- in at Tullamarine was called the Essendon Drive In because hardly anyone knew where Tullamarine was!)

John knew enough about Tullamarine to give me a list of about 12 descendants of pioneering families. Every time I spoke to one of these, they'd say, "I don't know much, you need to speak to so and so." They actually knew plenty and provided treasures such as the Methodist Church Centenary book, the 1926 Saleyards proposal, newspaper cuttings such as "The Clan McNab", photos of hay being loaded at Nash's Fairview, the old post office in Post Office Lane, the former Beech Tree Hotel as well as telling me property names, anecdotes and so on. Harry Heaps was funny; he'd always preface his anecdotes with: "I shouldn't tell you this, but". When conducting videotaped interviews with Gordon Connor, Jack Hoctor and Colin Williams, I had to suppress a snigger when they asked, "Are you taking my photograph?"

With the number of contacts and treasures escalating at the rate of one per day, Rosemary Davidson suggested that we have a history display at the Tullamarine Library. Anthony Rowhead, a Federal Airports inspector came, saw and acted. Within a week, he had commenced a project to rename streets in Tullamarine Airport after early settlers, aborigines and aviation pioneers.As mentioned in the airport's wikipedia entry, the project was shelved at the last moment, when all had been finalised but Anthony managed to sneak in Gowrie Park Drive. TAKE THAT BEAN-COUNTERS!
Despite that 1989 setback, the 1989 Back to Tullamarine and the writing of "Where Big Birds Soar" were ample compensation. Due to Winnie Lewis (nee Parr) and her black book of phone numbers and snowball system of communication, practically every living descendant of the Tullamarine pioneers was there. Those that weren't alive were there in spirit; I could almost sense them saying, "What was that?" every time their names were mentioned.

As most of those present had trouble reading captions etc, I raced home to get my trusty magnifying glass. Now these descendants had been well-brought up and were too well mannered to raise their voices but from 100 metres away, their quiet conversation sounded like the roar of a grand final crowd at the M.C.G. as the players run onto the ground. What a thrill! The attendees' only disappointment was that they had no written history to take home.My handwritten book, finished days before the event, which was opened by the Keilor Mayor, was only provided to the libraries.This was rectified at the 1998 reunion where every copy printed of "Tullamarine: Before the Jetport" was sold raising a good sum for Gladstone Park Primary School. At the reunions, the oldtimers provided new information during afternoon talk and a new saint was proclaimed; no lesser title would do justice to Alec Rasmussen, their former teacher, of whom they spoke in such glowing terms.

I stated earlier that I was lucky to have started my research when I did. Why was that? Here are a few reasons. Gordon Connor, Jack Hoctor and Colin Williams were all dead within a year and by now practically all of my witnesses to the past have passed on. The historic councils are no more since Jeff Kennett's municipal amalgamations. Ratebooks are no longer available and microfiche cause so much eye strain that I would have been blind with the amount of transcription that I did. (Some council employees thought I was a colleague because they saw so much of me!) If I had started after Rosemary left the Tulla library, the lack of her enthusiasm might have seen my own dedication expire.

MY SOURCES.
As well as rates, parish maps, directories,the aforementioned descendants, every local history written about the area and some that weren't written as local histories (The Oaklands Hunt, The Gold The Blue, The Life and Times of John Pascoe Fawkner, Memoirs of a Stockman, Boom and Bust etc),there was, and still is, interaction with family historians referred to me by the Broadmeadows Historical Society etc, (I usually get as much as I give.)

As a sample of my sources, I will list the sources for "Tullamarine: Before the Jetport.
Keith McNab, Gordon Connor, Colin Williams, Wally Mansfield, Jack Hoctor, John Fenton, Edie Thomas, Harry Heaps, Merv Henderson, Ina Henderson, Stan Exell, Sid Lloyd, Joyce Morgan, Noel Butler, Olive Nash, Ian Henwood, Eileen Reddan, Hilda Drever, Gordon Wright, Nathan Wright, Joe Crotty, Glenn Cotchen, Winnie Lewis, Leo Dineen, Dave Hatty, Bob Blackwell, Ted Fanning, B and P. Wright, Alma Koch, Peter Anderson, Jean Schwartz and Bev Ellis, Ken Gibb, Deidre Forfar (Robertson, McCracken historian), Mrs W.V.Murphy, Ian Farrugia (last occupant of Camp Hill and Gladstone homesteads), Alf Murray, Jan Hutchinson, Tom Dunne (last teacher at Tullamarine SS 2613.)
Broadmeadows A Forgotten History, Bulla Bulla, McCracken Papers, The Gold The Blue, The Oaklands Hunt, Keilor Pioneers: Dead Men Do Tell Tales, Mickleham Road: 1920-1953, Tullamarine Methodist Church 1970, Camp Hill Title Deeds, Tullamarine Progress Association Minutes Book 1937-1954, Official Opening of Caterpillar- speeches-progress, Birthday Brings Back The Past (Lily Green), Anti-Airport pamphlet of 1959 (containing Korman's plans), 1926 Saleyards Proposal, F.A.C. aquisitions map (circa 1960, showing owners), Broadmeadows History Kit- S.O'Callaghan, Architectural thesis on Arundel (K.B.Keeley), Arundel owners etc (Tony Cockram), Keilor Centenary Souvenirs of 1950, 1961 and 1963, Victoria and Its Metropolis, Cemetery Inscriptions (Bulla, Keilor, Will Will Rook), Greenvale: Links with the Past (Annette Davis, wife of Essendon champion, Barry), The Shire That Took Off (unpublished history of Bulla Shire sourced at the Sam Merrifield Library, plus others mentioned above.
My other work includes Dictionary History of Tullamarine and Miles around (2500 pages handwritten and more on computer, with most of my information on Greenvale and Bulla), Kilts and Cow Dung Flats (Strathmore and Pascoe Vale), A Trickle or a Torrent (Moonee Ponds Creek),information provided to family historians and Bruce Barber (Strathmore),assisting heritage studies, Early Landowners (parishes of Doutta Galla and Tullamarine with extensive titles information) and more recently NEW history about the Mornington Peninsula and preserving heritage buildings such as the Boyd cottage at 62 Rosebud Pde.
Being a local historian, obviously I have belonged to historical societies but I am not really a meetings person. I was the president of the reformed Keilor Historical Society (1988?)but I was so pleased when Susan Jennison took over the reins in the next year. I am purely a research person with a passion to see the contributions of my mates, the pioneers, acknowledged. I have been pleased to see their names added to Melway at my suggestion: Hannah Pascoe, McRae, Delahey, Lavars, Corrigan, Chadwick, McKay, Johnson, Gilmore, Mitchell and their properties: Gowrie Park, Chandos, Willowbank. Unfortunately, my maternal ancestors are unlikely to have a street named afer them. Imagine the ribbing you'd get if you lived in Cock Street!

The reason that I have not published my histories (probably 4000 pages by now)is that I object to the outrageous prices people have to pay for books. That is why I provided my work to libraries and when I sold books they were printed at my schools so that they could raise funds and prices could be low.I cannot express my gratitude enough to Scott for giving me the opportunity to provide the results of my research free to family historians. Although I am still a local historian, it is for family historians that I research and write. Hopefully, nobody will say of my work, "My family was there for 50 years and he didn't even mention them!"
I admire and respect Family historians but will never become one. Why? A local historian is the explorer who embarks on adventure and finds something else if he doesn't discover what he was after but a family historian is the surveyor who deals with the nitty gritty and does the "hard yakka" (another Aussie term meaning hard work from a brand of workwear.) Keep up the good work, Scott and his disciples!

8 comment(s), latest 4 years, 10 months ago

itellya's sporadic comeback

Due to the death of my computer and the reconstruction of this left-hander's left shoulder, my return to action depends on my right index finger and the availability of my wife's laptop. I'd like to thank my FTC well-wishers and inform them that both operations went well.
I feel guilty that so many of my journals have been started and not completed. My first task is to complete the BETHELLS OF BROADMEADOWS AND BULLA journal.

J.P.FAWKNER'S CO-OPS, SURNAME LIST FOR SECTION 13, TULLAMARINE, VIC., AUST.

The names in the surnames list are the members of John Pascoe Fawkner's co-operative which purchased land in section 13 of the parish of Tullamarine, north and south of Mansfields Rd, Tullamarine (Melway 4 A1 and 4 to G3-5).

The Melway reference and lot number of each purchaser's block(s)will be given in the journal: JOHN PASCOE FAWKNER AND HIS CO-OPERATIVES.

J.P.FAWKNER'S CO-OPS,SURNAMES LIST FOR PART SECTIONS 6, 7, TULLAMARINE (and George Scarlett.)

The names in the surnames list are the members of John Pascoe Fawkner's co-operative which purchased land in the part of sections 6 and 7 on the south west side of Bulla Rd (now Melrose Drive)in the parish of Tullamarine.

Section 5 was "Stewarton" (renamed Gladstone in about 1892 after the Engllsh Prime Minister's cousin. Its south west corner was the present corner of Lackenheath Drive and Mickleham Rd (Melway 5 J11.) Its boundary with the Township of Broadmeadows was Forman St (5 K7.) The eastern boundary was the Moonee Ponds Creek.

By drawing a line between Forman St and the west end of Grants Rd, the northern boundary of section 6 and all but about 180 metres of section 7 can be seen. If you continue the line of Lackenheath Drive 16 centimetres to the west on your Melway,you will find the exact south west corner of section 7 (just 5mm on the map north of gate 22 on Operations Rd.) The boundary between sections 5 and 6 was Broadmeadows Rd (now Mickleham Rd.)

J.C.Riddell, after whom Riddell's Creek was named,purchased section 6 and as the south west corner was across the road (a triangle roughly enclosed by Link Rd, Trade Park and Melrose Drive, he sold it to Fawkner. In return, Fawkner sold to Riddell the north east corner of section 7, a triangle south of the Cleanaway waste facility mainly comprised of Melway 5 E7.


The Melway reference and lot number of each purchaser's block(s)will be given in the journal: JOHN PASCOE FAWKNER AND HIS CO-OPERATIVES.

