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HISTORICAL HOWLERS in the area north west of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Histories about the area near Tullamarine have featured several howlers because of: vague locality names in the early days, municipal historians confining their research to their own municipality's rate books, and time limits preventing the development of a vast network of family historians/ descendants to check assumptions.
The description Moonee Moonee Chain of ponds, shortened to Moonee Moonee Ponds and later to Moonee Ponds meant anywhere near the whole length of the Moonee Ponds Creek, not the present suburb of Moonee Ponds.
In "The Stopover that Stayed", a history of ESSENDON by Grant Aldous, a terrific description was given of a farm in the Shire of BROADMEADOWS, John Cochrane's "Glenroy Farm" at "Moonee Ponds. This farm was of course at Glenroy, nowhere near the suburb of Moonee Ponds.
In "The Gold The Blue", A.D.Pyke's wonderful history of Lowther Hall at Essendon, Pyke mentioned Peter McCracken farming "Stewarton" at Moonee Ponds. It was only when researching Broadmeadows Shire rates that I discovered that John Cock moved onto "Stewarton" in 1892 and, that soon after, it was renamed as "Gladstone". This farm was section 5 in the parish of Tullamarine, the northern 777 acres of the present suburb of Gladstone Park.It was bought from the Crown on Niel Black's behalf by George Russell. Black, after whom a street in Broadmeadows Township (Westmeadows) was named, represented a syndicate which included Stewart and Gladstone; the syndicate's land in the Western District was also called Stewarton. Gladstone was a cousin of the British Prime Minister.
In "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History", Andrew Lemon stated that McIntosh had left the district because his name had disappeared from the Broadmeadows Shire ratebooks.That worthy pioneer had merely moved a stone's throw to the west into the Shire of Bulla. Andrew Lemon made another wrong assumption ; he thought that the James Robertson who settled at Gowrie Park (north of J.P.Fawkner's Box Forest, now known as Hadfield after Cr Rupert Hadfield) was a Keilor farmer. Poor Andrew did not have the help of the wonderful Deidre Farfor as I did! The three different James Robertson families and their properties will be the subject of another journal.
Here's an assumption of mine. If I'm wrong, perhaps somebody will let me know. Joseph Raleigh established Raleigh's Punt at Maribyrnong in 1850. ("Maribyrnong:Action in Tranquility".)A few years earlier, he was recorded at living at Mona Vale. I have a feeling that Mona Vale was Westmeadows. When Broadmeadows Township's Church of England was built in 1850, it doubled as a school but as an early (1969?) Westmeadows State School history stated, school was earlier conducted on Mr Raleigh's property and of course the township's main east-west street was called Raleigh St.

HISTORICAL ORIGINS OF NAMES OF TRARALGON, VIC., AUST. AND STREETS AND TOWNS IN THE VICINITY.

Unfortunately, although the names of towns, suburbs and streets can recall much of the history of an area, their origins were never officially recorded. The surveyors of townships often named streets after military or naval heroes, surveyors and politicians or senior bureaucrats. Those who know their area's history well will recognise streets named after pioneers such as Alphabetical Foster and Dr Farquhar McCrae at Dandenong because the surname was used. However if these streets bore a christian name of these two holders of the Eumemmering Run, the names might have been John,Vesy,Leslie or Fitzgerald and Farquhar Streets, making their origins much harder to determine.

It was while I was looking for the following account of Traralgon's early history, The River of Little Fish*, which I had read some years ago while researching Edward Hobson, that I discovered another gem.
(* "The River of Little Fish"
www.traralgonhistory.asn.au/rolf.htm
An historical account of Traralgon, written for the boys and girls of the city. First published in 1970. Contents. Foreword - from the author William J. Cuthill.)

I take my hat off to the journalist who wrote the following in 1914. If only the editors of all local papers had shown the same initiative, there would be no need for the guesswork involved regarding the origins of subdivisional street names derived from christian names. I only know the origins of the street names at Tootgarook such as Alma, Guest, Raymond, Ronald and Doig because a woman rang me to tell me that her hairdresser at Canterbury had owned land there and I managed to get in touch with his son. If only all municipalities had been required to record such details about subdivision streets! That is what the journalist did.

