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JIMMY AND TED WILLIAMS OF EASTBOURNE, ROSEBUD (VIC., AUST.) DID DIE ON SUCCESSIVE DAYS.

As you enter the Rye Cemetery from Lyons St there is a group of old graves about 20 metres ahead on the left of the path. If I remember correctly, three of them relate to the Stenniken family, the first their daughter, Mrs Kennedy (Sarah?) I think the next grave after those three is that of James Campbell Williams*. His sister,Carrie,is either buried in the same grave or the next one. However,there is no mention of their brother, Ted Williams (Edward junior.)The Rye Cemetery Index in the local history room of the Rosebud Library has no mention of Ted either but that is probably because it was compiled from grave inscriptions. The late Ray Cairns told me that Jimmy and his brother died a day apart and cleared up my confusion about Ned Williams. Jimmy's father was Ned and Jimmy's brother was called Ted. So the father was the one who moved the lighthouse to the top of Arthurs Seat and dug the Chinamans Creek canal.

(*James was known as Jimmy the Squid. He collected fishermen's catches which were left on the roadside and transported them to the Mornington Railhead,starting his run from Rosebud West. Isobel Moresby* mentioned that Chinese fishermen used to sell squid on the site of the tennis court (the playground in front of the historic kindergarten.) Perhaps their unsold squid catch was sent to Melbourne or other fishermen were catching squid too. (* ROSEBUD: FLOWER OF THE PENINSULA.)

If Jimmy and Ted died a day apart why was Ted not mentioned on the gravestone? At the age of 100 years and 10 days,Ray Cairns' memory was sensational but every now and then he wasn't certain, and he insisted on being certain as Peter Wilson stated in THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO. He was slightly confused about Carrie and Marion and as I didn't want to distress him,we moved onto other subjects. I spent weeks trying in vain to find confirmation of Jimmy and Ted dying on consecutive days.Now,about two years later,I found it while looking for
"Campbell, Rosebud" re the house near the Rosebud jetty that will have to be demolished for the construction of the much-opposed apartment/cafe; a descendant of George Fountain told me at the Dromana Museum last Sunday (19-1-2014) that a grandson of Melbourne's Lord Mayor,Edward Campbell had built the house.

HERE'S THE CONFIRMATION.
WILLIAMS. - On September 10, at EastBourne, Rosebud West, James Campbell, son of the late Edward and Mary Williams,beloved brother of Edward (died September9, 1947). Caroline, Ellen (Mrs. Connop, de-
ceased), Marion (Mrs. Edmonds, deceased) aged 89 years. -At rest. (P.9, Argus, 11-9-1947.)


EASTBOURNE was the name that Sidney Smith Crispo of the Victorian Coastal Survey gave to his grants at Rosebud West, crown allotments 52 and 44 Wannaeue, bounded on the west by Elizabeth Ave and on the south by Hiscock Rd. The Village Glen now occupies most of the land east of Chinamans Creek except the part of crown allotment 44 south of the freeway reservation. Recently (early 2013?), the Friends of the Tootgarook Swamp opposed filling of the swamp in the St Elmos Close area to extend the village and the gang of six on the council tried to sue Cameron Brown who led the protest.

Edward Williams Snr. came from Sydney in 1855 on a ship whose purpose was to survey Port Phillip Bay. The Burrells of Arthurs Seat must have invited the officers to some hospitality and Ned,as he was usually called, probably helped to row them ashore as he obviously enjoyed hospitality with the servants.

One of the servants was Mary Campbell who'd come out with her guardian, Robert Cairns and his wife,Mary (nee Drysdale) in 1852,probably acting as a nanny for the Cairns children. Edward Williams married Mary Campbell. Mary's maiden name was used as Jimmy the Squid's second given name. Young Edward was known as Ted, according to the late Ray Cairns.

Ned was amazingly strong and according to Colin McLear in A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA was a harvester of renown who could scythe an acre of crop in one day and,with Bob White, moved the first wooden lighthouse at today's McCrae to the summit of Arthurs Seat when the present metal lighthouse had been constructed. From 1863, he acted at caretaker of Crispo's grants between Canterbury Jetty Rd and St Johns Rd, Blairgowrie*, until he settled on his own grants straddling Browns Rd just east of Truemans Rd. Ned owned a butchers shop on Butchers Hill at Sorrento which was later sold to George White (of Irish descent and unrelated to the aforementioned Bob White, who like the Cairns family came from the Clackmannan district of Scotland) from whom George St, Sorrento probably got its name. Ned's sons were put in charge of the shop but obviously preferred outdoor life.
(*See my journal THERE WOULD BE NO SORRENTO WITHOUT SIDNEY SMITH CRISPO.)


I had presumed Ned Williams' transfer of his butchering operation from Sorrento to Rosebud was due to increased competition in Coppin's town but it was more likely that the 1890's depression was the cause. It would be interesting to study the Sorrento real estate activity in that decade. As with the 1843 depression, the battlers were affected and many peninsula farmers were forced to desert their farms in the 1890's. However, in both crashes the moneyed classes suffered the greatest losses.Shopkeepers in Sorrento,like in most coastal towns today, made their profits during the tourist season and just kept their heads above water during the rest of the year. If the owners of the clifftop mansions at Sorrento (the bulk of houses mentioned in the Shire of Flinders Heritage Study) were approaching insolvency, the shopkeepers,publicans and guesthouses would also go to the wall.

It has not* been established whether Edward Thomas Williams was Ned or Ted but in any case the butcher shop was certainly lost. (*IT HAS NOW;SEE DEATH NOTICES AT END!) It was probably the assignee who sold it to George White.

COMPULSORY SEQUESTRATIONS. |
Mr. Justice A'Beckett yesterday in the Supreme Court compulsorily sequestrated the estates of-lolm Henry Werner, ol' Rooky Lead, storekeeper, on the application of Mr. Vasey.
Edward Thomas Williams, of Sorrento,butcher, on the application of Mr. Wasley.

I have seen no record of a butchers shop at Rosebud at that time so Edward probably supplied customers from a cutting cart. Crispo died in 1899 at Edward Williams' residence, Eastbourne,so I believe Edward was leasing the property or had received a certificate ending his insolvency, and Crispo, apparently a bachelor,had left the estate to his mate, Ned, or sold it to him on easy terms. Whichever,Ned was able to build the heritage-listed house at 17 William Crescent about half a decade later.

While trying to find a heritage citation for Ned's new Eastbourne homestead, I came across Mike Hast's article about the opening of the Rosebud West Community hub. The summary mentioned William Rd, Blairgowrie so in view of the Crispo/Ned mateship, I checked its location. Sure enough the straight part was one of the main streets of Crispo's village of Manners Sutton (later Canterbury, both names coming from the Governor, Sir John Manners-Sutton who became Viscount Canterbury during his term of office.) So that makes some council officer guilty of TWO acts of historical vandalism! The shire must have resolved to remove the s from the end of street names where it had served a possessive function ('s) and Williams'(Cres., Rd.) from which the apostrophe had been dropped over time became William! It's a pity the know all (who crossed out the s where Peter Wilson, in THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO, had described Ned's house as being at 17 WILLIAMS CRESCENT, didn't ask the council why there was no s at the end of the street name.

NED WILLIAMS' PROPERTIES ON BROWNS RD.
In 1900, Ned's Browns Rd properties were occupied by Edward Connop and in 1910 by John and Marion Edwards of Eastbourne, Dromana. The 1910 assessment is an example of the the reason Cr Terry resigned from council. The shire was nearly broke from the lingering effects of the 1890's depression and Terry was demanding that properties be properly described so that it was clear who owed rates etc. It is unclear whether John and Marion were residing in a house in Dromana named after the Rosebud West farm,but their surname wasn't Edwards, it was Edmonds.

Ned Williams' daughter, Marion,had apparently married Ned Edmonds and one of their daughters had married James Woonton (according to the late Ray Cairns who added that James did road maintenance for the shire.)

In 1919,James had just started leasing the Eagle Ridge site, and the triangular 27A of 20 acres adjoining it on the west,from Ned Edmonds of Boneo. Marion Edmonds was assessed on "94 acres 39A" which John Edwards (sic) had occupied in 1910.
(No wonder Cr Terry was furious! It was 39B of 93 acres 2 roods and 8 perches, and 39A fronting Truemans Rd, consisted of a bit over 83 acres.)

EASTBOURNE.
In 1900,Edward Williams was leasing 69 acres of Eastbourne (crown allotment 52) from Crispo. (The rate collector obviously didn't read the death notices.) He apparently owned 170 acres in crown allotments 52 and 44. As c/a 52 in the high and dry area consisted of 141 acres,Ned was not occupying 43 acres of c/a 44 near the swamp.(Probably the land that Alex Crichton added to the Lovie grants.)

Ned was also assessed on the 20 acres of 27A Wannaeue (Melway 169 west half F12 and south east half E12.) The other Browns Rd grants were 27 B (Eagle Ridge Golf Club to bottom of diagonal western boundary* in Melway 252 G1) and c/a 39B (Melway 169 F11 part 10,part E 10,11.)
(*The western border of 27B went due south from the north west corner of Eagle Ridge.)