GEORGE SCARLETT.
In comments, garyboy alerted me to the issue in which George Scarlett's land was advertised for sale. The location of the land and lot numbers are given in my comment following his. The map showing subdivision lots has been sent to garyboy and is available to descendants of the other pioneers named in the surname list.The digitisation needed correction,which I have done, so that garyboy can copy and paste from here (there are still a few errors on trove.) The Lady of the Lake hotel was built on section 3 by David William O'Niall,subject of one of my journals, on land leased from William Foster by about 1847 and was a well-known landmark.It was just south of the Derby St corner and adjoined Broombank (Millar Rd area), leased by my great grandfather, John Cock, from 1867 until 1882. The 10 acre lot adjoined lots 31 and 32 and the reason it needed to be fenced separately is that a lane ran between it and the double block. (See my comment under garyboy's.)

MONDAY, 4th SEPTEMBER.
By Order of the Executors of the late Mr. George Scarlett.
Farms on the Deep Creek Road, Ten Miles from Melbourne.
A BLISS and CO. have received Instructions from the executors of the late Mr. George Scarlett to submit to public auction, at the Lady of the Lake, on the Deep Creek road, on Monday, 4th September, at two o'clock,
20 acres of beautiful agricultural land, having erected there a very substantially built four-roomed wooden
house, panelled doors, spouted, with a tank capable of holding water for the year; all fenced in, clear
and ready for the plough.
Also, 10 acres of splendid land adjoining, partially fenced in. To be sold in one lot or separately.
This being the property of a trust estate it must be sold without reserve, for the benefit of those interested
under the will.
Terms-Half cash, the remainder to remain (at the option of the purchaser) for two years at 8 per cent, on mortgage. 101. (Item 8,column 2,page 7, Argus, 26-8-1854.)

And as always when I help a family historian,I receive as much information as I give.

Thanks xxx for your well researched information relating to the location and sale of George Scarlett's land holdings in 1856. Interesting about the nearby Lady of the Lake Hotel and a very good chance George and sons patronized the establishment at some time. Interesting that George sought to acquire a rural acreage as after arriving in Melbourne in March 1841 with his wife and six children he established a jewelry business in Collins street however sales could not have been as brisk as expected and by 1843 he appeared on the Port Phillip Insolvency list. I'm uncertain as to when he applied for and was granted his land at Tullamarine but I know he was living there in early 1854 as his grandson also named George was born there in February of that year. I discovered this fact quite recently when I viewed a copy of George's 1878 (Ballarat) wedding certificate. Young George'e father James who was also residing at the Tullarmarine farm listed his occupation as gardener. Perhaps James and his other two brothers were farming the block however on the 14th June 1854 George (snr) passed away at the Watermans Arms Hotel in Little Collins street of a stroke, aged 52. I was never aware until a few months back whilst conducting a family history that the second son James Scarlett married an Irish Famine orphan girl, Lilly Ann Barber (Barbour) in 1853. They died in 1901 and 1903 and are buried in the Ballarat Cemetery. Lilly Ann was my grandfathers grandmother but I never heard him ever mention his Irish ancestry, Also my father who lived to 95 never mentioned Lilly Barber, George's Bankruptcy or of him dying in the Waterman's Arms. Possibly they never knew or it was things best forgotten. Thanks to Google it's not. Getting back to the Tullarmarine block.... I notice that a large portion of the 20 acres is outside the Airport restricted area so hopefully there isn't a problem with access as much of the area appears to unfenced open grassland. Aspirations to locate the site of the original dwelling which presumably would be on the northern section adjoining Andersons? lane. We'll see how I go and will keep you posted if I'm fortunate enough to stumble upon any relics of the era.. Apologies for straying into my ancestors closet but without your diligent and painstaking research I would have been facing an arduous task researching the Tullamarine connection. Kind Regards, Gary.

To save me sending a further email to Gary,having already told him about the 1858 advertisements, the partly fenced 10 acre block must have sold in 1854 but not lots 31 and 32. There is no doubt that Gary will be able to make a close inspection of the East Collingwood corner block (if he can find out which corner.) The Park/Stafford St intersection is at Melway 2C J8.The house block at Tullamarine (36 x 26 feet, about 10 x 8 metres) occupied only a small part of the 20 acres (140 x 280 metres) so the majority of the land was used for farming.

As stated earlier,each 10 acre block (on map 5 in my 1999 Melway) measures roughly 7 millimetres (frontage) by 14 millimetres (depth), the boundary dimensions having been roughly 700 links X 1400 links (140 metres X 280 metres.) As it would have been ridiculous to try to measure fractions of amillimetreI had to divide up the space filled with 10 acre blocks so that the space was filled and all blocks had the same dimensions (as demonstrated by title documents.) Using the dimensions of 700 X 1400 links,the product is 9.8 acres,fairly close to 10 acres.Gary will find that the total frontage of lots 31 and 32 on the map that I sent him is actually 14.5 millimetres so that the width of each 10 acre block is 7.25 millimetres (obtained by dividing the total space as described above.) As you can see,the Maths I learnt at school was not entirely useless and any subdivision maps I have produced were done with such care that I have actually found mistakes in parish maps as a result,such as the spot where Arundel Creek flows into the Maribyrnong River in Foote's Doutta Galla map.

THIS DAY.
To Speculators,Persons Seeking Investments, and Others
Unreserved Sale of Valuable Freehold Property.
By Order of tho Executor and Trustee of the late George Scarlett
SYMONS and PERRY have received instructions from the executor and trustee of the late George Scarlett to SELL by AUCTION, at their new rooms, Collins-street, on Monday, 8th inst, at 12 o'clock,
Lot 1.
2O acres, a little more or less, part of section 7, parish of Tullamarine, county of Bourke, 10 miles from
Melbourne, on the Deep Creek-road, and near the Beech Tree Hotel, on which is erected a good substantial weatherboard house standing on a frontage of 36 feet, by a depth of 26 feet. There is also a splendid
tank, well built of stone, with a good supply of water. The land is all fenced in.
Lot 2.
All that piece or parcel of land situate in East Collingwood, having a frontage of 108 feet 6? inches to
Park street, by a depth along Stafford street of 75 feet. The above is a splendid corner allotment, and is
worthy the attention of persons seeking investments.
Terms liberal, declared at sale.
The auctioneers wish to call the attention of capitalists and speculators to the above really choice pro-
perties as being of sterling quality, and are to be sold to the highest bidder. 1970
(P.2,Argus, 8-2-1858,near bottom of column 2.)


The above is,I think,the earliest reference to the Beech Tree Hotel that I have seen. The earliest reference to it in the Cole Collection of Hotel records was a ball held there in 1864. It is possible that the Lady of the Lake Hotel had been burnt down by this time and the Junction Hotel did not exist for some time, giving John Beech an opportunity to establish his hotel without competition. The Travellers' Rest near the site of Airport West Shoppingtown probably hadn't been built and the Inverness at Oaklands Junction was far enough away.

As shown in advertisements for the Beech Tree,it also had a huge underground tank.It is likely that it was lined with stone as George Scarlett's was.

2 comment(s), latest 2 years, 8 months ago

J.T.ROLLS, MARINER, PIONEER IN THE PARISH OF WANNAEUE, MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.

This journal was prompted by the similarity between L and T in old handwriting* and a rate collector's almost illegible handwriting.
(* See sample in:
How to Read 18th Century British-American Writing
dohistory.org/on_your_own/toolkit/writing.html
Something as basic to us as writing was quite different in 18th Century .... upper case K, P, and R can look similar, as can J and T. Also, at times L and S will be ..

In 1876 somebody named Rolls had replaced John Lovie on the latter's grants, 638 acres west of Boneo Rd with partial frontages to Truemans and Browns Rds. He had probably bought the property at a mortgagee's auction on 24-7-1876 and the rate collector had not had time to get all the new owner's details before the September meeting when the assessment was presented to the Shire of Flinders and Kangerong for approval.

In 1877, the new owner's initials were given but I couldn't work out whether they were J.T. or J.L. He was described as a mariner and was recorded as owner as well as occupant of the 638 acres and two roomed house which had been built by John Lovie. The link to the Wannaeue parish map can be found in the first comment under my PIONEERS OF THE PARISH OF WANNAEUE journal or you can google WANNAEUE, COUNTY OF MORNINGTON.

HOW LONG WAS J.T.ROLLS ON THIS FARM?
The answer will be found shortly. See answer at the end of the journal.

CAPTAIN ROLLS 3 WHO WENT TO SEA, AGED 15, WHEN HIS FATHER WAS OCCUPYING LOVIE'S GRANTS
Having the right initials may not seem very important but they would be for a family historian, so I tried a trove search for J.T.Rolls. Wow! First result was:
THIRD GENERATION CAPT. J. T. ROLLS AN OLD SEA DOG
Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Thursday 23 October 1924 p 7 Article

THIRD GENERATION; CAPT. J. T. ROLLS AN OLD SEA DOG !
The Niagara left Sydney for Vancouver to-day, under Captain Showman, the fourth officer of the Union Co. fleet to assume charge of the liner. Captain Harry Morriby was the first, Captain John Gibb was the next, and Captain John T. Rolls, who has just retired, was the third.

Captain Rolls has been going to sea since 1876, having started his career out of Melbourne In the ship Ellora.
He continued in sailing ships until April, 1885, when he joined the Union Company as a junior officer on the
Wairarapa.

THIRD GENERATION.
Captain Rolls is the third generation of shipmasters. His father was a shipowner, and captain in Victoria, and his Grandfather was a retired commander in the East-India Co.,taking the ship Rhoda to Australia later, and subsequently settling in Melbourne. Captain Rolls was born in 1861 and 1924 finds him the latest recruit in the ranks of the League of Ancient Mariners.

Countless other results referred to other people with the same initials so I tried "J.T.ROLLS" and got countless articles about his (their)ship's arrival from, or departure to, various places. Next I tried Captain Rolls.

The third Captain Rolls who retired in 1924 had gone to sea at the age of 15 in 1876. Therefore the owner of crown allotments 40A and 41-3, section A, Wannaeue was probably his father.

Extract from:
THIRTY YEARS IN COMMAND. CAPTAIN ROLLS RETIRES.
The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) Tuesday 4 November 1924 p 4 Article

Captain Roll's parents were early pioneers of Victoria, his father arriving from Kent in 1841 and his mother
landing in Victoria some 10 years later
. It was in the ship Ellora, owned by Mr John Blyth of Melbourne that Captain Rolls first went to sea in July 1876 when he was barely 15 years of age.