TRARALGON NAMES.
The Historical Society of Aus-
tralia is at present engaged on an
investigation of the meaning and
history of place names which are
used throughout the States. Such
an inquiry is interesting, and will
afterwards be of great value to
future historians. But for our-
selves, it may be interesting to do
the same thing in a small way, and
to enquire as to the various names
which have grown up in connec-
tion with our town, and endea-
vour to find out how they came
into being, and if there is any
meaning which they are intended
to convey.
When and by whom the name
Traralgon was given to this local-
ity, I have been unable to find out,
but it was certainly given at a very
early period in the history of the
State. The earliest spelling of the
name is reported to be "Tarral-
gon," a slight variation of the
present form, and the word itself
(by those learned in these mat-
ters) is said to be a native. name
signifying the "river of little
fishes," while the neighboring and
equally familiar name of Loy Yang
is said to mean "big eels."
The great bulk of names which
grow up around a town are usually
in. connection with street names.
These are necessarily many in
number, usually of local origin,
and are frequently used as a means
of perpetuating the names of citi-
zens who have rendered good ser-
vice to the community, and are
considered worthy to be held in
remembrance. Many items of his-
tory are often gleaned from such
a source as this.
When and by whom the first
streets in Traralgon were named
is another question to which I am
unable to give a definite answer.
The oldest township plan available
is dated 1871. On that plan the
following names are printed: Fran-
klin, Seymour, Hotham Kay and
Grey. Possibly they were given by
the surveyor who laid out the
township many years before that
date. Merely as names, they are
very suitable, but they have no
local meaning or significance. Kay
street, as then applied, extended
from the west to the east boun-
dary of the township, and inclu-
ded what is now known as the
Rosedale Road.
The next christening of streets
took place in the latter part of
the seventies, but by whom the
ceremony was performed I have
not been able to discover. While
recently examining an official plan
of the township in the Lands of-
fice, I noticed that the streets
which are now known as Peterkin,
Campbell and Gwalia were named
on it Black, Moore and Bowen.
This was before the formation of
the Traralgon shire, and it was
not done on any recommendation
from the Rosedale shire. As the
Lands department was selling land
in those streets at the time, possi-
bly these names were also applied
by some official in that office. The
peculiar part of the affair is that
the names were recorded nowhere
but on the official plan of the
township, and as they have
not been published since, the na-
mes have been completely lost, and
at a later date the streets were
re-named by the Traralgon shire
council.
In 1884 the Traralgon council
took up the question of street na-
mes, this being the first time that
any local authority had ever taken
the matter in hand. By resolution
the following names were formally
adopted: Argyle, Mitchell, Church,
Breed, Princess, Peterkin, Mason,
Mill, Berry and Gwalia. Shortly
afterwards, but apparently without
any express authority, the follow-
ing were added: Campbell, Ser-
vice, Deakin, George, John, Munro
Flora and High. About the same
time Mr. Peterkin subdivided Loch
Park, named after the Governor of
that time, and the streets in it
received the names of their daugh-
ters: Ethel, Mabel and Olive.
It may be mentioned that Miss. O.
Peterkin's wedding was recently
reported in your columns. Mr.
Breed followed with the Ben Vue
subdivision to the streets of
which he gave the christian na-
mes of himself, his wife and son:
Henry, Ann and Albert. Henry
and Olive were for different por-
tions of the same street, and as it
soon became evident that to have
two names for one street was very
undesirable, the name of Olive has
been gradually dropped, and the
whole length of the street in ques-
tion is now known as Henry street.
Another subdivision at this per-
iod was the Hyde Park, by Mr.
F. C. Mason, to the streets of
which the names of his children,
Charles, Marie,and Rose were gi-
ven, although these names as yet
have not come into general use.
The Templeton Estate gave us
Bourke, Collins, Swanston and
Morrison, although only Collins
street now remains, the rest hav-
ing reverted into private occupa-
tion.
For a period of nearly twenty-
five years, no further action was
taken. The council then again
took up the matter, and formally
adopted the following: Hickox,
Dunbar, McColl, McLean, Living-
ston, Howitt, Bridge, Shakespere
and Tennyson. The Park subdivl-
sion added to the list: Burns, Gor-
don and Moore. Except for some
private subdivlsion names which
have been given since, this com-
pletes the catalogue.
Now, reviewing this list, and se-
lecting the names of those who
were at one time residents, we get
the following: Campbell, Peter-
kin, Breed, Mill, McLean, Mitchell,
Hickox, Dunbar, McColl and
Munro. Howitt may also be re-
garded as a local name, in recog-
nition of the late Dr. Howitt's long
connection with the district, as
a police magistrate. Mr. Munro,
as manager of the Bank of Austra-
lasia, was not a resident of long
standing, although he was a very
active and energetic citizen when
he was here. With this exception,
all the others are pioneer citizens,
with whom the history of Traral-
gon will ever be associated. Only
one of them, Mr. Mill, is still alive,
but in their day and generation
they well and worthily did their
part in the building up of the
town in which we live, and Tra-
ralgon to-day is reaping the fruit
of their labors. Now that they are
no longer with us, it is well that
their names should be perpretra-
ted in the way which has been
done.
Of political names we have Ser-
vice, Berry, Deakin, Mason and
Livingston, each of whom has ren-
dered the State some service, and
are entitled to remembrance.
Franklin, Seymour, Hotham and
Grey are names of officers in the
Imperial service, but who Kay is
in memory of I am unable to say.
The name has no connection with
E. Kay, who, later on, was a pro-
minent resident.
The number of streets having
christian names is large. We have
the Peterkin names, Ethel, Mabel
and Olive; the Breed names, Ann
Albert and Henry; and Mason na-
mes, Charles, Marie and Rose; and
these we can account for. But
where George, Flora and John
came from is uncertain. The name
Flora was given to the Rosedale
road, and never came into use;
George and John are small streets
on the east side of the creek; and
the names are rarely used.
Several names are descriptive of
the physical features of the streets
—as High, Church and Bridge, and
explain themselves.
Poetry is well represented, as
we have Shakespere, Tennyson,
Burns, Moore, and Gordon.
There are other names which
have no local or other significanice
that I know of, such as Gwalia.
Whence it came, or what it stands
for, I cannot say, but the name
Bowen originally applied, repre-
senting the Governor of that per-
iod, would have been better.
Generally, it may be said that
names have grown up here, as they
have in other parts, in a hapha-
zard and disconnected fashion.
Given at different tlmes, and by
different people, without any com-
mon policy, no other result could
be expected. But it is rather to be
regretted that greater use has not
been made of this means of recog-
nising the services which have
been rendered to the community
by public spirited citizens. Besides
those, whose names have already
been enumerated, there are others
who have taken an active part im
the building of the town, and has-
tening its onward progress. But
they are now fading out of re-
membrance, and their works are
being forgotten. Naming a street
is a very, simple, yet very effective,
way of keeping alive the memory
of those people the community
wishes to honor.
A few references may be made
to the over-use of names, Traral-
gon being one which is very much
overworked. In addition to the
Traralgon township, and Traral-
gon Creek, we have TraraIgon
West, Traralgon South and Upper
Traralgon Creek. The latter is
cumbersome and confusing, and
might very well be replaced by
something simpler. Now that the
district referred to as making great
progress with a school, public hall,
and regular postal communication,
it is worthy of having some dis-
tinctive name, which would be all
its own.
Flynn's Creek and Upper Flynn's
Creek is another instance of re-
petition, which confuses a stran-
ger, and is a frequent cause of
letters being misdirected. The lat-
ter name might well be superseded
by something shorter, and more
euphonious, and more appropriate
to the district.
A further instance is Jeeralang.
Originally, it was the name of a
parish only. Now that settlement
has progressed, and schools and
post offices establshed, we have
Jeeralang North, Jeeralang South
Jeeralang West and Jeeralang,
while Jeeralang road is applied to
several different places. Except to
anyone intimately acquainted with
the locality, it is confusing in the
extreme, and to correctly address
a letter is often a problem. It
would greatly simplify matters if
each separate centre, where a post
office or school has been establi-
shed adopted some separate name
of its own. (P.3, Gippsland Farmers Journal (Traralgon), 26-5-1914.)

HISTORY DISAPPEARS TODAY IN ROSEBUD, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

Today, Thursday, 1-12-2011, the huge pine trees were cut down at 858 Pt Nepean Rd, Rosebud. Who planted them is unclear, but it was possibly George Fountain, who at one time owned number 858 and 854. The pines were planted on both blocks and George, a plumber who was the last Mayor of the Borough of North Melbourne before it merged with the City of Melbourne, called his holiday residence "The Pines".
The house at number 858, possibly built by William John Ferrier (subject of another journal), the nationally famous hero of the La Bella tragedy at Warrnambool in 1905, was probably occupied by George until a newer house was built on number 854. Ferrier's block was then sold to the Archers, who were keen recreational fishermen.
I took a mobile phone photo of the two pines, from which most of the branches had been lopped. Hopefully MUZZA OF McCRAE took a photo of these two very old trees with their clothes on and will be able to post it with his other great photos of historical interest.

1 comment(s), latest 1 year, 7 months ago

HISTORY NOTES (1), MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.

10 comment(s), latest 4 years, 9 months ago

HISTORY OF DROMANA TO PORTSEA, MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VICTORIA. SAY G'DAY TO OLD FRIENDS AND RELATIVES.

When I started researching Mornington Peninsula history in about August 2011, I did not know one descendant of pioneering families. My first contact was probably a Lacco descendant who ran a flower shop in Rosebud,who, I think, had been mentioned in Peter Wilson's ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD. The lady barber near Murray Anderson Rd showed me a map of early Rosebud showing where early residents lived and finally remembered that Harvey Marshall, a descendant of Captain Henry Everest Adams had given it to her; that led to a book called ADAMS' CORNER based on much information in Harvey's scrapbook.Harvey also put me in touch with Jim Dryden. After joining the Dromana Historical Society, I was given much information by Thelma Littlejohn who also put me onto Keith Holmes. I read Leila Shaw's THE WAY WE WERE and as a result became intrigued about a possible connection between Henry Gomm of Rosebud and Henry Gomm of Somerville, and winning my game of white pages lotto,got in touch with Murray Gomm whose tea chest is packed with history; THE MYSTERIOUS HENRY GOMM resulted. At about the same time Shirley Walter of Frankston responded to my DESPERATELY SEEKING request and THE FEMALE DROVER; A HISTORY OF MOOROODUC resulted,contact with other descendants of pioneers such as David Shepherd being made in the process, with my book about Joseph Porta, Victoria's first manufacturer of bellows resulting and being expanded by an article at the West Rosebud Bowling Club about Ron Porta, a team mate of Teddy Whitten at Footscray. Another who responded to my DESPERATELY SEEKING request was a Trueman descendant who led me to Raymond Guest, who led me to Ron Doig (a Rowley descendant) both of whom explained the origins of many street names on the Trueman grants at Tootgarook, and Ron led me to an extensive Trueman genealogy. Since then many more contacts have been added with Linda Berndt of Rye and Val Wilson of Mornington, and family tree circles members responding to my journals,providing incredible information. The author of BONNIE WILLIAM OF DUNDEE and Stephen Lynch of N.S.W who wrote PENINSULA PIONEERS about the White and Hillis families became contacts. The BACK TO RED HILL on 22-3-2015 was a response to a request for information about Red Hill's history after about 1940, and terrific memoirs were contributed to MEMORIES OF RED HILL POST 1940.

Phew!

AND YET, AND YET, I have made more contacts with descendants of Peninsula pioneers in the last fortnight than I did in those (nearly) four years. Importantly they cover all eras of the area's history.There are well over 2000 members in the HISTORY OF DROMANA TO PORTSEA FACEBOOK GROUP. If you're on Facebook, and either grew up in the area or are a descendant of a pioneering family, and would like to join the group, send me a private message with your email address and I'll email you the link.

a SAMPLE OF PIONEERING SURNAMES IS GIVEN IN THE SURNAMES LIST. SOME CLEVER PERSON LIKE JANILYE MIGHT POST THE LINK TO THE FACEBOOK PAGE IN COMMENTS TO SAVE YOU HAVING TO OBTAIN IT IN SUCH A ROUNDABOUT WAY. YOU CAN GOOGLE ROSEBUD MUSEUM*,PT NEPEAN RD TO GET A PAGE SPECIFICALLY ABOUT ROSEBUD. (*IT'S AN ONLINE MUSEUM- DON'T DRIVE TO ROSEBUD TO VISIT IT!)

8 comment(s), latest 6 months, 1 week ago

HISTORY OF SCHOOLS IN VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA: SCHOOL NUMBERS.

It probably seems to some that I spend every idle moment thinking of a new journal to write but that's not how they come about. They usually come about from a chance discovery. Right now I could be writing a new journal called Mr Roger's Tramway at Blackwood because of such a discovery while I was trying to find out when Greendale State School was established to verify my suspicion that Greenvale State School had kept its Common School number in 1872. Instead,one side-track being quite enough,the article was emailed to Margot Hitchcock.

This journal had its genesis in about March 2014 when I heard that the Dromana Historical Society and R.S.L. had received a joint grant for a Centenary of the Gallipoli Landing project. Rosebud's Anzacs were not to be included in the research so I wrote the ROLL OF HONOUR,ROSEBUD journal. I showed it to the Rosebud Primary School Principal, Tony Short, and he thought it would be great for the school captains to carry the Roll of Honour in the Anzac Day march but it was too hard to get off the wall.

Today I called on Tony to see if the Roll of Honour would be carried this year.Like myself, Tony hadn't realised just how tall and heavy it was and thought some sort of cross bar arrangement would be needed but that even then it might still prove too difficult for children to carry. He loved my suggestion of a large photograph of the Roll being carried instead.I showed him my ROLL OF HONOUR, ROSEBUD journal and later he asked me about how long Red Hill had existed. I replied about 1862 and he asked me what the school number was. I said that I didn't know and he had to ring the bell to end recess.

While I was reading Barry Wright's memories of Red Hill, I saw the Red Hill State School number and immediately realised that Tony must have assumed that school numbers (like car regos)could indicate vintage, which they would, FOR SCHOOLS ESTABLISHED AFTER 1872. But it may be no guide at all to the respective ages of say, the Ascot Vale and Wonthaggi schools if both became state schools in 1872. Indeed,if the Ascot Vale school was called Bank St State School,it would have a completely different number!

Some people may wonder why their historic school has a high number while relatively new schools have a very low number. Greenvale Primary school, built in recent decades on the subdivision of Hughie Williamson's "Dunvegan" has a very low number, No. 890. This was a rare case where a brand new school was given the same number as its predecessor (at the west corner of Somerton and Section Rds.)

In nearby Tullamarine, there were three old schools: the former Wesleyan School 632 at the bend in Cherie St, the Tullamarine Island school(number 519 but given as 619 in a source quoted later) and the Seafield school No. 546. Tullamarine Island children attended the Bulla or Holden schools when a reduction in numbers caused a closure;it operated twice so that might account for two different numbers (or 619 could be a typo.) The Island children used Paul Tate's Ford to cross Jacksons Creek on their way to the east end of McLeods Rd where the Holden School stood and when the second Island school on Bulla Park closed they crossed Deep Creek on Bedford's swing bridge to reach the second Bulla School in School Lane.

In 1884 schools 632 and 546 were replaced by S.S.2613 Tullamarine on the north corner of Bulla Rd and Conders Lane (north corner of Melrose Drive and Link Rd.) Again in 1961, this block being acquired for the airport,a new school was opened at the corner of Broadmeadows Rd and Dalkeith Avenue, occupying two LTC (Light timber construction) buildings which were clad with brick a decade later. Once again a new number was employed. Such a high number might lead people to believe that Tullamarine children had been uneducated for about 106 years!

Without wanting to present a history of education in Victoria, I will give a very short summary.Anyone could open a school in early days. Probably one of the earliest on the Mornington Peninsula was on Jamiesons Special Survey near Wallaces Rd (Melway 160 J 4)in the 1850's. Churches opened their own schools in populated areas and when they started asking for state aid only one of them would be chosen as a NATIONAL school based on the Irish model with a curriculum agreed by most denominations. In 1862, with schools coming more under state control, this time called Common Schools, Robert Quinan's school at Dromana was chosen over Daniel Nicholson's but when Quinan committed suicide through shame at not being able to balance the Shire's books (in his part time second job)Nicholson ended up with the job anyway. The Moorooduc school opened as a Common School in a church building near the south east corner of Mornington-Tyabb and Moorooduc Rds. Its number was 825 but its replacement at Jones Corner in 1880 or shortly after was called State School 2327.
Moorooduc Port Phillip Eastern region 825 3 308
Moorooduc Port Phillip Eastern region 2327 3 374

In 1872, the Education Department was established under the leadership of the revered Frank Tate. Schools were called State Schools and numbered in alphabetical order. Common schools probably kept their numbers. Did Greenvale keep its Common School number,given to it in 1869? Yes,or its number would have been higher than Greendale's school,which became a state school in 1872.

The following has saved me a visit to the Rosebud Library to consult VISION AND REALISATION.
No Title
The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 - 1918) Saturday 14 December 1872 p 2 Article
... in consequence of the bad attendance; third, to the Sunday school, at which, he stated, only two ... . Messrs. John Brady and William Courtney are gazetted members of the Greendale School committee.

It is likely that the Greendale school was a private affair until after the Greenvale Common School opened in 1869, and that it became a Common School in about 1870,retaining its common school number in 1872.

GREENDALE,
(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)
The school opened in Mr. Graham's barn by Mr. Chamon on Monday last, has been fairly attended during the past week, and will doubtless be a large school ere long.(P.3, Bacchus Marsh Express,15-2-1868.)

Greendale Central Highlands region 918 2 708
Greenvale Port Phillip Western region 890 3 50
In the alphabetical index of Victorian schools the first number is the school number with the second and third numbers being volume and page numbers in VISION AND REALIZATION.

Vision and realisation : a centenary history of state ... - Trove
trove.nla.gov.au/work/8440127
Headteachers of all the schools in existence in 1971 were asked to submit a history of their schools. The boss at Tullamarine's Dalkeith Avenue school was lucky to have plenty of descendants of pioneering families, and the Methodist Church centenary souvenir of 1970,to tell him about all the early schools in the area. All schools in existence in 1972 were given a copy of VISION AND REALISATION. Hopefully all copies from now-closed schools were donated to municipal libraries.

ALL Victorian Schools by name AND number
genealogyworld.blogspot.com/.../all-victorian-schools-by-name-and-nu...

Select this website and then choose one of the two alternative links down the page a bit:

Victorian Schools sorted by name
Victorian Schools sorted by number

Just to wrap up, what do these tell us?
Yabba Yabba Goulburn region 2483 3 817
Yabba Yabba South Goulburn region 2609 3 822
Yackandandah Upper Murray region 692 3 914
Yackandandah Upper Murray region 694 3 914
Yundool Goulburn region 1833 3 787
Yuroke Port Phillip Western region 548 3 41

Here's my guess.
The third,fourth and sixth schools started as Common schools in the 1860's and if they became state schools, they kept their common school numbers. The third school closed and later reopened,perhaps in a new building, as the fourth school. Yundool was probably the last school (alphabetically) to be established as a state school in 1872. Yuroke was established very early and was probably National School 548. Originally known as the Chalmers Institute,it was situated on Mickleham Rd across the road from the Dunhelen gates and was the venue for the meeting in 1857 at which the Broadmeadows Road District was formed. The first and second schools were probably established in the late 1870's or early 1880's.

Okay that wasn't all guesswork. Twenty seven years of local history research allows information to become a story. Like this one.

Jessie Rowe was a much-loved teacher at the Holden school and was given a big farewell circa 1903,when she left to teach at Tullamarine S.S. 2613. Within a few years she was resigning from the Department because she was marrying Frank Wright of "Strathconan" and was given a fond farewell again but with less sadness because she wouldn't be leaving the district. However before she left she had the unenviable task of telling her pupils of the drowning of William Mansfield and his son Willy at Bertram's Ford near Keilor in 1906. A Mr Rodgers took over from Jessie; all the pupils disappeared one hot lunchtime for a swim at the bone mill and, behaving stupidly, Colin Williams cracked his head open near the end of 1908. Colin was still recovering when school started the next year and was dismayed by tales of the new very strict teacher. The same teacher who organised community picnics on Alexander McCracken's Cumberland in 1909-1911,was secretary of the Tullamarine Progress Association 1924-1954, sent him a post card when Colin was serving overseas thirty or more years later,presented Broadmeadows Shire with the Tullamarine (Melrose Drive) Reserve, organised the Pioneers Roll still proudly displayed in the foyer of Tullamarine Primary School and has been honoured by the City of Hume with a plaque attached to a boulder at the Melrose Drive Reserve,a teacher named Alec Rasmussen.

3 comment(s), latest 2 years, 4 months ago

HOW DID SARAH WILSON LEAD ME TO HENRY TUCK? SHOREHAM & FLINDERS, VIC., AUST.

A few short weeks ago, all I knew about Sarah Wilson was that she and her sons,George and Robert, lived on Jamieson's Special Survey before the Kangerong Road Board's first assessment of 1864,and that the three of them were honoured on the DROMANA PIONEER PATHWAY and all of them signed a petition in 1861 requesting that Quinan's school be chosen instead of Nicholson's to become the Dromana Common School.

It was during my attempt to discover information about the Simpsons of Red Hill that I made contact with Margaret Connell (nee Simpson) through the assistance of Keith Holmes and was shown Connell genealogy compiled by Dot Watt (nee Connell.) Marg. and Dot told me to read Petronella Wilson's GIVING DESTINY A HAND.

Having read this book, I kept part of the Mornington News 2013 Anzac Edition because it related to a fascinating name change mentioned in the book. It was an article about Christie Johnstone who happened to be the grandson of Henry Tuck Junior, the fantastic bush poet, whose works are available from the Dromana Historical Society museum, and no doubt most local historical societies.

In A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, Colin McLear gave details of all the children of councillor John Calvin Griffith of Dromana and Mary. Mary Who?

Having all the details of Christie Johnstone's descent from Oliver and Sarah Wilson, I entered "Henry Tuck, obituary" and got what seemed at first hand to be a useless response. But it wasn't, despite the journalist's usual error of rendering Griffith as Griffiths. Mary must have been Mary Dowling!

OBITUARY. DEATH OF MRS. C. DOWLING, By the death of Mrs Catherine Dowling, as mentioned in our last issue, another very old resident of the Mornington Peninsula has been removed from our midst. Mrs Dowling had reached the ripe old age of 86 years at the time of death. Although she was not suffering from any painful illness, she had been gradually failing under the pressure of her advanced years for some considerable time, and her death was not unexpected. She was possessed of an exceedingly kindly, warm hearted disposition, and very many old residents of the district, as well as the younger generation, will remember her as a true friend who had always a kindly word, and was ready to do a kindly action for anyone with whom she came into contact. The deceased lady was born in County Wicklow, Ireland, and reached Melbourne with her husband-who predeceased her by some nineteen years-in the ship " Marco Pauls " on Christmas Day, 1852. She was thus a colonist of nearly 59 years. After spending eight years, in other parts of Victoria, the Dowlings came to Stony Creek, now known as Shoreham, in the year 1860, and they were the first settlers to actually reside on their own holding in this locality, which was a portion of Tuck's Old Manton's Creek run. The country was, at the time of their acquiring the land, in a very rough state, and Mrs Dowling had many interesting incidents of hardships to relate. Her quaint sense of quiet humor always made these reminiscences pleasant to listen to. Their first homestead, a slab erection on the banks of the Creek, was totally destroyed by the collapse of a giant gum tree one very stormy night. In this instance Mr and Mrs Dowling had a very narrow escape from death. A large fork of the tree came down on each side of the bed upon which they were sleeping. Upon another occasion Mr Dowling, when some little distance away from the homestead, was forced by the ferocity of the dingoes to take refuge and spend the night up in the branches of a tree. Of Mrs Dowling's family three daughters and one son, all of whom are well known throughout the Peninsula, are surviving. These are Mrs J. C. Griffiths of Dromana; Mrs.Joseph Stanley of Balnarring; Mrs West, and Mr Christy Dowling, who was living at "The Glen" with his mother at the time of her death. The recent demise of one daughter, Mrs Henry Tuck, of Flinders, is sadly re- membered by her friends, as is also that of another daughter, Mrs J. West. A son, Mr Thomas Dowling, died some years ago, and another son expired in infancy. The remains of the deceased lady were interred in the Flinders general cemetery, when a very large number of people attended the funeral to show their last respects.
(P.3, Mornington Standard, 5-8-1911.)

My journal FAMILY CONNECTION ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA is now dwarfed by the information available in my other journals. No doubt a Tuck family history has been written so I don't intend to write one. One of my aims in family connections was to explain geographically how the two families became acquainted; usually, apart from during war time and, to a much lesser degree during the 1890's depression when many peninsula lads headed west in search of gold, the families were at least near-neighbours. Robert Rowley and Christine Edwards caused me months of wasted time until I found the neighbourly connection had been at Longford, Tasmania before Robert joined Henry Cadby Wells in a lime-burning venture near Sorrento, circa 1841.

How then would the Jennings family of Rye be related to the Tucks? Before settling at Rye in 1914, George Dodd and Hannah (Wiffen)had spent time farming at Flinders, Cranbourne and Camperdown. Their son,Cecil, married Catherine Tuck. (JENNINGS:A PIONEERING RYE FAMILY by Linda Berndt,P.20, Southern Peninsula News, 13-7-2010.)

CHRISTIE JOHNSTONE'S DESCENT FROM OLIVER AND SARAH WILSON.
Olver Wilson, a staunch Presbyterian, (1791-1851) and Sarah Spence (1811-1870) married in 1832. Their third child, Matilda (1837-1878) was born in Lifford,Ireland.With her parents and siblings, George (1833-1905)and Jane (1834-1863), Matilda came to Australia aboard the Argyle, landing at William's Town on 13-4-1841. Robert (1843-1894)was probably born in the Flinders Lane house. Oliver had become established as a shoemaker but after his death in 1851, rents rose dramatically because of the gold rush and George suggested a move to Jamieson's Special Survey (the Safety Beach area, east to Bulldog Creek Rd.)

On 18-4-1855, a double wedding was celebrated in Sarah's house on the Survey. Matilda married William Johnson(1832-1875) and her sister Jane, married George Young. When Jane died six days after the birth of her fifth child, Sarah (b.12-8-1863), the baby was brought up as one of Matilda's family.

William and Matilda had eight children of their own:
William (1855-1905) who never married;
Matilda(Tilly,1858-1936) who never married;
William Henry (1860-1860);
Robert Henry (1863-1936)who married Catherine Tuck in 1915, their children being William Henry, Christopher James, Margaret and Mary. N.B. THE CHRISTIE JOHNSTONE ARTICLE CALLS HIM ALBERT HENRY!
Rebecca Sarah (1866-1922) who never married;
Mary Jane (1869-?);
Sarah (1871-1927)who married W.G.J.Coulter in 1903, their children being Ruby and William George;
Charles Oliver (1875-1963) who never married.

JOHNSON BECOMES JOHNSTONE.
The first-born, Billy acted as head of the family when his own father died ten weeks after the birth of Charles Oliver.The family had been living on a 5 acre portion of 67A* Balnarring. Billy kept on receiving demands for payment of bills but they were not his debts. A member of another Johnson family was responsible for them,possibly the family which lived near Warrawee (Vansuylen's grant.) This so annoyed Billy that he changed the family name to Johnstone by deed poll.
*It seems that this is a mistake and that that the 5 acre block was on 67B. i.e.The 20-10-1913 assessment records that Christopher Oliver Johnstone, Red Hill farmer, was rated on 5 acres and buildings, part crown allotment 67B,Balnarring.

TO BE CONTINUED 67A LOCATION , 20 WANNAEUE.-SEE COMMENT 1.
Crown allotment 67A in the parish of Balnarring is between Shoreham Rd and Stony Creek with its north east corner being exactly opposite the Oceanview Ave corner. It is roughly indicated by Melway 190 J11. In the 1860's William Johnson and Matilda settled on 5 acres of it with the Wilsons. Petronella Wilson stated that 67A was granted to Robert Wilson in 1871 but the parish map indicates that 67A and 67B were both granted to Edward Gray.

INQUESTS.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 29 September 1874 p 7 Article
... INQUESTS. Mr Candler held an inquest on the 25th inst, at Dromana. on the body of Edward Gray, aged 60 years, a farmer at Balnarring. On the 24th inst. the deceased and his son were burning trees, to clear a paddock, and i the son hearing a tree fall near the deceased I went up and found the ..

The farmers south and east of Arthurs Seat/Red Hill roads were not in the Kangerong Road District and their first assessment by the Flinders Road Board was on 13-6-1869. Ratepayers were listed geographically and the following excerpt starts in Tucks Rd near Shands Rd. Thomas Bullock 59 acres (west side where almost 97 acres were granted to F.Bullock in 1875), Hamilton Allen 115 acres(east side where 115 acres 2 roods and 30 perches were granted to A.Allan), George Young 16 acres, William Johnson 5 acres, George Wilson 32 acres,Edward Gray house and 53 acres, William Bayne 2059 acres (76AB of 208 acres between 67A and McConnell's 75AB, plus 630 acres granted across Shoreham Rd and obviously a lot leased.)

By 7-6-1870 George Young had gone, probably to Moorooduc on Andrew White's grants south of Vineyard Lane and on the west side of three chain (Old Moorooduc)road.After Jane (Wilson) had died in 1863, George had married the orphaned Janet White of "Mt Martha" in 1866 and through her George had probably come into ownership of the property or part of it. His address was certainly three chain road.

In 1870, George Wilson had 48 acres having occupied Young's 16 acres. William Johnson was not assessed on his 5 acres and may have been in Moorooduc; at about that time a William Johnson was considered ineligible to be on the electoral roll for the Mornington Division because he had sold his freehold land in the parish of Moorooduc. If this was so,George Wilson should have been assessed on the whole 53 acres of 67B but such logic usually escaped rate collectors who were too busy to worry about such details.



OH NO! MORE CONFUSION.PARISH OF WANNAEUE.
When I read the amusing tale of George and Ollie Johnstone in Hec Hanson's MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN, I assumed that George was related to the grantee of 20C Wannaeue but he wasn't! I have written a separate journal about George and Ollie.

Billy and his uncle George (Wilson)obtained a lease from the Crown in 1882 for crown allotment 20B (of section B)in the parish of Wannaeue. This consisted of 191 acres according to GIVING DESTINY A HAND but an 1872 Wannaeue map gives its area as 172 acres 2 roods and 2 perches. A later map shows that 20B was later split into 20B of 34 acres (granted to John Shand in 1905)and 20C of 130 acres (granted to W.Johnstone on 19-7-1902.) The reason for the splitting of the original 20B and the apparent loss of 8 acres was Roberts Rd, separating 20B on the west side from 20C, which was bounded by Shands, Roberts and Mornington-Flinders Rds.

Alexander Shand, who died during his son,John's term as President of the Shire of Flinders and Kangerong, had established an early steam sawmill beside Main Creek,which had the most constant supply of water in the area and William Johnson/Johnstone must have raised no objections to Alexander's waggons taking a short cut through his selection on the way to Red Hill. Eventually the shire declared his track a shire road.

My transcriptions of rate records only provide a snapshot of occupancy and of course the 1879 assessment does not mention William Johnson, George Wilson or any landholding of 172 (or 191) acres in the parish of Wannaeue.
This part of the parish, with Flinders, Red Hill (west of Red Hill Rd) and Dromana, was in the Central Riding.

1900.William Johnstone, 126 acres, c/a 20C,Wannaeue.
1910. R.H.Johnston,Shoreham farmer,80 acres, 20C, Wannaeue. Joseph Smith,farmer,Red Hill,50 acres,part 20c, Wannaeue.
1919 (the last assessment on microfiche)Robert Henry Johnstone (Billy's son and Christie Johnstone's father),38 acres and buildings,part c/a 20C, Wannaeue. Mrs Mary Cleave,Red Hill,24 acres and buildings,part 20C, Wannaeue. No other identified parts of 20C were assessed.


R. H. Johnstone, Red Hill, offering to purchase wood on Cape Schanck fronting his property, and calling at- tention to culvert near Dumbleton's as it is dangerous.- Tenders to be called for timber, and culvert to be at-tended to.(P.2, Mornington Standard, 6-6-1914.)

In referring to the timber/property on Cape Schanck, Robert Henry Johnstone was almost certainly discussing 20C Wannaeue. The above excerpt from a report of a Shire of Flinders and Kangerong meeting is the only article linking Johnstone and Cape Schanck and the only mention of Dumbleton in the area. It illustrated how vague locality names were in those days. The Johnsons were living on their 5 acre block on 67B, which was described (above)as being in Shoreham in one instance and and at Red Hill in another. None of the roads had names! How could Robert Henry say "the wood near Shand's Rd?" I can assure you that the following tender was for Limestone Road but very few people would know it.

No. 7-Metal, Main creek to Black's camp. (Black's Camp was on Boneo Rd halfway between Browns and Limestone Rds but there was another Black's Camp near the corner of Boneo and Long Point Road where the second Boneo (or Blacks'Camp) school was situated. Therefore Black's Camp described the general area.)

AND NOW FOR CHRISTIE JOHNSTONE'S STORY.
Christie Johnstone's story was in a Mornington News special Anzac Edition 2013, which also has an article about three Tuck boys. There was also a Southern Peninsula News Anzac Edition with exactly the same content. As I have had trouble finding this special edition online, and readers might too, I will reproduce Christie's story verbatim. There are three photos with the article (young Christie in uniform,the derelict 1877 Mantonville homestead and Christie outside his farm gate.) If family members would like copies of these, send me a private message.My comments are in brackets.

CHRISTIE CARRIES ON TUCK TRADITION by Peter McCullough.
Christie was born on 17 February 1920 at Main Ridge. His parents were Albert* Henry and Catherine Johnstone, and he had a brother,William Henry,and a sister. (His father was Robert Henry Johnstone.) His father was born in Dromana and the Johnstone family lived in Red Hill (i.e. 5 acres of 67B Balnarring.)"They were bushmen-splitting timber and that sort of thing." His father worked in Gippsland in his younger days, later moved to Main Ridge where his parents* had an orchard and grew strawberries. (Robert Henry was born in 1863,his father, William Johnson, died in 1875 and his mother, Matilda,nee Wilson,died in 1898. The orchard would have been on the 5 acres at RedHill/ Stony Creek/Shoreham and as his father died in 1875, it would have been more accurate to say that Robert's family had the orchard,with Robert's brother , William (1855-1905), who changed the family name to Johnstone, and was granted 20C Wannaeue, running the small farm with the assistance of his youngest brother, Charles Oliver (1875-1963.) C/A 20C would probably have been used for cattle grazing and getting wood for timber or firewood. Robert Henry must have returned shortly after his brother, William, died in 1905 and settled on 20C Wannaeue; he was assessed on the property in 1910, and probably earlier.)

Christie's mother, Catherine, was the eldest daughter of Henry Tuck Junior and the family moved to Flinders in 1924 to look after her father, who was almost 80 and to help him run the farm. His wife, Margaret had died in 1910. (The obituary of Mrs C.Dowling in 1911 -sixth paragraph of this journal- reveals that Henry had married Margaret Dowling.)

Christie went to school in Flinders, starting the same day as Eric Lucas who died just recently. It was a two mile walk to school and in those days he could walk to school and home again without seeing a car. He had more rides in a horse-and-buggy than he ever got in a motor car. As soon as Christie turned 14 he left school to work on the farm.

"Mantonville" was a dairy farm of 150 acres and all the milking was done by hand in those days. The family only milked about 20 cows as that was all they could handle.After the war, with machines, they were milking 50 cows. Kinross Dairies would collect the milk and take it to Edithvale. Christie milked cows for about 50 years and never took a holiday for 25 years. With a milk contract he had to be there every day. About 30 years ago he went out of the dairy business and has been running beef cattle ever since. However only 80 acres are left out of the original holding.

After Christie left school he did a lot of other work as well as milking cows twice a day: fence contracting, ploughing, wood cutting, and splitting posts. Just before he joined up in 1941 he worked at the Flinders Golf course for 12 months but he never hit a golf ball;"Working there five-and-a-half days a week,I reckon I saw enough of the golf course! Besides,I was still milking cows before and after work."

(I wonder if Christie knew the magnificent golfer in the surgical boot was related to him. Jane Darley,nee Wilson, was the daughter of George Wilson and niece of Matilda Johnson, nee Wilson.

William Edward Darley (born Jamieson's Special Survey, 1859-1938) and Jane's children were:
1. Florence Mary (1892-1943), spinster.
2. Annie Maude (1894-1967) who in 1937 married Joseph James Kay but had no children.
3. Kate Evelyn (1896-1981.) No issue. There may have been marriage detail which I neglected to record in my rush.
4. William George (1899-1971) bachelor.
5.Saville Maude (1910-1987)who in 1944 married Patricia Marie O'Donnell and had five daughters.
6. Lionel Edward (1913-1987)who in 1943 married Faye Chitts and had one daughter.

William George Darley,the fourth child and oldest son of Willam Edward and Jane (Wilson) was an outstanding golfer. He had a physical disability. When I googled "Darley, Flinders, Golf", I did find confirmation of this. He had to wear surgical boots as a result of being gored by a wild boar when he was seven.

Flinders Golf Champ Dies; 72 . - Google News
news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1300&dat=19710825&id...
Flinders golf champ dies; 72 . Bill Darley, of Flinders, one of Victoria's best known golfers died in his sleep early yesterday,aged 72. He played his last round of ...

There should be a spate of "aces" down Flinders way in the next few weeks. The club recently staged an exhibition match between Eric Lucas and Bill Darley against Ken Lucas, and Heidelberg professional Al Whykes.
Bill gave the gallery a perfect demonstration of how to hole out in one. He did the trick at the 15th-and what a reception he received! Of course, it was no trouble for Bill and Eric, to go on then and win the match 2 and 1. (P.14, The Argus, 12-1-1954.)

What a coincidence that Christie's lifelong friend, Eric Lucas, was Bill's partner in that contest!)

NEXT PAR WON'T SUBMIT- PASTED ONTO JOHNSON-JOHNSTONE FILE
Farmers were classed as an "essential trade" and were barred
TO BE CONTINUED IN COMMENTS BOX.

6 comment(s), latest 9 months, 3 weeks ago

HOW GLENGYLE, KEILOR (SECTION 1,TULLAMARINE) BECAME ARUNDEL, "TURNER'S" AND ELLENGOWAN. (VIC., AUST.)

DEDICATED TO THE BROWN FAMILY, EARLY PIONEERS OF KEILOR.

FROM jOE27.
I have recently purchased Christine Laskowski's book "Steel's Crk.etc" and was interested in mention of Thomas Bertram and Ellangowan. I have been endeavouring to identify :Glenlyle" and Ellangowan since as the name of my neighbour's property in Brown's Rd, is "Ellangowan". They are of the opinion it was named after the school their mother attended in S.Aust, which it could be. Perhaps it is a mere coincidence
A piece I have read on Arundel farm states that Colin Campbell* was the owner following
Capt. Richard Bunbury. Christine states that Thomas and wife Anna McLean Campbell arrived in 1849 and stayed for a while with his brother-in-law, Colin Campbell at "Glenlyle" before purchasing nearby property "Ellangowan." I am pleased that you have given me much information.I now have to find out who owned it before Thomas**.
Re Lawrence Kelly and wife Margaret. In another journal re North Pole Road you wonder if Margaret Kelly (nee Fox) was a sister of Michael Fox who also lived on North Pole Road. This surprised me as Mrs. Margaret Fox who came to Aust. with son Michael was the greatgrandmother of my late husband, Joe Brown. His grandmother, Bridget Brown, was Bridget Fox who arrived about 1850. Looking up Death Cert, of Margaret who died in 1881, she did have a daughter Margaret but she is noted as deceased on certificate. Reference to Lawrence and Margaret Kelly in "Dead Men do tell tales" states they were married in County Tyrone. She died at Violet Town in 1903 while staying with her daughter.
I thoroughly enjoyed reading your journals on Keilor and Tullamarine. Thank you.
Regards,______.


*K. B.Keeley believed that Richard Hanmer Bunbury who had property near the Merri Creek and was the Chief of Water Police at Williamstown (where street names honour him,as well as one at Gladstone Park) was a dummy bidder for Campbell who bought section 1 from him not long after the grant was issued. Bunbury was a naval officer who had lost his right arm in battle and had learned to paint beautifully with his left hand; high praise in the journal of the artistic Georgiana McCrae who came to Australia on the same ship.
**Alex Guthrie owned Ellangowan before Thomas Bertram.

SECTION 1,PARISH OF TULLAMARINE: GLENGYLE BECOMES ARUNDEL AND ELLENGOWAN.
GLENGYLE CHRONOLOGY ON TROVE.
THE CAMPBELLFIELD ANNUAL SHINTY MATCH.?In accordance with what may now, speaking relatively, be styled pristine usage, the Campbellfield Annual Shinty Match came off on New Year's Day, on a field adjoining Messrs. Barber and Lowe's flour mill, on the Merri Merri Creek.(Melway 7 J-K 9.) The public anticipations had been this time
excited even beyond the customary pitch by the extensive preparations which were being made, but they were not doomed to disappointment, for, as far as human agency could operate, the "gathering of the clans" on this occasion far excelled anything of the kind ever before witnessed south of the line. The day was overpoweringly hot, and consequently as ill suited as any day possibly could be for shinty playing, but notwithstanding, the amateurs of the game turned out,and nothing daunted set to work at a game, which even in the frosts and snows of Old Scotland forces the perspiration from the brow, the players exhibiting in their ranks a set of as stalwart chiefs as ever responded to the call of the Maccallum More, or joined in the slogan of Lochiel or Glengarry. At about one o'clock the players set to work, and manfully contested the game till nearly four o clock, when exhausted nature and the ample provision made by the Stewards for recruiting the inner man, alike combined to dictate the propriety of a " drawn game." The sports finished, the company adjourned to Messrs Barber and Lowe's mill, which the proprietors had kindly placed at the disposal of the Stewards, where an ample cold collation, provided by Mr. Yewers, the confectioner in Elizabeth street, awaited their attention, and was done ample justice to under the admirable presidency of Colin Campbell, Esq. of Glengyle. etc. (P.2,Argus,3-1-1850.)

On the 14th instant, at seven o'clock, a.m., at the residence of Thomas Bertram, Esq., Glengyle, near Keilor, Elizabeth, second daughter of the late Murdoch Campbell, Esq., of Callis, Coll, Argyleshire, Scotland. (P.4,Argus,15-4-1854.)

MONDAY, 2nd JULY. |
Sale of Farming Stock in an Insolvent Estate, by order of tho Official Assignee.
Upper Glengyle Farm, near Keilor.
A BLISS and CO. have received instructions from the Official Assignee to sell by public auction, on the premises known as the Upper Glengyle Farm, about one mile from Keilor, on Monday, 2nd July, at twelve o'clock precisely. Without Reserve.
The whole of the farming stock and agricultural implements belonging to the estate of Roderick Mackenzie*, consisting of Powerful draught horses (etc.) (The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 28 June 1855 p 3 Advertising.)

(* Roderick McKenzie was the grantee of crown allotment A of section 15 in the parish of Will Will Rook, consisting of 304 acres 3 roods and 27 perches. Indicated by Melway 6 K4 and 7 B5 it is bounded by Railway Crescent, Barry Rd, roughly King St and roughly Phillip St. The assignee had probably sequestered his grant, so he was most likely leasing Upper Glengyle; no sale of the Keilor property was mentioned.)

By the end of 1861, the part of section 1 near the present Arundel farm, which had probably been called Upper Glengyle, had been renamed Arundel but the horseshoe bend near Bertram's Ford, accessed by Browns Rd on the river flat (which later produced Thomas Bertram's renowned crops) was still called Glengyle by the Guthries, who were soon to moved to Togarf south of Emu Creek in the shire of Bulla.

As shall be seen, Alex Guthrie obviously ownedthis part of the Glengyle Estate, which he had occupied since 1851 (when his lease on the future Meadowbank/Gowrie Park at Campbellfield was terminated due to its purchase by Alexander Gibb and the so-called Keilor farmer* James Robertson.)

*Andrew Lemon's mistake of which Moreland City Council has been made aware.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 6 January 1863 p 2 Advertising
... Guthrie, Esq , to SELL by AUCTION, on the farm, Glengyle, one mile from Keilor, on Thursday, .. (i.e. a clearing sale.)

FRIDAY, MARCH 20.
Splendid Agricultural Property,
Within Eight Miles of Town.
DALMAHOY CAMPBELL and Co. are instructed
by Alex. Guthrie, Esq., to SELL by PUBLIC
AUCTION, at Morton's Hotel, on Friday, 20th March,
at two o'clock.
Unless previously disposed of,
Part of the Glengyle Estate, Keilor, about eight
miles from town, being Lots 8 and 9, containing
161a. 3r. 38p.
The soil is first-class, and it has a large frontage to
tho Deep Creek, which contains an abundant supply
of fresh water all the year round.
It adjoins tho property of Edward Wilson, Esq.,
substantially fenced, and subdivided Into lots, 107
acres being under cultivation, and bearing luxuriant
crops.
The improvements comprise comfortable dwelling
house, with stable, &c. ; also two hay-yards, and stock-
yard, all in good working order: a compact garden,
containing a number of vines, fruit trees, etc.
Intending purchasers are Invited to inspect the pro-
perty before the day of sale, which they will find not
to be surpassed.
Title unexceptionable.
Terms etc. (P.3, Argus,1863.)

It will be interesting to see how close the total acreage of Browns Rd Arundel Closer Settlement blocks comes to 162 acres or if it's closer to Thomas Bertam's 170 acres. I just realised that, having inserted the above, I've let the cat out of the bag re the author of the following advertisement.

WILL stand this season, at Arundel* (late Glen-gyle), Keilor, the imported Poltou Ass LA JOIE. This animal is very powerful, and of the breed celebrated for the production of the splendid mules used for artillery and other draught purposes in the south of France.

The Imported Egyptian Ass,MEHEMET.
MEHAMET is pure white, of the Hadji breed, from the neighbourhood of Mecca, famed for their spirit and endurance, and combines great energy with perfect temper.The mule in all countries of similar climate to this is a more serviceable animal than the horse. It enjoys almost entire immunity from disease. It thrives where the horse starves, and lives nearly twice as long. It is often larger than either parent.
Also, Will Stand at the same place, the Pure-bred Imported Alderney Bull, MERLIN.(P.8, Argus,14-12-1861.)
(* The person who wrote this advertisement didn't bother posting it;he took it to work. He most likely didn't pay for the advertisement. He knew a lot about exotic animals and as a stalwart of the acclimatisation movement, grew experimental crops as well as breeding chinchilla rabbits and having a virtual zoo on Arundel. His legacy allowed Cr Jack of Flinders Shire to obtain the Mornington Peninsula's first motorised ambulance. Getting warm? He was also the owner of The Argus and had retired as editor because of his failing eyesight which eventually forced him to return to England where he mixed in intellectual circles with such as Charles Darwin. A bachelor,he left most of his estate for charitable purposes in the Edward Wilson Trust.

FOR SALE, Ellengowan, one mile from Keilor,the property of Thos. Bertram, Esq., consisting of 170 acres, HOUSE, containing six rooms, with detached kitchen, store and servant's rooms, stabling, and other out-offices; orchard and vinery of four acres, in tho highest state of cultivation. The land has a frontage of one mile and a half to the Keilor or Maribyrnong River*, and is the finest agricultural land in the neighbourhood. From its proximity to the Melbourne markets, it is rarely that an opportunity occurs for securing so eligible and remunerative an investment.
For further particulars apply to JAMES TURNER**,831 Little Collins-street east ; or, to Mr. BERTRAM, Ellengowan.(P.8, Argus,2-6-1866.)

N.B.Thomas Bertram must have been leasing the homestead block in 1854 and then bought Guthrie's Browns Rd area circa 1863.
* You need a piece of string 12 centimetres long to check the river frontage on the Browns Rd area on Melway. Come on,don't let me do all the work!
** James Turner had probably bought the horseshoe bend accessed by the east-west section of McNabs Rd, on which he was assessed in Keilor's 1868 ratebook. Known as "Turner's",it was bought by the McNabs when the Overnewton Estate was sold off;they also bought the Oakbank Rd area across the river in the parish of Maribyrnong.

Tony Cockram,the owner of Arundel Farm in about 1989 gave me a copy of K.B.Keeley's Architectural Thesis on Arundel circa 1960. The Hume library system should have a copy of it and Moonee Valley might.

WHEN WAS BERTRAM'S FORD FIRST MENTIONED?
Arundel Rd, part of which is blocked off by the freeway and has been renamed after Jose Borrell who replaced the Cahills on Gumms Corner in 1916,was known as Bertram's road in 1865. Keilor Rd was still called Mt Alexander Rd in the early 1900's.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 24 May 1865 p 7 Advertising
... for WORKS on tho Mount Alexander and Bertram's Road, Keilor.

Although no mention was made of Bertram's ford in 1865 (or earlier),its construction was possibly part of the above works because early in 1866,maintenance was required. This is an extract from the report of the fortnightly Keilor Road Board meeting.

The clerk was instructed to write to the Bulla District Board, requesting their cooperation in the
construction of Grant's road, the boundary between the two districts. The engineers were instructed to examine Bertrams Ford, on the road from Keilor to the Arundel farm, with a view to having it and the approaches
put in proper repair. (P.5, column 2,Argus,30-1-1866.)