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Green's Corner is now occupied by the 711 service station. It was a Mobil garage when I arrived in Tullamarine in 1971 and until very recently. All the old timers knew it as Green's Corner because Cec and Lily Green bought the old Junction Hotel after Tommy Loft got it closed down in 1929.They conducted a shop in it and had a petrol bowser outside.One of Lily Green's happiest memories was serving Alister Clark of Glenara.
One story not mentioned in the attached newspaper article was told to me by a Green descendant. A former policeman called into the shop, and as they chatted about the old days, he said that he could show them something that would interest them. Cec and Lily followed him as he walked over to a door. "There it is!" he said. Funny, they had never noticed it! Almost completely lodged in the timber was a bullet fired in an attempt to arrest a bloke who had made the Junction one of his haunts: Squizzie Taylor.


I am sure this lady could have told a few stories.

28th September 1934, Frankston & Somerville Standard
The death of Mrs. Marion Haddon, aged 96 years, At the residence of her son-in-law, Mr G. McBride, at Main Ridge, on September 19 marked the passing of one of the Peninsula's earliest pioneers. Burial took place last Friday in the Flinders cemetery, the remains being Interred in the same grave as those of her husband who died about 20 years ago. Many beautiful floral tributes were received and the funeral was attended by a large number of persons representative of all parts of the district. The casket was carried by Messrs. J. Berkley, D. Campbell, C. White and J. Haddon. The pall-bearers were Councillors Higgens and Rudduck, Messrs. W. Gibson, R. White, J. Matthews, T. Derby and G. White. The Rev. W. Adams of Dromana, conducted a service at the house and read the burial service at the grave. Mr.Hector Gamble of Frankston, and Mornington, had charge of the funeral arrangements.
The late Mrs. Haddon was ill for only a few days before her death. Despite her great age, she recorded her vote at the polling booth on September 15. Married when aged 18 years, she came from Scotland with her husband 76 years ago. After their arrival in Australia they settled at Dromana. The late Mr. Haddon was employed by Mr Anderson on his station at Cape Schank where they lived until about 20 years ago. Mrs. Haddon lived in the districts of Dromana and Flinders for 76 years. She said that the first white woman she met in Dromana was the late Mrs. Holden who died only a few weeks ago. Mrs. Haddon had a family of nine children of whom two sons and five daughters survive her. There are 32 grandchildren, 49 great -grand- children and 18 great-great-grand children. The late Mrs: Haddon was held in high esteem and had a large circle of friends.
I wonder if Robert Joseph Haddon was a descendant of Marion. He produced a calendar some time before 1927,with one of his paintings being of a yacht sailing in Dromana bay.

Mr. Thomas Haddon passed away on 26th April. He was a native of Red Hill, and leaves a wife and four
children to mourn his loss. His parents live at Flinders. The funeral took place on 28th April, the remains being interred in the Frankston Cemetery. The pall-bearers were Messrs J. Haddon, G. McBride,J. Wilson, J. Patterson, G. Tuck, G.Cairns. The coffin-bearers were: Messrs J. Haddon, C. Tuck, R.Thompson, G. White. Rev.. C. H.Ball read the burial service, and Messrs Hector Gamble and Son conducted the funeral arrangements.((P.7, Standard (Frankston), 10-5-1945.)

Pall and coffin bearers' names seem to indicate that the Haddon family may have been good friend, if not relatives of the descendants of Sarah Wilson. James Matthews, a Dromana carpenter, one of Henry Tuck Jnr's daughters and Robert Wilson were all related to Sarah.


I will never forget the first time I saw Hay Lonie's name in a Broadmeadows Shire ratebook. I was having trouble deciphering some of the words because of terrible handwriting, sometimes taking five minutes to establish what a particular letter might be. "What sort of name is Hay?" I thought. It was not until nearly a year later, when I found his name in the Bulla shire ratebook re the assessment for Lochton, that I was reassured that he indeed had the same name as the area's principal crop.

I have included details (obituary, location etc. re Pasture Hill, Camp Hill and Lochton) about Hay in my journal 1888 GEOGRAPHY WITH THE MELBOURNE HUNT and having found the location of his Kilmore property, I decided that a separate journal might allow me to include that and other information I might discover.

Mr' Norman Bowers' Valleyfield estate was one of the very earliest settled farms in Kilmore district. It
is about four miles north-west of the town, with extensive frontages to Pyalong road, which runs through
the property. Some eighty years ago the original place was farmed, and later the home, which was right on
the roadway, was used as a hotel Harvest Home, the proprietor being Mr A. Downs. For a period the spot was a favorite locale for Kilmore picnics, which were numerous about 65 years ago. The property was added to considerably, and subsequently became an extensive dairy farm, conducted by the late Mr Hay Lonie.
About 250 cows were milked on the premises morning and evening, all by hand, and Mr Lonie himself despatched a waggon load of milk by the first train,' at 7 a.m., from Kilmore East, and again in the evening, six days a
week for Melbourne, and also a consignment on Sunday evenings, each trip meaning six miles from and to his farm. After Mr Lonie's death,the Valleyfield property changed hands, and Mr S. Bowers became owner.
(Present & Past WOOL v. MILK Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 24 October 1935 p 4. )

Golden Vein.
On Wednesday Messrs. Osborn and Hudson conducted a clearing out sale on account of Mr. J. H. McIvor at the Golden Vein estate in Moranding, when a large number of sheep, cattle, horses, plant, hay,furniture, and sundries came under the hammer to a big attendance of buyers and onlookers. A good clearance was effected at satisfactory prices.

In the late sixties and early seventies the Golden Vein property of 869 acres was owned by Mr.Laurence Bourke, M.L.A., and about 1872 the holding became the property of Mr. Hay Lonie, of Tullarmarine (sic), and from whom it was rented by Mr James McLeod at 5/- per acre. Fifty-seven cows were milked twice daily, giving an average of two and a half gallons, one gallon of milk making one pound of cheese.

Mr. McLeod introduced the Cheddar system into the district. (Details.....).

During Mr.Bourke's ownership, the Golden Vein was in a slovenly and untidy condition, owing to the fact that Mr.Bourke had to be absent a good deal on Parliamentary business, and the men he employed were careless and
slovenly, and the fences broken down and left there, because the men would not repair them. On the expiry of Mr. McLeod's lease, .Mr.Lonie went on to the farm and worked it for many years; principally in dairying. After Mr. Lonie's death the property was purchased by Mr.R. Fennelly,and leased to Mr.I W. Mclvor, who carried on a high class Ayrshire stud herd for some years. (etc.)
( Golden Vein.Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 16 January 1936 p 2 Article.)

This must be the article mentioned in his obituary (which debunked rumours that Hay had committed suicide.)

Mr Hay Lonie, well known in this district, has been missing since Wednesday, 14th instant. On the evening of that date he left Mr Grace's, South Melbourne, and since that time nothing has been heard of his movements. Much sympathy is felt for Mrs Lonie and family, whose state of anxiety can well be imagined. [Since writing above we learn with much regret that the remains were found in Melbourne yesterday, but up to the present we
have not been able to find further particulars than those conveyed in the following from the Herald of
yesterday :-"About 7 o'clock this morning a boy named William Bell, went to Constable T. Martin, who was on duty on Prince's Bridge, and informed him that the body of a man was floating in the River Yarra a short distance east of the bridge. Martin went to the spot indicated, recovered the body, and conveyed it to the City Morgue. The death has been reported to Dr Youl, and an inquest will be held, probably to-morrow." The remains
will be interred in the Kilmore Cemetery this (Thursday) evening.]
(P.3, Kilmore Free Press, 22-12-1892.)

The reason for this search will be explained later.

1884.October 23- The sudden death of Miss Barbara, oldest daughter of Mr Hay Lonie,and a most amiable girl, took place on 19th instant aged 19 years.
(Early Kilmore. PART LXI.
Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 10 June 1915 Edition: MORNING. p 1 Article.)

Not much else turned up except that Hay seems to have been awarded a government contact for the supply of milk while he was milking all those cows on Pasture Hill at Campbellfield.
(THE GAZETTE, P.6,Argus,8-12-1866.)

Oh dear,let's try JOHN THOMAS SMITH AND HIS ELECTORS on google.

No wonder, the above search did not produce clear results; I had the right area but the wrong town!

A website headed FREDERICK XAVIER TO ARTHUR ZOUCH has the following information.
The Melbourne Times of 23-4-1842 recorded that Peter Young had been granted a publican's licence for the "Bushman" in Sydney Road.The Port Phillip of 21-4-1843 shows that the hotel, once again described as being on Sydney Road was now called the Sugar Loaf Inn. The same paper, on 27-4-1844,stated that Peter had been granted his licence but the hotel was again called the Bushman.
(An alphabetical listing of squatters and their runs, from correspondence with the Governor, which is a different website, lists Peter Young of the Sugar Loaf Run.) Given Peter's purchase of land in Seymour at the first sales, his conducting the first sales in the township and the fact that Sugarloaf Creek intersects the Hume Highway in Seymour, it is reasonable to assume that the hotel was at Seymour and not in modern-day Carlton, Brunswick (or Plenty, Pascoeville near the Young Queen Inn, or Tullamarine near the Lady of the Lake- routes more likely to be called Sydney Road in the 1840's.)
Rev. Peter Gunn, who became the minister at Campbellfield's historic Scots Church (Melway 7 H6), had visited the Golburn (River?) area and Peter was among a large number who signed a letter of encouragement and contributed 50 pounds to support his ministry; another signatory was from Sunday Creek, which joins Sugarloaf Creek.(Port Phillip Herald 1-10-1844.)

Peter Young and Elizabeth christened John William in 1843.
Peter Young purchased allotments at the first sale of blocks at Seymour. (Melbourne Weekly Courier 23-3-1844.)
Peter Young was one of 469 voters who qualified by freehold in Seymour in the list of electors in the District of Bourke (Melbourne Courier 8-8-1845.)Peter Young was listed in the (1847?) Port Phillip directory as a settler, Seymour, Sydney Rd.

The website also lists newspaper reports showing that Peter Young was given depasturing licences in July 1843 and October 1844 in the Westernport District.Ah hah, I thought, perhaps Peter had been on Clyde Farm, Westernport before he went to Bulla. Then I remembered my search for a grant (or licence) that Captain Adams of Rosebud was supposed to have been given in about 1841. All such matters were dealt with in Sydney and the Public Records office gave me an index of correspondence. As Peninsula pioneers were referred to as late as 1888 in "Victoria and Its Metropolis" as being in the Westernport District, I concentrated on those entries.

Imagine my surprise to find Barker's Mt Alexander Run (near Castlemaine) described as being in the Westernport District! In view of what has been mentioned before, Peter Young's depasturing licences were almost certainly near Seymour.

Still none the wiser,about when Peter left Nairn, I returned to Trove and tried "Nairn, Bulla, Young, 1850-1867".
Argus 18-4-1853 page 12. Peter was offering Nairn for sale by private contract. He had probably only been there for about five years but how much he had accomplished! The advertisement describes the property in great detail, including the waterfall.For the sale of his furniture, library, stock, vehicles and so on, Peter employed prominent auctioneer, Dalmahoy Campbell (much discussed by Harry Peck in his "Memoirs of a Stockman.) (See Argus 20-5-1853 page 9.)

Argus 4-6-1853 page 8, column 1. Peter offered an incredible variety of grape vine cuttings for sale.

What does Peter Young have to do with the price of fish?

I have a theory that Peter Young influenced Hay Lonie's move to the Kilmore area and may have even been the land agent who handled the sale of Bourke's "Golden Vein" to Hay. Young would have been familiar with the Kilmore area, from very early days as he would pass through it on the way from Sunday Creek to Melbourne. As we all do,he'd return nostagically to his former haunt and perhaps visit relatives at Kilmore; James Young of Tabilk might have been a son (both having agricultural links with Tasmania.) With the eye of an expert agriculturalist and land agent,Peter may have noted the decrepit state of the "Golden Vein" and its potential as a dairy farm, and told Hay while making a nostalgic visit to Nairn at Bulla.

Hay Lonie's "Lochton" was 5a, Bulla, south of "Airey's" (through which Wildwood Rd zig-zags its way almost down to Deep Creek from the St John's Rd junction and which became part of David Patullo's "Craigbank estate)and Hay would have passed Lochton to reach Nairn, which he may have been leasing to McIntosh at the time, (7b-Melway 384 D-E11 and south half E10, and section 8-between St Johns and Oaklands Rds, 384 F-J, part 9-12.)

Born in Cupar, Fife, Scotland on 22 Nov 1842 to Andrew Lonie and Mary Fife. Hay married Jane McGregor and had 4 children. He passed away on 1892 in Melbourne East.
Family Members
Parents: Andrew Lonie 1804-1873; Mary Fife 1809-1877. Spouse(s) Jane McGregor
Children: Barbara Lonie 1865-1884; Mary Fife Lonie 1869-?; Andrew McGregor Lonie 1874-?;
Jean Elizabeth Lonie 1883-?
( Hay Lonie - Profiles and Historical Records -‎)

Hay was a brother of Henry Fife Lonie, one of whose children was William Hay Lonie. Good photos of W.H.Lonie and Henry's wife in:
William Hay Lonie - Profiles and Historical Records -‎

Given Names Hay
Surname / Family Name LONIE
Gender Male
Birth Date 22 NOV 1842
Birth Place Cupar, Fife, Scotland
Death Date 1892
Death Place Melbourne, Victoria, AUSTRALIA

Name at Birth: Hay LONIE
Birth: 22 NOV 1842 - Cupar, Fife, Scotland
Census: 1851 - Cupar, Fife, Scotland
Departure: 1854 - Liverpool, Lancashire, England
Arrival: Aboard the "Black Eagle". 19 OCT 1854 - Melbourne, Victoria, AUSTRALIA
Death: 1892 - Melbourne, Victoria, AUSTRALIA
Gender: Male

As the text in the following item has been corrected, obviously by a family historian, I do not wish to interfere with sales of the book that must be underway. Hay put 313 acres at Kilmore into the name of Henry's wife, Jane (Hay's sister-in-law),to avoid paying tax. The McGregors are mentioned.
(Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 11 October 1883 Edition: MORNING. p 3 Article)

Henry Lonie's wife was Jemima (nee Hall.) Hay had put the 313 acres into the name of his own wife,Jane (nee McGregor.) Henry obviously leased his farm at Kilmore to his cheese-making in-laws until he moved north.The text has not been corrected so I will post the following.

Sir,-In your issue of the 11th inst. you gave a report in re Land Tax case wherein there appears to be a slight error in having used the name of "Henry" instead of "Hay." It should have been "Jane Lonie wife of Hay Lonie" not of "Henry Lonie," and the mistake is attributable to a clerical error for which you are not accountable.-.You will greatly oblige Mr Hay Lonie and myself by kindly giving this publication.
Yours faithfully, ALEX. GRANT.59 Temple Court, Melbourne, 23rd October, 1883.
(P.3,Kilmore Free Press, 25-10-1883.)

Family Notices
Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 23 October 1884 Edition: MORNING. p 2 Family Notices
... DEATH. LONIE.-On the 19th instant, suddenly, Barbara, daughter of Mr Hay Lonie, Valley field, aged 19 years.

The following won't be found online apart from here. It comes from a general rundown on Tullamarine and surrounds circa 1860 on page 11 of my TULLAMARINE BEFORE THE JETPORT (1998.) The source for this excerpt has to be the Broadmeadows rate book of 1863.

Hay Lonie is renting land at Campbellfield with Brunton (possibly the flour miller and later owner of Roxburgh Park.) Not long after,he buys Camp Hill (16 B2) and Lochton (177 C4) to conduct his dairying.

Hay might have had outlets for his milk in Fitzroy and Hotham (North Melbourne.)
J ANTED, a good MILKER and DRIVER Apply Lonie s dalry, opposite Fltzroj Market.(P.1, Argus, 24-10-1867.)

If you think the digitisation above is bad, try this.
I've corrected the relevant bits. (REMEMBER TO SEARCH THORNGROVE)

TUESDAf, MARCH iiHi} esend. Agricultural inil Grazing Fjrni, ATill ff ill Rook, fronting the Old Sydney road *,Between Broadmeadows and Campbellfield 305 Acres Tlrat-elosa Land In tho Trust Estafo ofltho late Mr James Hearn.
M3 ROBERT BYRNE** ia favoured with Instruc. tiona to SELL bj AUCTION, ut his rooina, 2S Collins street east, on Tjesda}, March 24, at twelveo clock noon precise!}, {
That well known dairy and agricultural farm, adjoining Campbellfield, being Allotment B of Section 15 parish of Will Will Rook, containing 305.5 acres lately occupied by H Lonie, Esq.
(P.2, Argus, 16-3-1868.)

*The original Sydney Rd passed the Young Queen Inn at Melway 16 H9,near Bass St,turning left at 6 G9, veering right onto Johnstone (sic) St at 6 C8 (to avoid the creek) and left into Raleigh St, turning right again up the Ardlie St hill and then it was follow your nose (Mickleham Rd)to Wallan. The road is still called Old Sydney Rd north of Donnybrook Rd. This roundabout and very hilly route was necessary because of the Sydney road track being extremely boggy in wet weather. Later Pascoe Vale Road was made to the line of Somerton Rd, which was made toward Sydney Rd between Thorngrove and Cameron's Stony Fields/Roxburgh Park,with travellers possibly veering north east through the middle of the township where the Cliffords and Kernans were pioneers (Cliffords Rd.) Another route was along High St or Plenty Rd which also joined the Sydney road (and the road to the McIvor Diggings) near Wallan. When the direct route was made, the Young Queen and Broadmeadows Township went into limbo and a new Young Queen was built at Coburg.(Melway touring map 510 A10.)

**James Hearn owned much land at Mt Martha, as did Robert Byrne.

Messrs. Campbell and Sons, Kirk's Bazaar, report having sold, on account of Messrs. W. C. Hearn andThomas Wragge, trustees in the estate of the late James Hearn, their farm, situate at Somerton, and known as the Thorngrove Farm, and containing 338 acres. Mr. John Hearn was the purchaser, at a satisfactory price.
(P.5,Argus, 18-2-1892.)

I thought I knew the location of the farm on which Hay Lonie had been dairying prior to the 1868 advertisement. Big Clarke died at Roseneath in Woodland St, the residence of James Hearn, whom Lenore Frost said (in her book about Essendon's historic houses), was his son-in-law. Having done extensive research about the farms on Somerton Rd, I presumed Hay had been on Thorngrove (Melway 179 G-J9-11) but that was 4J of the parish of Yuroke and consisted of 338 acres.

The Will Will Rook map is also available online and it shows the 305 acres 2 roods 22 perches, 15B, Will Will Rook, described in the 1868 advertisement. Like Thorngrove,it had been granted to W.J.T. (Big) Clarke.

Crown allotment 15B, Will Will Rook, is indicated by Melway - I apologise for the delay. Before I could transpose this on my Melway, I had to plot the Yuroke/Will Will Rook boundary on maps 178,179, 6 and 7. As there is no road along the boundary,I had to start at Swain St (198 H12) and continue east through Dench's Lane
178 J-K12)so that my line met Merri Creek at exactly the same place as shown on the parish map,which it did. The parish boundary meets Merri Creek at the point where the Hume Freeway crosses the creek,which is also the north west corner of the Lalor Golf Course. (If you manage to transpose parish and crown allotment boundaries properly, there are always indications that you are right.)

The parish boundary is also the northern boundary of 15B, Will Will Rook. The corner of Berringa Court (6 J1) is at the north east corner and the boundary passes through the Kyabram St/Flynn Crescent corner ending at the top of 7 C2, 40 metres west of the Upfield railway line.

The southern boundary of 15B is Barry Rd,named after the pioneering family that lived on "Glenbarry".
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 24 April 1856 p 4 Family Notices
Campbellfield, Mr. William Barry, aged fifty-six years etc.
Garrett Barry married an Angel!

The western boundary of the 305.3875 acres is the original course of Pascoe Vale Rd,just west of the railway and the Barry Rd railway bridge. The eastern boundary is indicated by the line of King St (as it crosses Barry Rd) continued to meet (not quite) the Upfield line; if continued it would meet the western boundary of the Ford land just over the railway line (one of those welcome confirmations of accuracy I was talking about.)


In THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO, written by Peter Wilson (descendant of Walter Burnham), the late Ray Cairns (then a spring chicken in his seventies) thanked Peter for putting his (Ray's) information into a readable form and expressed the wish that somebody would expand the information contained in the book.

Family tree circles has enabled me to sort out the different White families on the southern peninsula (and Blooming/Bullocky Bob White of Red Hill, due to help from descendants of the lime burning Irish family and the Rosebud/ Red Hill family and help toolaroo write his book about the latter (which is connected to the Cairns family of Clackmannan in Scotland.) I have been also able to bring together family historians who were able to ease the work load and expand what they knew by sharing their knowledge.

Well, Ray's wish has been granted by Cameron Cairns. I hope somebody else is also researching the Cairns family and that person and Cameron can team up to not only expand what each has achieved but also solve those puzzles and dead ends which so often crop up. If this somebody is you,can you private message me with your email address and I will pass it on to Cameron. (P.S. We've already had a lengthy phone chat.) I apologise to Cameron for not reacting re his desire to discover a fellow Cairns researcher earlier; see bold type in the email.

Hi Ray,

Thanks for your reply.

I have spent today covering most of your journal entries which include references to the Cairns family in Boneo. Your work to date is very impressive, especially the rates and valuations. I recently obtained/downloaded the electronic copies of several of the parish maps available through the State Library of Victoria website

I have Peter Wilson and Ray Cairns' booklet (my second copy). I have been building on that book using the electronic records that would not have been previously available as a means to cross reference and expand the previous work. I have also managed to find a few elderly distant relatives who have been good enough to meet with me and in some cases provide me with copies of some valuable photos (including one of Mary Drysdale, Robert snr's wife, and another with 5 of Robert and Mary's oldest sons)

I grew up in Blairgowrie but now live in Brunswick. I still have family in Blairgowrie and Rye and will probably be down again in the next couple of months, if so it would be good to catch up to exchange notes if possible? Apart from that perhaps I could give you a call sometime in the next week if there was a suitable time and day for you? I would be interested to contact anyone you may know on the Peninsula who is currently researching Cairns family history.

I think I can help you with you the following post: "THE HALF BROTHERS OF THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO: "LYNDFIELD" IN THE PARISH OF LYNDHURST, VIC., AUST" The half brothers and the second marriage in Scotland is something I have been trying to crack which has been a little frustrating to say the least.

Look forward to keeping in touch


Cameron Cairns


Alistair Rosie makes repeated references to John Pascoe Fawkner being an early squatter in the Pascoe Vale area. His "run" was supposed to have been named Belle Vue Park. He certainly owned Belle Vue Park, having purchased it in 1839 but after a total of twenty hours trying to confirm or dispel this claim, including two hours this morning, I am no closer to a solution. There is no mention of depasturing licences in Port Phillip District in 1838 on trove and the only other connection I have found between Fawkner and squatting (except for his strident opposition to squatters)will be detailed later.

This morning's search was in vain but, as usual, turned up some interesting information. A website about St Kilda explained the origins of two names associated with the former shire of Broadmeadows. The aboriginal name for the St Kilda area was Yuroe Yuroke which described grinding stones found at the base of the red sandstone cliffs. Walert-gurn was the term for possum skin rugs. These were Boon-wurrung words, this clan occupying Melbourne's coastal area to Werribee as well as the Mornington Peninsula etc. I believe that Wollert (as well as Yuroke) was a parish name. Another website described how squatters erected bells on large poles and would ring them if their stations were attacked by aborigines. The bell would alert neighbours (living 10 or more miles away) to danger and also summon help. This would probably explain the name of Bell Post Hill in Geelong.

One criticism of J.P.Fawkner was that he was a hypocrite. Although his land purchases at Pascoeville and central Coburg (Jika Jika), Box Forest (Will Will Rook), sections 7, 10 and 13 (Tullamarine) and 22C (Doutta Galla) and perhaps others, were intended to provide his beloved yoeman farmers with the opportunity to obtain freeholds, he had actually been a squatter himself before the crash of 1843. Richard Broome's "Between Two Creeks", a history of Coburg, provides the information that Fawkner's Run was called Moonjettee (or something similar; I am relying on a 20 year old recall)from which the name of Monegeetta is derived.

To my knowledge, no depasturing licences were issued for the Port Phillip District before Fawkner bought Belle Vue Park but Fawkner may have squatted there illegally. I would much appreciate it if anyone can provide evidence of squatting licences being issued before 1939 or Fawkner actually occupying land at Pascoe Vale before he bought it. Just an afterthought, Governor Bourke visited John Aitken at Mt Aitken, west of Sunbury, so perhaps licences had been issued before 1839. However as he had instructed Robert Hoddle to survey from Batman's Hill (Spencer St Station site)along the moonee moonee chain of ponds very early, to enable sale of land in Jika Jika and Doutta Galla, it is unlikely that the Governor would have approved of squatting in those parishes.

7 comment(s), latest 4 years, 4 months ago


YET ANOTHER CONNECTION BETWEEN TULLAMARINE AND THE PENINSULA. When I was writing my DICTIONARY HISTORY OF TULLAMARINE AND MILES AROUND (pages D 86-7) in about 1990, I had no idea where Jamieson's Survey was and I'd never heard of Henry Dunn.
Henry leased Jamieson's Special Survey (Safety Beach area, east to Bulldog Creek Rd) from 1846 to 1851 according to Colin McLear.Henry later received the grants in Moorooduc which led to the naming of Dunns Rd and "Four Winds" in Kangerong on the south corner of White Hill and McIlroys Rds at Red Hill. Edmund Dunn of Viewpoint at Tullamarine might have been Henry's brother.

As the 3000 plus pages of DHOTAMA are handwritten, I can't copy and paste but I'll transcribe the start of his biography on page 424 of VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS: PAST AND PRESENT. According to Edmond, he leased land on Jamieson's Survey for FIVE years before buying Viewpoint in 1849. The year of purchase could be right because the two grants comprising the farm were issued in 1843 and 1846 (one of the grantees being Andrew Baxter who was related to Ben Baxter of Carrup Carrup/ Mornington Junction/ Baxter according to a Baxter descendant.) The details of Edmund's native place, voyage and arrival might apply to Henry.

DUNN, Edmond, Broadmeadows, is a native of Devonshire, England who arrived on the WESTMINSTER in 1841 after a voyage of 100 days. He resided in the metropolis for a few years, working for other and doing a little farming on his own account, growing oats on a small patch of land on which Coburg now stands. After leasing some land on Jamieson's Survey for five years, in 1849 he purchased Viewpoint Farm at Brodmeadows and commenced growing wheat. The area of his farm is 325 acres and he also owns 3000 acres and leases 5000 acres on the Loddon. He was married in 1847 to Miss George, a native of Somersetshire, who came out on the same ship with him etc.
As expected, Valerie Wilson O.A.M., has written about Henry Dunn on her excellent Mornington Cemetery pioneers website.
The Dunn Family
Henry Dunn was born in 1808, the son of Charles and Thomasina (Hooper) Dunn.
He was a farmer and grazier, and a very early pioneer of the Mornington area.
From 1846 until 1851 he leased the land known as Jamieson’s Special Survey at Safety Beach, south of Mt Martha.
William Dunn was born to Henry and his wife Catherine in Moorooduc, in 1865.
Henry Dunn died in 1891 and he and Catherine are buried in the Mornington cemetery.
Oak Hill
Oak Hill, Mornington – Tyabb Rd.
It is believed they are in the same grave as their son and his wife, but the headstone only acknowledges the presence of William Henry and wife, Betsy.
William Dunn purchased the property known as Park Hill in 1890, to run as a pastoral lease.
The property stretched from Mornington-Tyabb Road along Dunns Rd, to Bentons Rd, to Moorooduc Highway, and passed through three generations before being subdivided.
The homestead built on the property by William in 1892, is now the Oak Hill Gallery.
This is on part of the property which became the Mornington Peninsula Shire Civic Reserve in 1999.
William Dunn married Betsy Harrap in 1894, and together with his son Howard, later ran a dairy and a milk run from the property. The Dairy run was sold to James Sawyer in 1920.
William was also the local Pound Keeper.
William died in 1934 and Betsy in 1943.
Henry Dunn's biography was not in VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS. It is significant that the Harraps had lived a few miles north of Tullamarine before moving to Mornington. The source for this is Neil Hamilton Mansfield's 700+ page THE DAVID MANSFIELD STORY. As Harrap is not in the index, it will take many hours to find the reference. Henry Harrap's wife (nee Bennett, I believe) was born at Kilmore and buried at the Keilor Cemetery. In a roundabout way, she was related to me.
Edmond Dunn died in 1891, the same year as Henry.
(The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 22 May 1891 p 1)
In 1868 the Melbourne Hunt whose master was Samuel Waldock caused much destruction as they rode through Viewpoint and Edmond's testimony at the trial in which he sued Waldock for damages shows that he retained links with the peninsula.
"Edmund Dunn, who stated,-I am a farmer at Tullamarine, in the neighbourhood of Broadmeadows." (He described the damage.)
"Cross-examined by Mr. FELLOWS.-I paid 6s. each for the sheep.
Mr. FELLOWS.-They were scabby, were they not?
Witness.-They were not. I bought them at Cape Schanck, from Mr. Anderson. I don't know why they were so cheap. I got them at 6s., because I suppose Anderson could not get more. They never had scab, and were never treated for it." (…|||l-state=Victoria|||l-year=1868)
Edmund's brave stand against the prominent gentlemen of the Melbourne Hunt led to the formation of an organisation with a strange name but plenty of clout.
PAGE 3, ARGUS,4-8-1869.
A genealogical website indicates that Henry arrived on the same ship as Edmond (…)
her arrival in victoria in 1841 on ship Westminster - assisted immigrants victoria PROV
Another genealogy website stated:
An Elizabeth and Edmund DUNN (brother and sister) arrive in Victoria 30 July 1841 aboard the WESTMINSTER Elizabeth aged 26 a housemaid living with her brother, Edmund aged 22 a lab. Both were protestants who could read and write. Also aboard the ship were a couple Henry 28 and Mary 38 also from Devon - can't say if they were connected as they are all listed separately. Edmund was to go to work for Dr THOMPSON. Henry was not engaged. (He was protestant who could read and write also)
It seems Henry died in Sn Point, Vic 1891 #17893 aged 83 parents Charles DUNN and Thomasina HOOPER (so born about 1808)
I checked and now I have found
Edmund DUNN baptised 17 Oct 1819 Sampford Courtney parents Charles and Thomasin (farmer) making Thomasin 48.
Henry and Edmund had the same parents, so I guess that made them brothers!

LAW REPORT. - SUPREME COURT. SITTINGS IN EQUITY. NEW COURT-HOUSE.—MONDAY, Nov. 2. (Before His Honour Mr. Justice Molesworth.) COLLINS V. ROB[?]INS. - The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) - 4 Nov 1868

POSTSCRIPT 9-10-2017.
I often go exploring on trove while sipping a coffee if I'm not in the middle of a particular line of research. Entering Dunn, Mornington, I stumbled on the death of Henry Dunn's wife* and realised that I'd provided very little detail about Henry and Edmund's wives and children.

*Death has again suddenly visited this locality, the deceased on this sad occasion being Mrs. Dunn, wife of Mr. Henry Dunn, of Park Hill, who was found dead in bed on Thursday morning last, having expired during sleep. She retired to rest the previous night. in her apparently usual health, and with several lady friends drove into the Point and made several calls only the previous afternoon. The cause of death is attributed to heart disease. Deceased, who was highly respected, was interred in the local cemetery on Saturday last, the cortege being a very large one. (P.2, South Bourke and Mornington Journal, 24-10-1888.)

Val Wilson stated (above) that William Dunn was born to Henry and Catherine in 1865 and that Henry died in 1891.
It appears from William's birth record that Catherine had been married previously and that her maiden name was Peters BUT her maiden name was Peters and Hallett was her MOTHER'S maiden name, according to Catherine's death record. Henry and Catherine were married in 1864.

EventMarriage Event registration number981 Registration year1864
Personal information
Family nameDUNN Given namesHenry SexMale Spouse's family namePETERS Spouse's given namesCatherine Hollett (sic)

EventDeath Event registration number15888 Registration year1888
Personal information
Family nameDUNN Given namesCatherine Hallett SexUnknown Father's namePeters William Mother's nameBetty (Hallett) Place of birth Place of deathPARK HILL Age66 Spouse's family nameDUNN Spouse's given namesHenry

EventDeath Event registration number17893 Registration year1891
Personal information
Family nameDUNN Given namesHy SexMale Father's nameChas Mother's nameThomasin (Hooper) Place of birth Place of deathSn Point Age83

Edmund's biography stated that he was a native of Devonshire and Henry's death notice seems to confirm that Henry was too. I wonder if other members of the Dunn family had settled in South Australia.

DUNNN-on the 16th October, at his residence, Park Hill, Mornington, after a short illness, Henry Dunn, aged
83. Deeply regretted. A colonist of 50 years South Australian and Devonshire (England) papers please copy.
(P.1, The Age, 19-10-1891.)

EventBirth Event registration number11666 Registration year1865
Personal information
Family nameDUNN Given namesWilliam Henry SexUnknown Father's nameHenry Mother's nameCatherine Hallett (Peters) Place of birthMOOR (Parish of Moorooduc.)

No other children born to Henry and Catherine were found up to 1885.

This is the death record of William Henry's wife, Betsy, who died in 1943 according to Val Wilson.
EventDeath Event registration number20439 Registration year1943
Personal information
Family nameDUNN Given namesBetsy Maria SexFemale Father's nameHARRAP Henry James Mother's nameSarah (Bennett) Place of birthMORNINGTON Place of deathMORNINGTON Age75

EventDeath Event registration number18772 Registration year1934
Personal information
Family nameDUNN Given namesWilliam Henry SexMale Father's nameDUNN Henry Mother's nameCath Holliet (Peters) Place of birth Place of deathMORNINGTON Age69

DUNN.—On the 26th November, at his residence, Park Hill, Mornington, William Henry, dearly beloved husband of Betsy Maria Dunn(nee Harrap), loving father of Howard, Dagmar (deceased), Lynette (Mrs. Brown), and Henry, loving grandfather of Joan, Kevin, and Lynette, aged 69 years.(P.1, Argus, 28-11-1934.)

Edmund's biography in Victoria and Its Metropolis: Past and Present (above) stated that Edmund had married Miss George.Her given name was Maria.

Edmund and Maria were married in 1847.
EventMarriage Event registration number17B Registration year1847
Personal information
Family nameDUNN Given namesEdmund SexMale Spouse's family nameGEORGE Spouse's given namesMaria

EDMUND'S DEATH RECORD. (Edmund died in the same year as Henry.)
EventDeath Event registration number6010 Registration year1891
Personal information
Family nameDUNN Given namesEdmund SexMale Father's nameUnknown Mother's name Place of birth Place of deathEsdon Age66

EventBirth Event registration number6124 Registration year1855
Personal information
Family nameDUNN Given namesEmma SexUnknown Father's nameEdmund Mother's nameMaria (George) Place of birthM.PONDS
(Moonee Ponds meant anywhere the Moonee Ponds Creek and as Henry had purchased Viewpoint in 1849, that was probably the birthplace.)

EventBirth Event registration number8887 Registration year1857
Personal information
Family nameDUNN Given namesHenry Edmund SexUnknown Father's nameEdmund Mother's nameMaria (George) Place of birthM.PONDS

EventBirth Event registration number18596 Registration year1859
Personal information
Family nameDUNN Given namesMaria SexUnknown Father's nameEdmund Mother's nameMaria (George) Place of birthM PONDS

EventBirth Event registration number3777 Registration year1862
Personal information
Family nameDUNN Given namesSamuel SexUnknown Father's nameEdmund Mother's nameMaria (George) Place of birthTULL

EventBirth Event registration number16477 Registration year1864
Personal information
Family nameDUNN Given namesAlfred Alexander SexUnknown Father's nameEdmond Mother's nameMaria (George) Place of birthTULL

EventBirth Event registration number6808 Registration year1867
Personal information
Family nameDUNN Given namesCharles Edwin Hooper SexUnknown Father's nameEdmund Mother's nameMaria (George) Place of birthBROADMEADO

4 comment(s), latest 2 months ago


Henry William Wilson who married Thamer Burdett was the subject of one of my earliest journals as itellya on family tree circles. I speculated that he may have been related to Sarah Wilson, who was a fellow tenant on the survey in the early 1860's. Petronella Wilson's GIVING DESTINY A HAND, discovered years later, showed that there was absolutely no relationship, but my attempt just now to point out my wrong assumption would have taken years to submit in this journal (HENRY WILLIAM WILSON, BULLOCKY TO BUTCHER) and THE SHIRE OF FLINDERS, MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST. journal into which I had copied an excerpt.

A later journal was written, pointing out the danger of assuming a relationship between these and other Wilson families in Mornington, Tuerong and Main Ridge.


This journal results from a request for information about Henry William Wilson. Hopefully I will be able to cut and paste much of it from previous work.
POSTSCRIPT, 9-12-2016. Henry William Wilson who married Thamer Burdett was the subject of one of my earliest journals as itellya on family tree circles. I speculated that he may have been related to Sarah Wilson, who was a fellow tenant on the survey in the early 1860's. Petronella Wilson's GIVING DESTINY A HAND, discovered years later, showed that there was absolutely no relationship, but my attempt just now to point out my wrong assumption would have taken years to submit in this journal (HENRY WILLIAM WILSON, BULLOCKY TO BUTCHER) and THE SHIRE OF FLINDERS, MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST. journal into which I had copied an excerpt.

A later journal was written, pointing out the danger of assuming a relationship between these and other Wilson families in Mornington, Tuerong and Main Ridge.

Street names in most parts of the Southern Peninsula honour the family of Henry William Wilson. Henry Wilson Dr and Thamer St in the Rosebud Industrial Estate recall Henry and his wife. Coutts St at Safety Beach recalls a Wilson presence on the Survey. Burdett St on the west side of Truemans Rd is on the Stenniken grant. Coutts Ct, Benjamin St, Godfrey St and Wilson Rd west of St Johns Wood Rd at Blairgowrie recall that the shopping centre sits on the old Wilson abbatoir site. When I started my research, I wondered if Wilsons Rd at Mornington was named after Henry William's family. I believe that both the road and the C.B.Wilson were named after Charlie Wilson, the train-driving President of Mornington Shire, the child of a female Wilson from "Tuerong" and a totally unrelated Wilson male from an equally old Schnapper Point family. (Joan Downward, Bonnie William website re Tuerong.)

Colin McLear's A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA gives much detail about the Wilson family on pages 43 to 47.Henry was the son of a London butcher and the licencee of the Beauvoir Arms Hotel, Kingsland Rd, London, in 1843. With his wife, Thamer, and four children, he left London on 22-1-1853 aboard the Emigrant, arriving at Port Phillip on 23 April. Their youngest daughter, Emily, died during the voyage.

He established an abbatoir at Sandridge(Port Melbourne) while living at Emerald Hill (South Melbourne.) He would have been living in a tent in Canvas Town as Emerald Hill was first known. Rents were extraordinarily high in Melbourne and most newcomers had to slum it at Canvas Town or Newtown (Fitzroy.) After a disease in his cattle on a run near Cranborne led to failure, he moved to Dromana in the early 1860's.

He had a bullock dray and four bullocks and initially lived in a slab hut on what was later to become Walter Gibson's No.10 paddock of 125 acres, then part of Jamieson's Special Survey. (Melway 160 K4 and bounded on the north by Wallaces Rd according to the subdivision map of Clarke's Estate.) The Stenniken land was a triangular block, the base of which was formed by the Nepean Highway and the sides of Moorooduc Highway and the upper reaches of Tassells Creek.( Roughly 151 D11, and sold as part of the Bruce Estate.) Henry took over as Dromana's butcher after the McLear brothers gave it up, but he first slaughtered on their "Maryfield" before buying the 45 acres that became the Dromana Aerial Landing Ground (P.27) from Mr Carrington and slaughtering there.
Henry was born in London in 1820 and died at Dromana on 17-12-1894.Thamer (Burdett!) was born in 1818 and died on 18-11-1894. (Both are buried at the Dromana Cemetery, their headstone easily read.) Their children were Henry John b. 1849, Godfrey Burdett 17-2-1850 to 21-1-1919, Thamer Burdett b.1846, Sarah b.1850, Emily 1852-3.

Godfrey married Maria Stenniken (b. 6-1-1855, d. 1-9-1927) in 1878. Their children were Henry William Burdett Coutts (1879-1956), Benjamin Godfrey John Ralph (1891?-1953) and Samuel James Stenniken (1886-1949.)
(They must have had other children, surely. LIME LAND LEISURE has more Wilson genealogy.
I should have found the Wilson family connections before I typed the above.
Henry William Wilson married Thamer Burdett.
This marriage took place in England. Henry was the son of a London butcher. In 1843, Henry was running the Beauvoir Arms Hotel in in Kingsland Rd, London. Henry, Thamer and their four children left London on 22-1-1853 aboard the Emigrant and after a remarkably fast voyage, which obviously stopped them getting into the doldrums (in both ways), they reached Port Phillip on 23 April. (Dreamtime of Dromana page 43.) This source and Lime Land Leisure contain much business and genealogical detail about Henry?s descendants.
It is possible that some of Thamer?s family came with them and any Burdett family historian should inspect the Emigrant passenger list for that voyage. Henry established an abbatoir at Sandridge (Port Melbourne) and lived in Emerald Hill, where it is possible that he came into contact with Isaac White and Captain Henry Everest Adams, pioneers of Rosebud, and that Captain Adams gave Henry Wilson an idea.
It is likely that Thamer was related, however distantly, to Sir Francis Burdett and his daughter, Angela Burdett. Sir Francis, a Baronet, had married Sophia, daughter of Thomas Coutts, a wealthy banker who founded Coutts and Co.
Now if Henry had chatted to Captain Adams, the old sea dog would have bragged about being the son of Lord Vivian (which led to the name of his vineyard, Vivyan, with spelling altered in case his real father had an agent in Singapore- and given names of many in the Adams line). Wilson would have thought, ?Well, my wife is related to the wealthiest woman in England and one of the greatest social reformers and philanthropists in the world; why not flaunt that fact?? He was speaking of Angela, the first Baroness Burdett- Coutts and that is possibly how the Wilsons and Stennikens used Coutts as a given name and Coutts St in Safety Beach got its name. See Historic Origins of Street names entry and the sources named above. (Details about Angela Burdett -Coutts from Wikipedia.)
The Burdett Quarry, on 101 hectares at 160 Potts Rd, Langwarrin, was probably established by relatives of Thamer. Burdett St in Frankston?s The Pines Estate would have been named after the quarry family, which must have been in the area fairly early (since they shared this honour with the pioneering Brunnings family of Somerville); if it had been one of the many subdivision of Wilson land there would have been another street named Thamer, Wilson, Godfrey, Benjamin etc nearby. See next entry re Coutts.

Benjamin Godfrey John Ralph Wilson (son of Godfrey Burdett Wilson and grandson of Henry William and Thamer) married Dorothy McDowell. Ben?s first given name came from his maternal grandfather Ben Stenniken. His brothers had Henry, William, Samuel, James, Burdett, Coutts and Stenniken as given names.
Allotment 17, Wannaeue, on the west side of Jetty Rd, which extended to Spray St and Eastbourne Rd, was subdivided in the 1870?s by the Woolcotts of Melbourne. George and Susan Peatey purchased 2 acres on which they grew vegetables, which they sold along with poultry, eggs etc. Their cottage burnt down in 1912 by which time their son had established a similar business on the east side of Peatey?s Creek (Murray-Anderson Rd) on a Rosebud Village (foreshore) block. Another early purchaser from the Woolcotts was the Education Department but that block was not as big as the present school site.
By 1900 the only other blocks sold were owned by George Chapman from Dromana (4), Charles James (3 acres), Marshall (William? 7 acres), postmaster John Roberts whose daughter established the Post Office Store, now a caf? of that name (4 and house) and Furmbisher (2.5 acres). The commercial bank now owned 84 acres of Woolcott?s land. As crown allotment 17 consisted of 129.5 acres, Mrs Phillips and Frederick Taylor probably had three more blocks too.
By 1910, Henry Bucher had 4 lots, Annie Eliza Cairns 4, Rosebud Ted Cairns 6, Alf Hanson (of Alpine Chalet in Tucks Rd ) 6, blacksmith, Hy Geo Chapman 2, the Coburns of Springbank 4, Fallow 1, Maconochie 4, Back Road Bob Cairns 2 near state school, Marshall (Moonee Ponds R.E.Agent) 7, Susan Peatey 2, Mrs J.Spensley 4 and Vale , probably the politician after whom Vale St in Mornington was named had the 84 acres forfeited by Woolcott.
By 1920, Mrs Mary Butler had a house on lot 49 and her rate notice was to be sent to Mrs McDowell of Rosebud. Robert McDowell had lots 77, 79 and part of lot 75 and buildings. These were across McDowell St from the Presbyterian Church, which became the site of Woolworths. Ernest Rudduck?s store was being run by L.C.Leech. Houses had been built by the Cairns family, Mrs Helena Salina Mitchell of Essendon, and Joseph Maconochie of Richmond. One house had disappeared and Alf and John Peatey were assessed on the block only.
McDowell Street changed little for years. The McDowells? neighbours were Don Miller and his caravan park opposite the school, Rosebud Ted opposite Pattersons Garage, then Ivy Patterson, Harry Nichols and the SEC on the Rosebud Avenue Ave corner.
SOURCES: A Dreamtime of Dromana by Colin McLear, Kangerong and Flinders rate records, Wannaeue parish map, Pine Trees and Box Thorns by Rosalind Peatey, The Cairns Family of Boneo by Peter Wilson, On the Road to Rosebud by Peter Wilson, Map of early Rosebud incorporated in ?Early Rosebud? by Ray Gibb.

Samuel James Stenniken (son of Godfrey Wilson and Maria, nee Stenniken) married Ruby Bery Rudduck, daughter of Nelson Rudduck and Jane Sophia, nee Chapman.
After Nelson died in 1935, Sam and Ruby moved into Piawola, the fine double storey house next to the Uniting Church in Dromana that Nelson built in 1894. The connection between the families goes back to the arrival in Dromana of Nelson and Jane from Dandenong in 1871 or early 1872. By 1867 Henry William Wilson had given up his occupation as a bullocky to become a butcher, grazing and slaughtering on 45 acres that was known as the Dromana Aerial Landing Ground by 1927*, and selling his meat from a shop whose location is described in two different ways by Colin McLear. (Main St or McCulloch St?) Henry retired in 1877 at 57 and Godfrey took charge of the company, expanding into Sorrento and building a brick shop and home** in Gibson St, Dromana. (*New abbatoirs had been established at Melway 167 F2, and operated until 1955, where Coutts Crt, Godfrey St, Benjamin Pde and Wilson Rd now stand. **Godfrey named the home Beauvoir after a hotel that his father had run in London in 1843.)
Sam was born in 1886 and died in 1949. On his father?s death in 1919, Sam and his brother, Ben, took over the Dromana portion of the empire Godfrey had built up and also expanded their retail into McCrae and Rosebud where older brother Henry had built shops. They relocated their shop to Main St in 1934.

Henry's son, Godfrey, married Ben Stenniken's daughter, so a bit of information about this other pioneering peninsula family will not go astray. The following comes from the FAMILY CONNECTIONS entry in my PENINSULA DICTIONARY HISTORY.
Benjamin (1815-1897) married Mary Ann, daughter of Samuel Sherlock.
Mary Ann was the sister of the Sam Sherlock who was much involved in the southern peninsula as a lad and later became a pioneer of the area north of the Osborne Township which the locals called Green Island. This name is perpetuated by Green Island AvE(145 E6). Ben and Mary Ann (and Mary Jane, probably their daughter) were buried at Rye Cemetery; their details are on the cemetery microfiche at Rosebud Library.
Sam Sherlock worked for the Barkers at Boneo and at The Briars for Balcombe. After his marriage, he carried the mail on horseback from Rye and Hastings to Cheltenham.
( Osborne Primary School Centenary 1873-1973 by Leslie Moorhead.)
Perhaps it was en route to Cheltenham that he spotted the Green Island land. According to LIME LAND LEISURE, Sam Sherlock was a co-grantee of the Stenniken land (at 14) but it was probably Mary Ann?s father.

Benjamin Henry, son of Jack and grandson of Benjamin Jnr, married Dorothy, daughter of Harry Prince. Ray Cairns told me that Harry Prince bought some of his father?s land near Maroolaba and that it came into Ben?s ownership after the death of Harry Prince.
Ray Cairns? father, Hill Harry, inherited Maroolaba from his father, the original Robert Cairns, who settled in Boneo in 1852. Robert Cairns and the Pattersons moved to Fingal, near Pattersons Rd at about the same time in the 1870?s. Rather than repeat information contained in the PATTERSON-STENNIKEN entry, I will simply state that Maroolaba (part of which was bought by Harry Prince) was 260 metres from Mary Jane Stenniken?s grant. The Prince family could have earlier lived near Truemans Rd, but, if not, Fingal provides an explanation as to how the two families connected.

Maria, daughter of Benjamin Stenniken Snr married Godfrey Burdett, son of Henry William Wilson. Benjamin Stenniken was based in Truemans Rd but also leased land on the western portion of Jamieson?s Special Survey near Pickings Lane, near Henry William Wilson's abode. Family members could have resided there to manage the property for Ben. Maria probably resided there in the summer. Big Clarke had bought the survey and the northern part was given to Bruce, his son-in-law. (Colin McLear?s version is more likely than Hollinshed?s.) Maria used to work at Bruce?s house during ?the season?.
One more piece of information is contained in the final verse of one of my first pieces, a poem called ALONG THE BACK TRACK, which can be found in my CANTERBURY TALES and describes an imagined trip made by drapery hawker, Charles Graves, and young Godfrey Wilson in about 1860. They have traveled from The Willow (Safety Beach area) to the corner of Weeroona and Browns Rds, Godfrey having been reassured by Graves that the smoke came from kilns, not a bushfire.
As they turned back to Kangerong,
A well-known man came riding strong,
With five year old Maria, running late.
Godfrey married Maria in 1878.

Jack Stenniken married Lily Clemenger.
By 1910, Mary Ann Stenniken (most likely the owner of the Fingal land) was living in Dromana and assessed on crown allotment 6 of section 17. This block with frontages to McCulloch St and Heales St and halfway between the school corner and the freeway was leased from Patterson. Ralph Patterson had probably just leased it to her (because of the position of Mary Ann?s assessment). His wife?s entry is next and her property (1 lot and buildings, McCulloch St) was probably next door. As lot 6 had no buildings, it is likely that Mary Ann was staying with Ralph and her daughter, Rachel. Ralph Godfrey Patterson (whose second given name recalls the marriage of 1878 in the previous entry) was leasing 287 acres (lots 18 and 19) from Clarke on the Survey and was probably Rachel?s husband and Mary Ann?s son in law. His move to Dromana probably followed the sale of his Fingal grant to one of the Cairns family. (His 244 acres may have been the bulk of the 260 acres that Harry Cairns sold to Harry Prince.)
Robert Adams sold crown allotment 19 of Wannaeue (between Parkmore Rd and Adams Ave) to William Tetley in about April 1889. Subdivision plan 3513 shows that the Clemengers bought lots 1-5 of section B, fronting Parkmore and Rosemore Rds. Albert Holloway built Parkmore in 1896, probably on lots 1-5 of section A, fronting Pt Nepean Rd. The Clemengers bought this historic house in 1908, after it was occupied for some time by Mr and Mrs Fair. The Clemengers introduced tented accommodation. Jack Stenniken was born in 1893 and died in 1970.
(Adams Corner and Rosebud Flower of the Peninsula by Ray Gibb.)
Jack might have met Lily at a dance at the Mechanics Institute dances at Dromana, Rosebud or Rye or perhaps at the Boneo hall on the CFA site. Another possibility is that he worked for Ralph on the Survey or met Lily on the way from Truemans Rd to visit Mary Ann Stenniken in Dromana.

"A Dreamtime of Dromana" discusses members of the Wilson family on pages 43-7, 53, 65, 72, 80, 81?, 101, 114, 121, 132, 140, 144, 156, 162, 165 and 177. I would love to give these details now but I am halfway through the journals about the WHITES and THE RED HILL. However I find page 132 interesting because it tends to confirm my theory that George Wilson of the Flinders area might have been related to Henry William Wilson. Whoever made the index has stated that Sarah Wilson and her sons, George and Robert, settlers on Jamieson's Survey in 1855 signed the letter supporting Quinan's school. Sarah was obviously a widow and it is possible that Henry and Thamer's daughter was named after her. In 1900, George Wilson was assessed on 216 acres at Flinders and George Wilson Jnr on 96 acres at Flinders and 48 acres, Balnarring (the latter being at Melway 255 J1.)

Is it possible that Henry William had a brother named George who came out with him, went to the Survey very soon and then died, leaving his widow and children on farmland that needed to be cleared before it could help to pay the rates? And that Henry, at Sandridge, having seen the enormous amount of sleepers needed to build the railway to that place at the end of 1854, moved into the "hut, Survey", on which he was assessed in 1863, to support her? (There is no mention of Sarah, George and Robert in that assessment although they signed the document in March 1861.

By 1900, the ratebook revealed that Henry Willam (the son) had 1 lot and building, Dromana and 5 acres leased from Thompson. Godfrey Burdett had 144 acres and 2 lots, Dromana. The 144 acre block was the holding paddock/abbatoir that was called the Dromana Aerial Landing Ground by 1927 when Spencer Jackson was flogging the Panoramic and Foreshore Estates with the aid of his "history of beautiful Dromana" which the Dromana Historical Society has for sale. As I did not transcribe the rates in the parish of Nepean, I do not know the details of the family's property in Blairgowrie and Sorrento, but I am prepared to research this if requested in comments. A Catherine Eleanor Wilson had 3 lots and a building in Dromana but I have no idea whether she was related to the Henry or Sarah Wilsons.

In 1910, Mrs G.G.Wilson had 60 acres of the Cairns' brothers'320 acre "Little Scotland' at the north east corner of Boneo and Browns Rd but I don't know if she was related to H.W.Wilson, although Colin McLear mentions that they had land at Boneo. Godfrey Burdett Wilson, butcher, had: shop, house and land, McCulloch St, 1-3 of 4, 4 of 13, 11,2 of section 2; 40 acres 2,3 of 1 Kangerong, 100 acres and slaughteryards, Kangerong probably in Shergolds Lane ; 255 acres (lots 22 and 23 Clarke's.) His wife had house and land, Heales St, Ben had 150 acres Kangerong, Henry(living in Sorrento and running that branch of the empire) had 100 acres, Kangerong, and Sam, living in Dromana, had 180 acres Kangerong.

As the land designated as Kangerong was not granted to the Wilsons, it would take months of research to specify its location. Dromana Township was west of McCulloch St. Section 14 was bounded by the Esplanade, Verdon, Hodgkinson and Heales Sts with lots 1-3 near the beach, section 13 was across Verdon St, lot 2 section 2 was at the east corner of Latrobe Pde and McArthur St and I can only presume that 11 meant section 11, bounded by Codrington, Ligar and Verdon Sts with lots 10, 11 and 12, fronting Palmerstone Ave, granted to G.B.Wilson.

Lots 22 and 23 Clarke's is a pushover and the rate collector was amazingly accurate with the acreage! Lot 22 was 127 acres and 19 perches. Lot 23 was 127 acres 2 roods and 37 perches, giving a total of 254 acres,3 roods and 16 perches, only .15 of an acre out! The Wilson's were involved with the subdivision of the Safety Beach area and must have been involved with the land near Coutts St (160 D2) where the female drover thought Jagger's dairy was located. Lot 23 and 22 were between Pickings Rd and the south side of the Martha Cove Waterway with Victoria St the western boundary and the bend in Island Drive indicating the north east corner of lot 22. The western two thirds of the canals are in lot 23.
Even though he was living in Sorrento, Henry William Wilson Junior was still involved in the social fabric of Dromana. He was the Secretary of the Dromana Sports and was a handicapper for the athletic and wood chopping events. (Mornington Standard, 21-3-1901, p.26.) The Mornington Peninsula souvenir in The Argus of 7-6-1954 has and advertisement for the long established butchering business which features photos of the main players. This is just a sample of the information about the family that is available on trove.


PAGE 19,

5.3.4 Fruit-growing
An advertisement that appeared in 1888 for land at Redstone Hill, promoted it as ‘A beautiful
stretch of undulating country … lightly timbered, fenced, and subdivided into convenient
paddocks, with rich alluvial flats admirably adapted for Fruit Growing, and easily irrigated.29
An article of 1937 claimed that the first fruit tree planted in Victoria was possibly planted by
Martin Batey at Redstone Hill.30
In the 1870s it was noted that there were many orchards in
the Sunbury area.31

30 Source has not been identified, but was taken from a search in


The source was an article about THE OLDEST FRUIT TREE IN VICTORIA which I should be able to locate on trove with this subject and the words FLINTOFF and BATEY. The tree was planted at Greensborough!