Captain Rolls 3 was only 15 in 1876 and unlikely to own the Wannaeue land. What about Captain Rolls 1?
I think this would be him.
ROLLS.—On the 14th inst., at eight a.m., at the residence of his son, Curzon-street, North Melbourne,
Captain John Rolls, aged sixty-one years, after a painful and lingering illness. (P.4, Argus, 17-7-1861.)

The captain's son would have been J.T.Rolls 2 (circa 1830-1910) aged about 31 who bought the Wannaeue land 15 years later.

Is this Captain Rolls 2.
Murder of Captain Rolls.
Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954) Saturday 1 April 1882 p 4 Article
NO! Another article gave this captain's name as Phillip.
The Murder of Captain Rolls
Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Monday 26 June 1882 p 2 Article
... The Murder of Captain Rolls The case of the marder of Captain Philip Rolls, late master of the ... 66 words

CAPTAIN ROLLS 2, WANNAEUE PIONEER.
Is it possible that the owner of the 638 acres in Wannaeue during the 1870's was John Thomas Rolls who died at Brighton in 1910? Yes! His widow's death notice reveals that he had been a captain. He was born in about 1830 so he would have been about 11 when his father settled, 20 when his future wife settled, 31 when Captain Rolls 3 was born, and 46 when he bought Lovie's grants and his son, Captain Rolls 3, born 1861 went to sea barely aged 15.

ROLLS.—On the 28th January, at "Ravensbourne," Brighton Beach, John Thomas Rolls, in his 80th year. (Interred privately.) P.1, Argus, 31-1-1910.

ROLLS.—On the 18th March, at "Ravensbourne," Brighton Beach (suddenly), Mary Ann, relict of the late Captain John T. Rolls, in her 80th year. (Interred privately 21st.) P.1, Argus, 22-3-1910.

My purpose here is not to provide genealogy but to make ROLLS descendants aware of their family's involvement on the Mornington Peninsula. Descendants of Joseph Porta, Victoria's first manufacturer of bellows, had no idea of his grant at c/a 63 Moorooduc and (please excuse the pun), Rolls descendants could be in the same BOAT.

WHEN WAS J.T.ROLLS LAST ASSESSED ON THE 638 ACRES IN THE PARISH OF WANNAEUE? CHECK 1878+.
The net annual value of Lovie's 638 acres had been 30 pounds had been 30 pounds since 1872 if not before. John Rolls' name was not in the 1878 assessment so in searching for the new owner or occupant I looked in the net annual value column but none of the three or so properties with that value matched so I looked for Alexander Crichton's assessment. There it was at assessment number 46.
Alexander Crichton, (owner A.Crichton) 638 acres Wannaeue, net annual value 50 pounds.

That's a huge jump in the net annual value, so Alexander of Glenlee probably had plenty of revenue from Glenlee's famed cheese to achieve such a rapid improvement and had probably made an offer for the farm that John couldn't refuse. Was it in 1878 that John built Ravensbourne at Brighton?

He was obviously living close to the city by August, 1878 when he made a bid to become a director of the company below.
THE COLONIAL MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited)
A SPECIAL GENERAL MEETING of the shareholders of the above company will be held at the registered offices of the company, 84 and 86 Collins Street west, Melbourne, on Thursday, the 29th day of August inst,, at 2 o clock in the afternoon. (P.8, Argus, 22-8-1878.)

In 1881, John 2 was the marine surveyor for the United Australian Mutual Fire Insurance Company (Limited.)
(P.8, column 4, Argus, 18-8-1881.)

On January 28 a very old colonist,Captain John T. Rolls, passed away, after a long illness, at his residence,
"Ravensbourne," Brighton Beach, Victoria. The deceased arrived in Victoria 60 years ago, and for many years was
well known in shipping circles, but had lived in retirement for the last 37 years. He leaves a widow and two sons, Captain J. T. Rolls, of the Union S.S. Company, and Mr. W. Rolls, pastoralist, of New South Wales, also two daughters.(P.5, Examiner (Launceston), 8-2-1910.)

The above confirms that John 2 had retired just before he purchased John Lovie's 638 acres at Wannaeue by September 1875 and that he was the father of John 3 who retired in 1924. John 2 may have had another son who was about five years younger than John 3.

As the barque Veritas of this port was coming out from London, one of the apprentices, T. H. Rolls, fell from the flying jibboom into the sea, and was drowned. The accident took place on the forenoon of the 8th inst.,
when about 500 miles from Cape Otway. The vessel at the time was on the starboard tack and under topgallant sails,and although there was a moderate south-east breeze at the time, the sea was smooth. Two life buoys were thrown quite close to the young man, but whether the poor fellow had lost presence of mind, or was unconscious
from sudden fright, he did not appear to make an effort to secure either of them. A boat was also lowered, and a good look-out kept, but the search was fruitless, and young Rolls was never seen again. Captain Johnson had the barque brought to the wind, and she drifted past the life-buoys on the other tack, and remained in the vicinity of the accident for four hours. Young Rolls was between 15 and 16 years of age, and was a son of Captain J. T. Rolls, of this city. (P.22, The Australasian, 19-11-1881.)

ROLLS.— On November 12, at her residence, 1 Black-street, Middle Brighton, Jane Elizabeth, daughter of the late Captain J. T.and Mrs. Rolls, of Brighton, and sister of Captain J. T. Rolls, of Sydney.
(P.1, The Age, 14-11-1939.)

ROLLS—HEATHER.—On the 18th ult., at Wagga Wagga, N.S.W., by the Rev. W. C. Bates, William Charles, second son of Captain J. T. Rolls, of Brighton, to Phoebe, fifth daughter of the late Richard Heather, of Adelong, N.S.W.
(P.1, Argus, 6-10-1893.)

SATURDAY, MARCH 20.
On the Property. At Three O'clock.
BRIGHTON BEACH, BRIGHTON BEACH BRIGHTON BEACH, RAVESBOURNE ESTATE.SUPERIOR BRICK VILLA SUPERIOR BRICK VILLA
And 15 VACANT ALLOTMENTS. 15 VACANT ALLOTMENTS.
Under Instructions from THE EQUITY TRUSTEES' COMPANY LTD., in the Estate of J. T. Rolls.

THE HOUSE Is Known as "RAVENSBOURNE," ROSLYN STREET.
It is Constructed of Brick, and Contains (8?)Good Rooms, Vestibule, 3 Pantries, bathroom, laundry, and Scullery, and All Conveniences. It Stands on Land 80 ft. to Roslyn Street, by the Grand Depth of 300ft, Through to Champion Street, There is also Coach house and Stabling.
There also Being Land Adjoining, Which will be Offered at the Same Time.
There are
FIVE ALLOTMENTS,
Each Having Frontages of 60ft, to Were Street, by Depths of 150ft.;
Also FOUR ALLOTMENTS In Roslyn Street, Having frontages Varying from 55ft. to 79 ft., by Depths of 150ft.; and
THREE ALLOTMENTS In Champion Street, with frontages of 65ft, (69?) ft,and 79ft. Respectively, by Depths of 150 ft. ;
Also THREE ALLOTMENTS In South Road, Each Measuring 75ft by 179 ft.
TERMS, for House.-One-third Cash, Balance Within Two Months, Without Interest; or at one and two Years, with Interest at 6 Per Cent. TERMS FOR LAND.-, Cash, Balance Within One Month Without Interest or by Six Half-yearly payments; Interest at 6 percent.(etc.) (P.3, Argus, 6-3-1920.)

Ravesbourne had been put up for sale in May 1911 but obviously didn't sell.
(P.4, Brighton Southern Cross, 29-4-1911.)

John 2 and Mary Ann didn't have all our mod. cons. but they could afford a servant.

GIRL respectable, general, small family, references. Mrs. Rolls, Ravensbourne, Roslyn-rd., Brighton Beach.
(P.3, The Age, 25-7-1896.)

Well I didn't find when John 2 settled at Brighton but I've got a fair idea why he called the house Ravensbourne rather than Wannaeue and it had nothing to do with the birds in his garden.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.
Hobson's bay, arrived Dec. 6.
Ravensbourne, ship,- 1150 tons, William Richardson; from London August 2nd, with three passengers
in the second cabin. (P.2, Mt. Alexander Mail, 9-12-1864.)

THE ROLLS FAMILY, PIONEERS OF 1841!

3 comment(s), latest 9 months, 3 weeks ago

JAMES AND LAURENCE WHITE, AND LOUIS JOSHUA BERRYMAN, OF THE BALNARRING DISTRICT, VIC., AUST.

This journal,like many,arose from a private message. It was originally entitled A CONVERSATION ABOUT JAMES AND LAURENCE WHITE OF THE BALNARRING DISTRICT but as I have found just found much information about the so-called Mr Berriman from the so-called Euroa (who bought 160 acres from James White's estate in 1906) such as Eric Rundle purchasing Warrawee from his estate in 1950 (Balnarring Byways) and the lead he took in introducing agriculture to the district (P.2, Mornington and Dromana Standard, 3-7-1909), Louis is no longer a bit player in the story.

THE CONVERSATION.
Hi We own Ealing Park which is 13 Turners Road Balnarring and was part of the original 90 acres of James White.
Do you know when it was selected and then freeholded?
Regards
John

Having checked in Melway,it would seem to me that No 13 is just south of the bend in Turners Rd halfway between Myers and Hunts Rds and on the east side of Turners Rd. Your property would probably be the northernmost portion of crown allotment 60A, parish of Bittern, located on the east corner of Myers and Turners Rds and extending north to the aforementioned bend, as does crown allotment 59B on the west corner. The latter was granted to L.White (probably Lawrence) on 27-9-1878. Crown allotment 60A was granted to John White, administrator (executor)of J.White (probably James) on 21-2-1900.

James White had obviously settled in the area by 1874 as the following shows but there is no proof that he was on either of the two crown allotments mentioned.

THE SCHNAPPER POINT MURDER. (BY OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.)
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Monday 14 September 1874 p 6 Article
I asked the prisoner when he had left "The Plains," meaning Moriarty's place, he said, " Yesterday " (Sunday). I said, "Where were you all night?" He replied, "I stopped with an old man, I got off the track." I asked the old man's name, and he said he could not tell me. I mentioned two men, James White and John McConnell, the only two single men that I knew on the track, and he said it was neither of them.

There is much detail about James and Lawrence White in one of the volumes of Balnarring Byways, available at the Rosebud Library and possibly at your local branch. I can't recall whether it specifies crown allotments or year of settlement but it may. I don't think the books are available for loan and if you will find it hard to access the books, give me a yell.
Regards, me.

Yes, we are on the northern boundary of 60A and are occupants of a very old single storey weatherboard farmhouse, which presumably was built by the Whites, as it is quite a substantial building even now.

The building was probably built of timber milled on site, as it is quarter-sawn and the marks of the big saw are visible both on the structural timbers and the weatherboards. We are currently adding on to the house in the same style, with its ten foot ceilings. There are also two extant chimneys from the old house with hand-made bricks, which are also quite a feature.
Unfortunately the old buttery and cheesery are long gone, but looking for photos
Regards

John

I just found why John White, obviously not a son of James White, was administering the will of James in 1900. The hay might have been grown on 60A or another farm, of 160 acres, near Bittern station.

James White a well known resident of Balnarring, on Monday afternoon fell of a load of hay whilst loading a dray. He fell on his head and was instantaneously killed through the dislocation of his neck. Deceased was a single man. A post-mortem examination was conducted on Tuesday when a verdict of accidental death was returned. (P.3,Mornington Standard, 7-12-1899.)

While hunting for an obituary to find when 60A was settled or a legal notice to find John White's relationship to the deceased James,I found a bit of dirt on Lawrence White and his son,James - a sheep stealing charge.

MORNINGTON. Police Court. Before Mr Smallman P. M. and Messers G. S. Hepburn, W. M. Irvine and W. C. Walker J's P.
Mornington Standard (Vic. : 1889 - 1908) Thursday 15 November 1900 p 3 Article Illustrated
... . Hepburn, W. M. Irvine and W. C Walker J's P. Laurence White of Balnarring and James White his son a lad of ..

James White had another farm, of 160 acres.*.(60A is 95 acres, CORRECTION 90 ACRES!) The article is being digitised apparently.
CLOSER SETTLEMENT. ACTIVITY AT MORNINGTON. MORNTNGTON, Monday. [coming soon]
The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Tuesday 8 May 1906 p 6 Article
... closer settlement. In addition, the executors of the late James White's estate have sold 160 acres* at ... Balnarring at £5 5/ per acre to Mr. Berriman, of Beaufort.

* and has also just disposed of 160 acres in the estate of the late Mr James White, situated close to Bittern railway station, (P.2, Mornington Standard, 5-5-1906.)


John White was spending more than just the purchase price of 60A unless his tour was at the expense of the government.
Mr John White, of Balnarring, who has been away on an extended tour through England, South Africa, and several other countries, returned home last Tuesday.
(P.2, Mornington Standard, 8-3-1902.)

Mr John White, of Balnarring, who only recently returned from the war,has re-enlisted with the Contingent at present in camp.
(P.2, Mornington Standard, 3-5-1902.)

John White,executor of the single James White and grantee of 60A, was the eldest son of Lawrence White. He seemed to have owned a horse called INVESTMENT which stood at 60A.

Family Notices
Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 30 May 1912 p 3 Family Notices
... celebrated of Mr b John White, eldest son of the late Mr ti Laurence White, of Balnarring, and Miss

I'll try to have a look at the Flinders Road District rates (1869-1874) tomorrow to find if James White was assessed on 95 (correction,90) acres and if not there, the Shire of Flinders and Kangerong rates from 1875. Net Annual Values usually give an indication of when a homestead was built and extended.

Thanks xxx, very interesting, regards John.

I'm afraid that it's going to be near-impossible to determine the age of any buildings on crown allotment 60A Bittern. Titles information might help but I doubt it because they mainly concern the location and dimensions/ area of the land. I've researched the White land in each year from 1869 to 1907 and then, knowing about Cr Terry's demand for properties to be described properly, in 1911 and 1913.

James White seems to have built a house in between the assessments of 1884 and 1885 when the nett annual value of his property rose from 20 pounds to 25 pounds. There was a further rise in N.A.V. to 28 pounds in the 1888 assessment which could have been caused by an addition to the house or a general increase in the value of farmland as this was the height of the land boom. The value of his land then remained unchanged until 1905 (after 60A Bittern had simply disappeared from the face of the earth.)

In the Flinders Road Board's first assessment of 1869, neither James nor Laurence White was mentioned in the Bittern division (parish.) In 1870, Laurence was leasing 95 acres (N.A.V. 5 pounds 5 shillings) from the Crown. In 1874,the N.A.V. rose to 6 pounds 6 shillings.

The first Flinders and Kangerong Shire assessment in 1875 does not record either of the Whites but the 1876 rates showed that Lawrence was still leasing the 95 acres at Bittern from the Crown,the N.A.V. rising to 9 pounds.As stated previously he received the grant for 59B at the end of 1878 and the rate collector acknowledged his ownership in 1880. The following year "buildings" raised the N.A.V.to 10 pounds. In 1905 the value of his property doubled, obviously because of a more substantial BUILDING. His assessment remained the same for the next two years. The disappearance of James White's 60A necessitated a jump to 1911 and I forgot to record Laurence's assessment in that year. In 1913, there was no assessment of Laurence but James White, the former 14 year old student charged with sheep stealing, was rated on 96 acres, c/a 59 B,Bittern, N.A.V. 24 pounds. It would be extremely likely that Laurence had been on 59B by the 1870 assessment.

In 1876, James White was rated on 160 acres, Balnarring, N.A.V. 12 pounds and he was recorded as the owner in 1877. The N.A.V. rose to 15 pounds in 1879 and 17 pounds in 1881 when he was rated on 250 acres,Bittern and Balnarring and buildings. Amazing! The addition of 60B Bittern, which James must have settled in late 1880 or early to mid 1881, had only lifted the NAV by 2 pounds. The rise to 20 pounds in 1882 would seem to have been well warranted. In 1885,it rose to 25 pounds and in 1888 to 28 pounds, possibly because of additions to buildings or rising values caused by the 1880's boom. The value of the 160 acres in the parish of Balnarring (near the station as mentioned previously) increased by 2 pounds in 1905.

In 1899, some effort had been made to identify the 160 acres in Balnarring,with 74A,74B being noted. This is nonsense as crown allotment 74 Balnarring is nowhere near the Bittern railway station, and in fact became the Red Hill Village Settlement. This is a problem to be solved at another time,60A Bittern being our focus. By 1901 John White was recorded as the owner of the 250 acres,now specified as 160 acres Balnarring (NAV 18 pounds),and 90 acres Bittern (NAV 10 pounds),still a total of 28 pounds.

In 1902 the executors of James White were assessed on 160 acres Balnarring and "William Myers owner" was written in the assessment for 90 acres, Bittern. I must be blind because I could find no Myers' assessment in 1903! However Mrs Myers was rated on 90 acres Bittern in 1905 and 1906. I wanted proof that Mrs Myers had 60A, so remembering Cr Terry's campaign for proper descriptions of properties, I jumped to 1911. Mrs Myers was assessed on 90 acres,c/a 60A Bittern! The NAV was 10 pounds so James White's supposed house of 1885 must have been on the 160 acres near the Bittern station, or, if it was on 60A, in a fairly dilapidated condition. It would seem that the extant buildings on your property were built by the Myers family.

My next message speculated that the 160 acres might have actually been in the parish of Bittern, one of two blocks of roughly that size to the north / north west of 60A Bittern and granted to William Myers. Further rate research has proved that not to be the case.


FINDINGS.
THERE WAS NO HOUSE ON 60a BITTERN EVEN IN THE LAST RATE RECORD AVAILABLE ON MICROFICHE, 1919. The Myer family had occupied 60a since 1902 and in every assessment up to 1919,no house was mentioned, as had always been the case. Strangely no house was mentioned in the 1905 advertisement for the 160 acres that Mr Berryman bought many months later in mid 1906.

JAMES WHITE'S 160 ACRES (PART OF L.J. BERRYMAN'S 206 ACRES.)
It as if everyone had conspired to make it impossible to identify the 160 acres, Balnarring (parish)on which James White was rated in the first Flinders Road Board assessment of 1869. If it was not for Westley's 1905 advertisement and the two 1906 sales reports,the location could never have been identified. Berryman was assessed on 206 acres 18b Sub Crown allotment 26 Balnarring from 1906 to 1911 so he had to have owned James White's 160 acres (actually 154 acres, 3 roods 0 perches; 26AB, fronting the west side of Warrawee Rd)and 46 acres of 18B,immediately north, of 54 acres 3 roods and 6 perches.

What doesn't make sense is J.G.Benton was granted 26A, 26 B and 18B,the last on 15-10-1880 and issue dates for the others not stated, while James White was assessed on his 160 acres from 1869,combined with the 90 acre 60A Bittern as 250 acres from 1881. It was not until 1901, with James White's executor,Lawrence White's eldest son, John,listed as the owner of both that the composition of the 250 acres was revealed. It would then appear that James leased the 160 acres from the Crown until 1880 and then leased or bought it from Benton in 1881. A complication is that James Benton was assessed on 151 acres Balnarring NEAR PAUL VANSUYLEN until at least 1870 at the same time as James White was assessed on 160 acres.

From 1912,Louis Joshua Berryman was assessed on 26AB, now described as 155 acres (only 20 metres x 50 metres more than the exact area)and Mrs Annie Jane Berryman on 17AB and 18AB of 177 acres,north to 192 J-K1 fronting Balnarring Rd. In 1919 this remained the same (A.N. 2909 and 2910) but Louis (2911) was alsorted on lots 38-42,46, 47,part crown allotment 27,about 60 acres and buildings,Balnarring. One of the BUILDINGS was the WARRAWEE HOMESTEAD, 27AB being the triangle whose west side is indicated by Warrawee Rd.

Descriptions in 1905 advertisement and 1906 sales reports.
6th OCTOBER, 1905,
At Two O'clock,
At 311, COLLINS STREET
MT. ELIZA, FRANKSTON, 1 mile Moorooduc Station; coach from Frankston, nearly EIGHT ACRES. Dairying, Orchard (prize fruits), Grazing, W.B.DWELLING, 6 Rooms, newly renovated, Stabling, Cow-shed, Barn, Tanks. A charming country residence.

BITTERN, Dromana road, *4.5 miles Station, 160 ACRES, 25 Acres cleared and grubbed, balance rung and partly picked up, Chocolate Soil, securely fenced and well watered.

BALNARRING. 308 ACRES. 1 ROOD, 34 PERCHES, " GROUVILLE," about 4 miles Bittern Station, Allotment 15,Parish of Balnarring, known as *JOURNEAUX'S.
H.B. WESTLEY, ? AUCTIONEER and sworn valuer of 63 Queen street, Melbourne; will sell as above. (P.5, Mornington Standard, 23-9-1905.)

CLOSER SETTLEMENT. ACTIVITY AT MORNINGTON. MORNTNGTON, Monday. [coming soon]
The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Tuesday 8 May 1906 p 6 Article
... closer settlement. In addition, the executors of the late James White's estate have sold 160 acres* at ... Balnarring at £5 5/ per acre to Mr. Berriman, of Beaufort.

PROPERTY SALES. - Mr H.D.Westley, auctioneer, Melbourne,informs us that he has sold the remaining allotment in the estate of the late Mr Charles Wright, and has also just disposed of 160 acres in the estate of the late Mr James White, situated close to Bittern railway station, and also 308 acres known as "Journeaux." Balnarring.
(P.2, Mornington Standard, 5-5-1906.)

*The Balnarring Station, now Civic Court,did not exist until the Red Hill line was opened in 1921 so the station referred to in 1905 was the Bittern station. Measurement on Melway shows that the south east corner of
26AB (Stanley/Warrawee Rd corner)is four and a half miles from the Bittern Station EXACTLY.

Rate records.


LOUIS JOSHUA BERRYMAN.

The Balnarring District. PROGRESSIVE DEVELOPMENTS.
Mornington and Dromana Standard (Vic. : 1908 - 1911) Saturday 3 July 1909 p 2 Article


The Balnarring district, situated on the Southern end of the Mornington peninsula, affords proof that even
rich lands, when held in large areas,may fail to be a beneficial investment. Notwithstanding that the district is within a mile or two of the Bittern railway station, that it is not more than forty miles distant from Melbourne, that the rainfall is ample and well distributed, and that being near the sea ensures an equable and mild climate,yet it is notable that the holders of large estates in Balnarring and neighborhood have not prospered. As compared with smaller holdings of from 100 to 300 acres in area, these large properties do not make a favorable showing. Generally the fences are in disrepair, the ground is covered with fern and scrub, rabbits abound,and there is a general air of down at the heels.

UNFAVORABLE EXCEPTIONS.
The explanation of this state of affairs is easily stated. Some twenty years ago Balnarring was regarded as
good grazing country. Sheep and cattle flourished on the natural grasses, and those who had large holdings
were able to put them to profitable use. In those days there were no rabbits. About fifteen years ago this
pest made its appearance in the district, and finding the country to its liking rapidly increased in numbers.
Soon the rabbits practically took possession of the whole countryside.

They ate down and destroyed the more succulent grasses, and. with their disappearance went the utility of the
country from a grazing point of view. Then, as the rabbits kept down the more nutritious herbage, coarser
growths began to assert themselves. Bracken and shrubs continued to make headway, until to-day some thousands
of acres of fertile land in Balnarring are thus rendered temporarily valueless to either the individual or the community. Many of the large estate owners have apparently abandoned the fight, and it is the reverse of a
pleasing experience in driving along the main road from Bittern to Flinders to pass mile after mile of beautiful rich land capable of sustaining a large population, but now overgrown with fern and rubbish, practically given over to the rabbits.

IMPROVING THE POSITION.
Within the past five years some northern farmers have come into the district, and by bringing the plough
into use have demonstrated what the soils of the district will yield under proper treatment. Previous, however, to undertaking any tillage work they have completely wire-netted their holdings in order to keep the rabbits
out. With this immunity secured they have then cleaned up the harbor on their own land, and by ferreting and poisoning have effectually put an end to the rabbit trouble. These newer agriculturists have confined their purchases to areas of from 160 to 300 acres, the conclusions of the more experienced men being that the former
acreage is ample for one man to adequately work. The new settlers hail from the Western plains and the mallee, and all express themselves as well satisfied with the results already obtained.

ILLUSTRATIVE FARMS.
A typical representative of the new settlers is found in Mr L. J. Berryman, formerly of the Western plains,
his previous home being about eight miles south of Buangor. This settler's holding is within about four miles of the Bittern railway station, and consists of less than 300 acres of average quality land. When he took
possession his first work was to wire net, and then dig out the rabbits. Next he commenced to plough up what has been previously regarded as only fit for grass. This evoked the ridicule of other settlers, and he was
warned that by turning up the sod he would destroy the grass. It was also maintained that his experiences with
cropping would be unsatisfactory, because, as it was asserted, the land was not fit for cultivation. Mr Berryman preferred to find out by actual experience, and he worked the soil on the thorough lines which his previous experience had proved successful. The results turned out exceptionally good, and having now been repeated for four years fully justify the verdict that the Balnarring soils, when properly tilled, will yield regular and remunerative crops.

THE FARMING PRACTICE.
Mr Berryman's experience has demonstrated that mixed farming easily pays best. Rape thrives especially well in the Balnarring district, and this year there are several hundred acres thus seeded. In every case the plants are vigorous and forward, ranging, on the occasion of the writer's visit (the first week of June), from a
foot to eighteen inches in height. In every case they were easily carrying from 10 to 12 large crossbred sheep
to the acre. The association of sheep raising with grain growing is, in Mr Berryman's experience, the most profitable use to which the land can be put.Last year on 28 acres he obtained a heavy yield of Algerian oats and wheat mixed,thick,well headed and weighty. The average was 4 tons to the acre. The same field was ploughedup again in March, after the sheep had been given a good chance at the stubble.It was again reseeded with 3 lb. of rape to the acre in April, and the resulting growth was so substantial that by the middle of May he was carrying over eight large framed crossbred sheep to the acre. At the same time another 28 acres of new,roughly cleared land was put in with rape, and, although the growth here is not so good as on the stubble, 410 large sheep were being easily carried on this 50 acres.(etc.)



THE BLUE LOOKOUT by Jean Bryant (Transcribed from BALNARRING BYWAYS AND MEMORIES,VOLUME ,PAGE 47.)
In the 1890's James WHYTE and Laurence WHYTE and their famil(ies?) lived on a property at the top of a hill in Balnarring Rd south of Hunts Rd. It was called the Blue lookout and there were TWO houses on the property. On the 4th December 1899, Jim fell off a load of hay and was killed. He was helping his neighbour,MrTullis, to get in his hay. Dick Oswin,another neighbour helping had to then ride to Schnapper Point for the doctor and then on to Dromana for a policeman,only to find that the policeman had gone to Hastings.He went to Hastings the next day only to find the policeman had gone to Schnapper Point. (Jean mentioned that we take modern communication for granted!)

Larry Whyte and his wife Mary Anne (nee Bourke)had three sons,John (Jack),Patrick, James, and a daughter, Mary Ann. John and Pat,being old enough,went to the Boer War.Jim ran the property consisting of the usual sheep,cows and orchards but mostly the interest lay in horses. Jim bred horses and had a big stud stallion.He was a great horseman and went to Swan Hill and other places showing thoroughbreds for which he had many prizes.He married Elsie (Hinze CHECK, CAN'T READ MY SCRIBBLE)and had a daughter, Joan,and three younger boys. They used to delight in sitting on the corral fence rail and watch their father break in the horses. When Jim took the sheep to the market the family would follow in the jinker. The children went to Bittern West School in Hunt's Rd by pony.

In 1927,Jim was breaking in a circus pony which used to go under low branches to try and dislodge the rider. One night he did not return home and when his wife looked for him next morning she found him already dead. He was only 44 years old. (PHOTO OF ELSIE AND JIM ON THEIR HORSES.) Mrs Whyte had been expecting a baby and he was born on the day of the burial. Michael only lived for 18 months. Because Jim's two brothers were now settled in the city,the property was sold and Elsie took her family to the city too. Joan was eight years old at the time of the tragedy. In later years,she returned to nearby Hastings and with her husband Dick Bryant raised five children.

See comment 1 re Lawrence White's death notice and spelling of the surname.

BERRYMAN SEARCHES.
middle creek, george at Tatura,warrawee, eric rundle

JOURNEAUX SEARCHES,LOCATION OF GROUVILLE.

2 comment(s), latest 1 year, 3 months ago

James Hearn and Big Clarke: KANGERONG/MOOROODUC; ESSENDON; YUROKE (VIC.,AUST.) The Ashes.

In a history of Essendon's historic houses, or historical origins of street names in the Essendon area,probably written by Lenore Frost,it was stated that James Hearn was the son-in -law of William John Turner Clarke (often referred to as "Big" Clarke.) At the time of Big Clarke's death,he was practically paralysed and was being cared for at "Roseneath",the residence of James Hearn.

Roseneath was just east of the water reserve at the south corner of Mt Alexander Rd and Woodland St and was later the residence of William Salmon who donated part of his estate (Salmon Reserve) to the Essendon Council. The part of the Township of Essendon north of Glass St, named "Hawstead" contained larger "suburban" blocks and the one on which Roseneath was built seems to have been granted to a member of Big Clarke's family. GET ALLOTMENT DETAILS.

Despite claims that William Pomeroy Greene of Woodlands was responsible for the name of Woodland St,the above author (if my memory is correct)stated that the street name came from a huge estate/run in the west of Victoria held by Big Clarke. Greene may have been responsible for the naming of Essendon, being associated with a village of that name in England whose Anglican Church still has a font donated by the Greene family. This latter article (font etc)was in the Essendon Historical Society newsletter. The Water Reserve,fed by Five Mile Creek,is now Woodlands Park.

Since I started researching my SAFETY BEACH journal,I have been trying, unsuccessfully, to prove that either James Hearn or John Vans Agnew Bruce (a big contractor from Essendon who owned, by 1863,the 1000 acres of Safety Beach etc north of the line of Martha Cove Waterway or Tassells Creek leased by Edwin Louis Tassell)was a son-in-law of Big Clarke.

"THORNGROVE" in the parish of Yuroke was granted to Big Clarke and later owned by James Hearn, as was a grant a bit further south in the parish of Will Will Rook that Hay Lonie had been leasing as a dairy farm. Big Clarke was said to have bought all of Jamieson's Special Survey in stages and (a) sold the northern 1000 acres to Bruce at a big profit (LIME LAND LEISURE) OR (b)given it to his son-in-law,Bruce, as a wedding present (A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.) The Survey was the northern part of the parish of Kangerong and immediately north of the Sea Lane (Ellerina/Bruce Rd)in the parish of Moorooduc, was the Mount Martha Run,last held by James Hearn who received the grants for most of it, along the coast from Balcombe Creek's mouth to Hearn's Rd,the Dalkeith pre-emptive Right (north to White's Lane, now Range Rd)and other land east to the Tubbarubba diggings.

The passing of ownership from Big Clarke to James Hearn of two large tracts north /west of Melbourne and ownership of adjoining property near Mt Martha and even Clarke's death at Roseneath could just indicate a very close friendship,akin to that between Edward Williams and Sidney Smith Crispo,the former managing Manners-Sutton (west of Canterbury Jetty Rd)in early days and buying the latter's Eastbourne estate at Rosebud West,even caring for the great Crispo there during his last days. However it seems more likely that the association between Clarke and Hearn was more than just a friendship,probably a relationship.

While asking that great detailer of history,Isaac Batey, about John Rankin with the aid of trove,the truth may have finally emerged.
During my stay in the Riverina, falling in with Mr. James Hearne, a first cousin of the late Sir William Clarke,I learnt that (etc.) (P.4, Sunbury News, 4-7-1903.)

Sir William was Big Clarke's son and built Rupertwood (named after his own son) where the tradition of "The Ashes" started. I'm hoping that a F.T.C. member has a copy of the Clarke family history and can provide the exact details of the Clarke-Hearn relationship.My guess is that Big Clarke's wife was a Hearn. Help!

JAMES HEARN OF YUROKE AND MT. MARTHA. (VIC., AUST.)

On the 1st inst., at his residence, Thorngrove, Sydney-road, James Hearn, Esq., aged forty-six years: an old colonist, much respected ; leaving a widow and large family to deplore the loss of an affectionate husband and loving parent. (P.4,Argus, 2-9-1857.)

James Hearn of Mt. Martha and James Hearn north of Broadmeadows were one and the same! Lenore Frost said that W.J.T.(Big)Clarke died at Roseneath in Essendon,the property of his son-in-law,James Hearn. I presumed this James Hearn was the grantee of so much of the parish of Moorooduc but could not find any marital connection between him and a daughter of Big Clarke. Thorn Grove was granted to Big Clarke and might have been a wedding present to James Hearn. A page by Family Tree Circle's Tonkin may have uncovered the Hearn/Clarke family connection.

(PORTER Claude married Caroline HEARN 1878 - Family ...
www.familytreecircles.com/test-52905.html)

Groom: Claude Robert PORTER.
Birth place recorded as Launceston.

Bride: Carolind Louisa HEARN.
Birth place recorded as Melbourne.

Year married: 1878.
Place: Victoria.

Claude died 1925 in Malvern East, victoria, aged 67 years.
Parents named as William PORTER and Mary Ann MAKEPEACE.

Birth Note.
Claude was born in Tasmania on 26 March 1857.
Parents named as William PORTER and Mary Ann MAKEPEACE.

Mary died 1913 in Hawthorn, Victoria, aged 62 years.
Parents named as James HEARN and Louisa CLARKE.

James HEARN and Louisa CLARKE had several children in Melbourne but I'm unable to find a baptism/birth for Caroline.

MARRIAGE.
On the 3rd inst., at Thorngrove, by the Rev. M.Clarke, of Castlemaine, William Hann, eldest son of Joseph Hann, Esq., of Coolort Station, Western Port,to Mary Burge, eldest daughter of the late James Hearn, Esq., of Thorngrove, Yuroke. (P.4, Argus, 4-11-1859.)

The connections between the area north of Broadmeadows Township and the Mornington Peninsula keep on coming.
Ferdinand B.Hann owned Dunhelen,north of the Greenvale reservoir, not far from Thorngrove.
05 May 1903 - The Argus - p4
nla.gov.au/nla.news-page332211
Mr. George Howat reports having sold by private contract, on account of the executor of the late F. B. Hann, part of the Dunhelen Estate, Broadmeadows, ...



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19.
Unreserved Sale of Valuable Freehold Property. In the Parishes of Will Will Rook, Mickleham, and Moorooduc. ,
DALMAHOY CAMPBELL and Co. have received instructions from the executors of the late James Hearn, Esq, to OFFER for SALE by PUBLIC AUCTION, at Kirk's Bazaar, Bourke-street west, on Thursday, the 19th December next, at eleven o'clock, Without reserve,
The following very valuable properties:-
Lot 1,
containing 805a. 2r. 22p, situate about 10 miles from Melbourne, on the old Sydney-road,bounded on the west by the said-road, on the north by Portion 6, parish of Euroke ; on the east by Portion 18, parish of Will Will Rook ; and on the south by part of Lot 15.This property is all securely fenced with a four-wire fence. About 30 acres have been cultivated, and the land is well wooded and watered. It is let to Mr. Stephen Toogood for five years from January, 1858, at 200 per annum.
Lot 2.
containing 476a, in the parish of Mickleham, situate about 20 miles from Melbourne, bounded on the west by the Broadmeadows-road, on the north by the property of Mr. John Hatly, on the east by the property of Captain Pearson, and on the south by the township of Mickleham. This property is securely fenced on the east with a
post-and rail and wire fence, with a brush fence on the south west, and north boundary lines. This land is also well wooded and watered, and is let to Mr.Robert Creely for two years from March last at 100 per annum.
Lot. 3,
containing 380a 3r, in the parish of Moorooduc, Mount Martha, situate about four miles from Schnapper Point, bounded on the west by a three-chain road, being the main road to the Heads ; on the north and east by Lots 29 and 16, and on the south by a one chain road leading down to Port Phillip Bay. This land is well grassed, and fenced in with a wire and rail fence.
Lot 4,
containing 1,260a. in the same parish, and adjoining the above property, upon which is erected good substantial slab house, with kitchen,store, &c. ; also a good stock-yard and garden. This property is entirely surrounded by roads, and is fenced in with a substantial three-rail fence.
Lot 5,
containing 1,305a. 3r, in the same parish, and bounded on the west by Port Philip Bay, to which it has a magnificent frontage ; on the north by Osborne Village reserve ; on the east by the main road from Schnapper Point to the heads; and on the south by a Government reserve.This lot is fenced in with a three-rail fence on the north, east, and south ; and is, together with the last mentioned properties, situate about 35 miles from
Melbourne.
The auctioneers beg to draw particular attention to the sale of the above properties, as the executors have
decided on selling without reserve. The titles are unexceptionable, and the terms are unusually liberal, viz.-26 per cent cash; 25 per cent at six months; the remainder at the option of the purchaser, for three, five, or seven years, at 8 per cent. per annum. (P.2, Argus,23-11-1861, column 3 item 7.)


HEARN-CLARK.-On the 28th ult, at Lyndhurst,Brunswick, at the residence of the bride's brother-in-law, by the Rev. A. McVean, William Clarke Hearn, second son of the late James Hearn, Esq , of Thorn grove, to Elizabeth Anne, fourth daughter of the late Lieut Charles Griffin Clark, R.N. (P.4, Argus,2-8-1869.)

BIG CLARKE, THORN GROVE AND ROSENEATH, ESSENDON.
Read about Big Clarke and his residence,as he declined,at Roseneath. Read my journal:
YARNS: ABOUT BIG CLARKE AND HIS BRO AND DAVID DUNCAN THE BUILDER, VIC., AUST.

continue

8 comment(s), latest 1 year, 4 months ago

JAMES MELDRUM IS A FASCINATING MAN! VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

My wife is always complaining that I spend so much time dealing with dead people so here's a live, and lively one for a change. I was waiting for Chris Fatouris to finish a song so I could buy the CD of songs he has written. A few months ago, I had bought this world -class singer/guitarist's other CD and Mornington is fortunate to have him at its famed Main St market.

I noticed a man in a captain's cap listening intently, so I commented, "Good, isn't he?" The reply echoed my opinion and as we chatted, I must have mentioned Graeme Bell of Melbourne jazz fame. His assessment that Chris was an excellent singer and an excellent guitarist carried so much more weight when I found out that he had played clarinet with Graeme Bell and most of the other greats of the Melbourne jazz scene, including Frank Trainor. He was obviously overseas in about 1960 when Judith Mavis Cock started singing with Frank's All Stars before becoming the lead singer for The Seekers.

"What's so facinating about playing in jazz bands?" you might be asking. But wait, there's more; no, not steak knives, silly! This same man was a well-known artist who associated with Arthur Boyd (subject of one of my journals), Sidney Nolan and even Picasso, about whom he told me an erectile disfunction story. As well as showing me some of his paintings, he demonstrated his skills as a ventriloquist and a magician. His stories about the Mexican bandito types in Mexico, the madamoiselle in Paris and the Mafia in Carlton were sprinked with faultless quotations in Spanish, French and Italian (with translations for silly me.)

These bursts into foreign languages completely dispelled any suspicions that this elderly man was romancing. But I really didn't entertain any doubts because of the raid- fire succession of stories. Anyone who has tried creative writing knows the agonies of determining plot, sequencing and so on and anyone who has been forced to make a speech without notes knows how difficult it is to remember what they had rehearsed. Some people might think that my journals are just made up but I can assure you that if I were making them up, the task would be 1000 times more difficult than reporting facts absorbed into my memory or noted previously.

He was a gymnast and was most impressed when I told him of the Gault girls at Gladstone Park Primary School who were the only ones able to reproduce the fully-extended horizontal hang from a pole. He gained free passage on his travels by joining the crew of a steamer, served as a diplomat which nearly saw his end in front of a firing squad in Egypt during the Suez crisis.

I believe him but it would be difficult to verify the above. However, he told me a bit about his family. His son, Paul Meldrum, played for Carlton. His father was an architect and employed a nanny for his children. His brother was Lord Mayor of Melbourne and snaffled his architect father's estate while the fascinating man was overseas. Oops, I think I might have given you a clue with the footballer's name. I thought I'd tease you a bit by not putting the fascinating man's name in the title. Okay, the surname is Meldrum but it's not Max, even though he was a famous artist, and it's not Mollie.

He's writing a book called "From One Damn Thing to Another" which sums up the above fairly well. I think it should come with an audio version so that the "flavour" I experienced can be shared. What a wonderful TV series could be made from this book if a multi-talented actor could be found for the role of James Meldrum .

The following can be checked on trove and art/architecture websites. James was an artist, winning an important prize at the age of 17, and featuring in exhibitions with many notable artists. James told me his other son was overseas; he might be the famed jazz clarinetist in Britain. James Meldrum's brother was Richard who followed the father's occupation as architect; the firm is still prominent. Richard's term as Mayor was marked by a return to tradition and the banning of cars in some parts of the city. James and Richard were the sons of Percival Meldrum, who designed many well-known buildings.

THIS TEXT ACCOMPANIES THE ATTACHED JAMES MELDRUM PAINTING ON THE WEBSITE "FEATURED ARTIST: JAMES MELDRUM".
NAME: James Meldrum
OVERVIEW: James Meldrums paintings were first shown in London, then at Kozminsky galleries in Melbourne 1953. His large, colourful, surrealistic canvases depicting non functional furniture have appeared in many exhibitions and won him the 1971 Sulman Prize. He held about 30 solo exhibitions 1951 2006 including in London, Sydney and Melbourne. Widely traveled, his commissions included a number of mural commissions for architectural firms in Melbourne and Brisbane.


N.B. Durham Place (Rosebud Fishing Village ) was named after Emily Durham, the grandmother of Judith Mavis Cock whose daughter married Bill Cock, a D.F.C. winner. Judith spent her summer holidays there until 1949 before Bill moved to Tasmania. Unfortunately the timber house in the middle of the block on the west side of Durham Place has been demolished. When she started singing with Frank Trainor's band Judith used her mother's maiden name.


3 comment(s), latest 4 years, 7 months ago

JAMES PATRICK MAIN.

Hi ---. Can you tell me where Main's quarry was? was there one? Where was Main's Bridge?

REPLY 1.
"Kerr's Almanac for 1841 lists Moonee Ponds* occupiers. They were ......., Patrick Main who built Main's bridge (later known as Flemington bridge) over Moonee Ponds Creek, ...... (P. 4, Andrew Lemon's THE STOPOVER THAT STAYED.)

*Moonee Ponds in early days meant anywhere near the creek but two historians have not understood this. In the same book, Lemon includes a lengthy passage about John Cochrane's Glenroy Farm (which was never in the City of Essendon area). In THE GOLD THE BLUE, a history of the Lowther Hall school, A.D.Pyke assumed that Peter McCracken's Stewarton was in the Moonee Ponds area but it was section 5, parish of Tullamarine, later renamed as Gladstone Park.

14-12-1849. Mains Bridge (Flemington) washed away. (Sam Merrifield notes.)
(From Bob Chalmers' THE ANNALS OF ESSENDON VOLUME 1, which Bob gave me in response to the donation of my EARLY LANDOWNERS: PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA.)

The following comes from my EARLY LANDOWNERS. Section 12 Doutta Galla was bounded by Buckley Street west, then known as Braybrook road because it led to Solomon's Ford, from the Hoffmans Rd corner to the Rachelle Rd corner and a northern boundary indicated by an eastern extension of Clarks Rd, East Keilor including Farrell St in Melway 15 K11.

"SECTION 12 (East Keilor west of Rachelle Rd, Niddrie south of Farrell St.)
SECTION 12, MAIN’S ESTATE.
Bounded by Rachelle Rd., Buckley St., Hoffmans Rd. and the latitude of the north side of Farrell St., this was granted to James Patrick Main in 1846. He was probably Patrick who built the first bridge over the Moonee Ponds Creek at Flemington, still known as Main’s bridge after it had been swept away by floodwaters and rebuilt.
James P.Main, “ builder and settler, Moonee Ponds” in 1841 and 1847, may have been living on Main’s Estate. At the latter date, Thomas Anderson, dairyman, was on “Main’s Estate, Moonee Ponds”. I wonder if Thomas was related to James Anderson (a later occupant of Main’s Estate.)

SECTION 12 TITLE INFORMATION.
THE GRANT.
A COPY OF THE GRANT FOR SECTION 12 WAS FOUND IN SKETCH OF TITLE 15377, CONCERNING C.B. FISHER’S APPLICATION FOR TITLE OF McPHAIL’S “ROSE HILL”. IT STARTS:

PORT PHILLIP DISTRICT
L A N D P U R C H A S E
Suburban Lot
GRANTEE James Patrick Main VICTORIA, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland,Defender of the Faith and so forth:
TO ALL to whom these presents shall come,
GREETING: -
WHEREAS in conformity with the laws now in force for the sale of Crown Lands in our Territory of New South Wales, and our Royal Instructions under Our Signet and Sign Manual issued in pursuance thereof JAMES PATRICK MAIN of Melbourne has become the purchaser of the Land hereinafter described for the Sum of Eight hundred and thirty two pounds Sterling….

DATE 30 October 1846
COUNTY Bourke
ACRES 640

The 832 pounds did not include the yearly quit rent of one peppercorn (if demanded) and Her Majesty reserved such parts and so much of the said land as may hereafter be required for making Public Ways, Canals, or Railroads… AND ALSO All Sand, Clay, Stone, Gravel and Indigenous Timber….

....... In an anti- clockwise direction from the north east corner, we can then account for most of Main’s Estate:
i.e. Springbank (J.Wilson), Blair’s purchase, Rosehill Rd, and Rose Hill east of the creek, then heading north, Sinclair’s Farm, Rosehill Rd, lot 6 (1848 Laverty, McPhail, 1868 Hoffman) and lot 8 (1848 Roberts, 1865 Beale). The only area yet to be detailed is that occupied by the Niddrie Quarry.

LOT 10, COX’S FARM.
On 12-11-1850, Thomas Cox bought lot 10 from the Bears for 96 pounds. Consisting of 50 acres 1 rood 22 perches, this land started about 40 metres north of Noga Ave and included the southern 1/3 of the quarry site (K 876). It is likely that this was the 50 acre farm accessed from North Pole Rd, which James Anderson was leasing in 1900-1 and had occupied before moving onto Springbank, but it is also possible that Anderson’s “North Pole Road” farm was lot 8.
Other memorials concerning this land are:
1st series index- none.
2nd series.
307 359. 29-1-1883. Lease to John Beale for 10 years at a rent of 25 pounds p.a.
350 207. 8-5-1888. Contract and conditions of sale to speculator, G.W.Taylor, who also contracted to buy 18 C and D at about this time. (See the reasons why and the outcome in the section 18 entry.) Taylor agreed to pay L5542/12/6, which would have been equivalent to nearly 222 years rent under the terms of John Beale’s lease. C.B.Fisher’s purchase price of 3000 pounds for the 112 5/8 acre Rose Hill in January 1882 showed that the land boom was starting but Taylor showed, by paying almost twice as much for less than half as much land, that the Boom was flying along in top gear! Obviously Taylor forfeited part payments and the land, as he did with so many other farms.
385 168. Mortgage of the share and interest of Elizabeth Julia Whelan in 50 acres, Doutta Galla to John Butler Besley and Henry Besley of Bruthen for L 154/16/8. Elizabeth was the daughter of Thomas Cox and had inherited the land in the will of Thomas Cock (known as Cox), of which Ellen and William James Cock (known as Cox) were the exectrix and executor.
This memorial is the only entry in the E.J.Whelan index and no memorial concerning lot 10 is in the J.B. and H.Besley index so it is impossible to tell whether lot 10 was regained or forfeited.
LOT 12? COLLIER’S FARM.
James Collier bought the remaining 45* acres 2 roods 3 perches from the Bears on 14-2-1849 for 87 pounds cash. (*Called 55 acres in the Bear index but the memorial, which must have been written with poor quality ink, does say forty five.) I’d be willing to bet my last dollar that this was lot 12. It was north of Cox’s land and covered the rest of the quarry site (to a latitude indicated by the northern boundary of the Peter Kirchner Reserve east of the creek). Collier’s index reveals that he also had land on 6C (bisected by Puckle St/Holmes Rd). Another memorial concerns 39 acres in Doutta Galla (perhaps the land on 6C). Other memorials are:
K 750. 14-10-1850. Equitable Mortgage of 45 acres 2 roods 3 perches commencing 67 chains from the s/w corner of section 12 and extending 1406 links to the northern boundary of section 12. Charles Payne paid 35 pounds to James Collier.
236 954. 27-8-1860. Equitable Mortgage of the same land to secure to Margaret Harriss the repayment of 160 pounds she had lent to James Collier. I have been unable to determine whether Collier was able to repay the money or forfeited the land. However, this mortgage has helped to locate a farm mentioned by Angela Evans in “Keilor Pioneers: Dead Men Do Tell Tales”. Lawrence Kelly seems to have settled in Keilor by 1861. (Keilor’s ratebook of 1868 shows that he was leasing 18C of 163 acres from J.P.Bear.) By 1875, according to the above book, he was also renting 48 acres at Spring Gully from Margaret Harris. This would seem to indicate that Collier did lose his block if Margaret Harris still had ownership 15 years later.
The acreage of Collier’s Farm does seem to have been 45 83/160 acres. It is likely that Patrick Joseph Corcoran was leasing it in 1900-1 (part lot 0 section 12, 46 acres). Collier’s Farm was described as 46 acres when the late Alexander Smith’s land west of Spring Gully was advertised for sale on 13-3-1916.
N.B. The entry for Collier’s Farm in “Sam Merrifield’s House Names Index” edited by Lenore Frost, is wrong. The farm described is actually Smith’s Norwood. (See section 9.)
376 185. James Collier’s will of 26-1-1866 left all his (unspecified) estate to his daughter Mary, subject to an annual payment to James Collier’s wife Margaret. James died on 15-12-1868. These details were recorded much later on 13-8-1892 (376 185) and Mary was Mrs Amiss. The arrangements resulted from a marriage settlement between Mary and John Haines Amiss (soon to marry Mary) and the executors, James Jenning and John Cunningham, on 28-7-1879."

As J.P.Main was a resident NEAR the Moonee Ponds Creek in 1841, he may have had a depasturing licence south of the Foster brothers' Leslie Park" (Tullamarine/Keilor Park area) for which they obtained the lease in 1840 according to Sam Merrrifield's Annals. In this case, Mains quarry might have been the forerunner of the Niddrie Quarry on Main's Estate or on land a chain north east from Collier's Farm, i.e.

"ALLOTMENT C OF SECTION 18.
Bounded by Milleara Rd., Clarks Rd. and Spring St. and consisting of 162 ¾ acres, 18C was granted to D.T.Kilburn. He had also received the grant for lot 13 of section 4. Lawrence Kelly was leasing this property by 1868 and by 1875 was also leasing Collier’s Farm (at the n/w corner of section 12), which adjoined the s/e corner of 18C.
The Geological Survey map of 1860 shows a quarry used for road metal on 18C near Keilor Rd. This quarry and the ones near the s/w corner of the Essendon Aerodrome site may have been operating since, or before 1842, when Denis Larry was listed in the directory as a quarryman of Doutta Galla. The one on Kelly’s farm may, however, have been opened by Samuel Charles Brees*, who stated, on 20-1-1853, “Quarries are likewise opened at several parts of the line for the bottoming and levelling of the road.”
(*Brees was in charge of the construction of Mt Alexander Rd to the diggings and built the first substantial bridge at Keilor in 1854. A street in East Keilor was named after him by Garnet Price.)"

TROVE.
Unfortunately the two references from the 1840's give no indication of where the quarry might have been. Alexander Kennedy, in the second article, who not long afterwards built the Inverness Hotel at Melway 177 H11, could have been returning to Melbourne from his station near Guildford via Keilor, given that there was no great road to the diggings through Tullamarine in early 1847. I have referred previously to the vagueness of Moonee Ponds as a description of location in early days.

"SERIOUS ACCIDENT.—On Wednesday evening, as Mr. Alexander Kennedy, a settler
upon the Loddon, was proceeding with his son,servants, and drays into town, he found it necessary to encamp in the vicinity of the Moonee Ponds. This was about sundown, and Mr.Kennedy having business in town of a pressing
nature, departed on horseback, leaving his son in charge of the encampment. (He wasn't in Melbourne when his son arrived next day.)

However, about 11 o'clock yesterday morning,as Mr. Hogbin, brother-in-law of Mr. Evans, of the Duke of Kent, Lonsdale-street, was passing Maine's Quarries, on his way to town, he saw a party lying in the bush upon his back,...."

DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE.
Port Philip Gazette and Settler's Journal (Vic. : 1845 - 1850) Saturday 16 May 1846 p 2 Article
... that the prisoner and another man were dodging him, and on passing Main's quarry, on his road home, be ...
Domestic Intelligence.

The Melbourne Argus (Vic. : 1846 - 1848) Friday 22 January 1847 p 2 Article
... Kent, Lonsdale-street, was passing Maine's Quarries, on his way to town, he saw a party lying in the ... which he was riding stumbled, in the vicinity of Maine's Quarries, and the Rev. gentleman was thrown ... 4332 words

As there were no results for Main's quarry in the 1850's and the results in the 1860's weren't relevant, I tried quarry keilor and found:

WANTED, strong HORSES with drays to cart stone. Apply at Dick's Quarry, Keilor road. John Finlay.(P.8, Argus, 25-2-1860.)

Early quarries were almost always on the banks of creeks where there was plenty of freestone, so Dick's quarry was probably near Spring Creek which gives the name to Spring St, the northern end of the government road, followed largely by Rachelle Rd,which separated John Pascoe Fawkner's 11B Doutta Galla from Mains Estate. It is possible that 17CD which separated Mains Estate from Keilor Rd contained another quarry utilised by Samuel Brees in 1854. JOHN DICK was much involved with these two crown allotments.

Back to my EARLY LANDOWNERS. Had Main's quarry become Dick's quarry?

"17 C and D.
W.Nicholson was granted lots D and C, a total of 188 ¾ acres. A grocer who became premier, he was obviously a speculator. He received the grants for Ardmillan/Trinifour, Fairview and Springfield, all handily located on the route to Mount Alexander, which in a bit over a year would carry throngs of diggers. Land Plan 10509 shows that the western boundary of this land was about 140 feet west of Spring St and L.P. 10508 shows that the southern boundary was about 144 feet south of Grandview Rd.
The land was owned in 1868 by Joseph Nicholson, who had 195 acres; the extra 6 or 7 acres possibly being on lot B of section 11, south of Clarks Rd. Joseph does not seem to have been related to William Nicholson and did not inherit the property; he purchased the “Fairview Farm of 200 acres” in 1863. Joseph died in about 1879 but his widow, Sarah, aged over 60,was still using the farm for grazing purposes in 1888.
17C and 17D TITLE INFORMATION.
On 15-3-1854, W.Nicholson sold his grant to John Dick for 10000 pounds (Y 217). On the next day, Dick mortgaged 17 C and D to John Nicholson for 5000 pounds (9 140).
Confusingly, three transactions, concerning 17 C and D, were memorialised between John Dick and John Nicholson on 23-5-1859. They were:
79 402. Reconveyance of 17 C and D to John Dick.
79 404. John Dick mortgages 17 C and D for 3000 pounds.
134 296. Reconveyance by Endorsement to John Dick.
On 22-7-1861, John Dick conveyed an Equity of Redemption of 17 C and D to William Nicholson for 100 pounds (108 666). The index for John Dick has no further mention of 17 C and D. Neither is the land further mentioned in William Nicholson’s index. His will of 20-12-1864 (158 687) and the following memorial, dated 24-3-1866, mention a city hotel and county of Evelyn land but not the 188 ¾ acres of 17 C and D. When Dick bought 17 C and D, he was described as a farmer of The Merri Creek.
Sketch of Title 25560, resulting from Sarah Nicholson’s application for title in 1889, shows that William Nicholson regained ownership on 22-7-1861 (registered on 23-7-1861) and that on 29-10-1863, he sold 17 C and D to Joseph Nicholson for 1500 pounds. Joseph Nicholson died intestate on 24-7-1878.

Joseph Nicholson's extra 6 or 7 acres in 1868 may have been Dick's quarry and part of Collier's Farm.Was it earlier called MAIN'S QUARRY?

REPLY 2.
IN ADDITION TO MY PREVIOUS REPLY.
It seems that James Patrick Main (1802-1876) had been transported to Van Dieman's Land for life. Family researchers have not yet found records of his conditional pardon. His wife's name is possibly wrongly given as Isabella in one source; it appears to have been Mary.Her name might have been Mary Isabella. (I've forgotten her maiden surname.)Isabella was one of their daughters. It seems most of their children were born in Tassie, the last born in Melbourne in 1840 which indicates that the convict was indeed our James Patrick Main. In most convict records he is named as Patrick Main and he may have been still using this name (as recorded by Andrew Lemon) when he built Main's bridge at Flemington in 1839.

I speculated that Main might have had a depasturing licence covering a bigger area, including section 12 Doutta Galla, and his quarry might have been on the parts of sections 18 or 17 adjoining Main's Estate.

The following strongly suggests that section 12 Doutta Galla was the pre-emptive right of Main's Station for which the lease was cancelled in about 1847. Main's quarry must have been well-known by 1843 and was probably established by the time he built the bridge at Flemington. He built (or supplied the material for-forget which)the original Princes Bridge, probably using the stone from his Estate/station. All I have to establish now is five miles from Melbourne.

TO STAND THIS SEASON,
AT Mr Main's station, Stone Quarries, the Entire Horse, SAMPSON,
Five years old, sired by the Van Diemen's Land Company, from the imported horse, Duncan Gray,out of a Suffolk mare, is a dark chestnut horse of great power and fine action, stands sixteen hands high, rising six years old, has an excellent temper, and is well known as one of the best draught horses
in this part of the colony.
Sampson may be seen at the Horse Bazaar regularly on each Monday and Friday, where any information relative to him can be obtained.
Good Paddocks, within five miles of Melbourne,and every care taken, but without responsibility, and an allowance of one mare in five to bona fide owners. Terms — etc. (P.4, Melbourne Times, 8-8-1843.)

To save a lot of time and measurement I looked at Melway key map 5. The 10 km (6.21371 miles)radius from Melbourne passes through the midpoint of the Buckley St frontage of Main's Estate. Therefore the south east corner of the estate (Buckley St-Hoffmans Rd corner) would have been one sixth of 5km less, about 5.4 miles from Melbourne. There is no way that the parts of sections 17 and 18 south of Keilor Rd could be described as being five miles from Melbourne so Main's quarry must have been on MAIN'S ESTATE, the nearest part of which was 5.4 miles from Melbourne as the crow flies.Collier's Farm may indeed have been the site on which it was established. In 1843, Main's homestead was probably near the south east corner* of the estate and it might have later become Dugald McPhail's Rose Hill homestead. (*Nobody in their right mind would build a homestead near a quarry.)

I referred in my last message to Spring St (the northern end of the government road between c/a 11b and Mains Estate getting its name from the nearby creek. It is officially named Steeles Creek but one of its tributaries was Spring Creek in Tullamarine which gave the name to the Fosters' "Springs" and several farms to the south such as Spring Park, Springfield, James Wilson's Spring Farm on Main's Estate and James Robertson's Spring Hill (later renamed Aberfeldie after his mansion.) The areas near the creek in Tullamarine (e.g. David O'Niall's Lady of the Lake Hotel) and Mains Estate were both called Springs or The Springs circa 1850 but this caused confusion so the latter area was then referred to as Springfield. South of Buckley St, the creek was/is referred to as Rose Creek, hence the name of Dugald McPhail's "Rosehill" farm and the name of the eastern continuation of Dinah Pde.

The creek bisects Main's Estate and as stated earlier, most early quarrying was done on the banks of creeks. (I really should have written streams. George Spottiswoode, after whom Spotswood is named, took stone quarried near the Saltwater River along that river to Melbourne. I wouldn't mind betting that John Dick had earlier been quarrying on the Merri (Rocky) Creek before he established or took over the quarry on (near) Keilor road.)