In 1910,Caroline Williams (Carrie) was assessed on 69 acres in 52 Wannaeue (near Eastbourne Rd),her address,like the Edmonds, being given as Eastbourne, Dromana. She was also assessed on 162 acres in 7A Wannaeue, east of the southern, swampy half of Eastbourne (Melway 169 K6 to Hiscock Rd, adjoining the Eastbourne Primary School site, and fronting Boneo Rd south of a point opposite the Branson St corner.) Alex Crichton of the Glen Lee family had bought part of crown allotment 44 and sold this with John Lovie's grants between Ned's 39B and Eastbourne to Louis Jensen of Blackburn. Alex, who'd been assessed on Lovie's grants for many decades,had moved to Cockatoo.

In 1919 James C.Williams had crown allotment 7 (see Carrie in 1910) and Ted* had 190 acres and buildings part c/a 44 and crown allotment 52. The William Crescent house was of course on c/a 52. Caroline was leasing 69 acres,pt.c/a 44. (* As Ned was 83, I presume that Edward meant Ted.)

CRISPO.On the 13th October, at the residence of Mr. Edward Williams, Eastbourne, Rye, Sidney Smith Crispo, late secretary and paymaster, Admiralty Survey, Victoria, aged 71. Buried at Rosebud????? Cemetery.
(The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 18 October 1899 p 1 Family Notices)

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 22 April 1915 p 1 Family Notices
...bsp; affectionate family.) WILLIAMS - In sad and loving memory of my dear wife, and our loving mother, Mary Williams, who died at "Eastbourne," Rosebud, on the 21st April, 1914.

WILLIAMS. On the 12th November, at his residence, Eastbourne, Rosebud, Edward, loved father of Edward, James, Caroline, Ellen (Mrs.Connop), Marion (Mrs. Edmonds, deceased), aged 90 years.
(P.17, Argus, 13-11-1926.)

Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 10 September 1947 p 11 Family Notices
... Eastbourne. Rosebud West, Edward Thomas son of the late Edward and Mary Williams, be- loved brother
(Ted was the Edward Thomas Williams who was insolvent.)

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 30 April 1949 p 15 Family Notices
... - On April 29, at Dro- mana Community Hospital, Caroline, of Eastbourne, Rosebud West, eldest daughter ..

[PDF]
March 2013 - The Village Glen, Rosebud
www.villageglen.com.au/webdata/webpages/13/130.pdf‎

March 2013,Issue No 384, Eastbourne by Bergliot Dallas.

The following extract from the VILLAGE GLEN NEWS contains some mistakes but adds some important information, such as Ned making the road around Anthony's Nose in 1866 which I'd forgotten to mention. I'll have to check whether 19 William Crescent could be the original Eastbourne homestead in which Crispo died. There is no rate book evidence that Ned Williams occupied Eastbourne from the 1860's; this might be confusion caused by the author being unaware of Manners-Sutton at Blairgowrie. Bergliot seems to be unaware that there had been two homesteads on Eastbourne, the second, circa 1904 involving Croad and Morse,built for Ned. Probably not having consulted rate books and parish maps, Bergliot assumed that Eastbourne and the Browns Rd. properties adjoined when they were separated by John Lovie's grants,owned from early times by Alex Crichton.There is ample evidence (letters to the editor) that Crispo lived at Eastbourne, which was at times described as being at Rye,the name of Rosebud West not then being used.

Eastbourne Bergliot Dallas
How many of us here at the Village Glen are aware of the existence of Eastbourne, the historic farmhouse located close by at 19 William Street. It was built between 1885 and 1890, when the property comprised almost 200 acres and stretched from Eastbourne Road to Browns Road, roughly between Balaka Street and Elizabeth Avenue.

Edward Williams came from Sydney in about 1860 (ACTUALLY 1855 ACCORDING TO "THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO"), and was a member of the crew of HMVS, the Survey Ship Victoria. He was later described variously as a contractor, farmer, butcher and yeoman! On the Victoria he met Sidney Smith Crispo, the paymaster who lived at Canterbury
Jetty, Rye. He owned the property that Williams and his family occupied from 1864, but never lived there, and the sale to Williams was only finally concluded in 1899, three weeks prior to Crispo's death from influenza.

Mary Campbell migrated from Stirling, Scotland, in 1852 on the Europa with one of the Cairns families as a nursemaid for their children. On the Mornington Peninsula, she was employed by the Burrells at what had been the McCrae homestead. During this time, she met and married Edward Williams, who was fourteen years her junior. They had five children.

The house is built of local limestone, with exterior walls about 60cm thick. This keeps the temperature inside quite even, neither cold in winter nor hot in summer. W J Croad was contracted as the builder and George Morce did the stone work. There are numerous examples of the work of both these Sorrento men in Portsea, Sorrento and Rye, but the house is certainly unique* in the Rosebud/Tootgarook, area and was named in the Shire of Flinders Heritage Study inventory as a house of local significance.
(* Eleanora Davey Cairns' Eleanora in the grounds of Rosebud Hospital was also built of limestone circa 1904 and is also heritage- listed.)

Edward Williams contributed quite significantly to the settlement and history of the area. He cut the road around Anthonys Nose next to the beach, and undertook the contract to drain the Tootgarook Swamp (as well as most of his pasture), creating Chinamans Creek, so named because a man called Wong-Shing leased the land on the eastern bank of the creek and used it as a market garden for many years around the early 1900s. In Sorrento, opposite the Park, the butchers shop of Williams and Son (Edward and his son, Edward Jnr) traded for many years,and animals from Eastbourne were slaughtered on the site then known as Butchers Hill, on the corner of Hotham Road and George Street.

The old dairy, which was at one time the Eastbourne Butter Factory, can still be seen beside the house. One of the daughters, Caroline (known as Carrie), is remembered as always wearing a black dress, white bonnet and apron, selling eggs and butter. She died aged 90 in 1949, a spinster. Edward and Mary and their children are buried in the Rye Cemetery.

Just in conclusion, Eastbourne might have become part of Federanium, the capital city of Australia if Crispo's plan had been adopted. See:
BONEO AND FINGAL IN 1902, MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC ...
www.familytreecircles.com/boneo-and-fingal-in-1902-mornington-peni...‎
Jun 4, 2013 - 'Federanium.' The streets a mile and two miles long. S: 8. CRISPO ... BONEO. Mornington Standard (Vic. : 1889 - 1908) Thursday 17 May 1894 .

JOHN BATMAN'S DESCENDANTS, and the grave at Toolern Vale, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

It's amazing what you find when looking for something else.

You Yangs wrote that a daughter of John Batman had been buried on the Dennistoun pre-emptive right, Green Hills in the parish of Yangardook near Toolern Vale.I found this while checking the correct spelling of Dennistoun which was rendered as Dennistown on another copy of the map. Maybe true, maybe rumour, but I pasted the article in comments under my DICTIONARY HISTORY OF BULLA journal, just in case.

Not long after, I was reading Isaac Batey's memoirs of Sunbury district pioneers,just for fun. Isaac,unlike most historians, wrote about the little people as well as the big-wigs, and this article was about people who had worked for squatters. He mentioned that the Collyer brothers who had managed Green Hills had both married daughters of John Batman. On a scale of 1 to 10, the credibility of the claim about the grave near Toolern Vale had risen to about 9.99. No written history is going to be free of errors, sometimes because of incorrect assumptions (which in scientific method can be discovered fairly soon through experimentation), sometimes through quirks of memory, sometimes through accepting folklore as fact. In hundreds of hours spent reading Isaac's amazing articles,I have spotted only one error. He called the Lady of the Lake Hotel at Tullamarine the Lady of the Lady. Unfortunately this mistake was repeated in the Tullamarine Methodist Church centenary souvenir of 1970.That is the only reason that the credibility score did not rise to 10.

The following confirms his claim about the Collyer lads marrying John Batman's daughters. And what of Batman's sons? No children,they did not move to Gotham City! Read the article.

JOHN BATMAN. DESCENDANTS OF THE FOUNDER. UNPUBLISHED MEMORANDA.
The Broadford Courier and Reedy Creek Times (Broadford, Vic. : 1893 - 1916) Friday 17 April 1903 p 5 Article.

5 comment(s), latest 3 years, 2 months ago

JOHN COSGRAVE, PIONEERING LANDOWNER IN KENSINGTON AND OAKLANDS JUNCTION, BULLA.

BULLA.(From my DICTIONARY HISTORY OF TULLAMARINE AND MILES AROUND.)
Much detail was given by I.W.Symonds in his "Bulla Bulla, an illustrated history of the Shire of Bulla."
Tulip Wright was granted section 3, Bulla Bulla on 22-6-1856. He soon subdivided the 640 acre block at the north east corner of Oaklands and Somerton Rds, directly north of W.P.Greene's "Woodlands." Mary Daniel, whose Narbonne was near Daniels Rd and Andrew Carroll were early buyers. John Cosgrave bought some of Mary Daniel's purchase. He used to ride a bone-shaker (bicycle) to his farm. Symonds may have said that John was the first treasurer (see below.)

Page C.184, DHOTAMA.
In 1853*,Mary Daniel sold 53 acres to John Cosgrave "who was at that time alderman and first treasurer of the City of Melbourne (sic)." He built a house in 1854 after living in a tent and used to cycle out on a boneshaker from North Melbourne. His children were Katie and Davey.His land was later bought by the Oaklands Hunt Club. (P.44, Bulla Bulla, I.W.Symonds.)
(*Although Tulip Wright's grant seems to clearly state 1856, for the sale to take place in 1853, the grant must have been issued on 22-6-1850,which seems more likely because of Tulip's involvement outside the Bulla area shortly afterwards, e.g.Lincolnshire Arms at North Essendon, Sir John Franklin in Sunbury. John was not an alderman and treasurer at the same time. The term "first treasurer" could depend on whether the Corporation WAS or BECAME the City of Melbourne.I have a feeling that the corporation was set up to control markets etc and was transformed into a city council. The town of Melbourne was incorporated on 22-10-1841 and...The Town of Melbourne was raised to the status of a City by Letters Patent of Queen Victoria dated 25 June 1847, just five years after its incorporation.As the city was in existence for over a decade before John became treasurer, he was certainly not the city's first treasurer.)

John's land (top of Melway 177 K4),between Mary Daniel's "Narbonne" and James Musgrove's land, was bought by the Hunt in 1908 and housed the kennels and kennel huntsman (H.H.Daniel and then his son H.H.Daniel Jnr) until the hounds were moved to "Sherwood in 1946. (Pages 27, 55,239, THE OAKLANDS HUNT,D.F.Cameron-Kennedy.)


Place: Oaklands Hunt Club - Hume City Council
www.hume.vic.gov.au/.../Oaklands_Hunt_Club_Oaklands_Junction.pdf
I.W. Symonds, Bulla Bulla: An Illustrated History of the Shire of Bulla, Spectrum ... Mary Daniel had sold a 53 acre allotment to John Cosgrave, alderman and first .

KENSINGTON. (From my EARLY LANDOWNERS:PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA.)
Lot. 9. Two allotments of land near tho residence of Messrs. Coote and White (sic), and other gentlemen, and
adjoining the property of Mr. Alderman Cosgrave, parish Doutta Galla, and near the residence of Mr.
Rankin, 59 x 132. (P.8, Argus,21-7-1858, column 2, SALE OF VALUABLE PROPERTIES BY TENDER.)

F.J.Coote's house was across today's Kensington Rd (formerly Footscray Rd) from Edward Byam Wight's "The Ridge",whose driveway is now The Ridgeway. Coote's house (now 18 Henry St if I remember correctly) after having served as a Footscray Rd dairy became accommodation for priests at the Holy Rosary Church and is heritage-listed (at a higher level than when I first became aware of it.) John Rankin's house was across Princes St (now Rankins Rd) from the future (1860) Kensington Railway Station.

John Cosgrave's land at Kensington was in Melway 42 K3. He purchased most of the land between Hampden and Gower Sts in 1854.I had not noticed previously that he also had bought a triangular block that met Macaulay Rd east of the railway crossing right near John Rankin's house. Also in 1854, he bought land between Gower and Henry Sts which fronted the southern five eighths of the Henry St frontage.

Extract from EARLY LANDOWNERS: PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA.
ALLOTMENT 20.
This was granted to William Highett who came to the Port Phillip District to manage the Union Bank. Highett also received a grant in the parish of Yuroke.
His land dealings fill many pages of the lands title index; no doubt many were in Highett. The entrance in Dynon Rd between Kensington Rd and the railway bridge is actually Highett St.
Not long afterwards, Highett sold allotment 20 to lawyer, Henry Jennings, after whom Henry St was probably named. In 1854, Jennings subdivided the land, selling the land north east of Derby St in 78 lots. The main buyers were F.J.Coote, William and David Winder, and John Cosgrave. Coote was a partner in Jennings’ legal firm and Cosgrave was treasurer of the Corporation of Melbourne. William Winder was a brickmaker and David Winder had purchased the land between Stubbs St and the Macaulay Station site in 1849.
Coote bought most of the land between 18 Henry St and Derby St, which also fronted Kensington Rd, and lots 3-7 (the shop area between Gower St and Hampden Rd). The Winders bought nearly all the Macaulay Rd frontage between Gower St and Kensington Rd. Cosgrave bought land on both sides of Gower St from Derby St up to the church and school sites as well as north east of the latter. Land near the Holy Rosary church site was bought by Thomas Lilley (who owned it for 18 years), and Joseph Hore (who sold to John Brooks in 1857.) Across Gower St, Josh Hore, T.Gregory and T.Stubbs bought blocks that they sold to the McMeikans in 1859.
The McMeikans bought land from Cosgrave in 1864 and Coote in 1868 to extend their property to Bellair St. In 1863, J.T.Smith bought all of Cosgrave’s land east of Gower St (sold to Durham in 1879). Smith also bought six of Cosgrave’s blocks south west of the church site, Robert Wallace buying the other 9 blocks (to Derby St) in 1869.
Durham subdivided his land fairly quickly; Munro’s 1884-5 plan of allotment 19 subdivision shows the nearby houses of Durham and Clarke (manager of the Apollo Candle Works in Swamp i.e. Dynon Rd) with Mr Dixon in the old McMeikan house. In 1888, the two rows of terrace houses were added.
In 1871, Frederick John Coote bought lot 68, between 18 Henry St and Kensington Rd.
It had been owned by Henney (1854-65) and Warnock.
The heritage status of 18 Henry St has been significantly upgraded recently. The house had been built by 1867, when a picture was produced showing this house and those of Peter Wilson (church site), McMeikan and Cosgrave (school site). This picture clearly shows lot 68 is fenced off from Coote’s property.

F.J.Coote’s house is in the foreground of this picture (C.1866.)
Serving as a dairy and the residence of Richard Nelson for the first four decades of the 1900’s, the house was called 11 Footscay Rd, from 1893 until 1915.
This map* shows original and later owners of lots in Jennings’ subdivision.
(*ANYONE DESIRING THIS MAP SHOULD PRIVATE MESSAGE THEIR EMAIL ADDRESS TO ME. THE MAP WAS MADE BY ME FROM DESCRIPTIONS OF LAND IN MEMORIALS AND EXISTS NOWHERE ELSE.)




THE FOLLOWING TEXT COULD NOT BE CORRECTED ON TROVE.
In our obituary column of yesterday appeared an announcement of the death of Mr John Cosgrave who was for many years the treasurer of the Melbourne Corporation. The deceased gentleman was a native of Queenstown, Ireland. In the beginning of 1837 he arrived in Tasmania accompanied by his parents. Shortly afterwards he went on a
whaling voyage but on returning came over to Port Phillip and settled down here. A little while after his arrival he became the licensee of the Fitzroy Arms Hotel* King street and was elected to a seat at the council table of the corporation towards the end of l850 and subsequently became the alderman for the Gipps Ward. During tho excitement which prevailed in Melbourne in 1852 owing to the discovery of gold and the outbreak of the diggings, his business prospered and he soon succeeded in accumulating considerable wealth. He was always noted for his genial and generous disposition and to his generosity can be traced the loss of his fortune. While he was made prosperous and affluent by the finding of the precious metal at Ballarat and Bendigo, its
discovery had an opposite effect on many of the old colonists who in their straitened circumstances were not unfrequently assisted by Mr Cosgrave. Upon Mr Fairwell relinquishing his position of treasurer of the
corporation in 1861, Mr Cosgrave resigned his aldermanship and was elected to fill the vacancy, and ever since then continued to act in that capacity. About 12 months ago he had a severe attack of gout and obtained leave of absence in consequence. He partially regained his health, but was never strong enough to resume his duties.
He was an accomplished boatbuilder and at the last Melbourne International Exhibition obtained the first prize for models of naval architecture. He was 58 years of age and leaves a son and daughter. His remains will be interred in the Melbourne Cemetery this afternoon.
(P.5,top half of column 2, Argus, 27-1-1885.)

It would be a fair assumption that James Cosgrave of the Fitzroy Arms Hotel was related in some way to John Cosgrave and that the hotel was on a corner block.(King/Little Bourke St.)
MISS HARRIET PHIPPS will hear of her brother William by applying to Mr. Jas. Cosgrave, Fitz Roy Arms, Little Bourke-street west.(P.2,Argus, 25-10-1853, MISSING FRIENDS.)

COSGRAVE.—On the 11th inst., of scarlet fever, at her residence, Kensington, Ellen, the beloved wife of
John Cosgrave, city treasurer, aged thirty-nine years. (P.4, Argus, 12-10-1868.)

Funeral Notice.
THE Friends of JOHN COSGRAVE, Esq., City Treasurer, are respectfully invited to follow the remains of his late wife to the place of interment, Melbourne General Cemetery. The funeral to move from his residence, Kensington, on Tuesday, 13th inst., at half past 2 o'clock p m.
JOHN DALEY, undertaker, Latrobe and Spring streets. Melbourne. (P.8, Argus, 12-10-1868.)

ATCHESON.-On the 28th inst., at Kensington, the residence of his son-in-law, John Cosgrave, Esq.,city treasurer, Melbourne, Mr. Matthew Atcheson, aged sixty-four years. (P.4, Argus, 29-10-1867.)

Great regret is expressed amongst yachtsmen at the death of Mr John Cosgrave, whose interest in yachting never seemed to abate. He was one of the original members of the Victoria Yacht Club, and before the existence of that body had in 1858 built and won races with the celebrated Paddy from Cork cutter, 8.5 tons, which is still in Hobson's Bay. He also designed and had built by Edwards, of Princes bridge, the yachts Gleam, Idea, and Soud, centre-boarders, of from three to four and a half tons. In 1877 the Kathleen, a well known prize taker on the Albert-park lake, came on the scene from his design.

In the way of models, Mr Cosgrave took a medal at the last Intercolonial Exhibition, and with his models,
which are now in the Technological Museum, he was awarded first prize in the Melbourne International
Exhibltion. Mr Cosgrave's demise will be much felt for his practical information was always
placed at the command of the beginner. (P.5, Argus, 31-1-1885, YACHTING NEWS.)

It seems that the discovery of gold at Bendigo was due in no small measure to John Cosgrave's glowing report of the Ballarat diggings.

THE DISCOVERY OF GOLD AT BENDIGO.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE ARGUS
Sir,—On my return from Tasmania a few days ago my attention was directed to a discussion which took place in the Legislative Assembly on the 20th inst., as to who was the discoverer of gold on the Bendigo goldfield, and as I can perhaps throw some light on that subject, I now address you.

Now, Sir, I claim the honour of developing the first gold reef in Victoria and the first silver lode in Australia and I now, for the first time, publicly claim to be one of a party of eight men who discovered the first payable gold on the Bendigo field, and I will now narrate the circumstances leading up to and attending the discovery.

Early in 1851 I was working in Fulton's Foundry, in company with Mr. John Ditchburn, engineer—the now well known share-broker of this city—and others, when the discovery of rich gold on the Turon diggings, N.S.W., threw the people of Melbourne into a state of intense excitement, whereupon James Gardiner and Jonathan Sheldrake,blacksmiths ; Edward Whitehead, drayman ; and myself formed a party to proceed thither, but before starting for Sydney we had an interview with Mr. John Cosgrave, the late city treasurer, who had just returned on a fleet horse from Ballarat, where gold had just been discovered. After hearing his glowing account of the find we decided to try our fortune on that field, and very soon after made our maiden effort as gold diggers on the top of the Black Hill.(Great success, less success later at Creswick and a lack of water at Forest Creek allied with the advice of the Porcupine Inn's Mr Fenton led the party to the Bendigo area etc.) G. M. NEWMAN,
Mining Engineer and Expert.
Phair's Hotel, Collins-street, Aug. 29. (P.10, Argus, 5-9-1890.)

The Corporation's finance committee had apparently recommended somebody else to succeed Mr Fairwell as treasurer and The Argus complained about how despicable it was to appoint a failed businessman,a decayed publican and one of their own to the job. John's successful long tenure must have had the writer eating his words! TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1861.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 17 September 1861 p 4 Article

Another member of the Cosgrave family was Edward.
ANNUAL LICENSING MEETING.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 25 April 1855 p 5 Article
... -street. Granted. Edward Cosgrave, FitzRoy Arms, King-street. Granted.

By 1858, John was running the Fitzroy Arms,but in 1860 he moved to a Swanston St hotel.

John Cosgrave, Cleal's Hotel, Swanston-street,from Daniel Cleal. Granted; the name to be changed to Cosgrave's Hotel.
.........
James Healey, Fitzroy Arms Hotel, King street, from John Cosgrave. Granted.(P.5, Argus, 5-9-1860.)

A meeting of the general subscribers to the Hobson's Bay regatta, to take place on the 1st April, was held at the Port Phillip Club Hotel last night. Mr. J. Cosgrave occupied the chair.(P.4, Argus, 9-3-1876.)

No marriage notice has been found for John Cosgrave and Ellen Atcheson.

It would seem that Edward Cosgrave married a Miss Fennell and that she was a widow before her brother died in November.
DIED.
On the 14th inst., of consumption, at the residence of his brother-in-law, Mr. Daniel Farrell, Leveson-
street, North Melbourne, Mr. William Fennell, brother of Mrs. Cosgrave, FitzRoy Arms, deeply regretted.
(P.4, Argus,16-11-1855.)

DIED.
On the 15th inst., at his residence, Fitzroy Arms, Corner of King and Little Bourke streets, after five days' illness, Mr. Edward Cosgrave, aged 26 years, much regretted by a numerous circle of friends.
(P.5, The Age, 16-6-1855.)

DEATH.
On the 29th inst., at 185 King-street, Jane, wife of Mr. Caleb Malpass, and sister-in-law of Alderman Cosgrave, aged 25 years. Funeral at 3 o'clock this day.(P.4, Argus,30-4-1860.) Jane nee Atcheson?

John was at the Fitzroy Arms in 1853.
BIRTH.
On Saturday, the 19th instant, at her residence, the Fitzroy Arms, corner of King and Little Bourke streets,the wife of Alderman Cosgrave, of a son. (P.4, Argus,24-2-1853.)

Could this be John Cosgrave's father?
COSGRAVE. —On the 18th inst., at his residence, 101 Little Bourke-street west, Mr. J. J. Cosgrave, aged 72 years. (P.4, Argus,19-3-1872.)

Silly me.I had searched for Katie and Davey in family notices without luck,presuming that more formal names would be used.There was nothing about Katherine.
McDONALD–COSGRAVE. –On the 11th inst., at St.Allpius' Church, Ballarat, by the Rev. Father O'Donnell, Michael Richard McDonald, of Ballarat, to Kate, eldest daughter of Mr. John Cosgrave, Melbourne.
(P.4, Argus,15-6-1867.) Their silver wedding notice was on P.1, Argus,22-2-1912; almost illegible but some details (names of church and priests)are different and Katie was John's only daughter.

NICE AND CLOSE TO THE LAKE!
COSGRAVE.—On the 25th inst., at his residence, Ross-telon, Ferrars-place, Albert-park, John Cosgrave (city treasurer), aged 58 years. (P.1, Argus, 26-1-1885.)

John Cosgrave's children were said by Symonds to be Katie and Davey but the following shows that the surviving son was John Thomas Cosgrave. Davey may have been the son born in 1853 and could have died as a child.

COSGRAVE.---In loving memory of my dear brother, John Thomas Cosgrave, died 22nd September, 1914, at Williamstown (Katie McDonald.)(P.1, Argus,22-9-1915.)

GRAND DAUGHTER AGNES?
McEWIN-COSGRAVE - on the 6th May,1935 at the Church of All Saints Newtown,Geelong by the Rev Denis M.Deasey B.A., John Oswald youngest son of the late Rev.John McEwin and of Mrs McEwin, Finniss street, North Adelaide to Agnes Beatrice of Dysart, Geelong younger daughter of the late Mr and Mrs J T Cosgrave of Melbourne.
(P.15, Argus, 15-6-1935.)

3 comment(s), latest 1 year, 11 months ago

JOHN PASCOE FAWKNER, CHAMPION OF THE YOEMAN FARMER.

WE WANT LAND!
Just think,this letter was written at Pascoe Vale.

THE BEST WAY TO ESTABLISH A COLONIAL YEOMANRY.
Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 - 1851) Tuesday 21 August 1849 Edition: MORNING p 1 Article.


My time researching in the Titles Office showed me how much land was in the hands of a very small number of people. Many of the gold miners had been farmers, a large number of them having been tenant farmers in Ireland. They did not have the money to buy the large crown allotments that became available when parishes had been surveyed. In the parish of Will Will Rook,north of J.P.Fawkner's Belle Vue grant a huge area of land was bought by speculators, Hughes and Hosking, and later became part of the Kennedy estate.Much land in the parishes of Tullamarine and Bulla was alienated in square mile blocks.

Later land acts tried to prevent big landowners from obtaining so much land in grants but the use of dummies, and possibly loopholes enabled James Hearn, W.A.Blair, Charles Gavan Duffy, James Ford, James Purves, the Cains and Professor Hearn to buy huge tracts of land between Balcombe Creek's mouth and Portsea on the Mornington Peninsula for example.

Former squatter he may have been, but John Pascoe Fawkner had a great affection for yoeman farmers. He made a plea to the government to help them obtain freeholds in 1839, and a decade later he was sick and tired of the lack of action. You must read the letter. When Townships were established, suburban blocks were provided,but often multiple blocks were snapped up by such as Frederick Dawes Wickham at Horseshoe Bend near Keilor and William Allison Blair at Rye.

The only real efforts to establish closer settlement that came from Government were caused by the 1890's depression and the aftermath of war. The first effort was probably an attempt to remove beggars from the city (as one does before the Olympic Games are conducted!) Village settlements gave these people a chance to be self-sufficient and to pay off their land on easy terms.

After world war 1 an obligation to servicemen led to the establishment of soldier settlements in many areas.
By the 1930 depression the government probably decided it was easier to put the unemployed on susso projects such as Coburg Lake and the Great Ocean Road.Father Tucker's village settlement at Carrum Downs is discussed in my GORDON BOYINGTON journal.

However it was mainly the death of big landowners and the burden of death duties that caused many big landowners, such as Sir Rupert Clarke of Rupertswood and the family of William Taylor of Overnewton at Keilor, to ask the Crown to resume their huge estates. The Closer Settlement Acts circa 1900 finally achieved what John Pascoe Fawkner started in 1850, shortly after he wrote the letter,at the top of today's Oak Park Court;to give people the chance to buy their own small farms, not because they were out of a job or they had served King and Country but as a right.

Tulip Wright (section 3 Bulla) and Charles Gavan Duffy (the Irish Land Rights hero) did subdivide their grant fairly early but I doubt that their motives were as pure as good old J.P.F.,THE CHAMPION OF THE YOEMAN FARMER AND CLOSER SETTLEMENT.

Details of the many pieces of land bought by J.P.Fawkner on behalf of his co-operative members are given in several other of my journals.

JOHN THOMAS SMITH AND HIS ELECTORS, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA, 1852.

As I no longer have notes or maps, this journal comes entirely from memory.It is prompted by a McCracken search on Trove, the National Library of Australia's digitised collection of newspapers, and an article headed NORTH BOURKE on page 5 of the Argus of 20-1-1852. (Apologies. The date should read 20-12-1852.) In short, the article is about a meeting of electors resolving to ask John Thomas Smith to vacate his seat as a member of the legislative council for North Bourke.The intention of my journal is to give detail of most of the people involved.

SMITH.
J.T.Smith, seven times Mayor of Melbourne,arrived from Sydney to teach at George Langhorne's mission for the aborigines on the Botanical Gardens site. He soon became a businessman and received grants for land at Green Gully near Keilor in the parish of Maribyrnong; North Essendon,and Kensington (including the State School site) in the parish of Doutta Galla and what became the Ranelagh Estate, Mt Eliza, at the north west corner of the parish of Moorooduc.
At the time of this meeting, he was probably living in Melbourne,possibly in the oldest surviving house in Melbourne, photographed by the wonderful MUZZA OF McCRAE. He later built Ascot House in Fenton St Ascot Vale. In the early 1860's, he was a foundation member of the Borough of Essendon and Flemington and became one of the three M.L.C.'s for West Bourke. He was accused of bribing voters with inducements such as oranges that he grew; his orchard was probably near Cranwell St, North Essendon not far east from the Irish Dr Harbinson's orange grove (Melway 16 E12.)The Fitzroy Historical Society website states that he was also an alderman in that area.His portrait can be seen on the internet. Edward Wilson, editor of the Argus, constantly criticised J.T.Smith.(Sources: The Stopover That Stayed" Grant Aldous;parish maps; Keilor Centenary Souvenir 1950? eMelbourne past and present website under Mayoralty etc.)

MCDOUGALL.
Robert McDougall's biography must have been in Victoria and Its Metropolis for me to know so much of his movements. I believe he spent 10 years on Glenroy, which seems to have been divided into three farms: from Camp Rd, heading south, Pasture Hill, Bayview Farm and Glenroy Farm. Glenroy farm extended south to Rhodes Pde. John Kerr much later purchased the other two farms and built Glenroy House or Kerrsland which still stands as part of Penola College. Glenroy was so named by the Camerons, the original squatters, and they were still on Glenroy at this time as well so it is not clear which parts Mc Dougall and the Camerons had.
Robert McDougall later leased the Aitken Estate (section 8 Doutta Galla and possibly part of section 7 as described in the Thomas Miller (sic, Millar) journal) before moving into his newly- built "Arundel" mansion (Melway 4,G11) in about 1872.Unfortunately the Arundel mansion was ruined by Robinson's "fenestrations" circa 1950.
Robert was a foremost proponent of the Booth breed of Shorthorn cattle; as a result Harry Peck, in "Memoirs of a Stockman", stated that he and his neighbour, Harry Stevenson of "Niddrie" (Melway 15 K and 16 A 8-10)were bitter enemies, the latter being an advocate of the Bates strain. Ironically, Murray River steamer owner, McCulloch, who followed John Cochrane on Glenroy Farm, was also a prominent breeder of shorthorns.
You might well ask how McDougall and Stevenson could be neighbours. The answer is that they had other adjoining land on St John's grant (23 Doutta Galla), Stevenson near Strathmore Heights and McDougall near Strathmore North, both properties extending south into Essendon Aerodrome, which was originally called St John's Field.
The McDougalls also bought Warlaby, section 11 of the parish of Bulla Bulla (Melway 384 J8.)They probably owned it by 1888 when the first meeting of the Oaklands Hunt followed a trail from Warlaby laid by Farquhar McRae (not McCrae but possibly related)who was in charge of the hunters on "Glenara". "Warlaby",640 acres or a square mile, extended north to a western extension of Craigieburn Rd, which separated it from the Brannigans' St Johns. Due east of Warlaby was "Oaklands" which gave Oaklands Rd its name and north of that farm was Harpdale whose beautiful homestead (circa 1992) still bore the Brodie name set in tiles.
Warlaby was the home of Robert McDougall's son, Alexander (Sandy) who married Sandy Smith's daughter and moved to Western Australia in the early 1900's. Sandy Smith owned a mansion, Coilsfield, which was demolished to build the Essendon Hospital; he had earlier farmed near the Aitken Estate. (Sources:Victoria and Its Metropolis; Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History" Andrew Lemon; Keilor rates; "The Stopover That Stayed" Grant Aldous; Doutta galla parish map, Bulla rates and parish map, Bob Blackwell re farm names; "The Oaklands Hunt" D.F.Cameron-Kennedy; "Bulla Bulla" I.W.Symonds; various essendon histories; videotaped visit to Jack Simmie's Harpsdale; "Early Landowners: Parish of Doutta Galla" Ray Gibb; K.B.Keeley's architectural thesis on Arundel.)

PARDON MY IGNORANCE!
Some people whose names were included in the article lived outside my area of research, which started as Tullamarine, but expanded rapidly due to Bob Blackwell and George and Syd Lloyd. These surnames are Budd, Kyle, Guthrie and Reynolds. I have seen the name Guthrie and "Glengyle" which ring a bell but not very loudly. If I remember correctly, Reynolds was mentioned by Richard Broome in "Between Two Creeks", the history of Coburg. The names of Reynolds Pde and Reynard St, near Coonan's Hill may have been connected to this pioneer. Incidentally, Pentridge was the original name for Coburg and was changed during a royal visit in (1869?) to honour the Royal name Saxe-Coburg, which was changed to Windsor due to anti-German sentiment during W.W.1. Many families of German ancestry anglicised their surnames during W.W.1, such as the Groenberger family that was running the Junction Hotel at Tullamarine (SOURCE:Gordon Connor, whose testimony, like that of Colin Williams' also 99 at the time, can be taken as GOSPEL.)
POSTSCRIPT-GUTHRIE. I had a dim recollection of seeing the name, Guthrie, in relation to the Bulla area (Glenn & Guthrie?) and near Keilor Village. A search on trove revealed that Alexander (and J.) Guthrie had a farm called Glengyle, one mile from Keilor.They were living there in 1851.
I had a dim connection in my brain of Guthrie with Thomas Bertram and it proved to be correct. The Argus of 15-4-1854 reported on page 4 that Elizabeth, the second daughter of the late Murdoch Campbell of Scotland had died at the residence of Thomas Bertram Esquire, Glengyle, near Keilor.
The ford over Deep Creek, on Arundel Rd, which provided access to Keilor Village (where the Mansfields drowned in 1906 because the partly built Arundel bridge had been swept away) was known to all as Bertram's Ford.The ramp leading to the ford can still be seen between the house on the Browns Rd corner and the river(Melway 14 H2.)
Section 1 of the parish of Tullamarine was granted to R.H.Bunbury in 1842 but K.B.Keeley believed he was a dummy bidder for Colin Campbell who was the owner from 1843 until 1851 when he sold it to Donald Cameron. Two parts of "Arundel were sold off before Argus editor, Edward Wilson bought it in 1854; farms that were later known as Ellengower (or Ellengowen, I could not decipher the Keilor rate collector's writing) and Turner's. Was Colin Campbell a brother of Elizabeth Campbell and Thomas Bertram's wife?
Either of these farms could have been Glengyle. Ellengower was the Browns Rd area and the ramp passed through it, making the naming of the ford a foregone conclusion if Bertram had owned it. Turner's, later bought by the McNabs of Oakbank, (as was the land at Melway 4 B11)is situated between the east-west section of McNabs Rd and the river (4 D-F 12.) The decision on which was Glengyle rests on the description of Glengyle being one mile from Keilor. Bertram's Ford was about a mile from Keilor while Turner's was at least 2 1/2 miles.Therefore Glengyle, occupied by the Guthries and Bertrams, would have been in the horseshoe bend bisected by Browns Rd (Melway 14 G2.)
My suspicion of a connection with the Bulla area also proved to be correct so I'll go one step further and suggest that there was some sort of connection between the Guthries and Peter Young of Nairn, who will be discussed later. Alexander Guthrie Young, a colonist of 52 years died in 1891 at the age of 59.
(The Argus 9-12-1891 p.1) Alexander Guthrie obviously moved from Glengyle to the Bulla area. Mrs Alexander Guthrie gave birth to a son at Bulla Bulla, Deep Creek on 1-5-1859.(A.3-5-1859 p.4.)
Alexander Guthrie died at Togarf, Sunbury at the age of 70 on 27-11-1880. (A. 29-11-1880 P.1 and 8.) Togarf was obviously a farm and his widow, Ann, exhibited her Ayrshires with success at many shows. She died at Murtoa at the age of 80. (A. 27-9-1901 p.1.)
Postscript. Having obtained a map of Bulla Bulla parish, I can state that A& J. Guthrie's grants, issued in October of the years stated, consisted of section 14 (1852,503 acres), 22, part 4 (1854,135 acres 3 roods 10 perches) and 23 part 2 (1854, 384 acres 37 perches.) As I no longer have my Bulla rates transcriptions, I have no idea whether his farm (Togarf)remained this size.These grants were in the area shown on Melway map 383. I would imagine that they had been squatters before alienation and that section 14 was the homestead block and pre-emptive right. Section 14 was bounded by Southern Plains Rd, the line of Gellies Rd continued south almost to Emu Creek, and this creek on the south and west. A now-closed road, leaving Sunbury Rd opposite the east boundary of Craig and O' Grady's grant (Shepherds Lane), crossed Emu Creek in the east side of 383 D7, and travelled through the grant to the west end of Southern Plains Rd. This would have to be the private road to Daameeli; this property is on Richard Brodie's grant, 24(1). This road was the eastern boundary of 23 (2) and Emu Creek was the eastern boundary of 22 (4). The former fronted Sunbury Rd, the latter Gellies Rd and both Lancefield Rd.The tributary shown in Melway 383 B-D7 was about 100 metres (5mm on the map)north of the boundary between the two allotments.
Finally, although my memory is not too hot about what you say to Jan if things don't seem fair, it is pretty reliable concerning local history. I stated earlier that I had vague memories of seeing "Glenn and Guthrie" somewhere. Joseph Dubois returned my material yesterday and while looking for something else I found it!
In the Annals of Tullamarine (a large part of "Tullamarine: Before The Jetport").
1863. (After mentioning that James Sharp was leasing 40 acres of Chandos from J.C.Riddell and was to move to Hillside four years later.)Broadmeadows' rate records list the following Tullamarine residents east of Bulla Rd from the present bridge to Nash's Lane:
H.J.Brown and Glenn & Guthrie (Camp Hill), E.Dunn (Viewpoint), J.Maconochie (Stewarton)Love and Sharp as above, C &J.Nash (Fairview), W.Wright (Sunnyside), R.Beaman (Broombank), J.Foster, T.Anderson, R.Mitchell, T.Wright, P.Kettle, J.Gawley, J.Wright, J.Hendry (store, later P.O. too), C.Evans (shop.)

One last thing. Applications for occupation licences were invited on page 1 of The Argus of 11-6-1847.The various parcels of land were numbered but no location was given other than parishes. Alexander Guthrie had leased 640 acres in Will Will Rook for the previous two years. I checked the parish map on the internet, but there were no dates for the issue of grants. Then I remembered that Joseph had returned my material. According to "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History" only two grants were not issued in 1838. They were sections 5 and 2. Alexander Gibb purchased section 5 in 1848 after leasing the 640 acres for some time (Page 20) so Alexander could only have been leasing Box Forest, granted to John Pascoe Fawkner in 1850 (on behalf of his co-operative.) This square mile, bounded by the Northern Golf Club, Hilton St/ Box Forest Rd, the cemetery and Boundary Rd is now named after a Broadmeadows Shire Councillor, circa 1927, Cr Rupert Hadfield.



PETER YOUNG.
In "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History", Andrew Lemon mentioned George Langhorne conducting Free Presbyterian services at Peter Young's Nairn and how the United Presbyterians had caused problems. Andrew's source was obviously Peter Young's letter published on page 4 of The Argus of 19-2-1851.
Here are the headlines about Peter Young. He was a very proud Scot with a good knowledge of the "land o' cakes" and a love of poetry. He was on the front foot when situations needed correcting. He was a stalwart of the Free Presbyterians and a member of the Order of Oddfellows, working hard to advance the former and defending the latter group from unjustified criticism. Above all he was an expert farmer, and I mean an EXPERT. He seems to have moved to Clyde Park, Westernport before his death.

As I have the Bulla Bulla map now I'll tell you about Nairn before I detail the trove articles. See Melway map 384. Peter Young received the grant for Section 8 (a square mile/ 640 acres) on 26-11-1848. He added the 130 acre 7B on the other side of St John's Lane on 18-9-1851. (St John's lane led to the Brannigans' "St John's Hill", not heaven!) The William Inglis and Son thoroughbred horse sales complex is in the south east corner of section 8 and the end of the public section of St Johns Rd indicates its north western corner. Allotment B of section 7 is between St Johns Rd and Deep Creek; the southern boundary was the now closed road in C-E 12 and the northern boundary is indicated by 110 St Johns Rd.

TROVE- A CHRONOLOGY.
While reading Isaac Batey's fascinating historical articles in the Sunbury newspaper, I half-noticed his reference to a Mr Young being ( a squatter?) near Essendon in the early days (probably 1847.)This could have been Peter Young. I will start with an advertisement that Peter placed in The Argus (as I thought, soon after arriving), which outlines his past.He was actually in Victoria by 1842!
All items are from The Argus unless otherwise specified: 1846-8 was the Melbourne Argus.

24-9-1847 page 2. Peter announced that he was setting up as an auctioneer and commission agent. He said that he had been land steward for the Marquis of Breadalbane (in Scotland), an experimental farmer and land steward for A. Speirs, the M.P. for Richmond (Tasmania), superintendent of the Government Domain farm in Van Dieman's Land and latterly superintendent of J. and W. Macarthur's stations. Peter must have arrived in Melbourne by 1846 or very early 1847. A letter he wrote to the Port Phillip Gazette was republished in the Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (12-6-1847 page 4.) There had been an outbreak of black leg in young cattle near Port Fairy,to which no solution had been found,and Peter wrote from the Crown Hotel outlining his method that had worked so successfully in New South Wales in the winter of 1837. He had been in charge of 8000 cattle and the sudden death of cattle 20 miles away was put down to snake bites until Peter arrived and diagnosed black leg after dissecting a carcass.

27-1-1847 page 1-2. Peter made a toast at the Robbie Burns Festival that was a virtual history of Scotland and occupied 4 1/2 columns of The Argus.

28-5-1847 page 2. SEYMOUR. Preparations are being made for the sale to be conducted by Mr Peter Young on the 24th. This was to be the first ever in the township.Peter was auctioning well before the advertisement appeared.

1-6-1847 page 2. An excited report of the sale was given. The correspondent told of Peter's plans for regular sales.

3-8-1847 page 2. A DANGEROUS NUISANCE. At the close of business at the Police Office on Saturday, Mr Peter Young informed the Mayor of the cattle, horses, pigs and goats in Latrobe St West and no constable ever being seen to control this. The Chief Constable, who had earlier ignored Peter's complaints, was huffy but the Mayor instructed him to send two constables and impound these animals.

30-11-1847. The Seymour correspondent understood that Peter had intended to conduct quarterly sale but none (bar the first) had come off yet.

20-4-1849 page 4. Peter complained that he hadn't been getting his Argus or Patriot.He was now on Nairn.

19-4-1850 page 3, column 4. FOR SALE. Seed wheat and potatoes of a very superior quality grown from seed of last year's crop at Warrnambool. On sale by the undersigned, Peter Young, Nairn, Deep Creek.

27-4-1850 page 2. BIRTH. At Nairn, parish of Bulla Bulla on the 25th, Mrs Peter Young of a daughter.

8-1-1851 page 2.(Original correspondence to the Mt Macedon paper.) Peter said that up until the end of 1850 mail had been picked up at Mr Wright's Bridge Inn but the mail run to Mt Macedon now went through Keilor. (This is of interest because it seems that Tulip Wright did start the Lincolnshire Hotel's construction during 1851. Donohue applied for the Bridge Inn licence in 1851 but his application was postponed because of the filthy state of the Bridge Inn. (See THE HOTELS NEAR TULLAMARINE journal.) It may have been because Tulip had left, abandoning his hotel, that the route was changed.)Peter complained that 500 residents near Bulla now had to pick up their mail from Melbourne or Gisborne, stating that only about 5 people lived on the new route between Keilor and The Gap. (He was talking about William Taylor of Overnewton, James Robertson of Upper Keilor,possibly the Page Brothers of Glencoe-I'll have to ask Isaac Batey if they were still there; their drinking might have seen them off by 1851, and one or two others.) P.S. Edward Page advertised the homestead block in 1859. (The Argus 27-6-1859 page 2, column 2.)


10-2-1851 page 2. Peter hasn't given up. He now accuses two magistrates of using undue influence to change the mail run. One magistrate was certainly William Taylor; I'm not sure if Robertson was a J.P. too. His son, James, was and another son, Francis, was a member of parliament.

19-2-1851 page 4.Peter wrote a letter about Langhorne teaching Sunday School at theschoolhouse on Nairn on Sunday mornings and conducting Free Presbyterian services in the afternoon and how the United Presbyterians
were interfering with their fund-raising for a church for Broadmeadows and Deep Creek (Westmeadows and Bulla.)
"Vision and Realisation", the Victorian Education Department history of 1972, mentioned an early school on the McDougalls' "Warlaby" (probably named Oaklands) in a declivity; this may have been a mistaken reference to Peter's school unless another was built on Warlaby later. My memory from reading the book 20 years ago is dim but I think it mentioned two schools with different National School numbers.

31-5-1851 page 2. Another farming problem had arisen, smut in wheat. As everyone would know, when crops are affected, prices rise. Think bananas! Due to his innovative ideas and experience, Peter had worked out a solution and he could have cashed in big-time. He had put down 140 acres of wheat at Nairn the previous year and not one head of smutted wheat had grown due to his treatment of the grain before planting that he had developed 17 years earlier. Peter was not going to keep this a secret and let his colleague suffer. Could you imagine Coles giving Woolworths a helping hand?

25-6-1852. Peter wrote a letter headed "To Improve Crops by Pollen" which showed that he had a thorough grasp of the history of the development of the various types of wheat.

11-8-1852 page 6.Peter Young of Nairn requested permission from those who had donated money for the church in the parish of Bulla (not enough to proceed) to hand it over to the National School, whose establishment had been resolved at a meeting he'd recently chaired.

The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston) 3-11-1852 page 722 (no kidding!) As Peter McCracken , the President of the Port Phillip Farmers' Society was absent (due to the drowning of his young son, William, in the Moonee Ponds Creek near the bottom of Pascoe St, Westmeadows; see McCracken below), Peter Young of Nairn took the chair, filling it most capably, at the function to honour David Duncan's service to the organisation. (See the WILLIAM THOMPSON AND DAVID DUNCAN journal.)

6-3-1868 page 2. Evan McIntosh was holding a clearing sale at Nairn, his lease having expired. Peter may have moved to Westernport but he also could have been conducting a business in Melbourne.

6-5-1895 page 1. H.W.Shepherd married Susan, the daughter of the late Mr Peter Young Esquire of Melbourne and Clyde Park, Westernport.

While trove is a fantastic resource, it does not distinguish between the surname Young and the opposite of old, which led to many wasted hours. I did not find any other family notices or references to Clyde Park, Westernport apart from the 1895 marriage of his daughter.

I tried googling YOUNG with CLYDE, BERWICK and WESTERNPORT, the last named combination reminding me of a discovery I made at the P.R.O.V. (See SQUATTERS IN THE WESTERNPORT DISTRICT journal.)

A website headed FREDERICK XAVIER TO ARTHUR ZOUCH has the following information.
The Melbourne Times of 23-4-1842 recorded that Peter Young had been granted a publican's licence for the "Bushman" in Sydney Road.The Port Phillip of 21-4-1843 shows that the hotel, once again described as being on Sydney Road was now called the Sugar Loaf Inn. The same paper, on 27-4-1844,stated that Peter had been granted his licence but the hotel was again called the Bushman.
(An alphabetical listing of squatters and their runs, from correspondence with the Governor, which is a different website, lists Peter Young of the Sugar Loaf Run.) Given Peter's purchase of land in Seymour at the first sales, his conducting the first sales in the township and the fact that Sugarloaf Creek intersects the Hume Highway in Seymour, it is reasonable to assume that the hotel was at Seymour and not in modern-day Carlton, Brunswick (or Plenty, Pascoeville near the Young Queen Inn, or Tullamarine near the Lady of the Lake- routes more likely to be called Sydney Road in the early 1840's.)
Rev. Peter Gunn, who became the minister at the Campbellfield's historic Scots Church (Melway 7 H6), had visited the Golburn (River?) area and Peter was among a large number who signed a letter of encouragement and contributed 50 pounds to support his ministry; another signatory was from Sunday Creek, which joins Sugarloaf Creek.(Port Phillip Herald 1-10-1844.)

Peter Young and Elizabeth christened John William in 1843.
Peter Young purchased allotments at the first sale of blocks at Seymour. (Melbourne Weekly Courier 23-3-1844.)
Peter Young was one of 469 voters who qualified by freehold in Seymour in the list of electors in the District of Bourke (Melbourne Courier 8-8-1845.)Peter Young was listed in the (1847?) Port Phillip directory as a settler, Seymour, Sydney Rd.

The website also lists newspaper reports showing that Peter Young was given depasturing licences in July 1843 and October 1844 in the Westernport District.Ah hah, I thought, perhaps Peter had been on Clyde Farm, Westernport before he went to Bulla. Then I remembered my search for a grant (or licence) that Captain Adams of Rosebud was supposed to have been given in about 1841. All such matters were dealt with in Sydney and the Public Records office gave me an index of correspondence. As Peninsula pioneers were referred to as late as 1888 in "Victoria and Its Metropolis" as being in the Westernport District, I concentrated on those entries.

Imagine my surprise to find Barker's Mt Alexander Run (near Castlemaine) described as being in the Westernport District! In view of what has been mentioned before, Peter Young's depasturing licences were almost certainly near Seymour.

Still none the wiser,about when Peter left Nairn, I returned to Trove and tried "Nairn, Bulla, Young, 1850-1867".
Argus 18-4-1853 page 12. Peter was offering Nairn for sale by private contract. He had probably only been there for about five years but how much he had accomplished! The advertisement describes the property in great detail, including the waterfall.For the sale of his furniture, library, stock, vehicles and so on, Peter employed prominent auctioneer, Dalmahoy Campbell (much discussed by Harry Peck in his "Memoirs of a Stockman.) (See Argus 20-5-1853 page 9.)

Argus 4-6-1853 page 8, column 1. Peter offered an incredible variety of grape vine cuttings for sale.

Joseph Clarke of "Goolpala", Saltwater River (Probably the future "Rupertswood")might have bought all of Peter's property north of Melbourne.The Argus of 16-9-1865 reported, on page 2, the sale of the late Joseph's estate: lot 1. Nairn; lot 2.About 9 acres of portions 29 and 30 Doutta Galla near the racecourse (the future showgrounds site near Clarke Ave, Melway 28 F11); lots 3-9. original allotments in the Township of Seymour. N.B. Clarke may have bought the showgrounds land from the grantee, Pearson, who had sold 4 acres to John and David Charles Ricketts in 1851.

The advertisement states that Nairn was split into two farms, leased by Mr McIntosh (300 acres) and Mr Millar (450 acres.) Part of Nairn was to become William Michie's "Cairnbrae". It also stated that Peter had framed the economy of Nairn upon sure principles and described the orchards and so on. In 1860, W.C.Howie had been on Nairn and placed a notice about a black pig that had strayed into his paddock (The Argus 30-6-1860 page 8, last column.)

As we know that Peter was an auctioneer, he may have been a partner of the firm of Young and Timbury,which advertised the sale of the cargo of a ship in The Argus of 18-5-1860 (page 2, bottom of column 4.)
A George Young, from Tasmania was a pioneer near Dromana and might have been related to Peter. (See "A Dreamtime of Dromana".)Peter was certainly not related to Frankston pioneer, Mark Young, who was a Roman Catholic.
As Clyde is near Berwick, J.Young and James Grant Young (Argus 11-7-1883 page 5 and 10-10-1867 page 6 column 3) may have been related, although Mark Young was involved in the Dandenong area before moving to Frankston and they might have been related to him instead.

McCRACKEN.
Peter McCracken farmed on Stewarton from 1846 until 1855.This was the 777 acres of Gladstone Park/Gardens between the Forman St and Lackenheath Dr. corners and extending to the Moonee Ponds Creek, which formed the eastern boundary.I have just spent two hours looking for the death notice of Peter's three year old son, William, in 1852, which I read last night but cannot now find! However, an indication of this death is found on page 722 of The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston) of 3-11-1852.

One of the extracts from Melbourne papers was THE FARMERS' SOCIETY. The article concerns a presentation of a silver service to MR DAVID DUNCAN OF THOMPSON AND DUNCAN, CORNFACTORS, BOURKE ST, MELBOURNE. (David had been treasurer of the body since its inception.See David Duncan and William Thompson journal.)As the President, Peter McCracken of Stewarton, was absent due to a severe domestic calamity , Peter Young of Nairn took the chair.

Young William had walked with his siblings part of the way to school (at the two year old St Paul's Church of England in Broadmeadows Township at Melway 6 B7.) They would have crossed at the bottom of Pascoe St, where there was later a bridge according to Sid Lloyd, until it was swept away in a flood and required entry to Jim Barrow's Gladstone via Forman St.Young William probably slipped into the creek on the way home. (Extracts from The McCracken Letters provided by Deidre Farfor.)

Peter then had a dairy farm at Kensington, on allotments 19 and 18 of section 2, Doutta Galla, leased from John Robert Murphy, the grantee, from 1855 until 1863.This land lay between Kensington Rd and a line near Tennyson St (Melway 42 K4.)Peter suffered the loss of all his haystacks in 1861 and struggled through 1862 because the grass was poor and the hay expensive. After he had moved to "Ardmillan", his mansion at present 33-39 Ardmillan Rd, and ended his lease on the Kensington land, pork butcher, Samuel Cox, leased the old dairy and from 1874 to 1882 William Samuel Cox ran his Kensington Park Racecourse; when Kensington Park was subdivided, W.S.Cox started a new course on Feehan's farm, where it still stands, extended onto Long John Mooney's grant, and then to Wilson Rd.
(The McCracken Letters, P.5 "Early Landowners: Parish of Doutta Galla" Ray Gibb, "Ardmillan" Ray Gibb re address of the mansion.)

Optimistic reports of the Melbourne and Essendon Railway's meeting appeared on page 6 of the 30-8-1859 issue of The Argus. Directors appointed were George Holmes, Hugh Glass, J. Dinwoodie, C.Bradshaw, J.C.King, Peter McCracken and E.B.Wight. I think Holmes, a major contractor, who was building this line, was the man after whom Holmes Rd in Moonee Ponds West was named. Hugh Glass of Flemington House was a neighbour of Peter's brother, Robert and, with the McCrackens and Robertsons, owned most of the railway's route. Dinwoodie held a mortgage on the Aitken Estate at one time, the Bradshaws owned land at Hawstead and between Epsom and Union Rds, and Edward Byam Wight owned "The Ridge" across present Kensington Rd from Peter McCracken's dairy and the "Temperance Township" triangle mentioned in relation to the Bradshaws.(Early Landowners: Parish of Doutta Galla- titles and parish map, The Stopover That Stayed.)

Peter is known to have been on Ardmillan by 1860; on page 4 of The Argus of 24-4-1860, appeared the death notice of John, the fourth son of Peter McCracken of Ardmillan near Essendon, who had died of croup at the age of 2 years and 7 months.The railway opened at about that time but by 1864 it had to close because of insufficient patronage. No doubt James McConnell had sold his grants at Kensington and Moonee Ponds (bisected by Puckle St)at a good profit but the majority shareholders such as Glass and Peter suffered heavy losses. The former died from an "accidental overdose" and Peter lost Ardmillan.

He'd sold the part east of the railway to Taylor and by 1874, the rest of his estate had been sold, the homestead block to stock agent William Hudson and the western and northern portions to Edward Dale Puckle who sold subdivided land to such as Thomas Jennings Jnr, born in Melbourne in 1837.In a letter, Peter said that one consolation was that his new residence in Powlett St, East Melbourne was at least closer to work. And what was that? I'm going to make you wait.

Peter's brother, Robert, bought Ailsa from Captain Buckley; a letter from "Ardmillan" to Scotland indicates that this took place in April/May 1865, not in 1864 as stated by A.D.Pyke.The property was north of Kent St and went north to the Filson/South St midline. Glass had earlier purchased the Ascot Vale Rd frontage. In 1873, the Essendon Football Club commenced and played on the Ailsa paddock; it is claimed that the club had to move to another ground because the V.F.A. demanded a fenced ground in 1877, but it is more likely that the club moved to the East Melbourne Ground in 1875.John Filson lodged a subdivision plan for the paddock in 1875, naming the main streets after himself and his wife (nee Harding.)

Why didn't the club play at Windy Hill? Most football teams had formed from cricket clubs but Essendon was mainly composed of horse lovers. As most of the councillors were cricket lovers, they refused the "Same Olds" use of the ground. Later the council made the ground available to a V.F.A. club, Essendon Town (later known as Essendon A),which experienced great success in about 1910 when the great Dave McNamara was place kicking goals from 80 yards out and kicked the first century ever.A decade later many of their stars transferred to North Melbourne and the club folded. At last the ground was made available to the V.F.L. club "the Same Olds" which adopted the Bombers as a nick-name when aeroplane manufacturing no longer relied on aeroplane dope.

Ailsa was demolished when the house and a small portion of the land was sold to the Catholic Church. The new buildings functioned as a convent and college/university for a great length of time and recently became a Scientology centre.

The Mar Lodge Estate, adjoining Hoffman's Butzbach (later Croft's Buckley Park)was inherited by Francis Robertson of Upper Keilor, whose brother, James, inherited Upper Keilor and "Spring Hill" which became Aberfeldie. Francis, a bachelor and member of Parliament 1860-1864 and 1868-1886, built the 43 square homestead in 1863. He died at 1 p.m. on 11-3-1886 and the McCrackens bought MarLodge in 1888 according to the Essendon Conservation Study.

Coiler and Alexander McCracken sold 3 acres to the Government on 27-11-1910 for 1000 pounds; this was the original small portion of the Essendon High School site. Gordon Connor, one of the school's early pupils recalled cows grazing right to the high school fence. This continued for almost a decade until Mar Lodge was subdivided in 1919. There would have been no need to mow the grass because, on 7-1-1919,fire destroyed 150 acres of grassland owned by the late Alexander McCracken and tenanted by F.Flanagan.

Before continuing, I had better mention a bit about the McCracken family. It hailed from Ardwell Farm on the Ardmillan Estate in Ayrshire, Scotland. Peter, Robert and Alexander Earle were three brothers involved in the Essendon area and there was apparently a sister, Grace, who married Alexander McGeoch, spirit merchant and died at the residence of her brother, Robert McCracken (The Argus 20-4-1859 p.4.)

Alexander Earle McCracken returned to Scotland in 1857 due to the ill health of his wife Jane. This reminds me of an error that I need to fix in the Thomas Miller (sic, Millar) journal. I stated that Jane had mentioned Thomas Millar's funeral but she had written about a grand festivity on "Miller's Farm"; another family member had written about the funeral.
Mar Lodge extended west from McCracken St to include all present Hedderwick St house blocks.Between there and Hoffmans Rd was Butzbach, granted to William Hoffman, a brick manufacturer. Alexander Earle McCracken was probably the first tenant on Butzbach and within ten months of the grant being issued had built stables with four stalls and a barn.In March 1851, he was building a house which was probably between Croft St and the bend in Price St (Melway 28 B2.)Alexander grew wheat (probably supplied to Barber and Young's flour mill on the Pipeworks Market site at Campbellfield) and the farm prospered but as mentioned earlier Alexander Earle and Jane returned home in 1857.

In a letter dated 14-4-1858, Robert told Alexander Earle that the McAuleys were now farming Butzbach. In the following year, the death occurred of nine year old Grace, the daughter of Mr Alexander Earle McCracken late of Butzback (sic), Saltwater River (The Argus 12-10-1859 p.6.) Not a good year for the McCrackens; little Grace had taken the same journey as her Auntie Grace and the optimism regarding the railway was to turn to heartache within a few years.

When Essendon F.C. started playing at Ailsa, Robert's 17 year old son, Alexander, a 17 year old Scotch College student, was its first secretary. Peter's son, Coiler or Collier, was the team's first captain. Alexander was to become the first President of the V.F.L. until shortly before his death in 1915. He was to become prominent in the Oaklands Hunt Club. He purchased "Cumberland" whose homestead ruins can still be seen at Melway 178 C12. After-hunt festivities were generally held at Cumberland, Alister Clark's "Glenara" or the Inverness Hotel until the club purchased "Sherwood". The Tullamarine community picnics, organised by its schoolteacher, Alec Rasmussen, were conducted on the 880 acre Cumberland, in 1909, 1910 and 1911. After Alexander's death, the Johnsons of "Glendewar" across the creek lived in its beautiful homestead but had to return to a humbler home when the Cumberland mansion was destroyed by fire.

Cumberland had a strong footy connection because of Alexander McCracken but also because of Thomas Wills, the grantee (of section 5 Will Will Rook?), an overlander, who was the uncle of Tom Wills, footy's creator, and Colden Harrison, codifier of the rules in 1866 and called the father of football.
("Running With The Ball" ? and A. Mancini.)

Cumberland was Alexander's country retreat but his real home was "North Park", now the Columban Mission on the south side of Woodlands St, Essendon. His cousin, Peter's son, Coiler (obviously named after Coiler Robertson of La Rose) built Earlsbrae, which is now part of the Lowther Hall school. Coiler got into finncial difficulty and left for Bourke in New South Wales. (See "The Gold The Blue for extensive detail.)

COILER ROBERTSON, LA ROSE. See the journal about the 1847 Port Phillip Directory to find details about the "La Rose" Robertsons, the farm's location and two other Robertson families in the area.

4 comment(s), latest 3 years, 2 months ago

JOHN TOWNSEND, DROMANA, VIC., AUST. : FIRST TO USE MOUTH TO MOUTH IN AUSTRALIA?

In 1954, James Elam was the first to demonstrate experimentally that cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was a sound technique and, with Dr. Peter Safar, he demonstrated its superiority to previous methods. