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IAN KENDALL'S SCOTTISH PLACE NAMES IN MELBOURNE.

EMAIL TO IAN KENDALL.
I found your website when I was looking for something else. You've put a lot of work into it; well done!
I mainly looked at Melbourne's north west, whose history I have been researching since 1988 and the Mornington Peninsula (since August 2010) and have only commented on these. I have not worried about street names, although I might mention some in the following.

I agree completely with your origins for Arthurs Seat, Baxter, Calder Park, Campbellfield, Craigieburn (the Robbie Burns was another hotel near the Craigie Burns,shown on a survey map), Dallas, Deer Park, Flemington, Keilor (which I've seen as Keillor in some sources), Kealba, Kingston (see Graham Whitehead's City of Kingston website) McCrae, Meadow Heights, Moreland (which was leased by Michael Loeman for about 14 years before he moved onto Glenloeman on Loemans Rd near Bulla, with the result that the Moreland Rd bridge was known as Loeman's bridge), Newmarket, Rosanna, Red Hill (one of the roads leading to it is White Hill Rd) and Westgarth.

I have listed other suburbs where I doubt some of the sources or additional information might be useful.
WATSONIA. I have seen sources that attribute the name to James Watson, which seems reasonable, given the proximity to Rosanna. While on that area, Janefield owes its name to John Brock who was an early squatter near Bulla until Big Clarke got his special survey and, I think, was a Scot.

WESTMEADOWS.It was originally known as Broadmeadows Township before the railway went through Campbellfield circa 1872, giving that locality the name of East Broadmeadows; when the "East" was dropped the Township was called West Meadows. Westmeadows now includes former farmland near the township such as Kia Ora, Willowbank (many of whose street names were my suggestions) and Wattle Glen.

ABERFELDIE. James Robertson 2 of Upper Keilor is the correct origin. The source proposing a link with a Napier Estate might be correct; Thomas Napier (of Rosebank in Strathmore) might have called a squatting run by this name and his son Theodore (of Magdala in Strathmore) might have been involved in the subdivision of the West Essendon grants (originally known as Spring Hill) and suggested the name of the house for the estate. Strathmore and streets named after Rosebank and Magdala owe their origins to the Napiers. I believe a Napier was involved in the relief of Lucknow and Magdala was also involved with his exploits in India.
As far as I know, Aberfeldie has everything to do with James Robertson and nothing to do with the Napiers. If another Scottish family was involved with naming the estate, it would be far more likely to be the McCrackens, related by marriage.The reference to a Napier estate might have also resulted from confusion between Aberfeldie and Glenbervie; Grant Aldous probably described the origin of the latter name in "The Stopover That Stayed".
(By the way, there were three James Robertson families in the area: 1.Upper Keilor/Mar Lodge/ Aberfeldie; 2.La Rose/ Trinifour and 3.Gowrie Park at Campbellfield. See itellya's journal about the Robertsons on FAMILY TREE CIRCLES.)

BLAIRGOWRIE. Dr John Blair's Blairgowrie House was built by an Irish pioneer and politician named O'Grady who named it Villa Maria. When he bought the house, Blair renamed it Blairgowrie. When the estate was subdivided, it was called the Blairgowrie Estate but was described as being at Sorrento. (See page 1, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 28-3-1923.) It was not until about 1940 when the Cain family's "Tyrone" east of Canterbury Rd was subdivided that Blairgowrie appeared in the newspapers to describe a locality. Incidentally a gowrie website states that Blairgowrie means "field of goats".

BROADMEADOWS. The earliest reference to the Broadmeadows Hotel on trove was in 1855. Just about the only reference to Broadmeadows in 1850, (apart from the proclamation of a township at Broadmeadows, poor attendances at St Pauls and the calling of tenders for its manse) was a much repeated advertisement about a stallion standing at stud at Samuel Thorpe's farm. In November, 1851, Mrs Brodie, formerly of Moonee Ponds (the vast Brodie squatting run, not the suburb, but possibly Harpsdale or Dunhelen) opened a store in the township. A meeting was called by about 5 Scots about the need for a crossing at the foot of Cameron's estate at THE BROADMEADOWS. In 1852, Machell's estate AT BROADMEADOWS (actually the land bounded by Section Rd, Somerton Rd, Mickleham Rd and Swain St at Melway 178 H7-11) was advertised for sale.

The above demonstrates that BROADMEADOWS described a district which consisted of the parish of Will Will Rook, and even den Machell's grant in the parish of Yuroke, and that the hotel was named because of the district, not the other way around.

An article about Kilmore by "The Vagabond" described the 6000 acres of hay at Broadmeadows and said it was an English name. The first large area of wheat in the colony was grown at Campbellfield by John GRANT who was leasing land from the CAMPBELLS. Nearby were the CAMERONS and KENNEDYS on Glenroy,Ruthvenfield, Stoney Fields and Dundonald, the GIBBS and ROBERTSONS on Meadowbank and Gowrie Park, the McKERCHARS on Greenan and Greenvale, and they were the pioneers, SCOTS, who would have coined the apt name for the district. The place was so full of Scots that the trustees of Will Will Rook Cemetery apparently did not feel a need to have sections for denominations other than Presbyterian and John Kingshott was appointed to the school committee so it would not consist entirely of Presbyterians.Do you think that Broadmeadows was coined by Englishmen? I don't!

BURNSIDE. This suburb was named after James Burnside, a pioneer near Deer Park and a grantee in in the parish of Maribyrnong. His son's obituary was on page 1 of the 15-1-1943 issue of the Sunshine advocate; the son may have married a descendant of James Robertson of Upper Keilor.

GLADSTONE PARK. The name derives from the northern 777 acres of Gladstone Park (and the Gladstone Gardens Estate north of Lackenheath Drive on the west side of the freeway.) This was section 5 of the parish of Tullamarine, consisting of 785 acres, 8 acres probably having been lost in the making of today's Mickleham Rd. The parish map records George Russell as the grantee but he bought it for fellow Western District squatter, Niel Black. Black was agent for the firm of Stewart, Black, Gladstone etc back home. Section 5 was called "Stewarton", the same name as another of the firm's farms in the Western District. Black probably wanted section 5 as a holding paddock but it was leased 1846-1855 by Peter McCracken, who moved to his dairy farm on J.R.Murphy's Kensington Park and then to Ardmillan at Moonee Ponds.

Gladstone, a cousin of Disraeli's foe, came into ownership of Section 5 and the farm's name became Gladstone a year after John Cock succeeded John Kerr as the tenant in about 1892. The Gladstones had sold it to G.W.Taylor for 74 575 pounds in mid 1888 but regained it when Taylor could not complete payments in the bust that followed the boom, as Cannon would put it. The Gladstone family owned the property until the 1920's.

GOWANBRAE. This farm was originally named Camp Hill, a name that applied during the tenure of Eyre Evans Kenny, Brown, Lonie, Gilligan, Williamson etc. When Scott, presumably a Scot, bought the farm in the 1930's, he renamed it Gowanbrae. Malvern Ave owes its name to Sir Bruce Small who owned the property and wanted to produce his famous Malvern Star bicycles there but could not get a railway siding on the Albion-Jacana line.

GOWRIE.
Alexander Gibb leased section 5 Will Will Rook for some time and then it was purchased in two halves, each of 320 acres, in 1848. Gibb called the northern half "Meadow Bank" and James Robertson called his half Gowrie Park. Both, of course, were Scots.
Incidentally, most of Melbourne Airport's operational area (except for the Terminal building on Payne's pig farm,"Scone") are on another Gowrie Park, which is today recalled by Gowrie Park Drive at Melway 5 C5.

GREENVALE.
Even if this name was a simple description of the landscape, it was coined by a Scot, John McKerchar, for his farm name (which was renamed "The Elms" by a later owner.) Swain St, off Mickleham Rd, indicated the boundary between Dundanald and Machell's early subdivision but also indicates the boundary between the parishes of Will Will Rook and Yuroke to the north. The name of McKerchar's farm came to describe the part of Yuroke near Somerton Rd and the present school on Hughie Williamson's old "Dunvegan" carries the same number as the one started by John McKerchar on the Section Rd corner!

NIDDRIE. This was the name of Henry Brown Stevenson's farm. See his death notice on page 1 of The Argus of 5-7-1893. The Morgans kept the name when they bought it in (1906?) and owned it for many years. The farm was bounded by the Orange Gr/Bowes Ave midline, the King/Fraser St midline, Nomad-Treadwell Rd and Keilor Rd.

Hadfield should be called Fawkner, but the grantee's named travelled to a nearby area and in the same way, the name of the Stevenson/ Morgan farm travelled south of Keilor Rd. It is possible that Niddrie was named by the grantee, Thomas Napier of Rosebank.

ROXBURGH PARK.
The association with Brunton is correct; he probably did not find the Cameron name of Stoney Field (as in the rate records) very appealing. It was not known as Ruthvenfield; this Cameron property is today bisected by Blair St, east of the railway line.

ST KILDA. I have read that the suburb was named after a yacht owned by the family of Big Clarke; this was one of the theories.I had a pleasure craft in mind but a working yacht makes sense because W.J.T. had little time for pleasure and other pursuits that didn't make money (except the girlies!)

STRATHMORE. See Bruce Barber's Strathmore website. There could be a connection with the Queen Mother but I have seen no mention of this. I quote from page 165 of "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History". "It was not until 1943 that the (North Essendon and South Broadmeadows) Progress Association submitted "Strathmore" (a Scottish name associated with the Napier family) to the Broadmeadows Shire Council." No source is given but I suspect that Andrew Lemon had seen the correspondence. I don't think the progress association would have been aware of any connection between the name and the Queen Mother.

BELL.
It must be 20 years since I read Richard Broome's "Between Two Creeks" the history of Coburg. But I distinctly remember Bell Manor!

FINGAL.
Fingal is a parish south of Limestone Rd and south of the parishes of Wannaeue and Nepean, which are separated by Government-Weeroona Rd. Most parish names have aboriginal origins so Fingal and Nepean are unusual. Parish names would have been decided by surveyors or the Lands Department, whose boss was James Grant, presumably a Scot, at the time Fingal was surveyed.Fingal is Irish for foreign tribe according to wikipedia, and if my recollection is correct the Scots were from Ireland, making them a foreign tribe.

MERLYNSTON. I'm sure Richard Broome discussed the name's origin.

OLIVERS HILL. This was originally known as Old Man Davey's Hill.

ITELLYA HAS REALLY RETIRED THIS TIME.

Frustration at my edits not submitting caused me to retire twice but my enthusiasm led to resumptions as soon as the situation improved. However now my internet connection is practically zero and has been for weeks. Add this to the frustration of not receiving replies to my emails re the William John Ferrier 110th anniversary (see below) and from schools etc., and the result is that my enthusiasm is as strong as my internet connection, practically zero. When I was having trouble submitting edits,at least I could still research trove etc., but now if I turn on my computer, it is almost certain that the internet will not be connected. That means no trove, no F.T.C., no facebook and no email.

To get a signal,I have to go walkies, a bit like a business owner having to duck home from the office to use the internet. This is the main reason for the almost complete loss of my enthusiasm. This email of May 22 from a council officer,still not followed up almost eight months later, is typical of another factor.

Dear Mr xxxx,

Thank you for your recent letter concerning Ferrier’s 100th anniversary. I have passed your letter on to my Local History Coordinator for advice and will ensure that we reply to you by the end of next week.

Regretfully, my plans for the 110th anniversary of Ferrier's heroism in 1905 and the Back to Red Hill reunion will not be able to be pursued.

As my computer will be unplugged in future, if you send me an email or a private message on F.T.C.,please text your name and F.T.C. to 0438 874 172.
Best wishes to my many history friends and thank you for your help over the years.

ITELLYA HAS RETIRED.

After ten attempts to post a comment on the DICTIONARY HISTORY OF BULLA journal (second prize essay on the history of Bulla),itellya has retired. The essay has been posted on Ray Gibb's Facebook page. It is quoted almost verbatim in I.W.Symonds' BULLA BULLA.

2 comment(s), latest 2 years, 4 months ago

ITELLYA IS A STICKY BEAK: JOSEPH PORTA, THE LADY SURVEYOR AND JAMES DAVEY'S CORAL-COVERED COAL.

ITELLYA DON'T LIKE MYSTERIES
AND READS EVERY HISTORY BOARD HE SEES.
THINGS THAT SEEM LIKE COINCIDENCE
FIT TOGETHER, MAKING SENSE.

Entering the Rosebud West Bowling Club for a Rosebud Rockers dance, I saw an article pinned on the notice board with a picture of a footballer. My wife bought me a jumper years ago; it had "Football is Life" in large letters on it, which showed (a) that my wife understood me and (b)why I just had to look at the article. It was about Ron Porta, who had brought back Somerville Football Club's glory days and had recently died. The bulb lit up. I had seen that surname on my Moorooduc parish map. Ron's wife and brother had never heard of lot 63 Moorooduc but trove proved that Joseph Porta, Ron's ancestor, had been near Somerville a century before Ron coached the side.

I have mentioned the lady surveyor in reference to Bernard Eaton in the RED HILL PIONEER journal. The information on that history board became etched in my memory bank because I knew well the difficulty of just walking in the mountainous terrain near Blackwood. I imagined the difficulty of carrying out a meticulous task like ensuring that levels were spot on so that water would flow for miles, with only gravity to propel it, along races such as the one that the Byers Back Track follows to O'Brien's Crossing. I imagined her tripping over fallen branches and bracken fern, exposed tree roots and protruding reef rock (unseen because of her ankle length dress), which would have been fatal if it happened where the race went around a huge granite boulder about an arm's length from a plunge of a hundred metres into the Lerderderg Gorge. How the author of "Those Courageous Hardy Women" would have loved a story like that to demonstrate how courageous and hardy the female pioneers were near Sorrento. At Greendale, between the Western Highway and Blackwood, there is a Shuter St. I wonder how many Greendale residents know how the street got its name. What a coincidence that there is a street with the same name just south of Puckle St in Moonee Ponds! "Oh really!" as Sam Newman would say. Read about Charles Shuter in Alexander Sutherland's "Victoria and Its Metropolis: Past and Present" (1888.)

The last item was the result of coincidence, just sheer good luck. I usually listen to another station, but on another radio, tuned to 3RPP, the local peninsula station, I heard some good music so as I started the computer, I switched the set nearby to RPP. The next stroke of luck was that I needed to free up some disk space and while that was happening, the next program "Beyond Infinity" commenced. The first discussion in this science program was about a comet that a Professor from Newcastle said crashed into the sea near New Zealand.It caused a giant tidal wave that formed chevrons (spearhead shaped sand dunes)all around the south east coast, 90 metres above sea level and well inland. The theory that aborigines made middens on clifftops was debunked as the same shells were found in cliff faces and buried in concrete-like chevrons. Why was this of more than scientific interest to me? It was only last night while trying to confirm or disprove a theory (that the Davey pioneers of Frankston and near Red Hill were related)that I came across the curious tale of James Davey, son of Mr J.Davey of Balnarring, finding a large lump of coal covered with coral near a creek near "Warrawee" about a mile from the coast. There was great curiosity about how it came to be there. My thought at the time of reading this article was that somebody had found it on the beach but discarded it when his friends displayed a "So? Whatever!" attitude to his unusual find. (See Mornington Standard, 15-10-1896 page 2, 2nd last column.)
Now I think we have an explanation of how the coral-covered coal came to be a mile inland!

1 comment(s), latest 5 years ago

ITELLYA'S HISTORY STORAGE BOX.

As I have been unable to submit journals and edits for a week (and many times in the past), I have started a new Facebook group with the above title so that this information can be viewed by family tree circles members until it successfully submits. The link is: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1594310247565466/

THE ENTRY HEADINGS IN THE CHRONOLOGY POST ON THE FACEBOOK PAGE AS OF NOON, WEDNESDAY, 15-6-2016 ARE LISTED BELOW. THEY HAVE BEEN NOTED IN THE ALPHABETICAL INDEX BUT WILL NEED TO BE INSERTED IN THE CHRONOLOGY OF BURIALS AT DROMANA JOURNAL.

CHRONOLOGY OF BURIALS AT DROMANA WITH BIOGS.
16-11-1876. ALEXANDER HALDAN.

Late April, 1884. CHARLES BARNETT, DROMANA.

28-5-1892. ALFRED HERBERT LAWRENCE, AGED 19. Mornington Disaster.

(May/June 1908. MRS FRANCES ELIZABETH NASH, nee WAPLES.
Currently in progress.

(6+)-9-1939. MRS ELIZABETH FOX.
FOX� Elizabeth photo 6/9/1933 89

23-5-1940. TED INGLEFINGER, WICKETKEEPER FOR THE PREMIERS.

12-11-1946. KATHERINE SUSAN GRAY.

24-12-1947. MOTHER OF CR.FOREST EDMUND (JOE) WOOD.

12-6-1951. CHARLES ROBERT BURNHAM.

7-3-1953. JAMES GEORGE CHAPMAN.

28?-7-1956. MRS FRANCES ELIZABETH EDWARDS.
Daughter of Frederick and Elizabeth Nash and formerly Mrs William Davidson.
(See: (May/June 1908. MRS FRANCES ELIZABETH NASH, nee WAPLES.

23-8-1956. MRS MARY LOUISA BROWN.

(11+)-11-1956. RONALD JAMES HIPWELL AGED 4 YEARS 10 MONTHS. Ashes interred.

JUNE, 1996. MRS SELINA McLEAR.
Selina was the widow of George McLear (see burial entry, 28-3-1950.)

2 comment(s), latest 7 months, 1 week ago

ITELLYA'S SOURCES AND WHY HE DOES IT.

I apologise for not listing sources in most of my journals. The reason that I do not do so is that sometimes one sentence might be an amalgam of information from four or five sources. Can you even imagine reading a journal littered with footnote numbers and with a list of sources that is longer than the actual article? One thing that irritates me about reading scholarly histories is the need for a ruler, to locate the page on which the sources are listed.

It is often the case that somebody starting family history research, or even somebody that has vaguely considered it (such as Somerville's "Local Footy Hero"), groans, "I wish I had asked mum, grandpa etc more questions." How many old photos get thrown out because the people, buildings etc in them (and the year or date!!!) have not been recorded on the back? DO IT NOW, FOLKS!
I was lucky that I started my historical research when I did. My older brother was doing our family history and wanted me to check the Broadmeadows rates to confirm that our great grandfather had farmed on Gladstone Park. I transcribed every entry for John Cock (Broombank 1867-1882, Springbank 1882-1992, Stewarton/Gladstone 1892-1911.)

Great grandfather had received great coverage in Andrew Lemon's "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History" but I could not help noticing that almost all of the pioneers, whose names my eyes raced past, had not rated a mention.
NOT FAIR, JAN! (For the information of our American and British friends, that's a line in a bank advertisement that has become part of Aussie speech, just like "Tell him he's dreaming" from "The Castle".)

The council elections were coming up and the fantastic rates officer informed me that I could not have access to the strongroom, where the original rate books were kept, until the elections were over. Kindly, he gave me a map "to keep me occupied" until then. It was a map comprising parts of the parishes of Wiil Will Rook, Tullamarine and Bulla that was made to indicate the properties owned by Stanley Korman, a 1950's version of G.W.Taylor. His subdivision of Gladstone Park (with its innovative bullseye road layout) was thwarted by Airport plans and his Stanhill company collapsed, costing many small shareholders their life's savings.

What excited me was that a farm on the map was labelled "A.Cock". That was my great uncle, Alf. Excitedly, I raced to the Tullamarine library to find out more about Alf. I read all the available history of Tullamarine but found no mention of him; not surprising because it consisted of only 1 1/2 foolscap pages! That did it. As it was Australia's 200th year, I decided that as a bicentennial project, I would expand Tullamarine's recorded history.

Tullamarine was in the Broadmeadows, Keilor and Bulla shires, so logically, I needed to transcribe rates information for each and I needed the Tullamarine, Doutta Galla, Bulla Bulla and Will Will Rook parish maps.Later the Maribyrnong parish map joined my collection. How did I get them? The librarians were fantastic: Bev Brocchi at Niddrie, Rosemary Davidson at Tullamarine and Jenny Shugg at Gladstone Park Secondary College.They supplied the maps free because they soon learned that what they gave would be repaid tenfold.

The rest came about because of Gordon Henwood, a cleaner at the school where I taught. I was a fairly dedicated teacher and was always there when everybody else had left, so we became good mates. I mentioned my brick wall about Alf's farm. Gordon knew the Arundel Closer Settlement like the back of his hand; he was a descendant of J.D.McFarlane and had been brought up there. He told me that I was talking about John Fenton's "Dunnawalla" and that I should go and see John. I ignored the "Beware of the dog" sign and my bravery was rewarded. John came out with the usual line of "I'm not a pioneer" although he had been there before Tullamarine was a suburb. (The Drive- in at Tullamarine was called the Essendon Drive In because hardly anyone knew where Tullamarine was!)

John knew enough about Tullamarine to give me a list of about 12 descendants of pioneering families. Every time I spoke to one of these, they'd say, "I don't know much, you need to speak to so and so." They actually knew plenty and provided treasures such as the Methodist Church Centenary book, the 1926 Saleyards proposal, newspaper cuttings such as "The Clan McNab", photos of hay being loaded at Nash's Fairview, the old post office in Post Office Lane, the former Beech Tree Hotel as well as telling me property names, anecdotes and so on. Harry Heaps was funny; he'd always preface his anecdotes with: "I shouldn't tell you this, but". When conducting videotaped interviews with Gordon Connor, Jack Hoctor and Colin Williams, I had to suppress a snigger when they asked, "Are you taking my photograph?"

With the number of contacts and treasures escalating at the rate of one per day, Rosemary Davidson suggested that we have a history display at the Tullamarine Library. Anthony Rowhead, a Federal Airports inspector came, saw and acted. Within a week, he had commenced a project to rename streets in Tullamarine Airport after early settlers, aborigines and aviation pioneers.As mentioned in the airport's wikipedia entry, the project was shelved at the last moment, when all had been finalised but Anthony managed to sneak in Gowrie Park Drive. TAKE THAT BEAN-COUNTERS!
Despite that 1989 setback, the 1989 Back to Tullamarine and the writing of "Where Big Birds Soar" were ample compensation. Due to Winnie Lewis (nee Parr) and her black book of phone numbers and snowball system of communication, practically every living descendant of the Tullamarine pioneers was there. Those that weren't alive were there in spirit; I could almost sense them saying, "What was that?" every time their names were mentioned.

As most of those present had trouble reading captions etc, I raced home to get my trusty magnifying glass. Now these descendants had been well-brought up and were too well mannered to raise their voices but from 100 metres away, their quiet conversation sounded like the roar of a grand final crowd at the M.C.G. as the players run onto the ground. What a thrill! The attendees' only disappointment was that they had no written history to take home.My handwritten book, finished days before the event, which was opened by the Keilor Mayor, was only provided to the libraries.This was rectified at the 1998 reunion where every copy printed of "Tullamarine: Before the Jetport" was sold raising a good sum for Gladstone Park Primary School. At the reunions, the oldtimers provided new information during afternoon talk and a new saint was proclaimed; no lesser title would do justice to Alec Rasmussen, their former teacher, of whom they spoke in such glowing terms.

I stated earlier that I was lucky to have started my research when I did. Why was that? Here are a few reasons. Gordon Connor, Jack Hoctor and Colin Williams were all dead within a year and by now practically all of my witnesses to the past have passed on. The historic councils are no more since Jeff Kennett's municipal amalgamations. Ratebooks are no longer available and microfiche cause so much eye strain that I would have been blind with the amount of transcription that I did. (Some council employees thought I was a colleague because they saw so much of me!) If I had started after Rosemary left the Tulla library, the lack of her enthusiasm might have seen my own dedication expire.

MY SOURCES.
As well as rates, parish maps, directories,the aforementioned descendants, every local history written about the area and some that weren't written as local histories (The Oaklands Hunt, The Gold The Blue, The Life and Times of John Pascoe Fawkner, Memoirs of a Stockman, Boom and Bust etc),there was, and still is, interaction with family historians referred to me by the Broadmeadows Historical Society etc, (I usually get as much as I give.)

As a sample of my sources, I will list the sources for "Tullamarine: Before the Jetport.
Keith McNab, Gordon Connor, Colin Williams, Wally Mansfield, Jack Hoctor, John Fenton, Edie Thomas, Harry Heaps, Merv Henderson, Ina Henderson, Stan Exell, Sid Lloyd, Joyce Morgan, Noel Butler, Olive Nash, Ian Henwood, Eileen Reddan, Hilda Drever, Gordon Wright, Nathan Wright, Joe Crotty, Glenn Cotchen, Winnie Lewis, Leo Dineen, Dave Hatty, Bob Blackwell, Ted Fanning, B and P. Wright, Alma Koch, Peter Anderson, Jean Schwartz and Bev Ellis, Ken Gibb, Deidre Forfar (Robertson, McCracken historian), Mrs W.V.Murphy, Ian Farrugia (last occupant of Camp Hill and Gladstone homesteads), Alf Murray, Jan Hutchinson, Tom Dunne (last teacher at Tullamarine SS 2613.)
Broadmeadows A Forgotten History, Bulla Bulla, McCracken Papers, The Gold The Blue, The Oaklands Hunt, Keilor Pioneers: Dead Men Do Tell Tales, Mickleham Road: 1920-1953, Tullamarine Methodist Church 1970, Camp Hill Title Deeds, Tullamarine Progress Association Minutes Book 1937-1954, Official Opening of Caterpillar- speeches-progress, Birthday Brings Back The Past (Lily Green), Anti-Airport pamphlet of 1959 (containing Korman's plans), 1926 Saleyards Proposal, F.A.C. aquisitions map (circa 1960, showing owners), Broadmeadows History Kit- S.O'Callaghan, Architectural thesis on Arundel (K.B.Keeley), Arundel owners etc (Tony Cockram), Keilor Centenary Souvenirs of 1950, 1961 and 1963, Victoria and Its Metropolis, Cemetery Inscriptions (Bulla, Keilor, Will Will Rook), Greenvale: Links with the Past (Annette Davis, wife of Essendon champion, Barry), The Shire That Took Off (unpublished history of Bulla Shire sourced at the Sam Merrifield Library, plus others mentioned above.
My other work includes Dictionary History of Tullamarine and Miles around (2500 pages handwritten and more on computer, with most of my information on Greenvale and Bulla), Kilts and Cow Dung Flats (Strathmore and Pascoe Vale), A Trickle or a Torrent (Moonee Ponds Creek),information provided to family historians and Bruce Barber (Strathmore),assisting heritage studies, Early Landowners (parishes of Doutta Galla and Tullamarine with extensive titles information) and more recently NEW history about the Mornington Peninsula and preserving heritage buildings such as the Boyd cottage at 62 Rosebud Pde.
Being a local historian, obviously I have belonged to historical societies but I am not really a meetings person. I was the president of the reformed Keilor Historical Society (1988?)but I was so pleased when Susan Jennison took over the reins in the next year. I am purely a research person with a passion to see the contributions of my mates, the pioneers, acknowledged. I have been pleased to see their names added to Melway at my suggestion: Hannah Pascoe, McRae, Delahey, Lavars, Corrigan, Chadwick, McKay, Johnson, Gilmore, Mitchell and their properties: Gowrie Park, Chandos, Willowbank. Unfortunately, my maternal ancestors are unlikely to have a street named afer them. Imagine the ribbing you'd get if you lived in Cock Street!

The reason that I have not published my histories (probably 4000 pages by now)is that I object to the outrageous prices people have to pay for books. That is why I provided my work to libraries and when I sold books they were printed at my schools so that they could raise funds and prices could be low.I cannot express my gratitude enough to Scott for giving me the opportunity to provide the results of my research free to family historians. Although I am still a local historian, it is for family historians that I research and write. Hopefully, nobody will say of my work, "My family was there for 50 years and he didn't even mention them!"
I admire and respect Family historians but will never become one. Why? A local historian is the explorer who embarks on adventure and finds something else if he doesn't discover what he was after but a family historian is the surveyor who deals with the nitty gritty and does the "hard yakka" (another Aussie term meaning hard work from a brand of workwear.) Keep up the good work, Scott and his disciples!

8 comment(s), latest 5 years, 1 month ago

itellya's sporadic comeback

Due to the death of my computer and the reconstruction of this left-hander's left shoulder, my return to action depends on my right index finger and the availability of my wife's laptop. I'd like to thank my FTC well-wishers and inform them that both operations went well.
I feel guilty that so many of my journals have been started and not completed. My first task is to complete the BETHELLS OF BROADMEADOWS AND BULLA journal.

J.P.FAWKNER'S CO-OPS, SURNAME LIST FOR SECTION 13, TULLAMARINE, VIC., AUST.

The names in the surnames list are the members of John Pascoe Fawkner's co-operative which purchased land in section 13 of the parish of Tullamarine, north and south of Mansfields Rd, Tullamarine (Melway 4 A1 and 4 to G3-5).

The Melway reference and lot number of each purchaser's block(s)will be given in the journal: JOHN PASCOE FAWKNER AND HIS CO-OPERATIVES.

J.P.FAWKNER'S CO-OPS,SURNAMES LIST FOR PART SECTIONS 6, 7, TULLAMARINE (and George Scarlett.)

The names in the surnames list are the members of John Pascoe Fawkner's co-operative which purchased land in the part of sections 6 and 7 on the south west side of Bulla Rd (now Melrose Drive)in the parish of Tullamarine.

Section 5 was "Stewarton" (renamed Gladstone in about 1892 after the Engllsh Prime Minister's cousin. Its south west corner was the present corner of Lackenheath Drive and Mickleham Rd (Melway 5 J11.) Its boundary with the Township of Broadmeadows was Forman St (5 K7.) The eastern boundary was the Moonee Ponds Creek.

By drawing a line between Forman St and the west end of Grants Rd, the northern boundary of section 6 and all but about 180 metres of section 7 can be seen. If you continue the line of Lackenheath Drive 16 centimetres to the west on your Melway,you will find the exact south west corner of section 7 (just 5mm on the map north of gate 22 on Operations Rd.) The boundary between sections 5 and 6 was Broadmeadows Rd (now Mickleham Rd.)

J.C.Riddell, after whom Riddell's Creek was named,purchased section 6 and as the south west corner was across the road (a triangle roughly enclosed by Link Rd, Trade Park and Melrose Drive, he sold it to Fawkner. In return, Fawkner sold to Riddell the north east corner of section 7, a triangle south of the Cleanaway waste facility mainly comprised of Melway 5 E7.


The Melway reference and lot number of each purchaser's block(s)will be given in the journal: JOHN PASCOE FAWKNER AND HIS CO-OPERATIVES.

GEORGE SCARLETT.
In comments, garyboy alerted me to the issue in which George Scarlett's land was advertised for sale. The location of the land and lot numbers are given in my comment following his. The map showing subdivision lots has been sent to garyboy and is available to descendants of the other pioneers named in the surname list.The digitisation needed correction,which I have done, so that garyboy can copy and paste from here (there are still a few errors on trove.) The Lady of the Lake hotel was built on section 3 by David William O'Niall,subject of one of my journals, on land leased from William Foster by about 1847 and was a well-known landmark.It was just south of the Derby St corner and adjoined Broombank (Millar Rd area), leased by my great grandfather, John Cock, from 1867 until 1882. The 10 acre lot adjoined lots 31 and 32 and the reason it needed to be fenced separately is that a lane ran between it and the double block. (See my comment under garyboy's.)

MONDAY, 4th SEPTEMBER.
By Order of the Executors of the late Mr. George Scarlett.
Farms on the Deep Creek Road, Ten Miles from Melbourne.
A BLISS and CO. have received Instructions from the executors of the late Mr. George Scarlett to submit to public auction, at the Lady of the Lake, on the Deep Creek road, on Monday, 4th September, at two o'clock,
20 acres of beautiful agricultural land, having erected there a very substantially built four-roomed wooden
house, panelled doors, spouted, with a tank capable of holding water for the year; all fenced in, clear
and ready for the plough.
Also, 10 acres of splendid land adjoining, partially fenced in. To be sold in one lot or separately.
This being the property of a trust estate it must be sold without reserve, for the benefit of those interested
under the will.
Terms-Half cash, the remainder to remain (at the option of the purchaser) for two years at 8 per cent, on mortgage. 101. (Item 8,column 2,page 7, Argus, 26-8-1854.)

And as always when I help a family historian,I receive as much information as I give.

Thanks xxx for your well researched information relating to the location and sale of George Scarlett's land holdings in 1856. Interesting about the nearby Lady of the Lake Hotel and a very good chance George and sons patronized the establishment at some time. Interesting that George sought to acquire a rural acreage as after arriving in Melbourne in March 1841 with his wife and six children he established a jewelry business in Collins street however sales could not have been as brisk as expected and by 1843 he appeared on the Port Phillip Insolvency list. I'm uncertain as to when he applied for and was granted his land at Tullamarine but I know he was living there in early 1854 as his grandson also named George was born there in February of that year. I discovered this fact quite recently when I viewed a copy of George's 1878 (Ballarat) wedding certificate. Young George'e father James who was also residing at the Tullarmarine farm listed his occupation as gardener. Perhaps James and his other two brothers were farming the block however on the 14th June 1854 George (snr) passed away at the Watermans Arms Hotel in Little Collins street of a stroke, aged 52. I was never aware until a few months back whilst conducting a family history that the second son James Scarlett married an Irish Famine orphan girl, Lilly Ann Barber (Barbour) in 1853. They died in 1901 and 1903 and are buried in the Ballarat Cemetery. Lilly Ann was my grandfathers grandmother but I never heard him ever mention his Irish ancestry, Also my father who lived to 95 never mentioned Lilly Barber, George's Bankruptcy or of him dying in the Waterman's Arms. Possibly they never knew or it was things best forgotten. Thanks to Google it's not. Getting back to the Tullarmarine block.... I notice that a large portion of the 20 acres is outside the Airport restricted area so hopefully there isn't a problem with access as much of the area appears to unfenced open grassland. Aspirations to locate the site of the original dwelling which presumably would be on the northern section adjoining Andersons? lane. We'll see how I go and will keep you posted if I'm fortunate enough to stumble upon any relics of the era.. Apologies for straying into my ancestors closet but without your diligent and painstaking research I would have been facing an arduous task researching the Tullamarine connection. Kind Regards, Gary.

To save me sending a further email to Gary,having already told him about the 1858 advertisements, the partly fenced 10 acre block must have sold in 1854 but not lots 31 and 32. There is no doubt that Gary will be able to make a close inspection of the East Collingwood corner block (if he can find out which corner.) The Park/Stafford St intersection is at Melway 2C J8.The house block at Tullamarine (36 x 26 feet, about 10 x 8 metres) occupied only a small part of the 20 acres (140 x 280 metres) so the majority of the land was used for farming.

As stated earlier,each 10 acre block (on map 5 in my 1999 Melway) measures roughly 7 millimetres (frontage) by 14 millimetres (depth), the boundary dimensions having been roughly 700 links X 1400 links (140 metres X 280 metres.) As it would have been ridiculous to try to measure fractions of amillimetreI had to divide up the space filled with 10 acre blocks so that the space was filled and all blocks had the same dimensions (as demonstrated by title documents.) Using the dimensions of 700 X 1400 links,the product is 9.8 acres,fairly close to 10 acres.Gary will find that the total frontage of lots 31 and 32 on the map that I sent him is actually 14.5 millimetres so that the width of each 10 acre block is 7.25 millimetres (obtained by dividing the total space as described above.) As you can see,the Maths I learnt at school was not entirely useless and any subdivision maps I have produced were done with such care that I have actually found mistakes in parish maps as a result,such as the spot where Arundel Creek flows into the Maribyrnong River in Foote's Doutta Galla map.

THIS DAY.
To Speculators,Persons Seeking Investments, and Others
Unreserved Sale of Valuable Freehold Property.
By Order of tho Executor and Trustee of the late George Scarlett
SYMONS and PERRY have received instructions from the executor and trustee of the late George Scarlett to SELL by AUCTION, at their new rooms, Collins-street, on Monday, 8th inst, at 12 o'clock,
Lot 1.
2O acres, a little more or less, part of section 7, parish of Tullamarine, county of Bourke, 10 miles from
Melbourne, on the Deep Creek-road, and near the Beech Tree Hotel, on which is erected a good substantial weatherboard house standing on a frontage of 36 feet, by a depth of 26 feet. There is also a splendid
tank, well built of stone, with a good supply of water. The land is all fenced in.
Lot 2.
All that piece or parcel of land situate in East Collingwood, having a frontage of 108 feet 6? inches to
Park street, by a depth along Stafford street of 75 feet. The above is a splendid corner allotment, and is
worthy the attention of persons seeking investments.
Terms liberal, declared at sale.
The auctioneers wish to call the attention of capitalists and speculators to the above really choice pro-
perties as being of sterling quality, and are to be sold to the highest bidder. 1970
(P.2,Argus, 8-2-1858,near bottom of column 2.)


The above is,I think,the earliest reference to the Beech Tree Hotel that I have seen. The earliest reference to it in the Cole Collection of Hotel records was a ball held there in 1864. It is possible that the Lady of the Lake Hotel had been burnt down by this time and the Junction Hotel did not exist for some time, giving John Beech an opportunity to establish his hotel without competition. The Travellers' Rest near the site of Airport West Shoppingtown probably hadn't been built and the Inverness at Oaklands Junction was far enough away.

As shown in advertisements for the Beech Tree,it also had a huge underground tank.It is likely that it was lined with stone as George Scarlett's was.

2 comment(s), latest 2 years, 11 months ago

J.T.ROLLS, MARINER, PIONEER IN THE PARISH OF WANNAEUE, MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.

This journal was prompted by the similarity between L and T in old handwriting* and a rate collector's almost illegible handwriting.
(* See sample in:
How to Read 18th Century British-American Writing
dohistory.org/on_your_own/toolkit/writing.html
Something as basic to us as writing was quite different in 18th Century .... upper case K, P, and R can look similar, as can J and T. Also, at times L and S will be ..

In 1876 somebody named Rolls had replaced John Lovie on the latter's grants, 638 acres west of Boneo Rd with partial frontages to Truemans and Browns Rds. He had probably bought the property at a mortgagee's auction on 24-7-1876 and the rate collector had not had time to get all the new owner's details before the September meeting when the assessment was presented to the Shire of Flinders and Kangerong for approval.

In 1877, the new owner's initials were given but I couldn't work out whether they were J.T. or J.L. He was described as a mariner and was recorded as owner as well as occupant of the 638 acres and two roomed house which had been built by John Lovie. The link to the Wannaeue parish map can be found in the first comment under my PIONEERS OF THE PARISH OF WANNAEUE journal or you can google WANNAEUE, COUNTY OF MORNINGTON.

HOW LONG WAS J.T.ROLLS ON THIS FARM?
The answer will be found shortly. See answer at the end of the journal.

CAPTAIN ROLLS 3 WHO WENT TO SEA, AGED 15, WHEN HIS FATHER WAS OCCUPYING LOVIE'S GRANTS
Having the right initials may not seem very important but they would be for a family historian, so I tried a trove search for J.T.Rolls. Wow! First result was:
THIRD GENERATION CAPT. J. T. ROLLS AN OLD SEA DOG
Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Thursday 23 October 1924 p 7 Article

THIRD GENERATION; CAPT. J. T. ROLLS AN OLD SEA DOG !
The Niagara left Sydney for Vancouver to-day, under Captain Showman, the fourth officer of the Union Co. fleet to assume charge of the liner. Captain Harry Morriby was the first, Captain John Gibb was the next, and Captain John T. Rolls, who has just retired, was the third.

Captain Rolls has been going to sea since 1876, having started his career out of Melbourne In the ship Ellora.
He continued in sailing ships until April, 1885, when he joined the Union Company as a junior officer on the
Wairarapa.

THIRD GENERATION.
Captain Rolls is the third generation of shipmasters. His father was a shipowner, and captain in Victoria, and his Grandfather was a retired commander in the East-India Co.,taking the ship Rhoda to Australia later, and subsequently settling in Melbourne. Captain Rolls was born in 1861 and 1924 finds him the latest recruit in the ranks of the League of Ancient Mariners.

Countless other results referred to other people with the same initials so I tried "J.T.ROLLS" and got countless articles about his (their)ship's arrival from, or departure to, various places. Next I tried Captain Rolls.

The third Captain Rolls who retired in 1924 had gone to sea at the age of 15 in 1876. Therefore the owner of crown allotments 40A and 41-3, section A, Wannaeue was probably his father.

Extract from:
THIRTY YEARS IN COMMAND. CAPTAIN ROLLS RETIRES.
The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) Tuesday 4 November 1924 p 4 Article

Captain Roll's parents were early pioneers of Victoria, his father arriving from Kent in 1841 and his mother
landing in Victoria some 10 years later
. It was in the ship Ellora, owned by Mr John Blyth of Melbourne that Captain Rolls first went to sea in July 1876 when he was barely 15 years of age.

Captain Rolls 3 was only 15 in 1876 and unlikely to own the Wannaeue land. What about Captain Rolls 1?
I think this would be him.
ROLLS.—On the 14th inst., at eight a.m., at the residence of his son, Curzon-street, North Melbourne,
Captain John Rolls, aged sixty-one years, after a painful and lingering illness. (P.4, Argus, 17-7-1861.)

The captain's son would have been J.T.Rolls 2 (circa 1830-1910) aged about 31 who bought the Wannaeue land 15 years later.

Is this Captain Rolls 2.
Murder of Captain Rolls.
Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954) Saturday 1 April 1882 p 4 Article
NO! Another article gave this captain's name as Phillip.
The Murder of Captain Rolls
Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Monday 26 June 1882 p 2 Article
... The Murder of Captain Rolls The case of the marder of Captain Philip Rolls, late master of the ... 66 words

CAPTAIN ROLLS 2, WANNAEUE PIONEER.
Is it possible that the owner of the 638 acres in Wannaeue during the 1870's was John Thomas Rolls who died at Brighton in 1910? Yes! His widow's death notice reveals that he had been a captain. He was born in about 1830 so he would have been about 11 when his father settled, 20 when his future wife settled, 31 when Captain Rolls 3 was born, and 46 when he bought Lovie's grants and his son, Captain Rolls 3, born 1861 went to sea barely aged 15.

ROLLS.—On the 28th January, at "Ravensbourne," Brighton Beach, John Thomas Rolls, in his 80th year. (Interred privately.) P.1, Argus, 31-1-1910.

ROLLS.—On the 18th March, at "Ravensbourne," Brighton Beach (suddenly), Mary Ann, relict of the late Captain John T. Rolls, in her 80th year. (Interred privately 21st.) P.1, Argus, 22-3-1910.

My purpose here is not to provide genealogy but to make ROLLS descendants aware of their family's involvement on the Mornington Peninsula. Descendants of Joseph Porta, Victoria's first manufacturer of bellows, had no idea of his grant at c/a 63 Moorooduc and (please excuse the pun), Rolls descendants could be in the same BOAT.

WHEN WAS J.T.ROLLS LAST ASSESSED ON THE 638 ACRES IN THE PARISH OF WANNAEUE? CHECK 1878+.
The net annual value of Lovie's 638 acres had been 30 pounds had been 30 pounds since 1872 if not before. John Rolls' name was not in the 1878 assessment so in searching for the new owner or occupant I looked in the net annual value column but none of the three or so properties with that value matched so I looked for Alexander Crichton's assessment. There it was at assessment number 46.
Alexander Crichton, (owner A.Crichton) 638 acres Wannaeue, net annual value 50 pounds.

That's a huge jump in the net annual value, so Alexander of Glenlee probably had plenty of revenue from Glenlee's famed cheese to achieve such a rapid improvement and had probably made an offer for the farm that John couldn't refuse. Was it in 1878 that John built Ravensbourne at Brighton?

He was obviously living close to the city by August, 1878 when he made a bid to become a director of the company below.
THE COLONIAL MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited)
A SPECIAL GENERAL MEETING of the shareholders of the above company will be held at the registered offices of the company, 84 and 86 Collins Street west, Melbourne, on Thursday, the 29th day of August inst,, at 2 o clock in the afternoon. (P.8, Argus, 22-8-1878.)

In 1881, John 2 was the marine surveyor for the United Australian Mutual Fire Insurance Company (Limited.)
(P.8, column 4, Argus, 18-8-1881.)

On January 28 a very old colonist,Captain John T. Rolls, passed away, after a long illness, at his residence,
"Ravensbourne," Brighton Beach, Victoria. The deceased arrived in Victoria 60 years ago, and for many years was
well known in shipping circles, but had lived in retirement for the last 37 years. He leaves a widow and two sons, Captain J. T. Rolls, of the Union S.S. Company, and Mr. W. Rolls, pastoralist, of New South Wales, also two daughters.(P.5, Examiner (Launceston), 8-2-1910.)

The above confirms that John 2 had retired just before he purchased John Lovie's 638 acres at Wannaeue by September 1875 and that he was the father of John 3 who retired in 1924. John 2 may have had another son who was about five years younger than John 3.

As the barque Veritas of this port was coming out from London, one of the apprentices, T. H. Rolls, fell from the flying jibboom into the sea, and was drowned. The accident took place on the forenoon of the 8th inst.,
when about 500 miles from Cape Otway. The vessel at the time was on the starboard tack and under topgallant sails,and although there was a moderate south-east breeze at the time, the sea was smooth. Two life buoys were thrown quite close to the young man, but whether the poor fellow had lost presence of mind, or was unconscious
from sudden fright, he did not appear to make an effort to secure either of them. A boat was also lowered, and a good look-out kept, but the search was fruitless, and young Rolls was never seen again. Captain Johnson had the barque brought to the wind, and she drifted past the life-buoys on the other tack, and remained in the vicinity of the accident for four hours. Young Rolls was between 15 and 16 years of age, and was a son of Captain J. T. Rolls, of this city. (P.22, The Australasian, 19-11-1881.)

ROLLS.— On November 12, at her residence, 1 Black-street, Middle Brighton, Jane Elizabeth, daughter of the late Captain J. T.and Mrs. Rolls, of Brighton, and sister of Captain J. T. Rolls, of Sydney.
(P.1, The Age, 14-11-1939.)

ROLLS—HEATHER.—On the 18th ult., at Wagga Wagga, N.S.W., by the Rev. W. C. Bates, William Charles, second son of Captain J. T. Rolls, of Brighton, to Phoebe, fifth daughter of the late Richard Heather, of Adelong, N.S.W.
(P.1, Argus, 6-10-1893.)

SATURDAY, MARCH 20.
On the Property. At Three O'clock.
BRIGHTON BEACH, BRIGHTON BEACH BRIGHTON BEACH, RAVESBOURNE ESTATE.SUPERIOR BRICK VILLA SUPERIOR BRICK VILLA
And 15 VACANT ALLOTMENTS. 15 VACANT ALLOTMENTS.
Under Instructions from THE EQUITY TRUSTEES' COMPANY LTD., in the Estate of J. T. Rolls.

THE HOUSE Is Known as "RAVENSBOURNE," ROSLYN STREET.
It is Constructed of Brick, and Contains (8?)Good Rooms, Vestibule, 3 Pantries, bathroom, laundry, and Scullery, and All Conveniences. It Stands on Land 80 ft. to Roslyn Street, by the Grand Depth of 300ft, Through to Champion Street, There is also Coach house and Stabling.
There also Being Land Adjoining, Which will be Offered at the Same Time.
There are
FIVE ALLOTMENTS,
Each Having Frontages of 60ft, to Were Street, by Depths of 150ft.;
Also FOUR ALLOTMENTS In Roslyn Street, Having frontages Varying from 55ft. to 79 ft., by Depths of 150ft.; and
THREE ALLOTMENTS In Champion Street, with frontages of 65ft, (69?) ft,and 79ft. Respectively, by Depths of 150 ft. ;
Also THREE ALLOTMENTS In South Road, Each Measuring 75ft by 179 ft.
TERMS, for House.-One-third Cash, Balance Within Two Months, Without Interest; or at one and two Years, with Interest at 6 Per Cent. TERMS FOR LAND.-, Cash, Balance Within One Month Without Interest or by Six Half-yearly payments; Interest at 6 percent.(etc.) (P.3, Argus, 6-3-1920.)

Ravesbourne had been put up for sale in May 1911 but obviously didn't sell.
(P.4, Brighton Southern Cross, 29-4-1911.)

John 2 and Mary Ann didn't have all our mod. cons. but they could afford a servant.

GIRL respectable, general, small family, references. Mrs. Rolls, Ravensbourne, Roslyn-rd., Brighton Beach.
(P.3, The Age, 25-7-1896.)

Well I didn't find when John 2 settled at Brighton but I've got a fair idea why he called the house Ravensbourne rather than Wannaeue and it had nothing to do with the birds in his garden.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.
Hobson's bay, arrived Dec. 6.
Ravensbourne, ship,- 1150 tons, William Richardson; from London August 2nd, with three passengers
in the second cabin. (P.2, Mt. Alexander Mail, 9-12-1864.)

THE ROLLS FAMILY, PIONEERS OF 1841!

3 comment(s), latest 1 year, 1 month ago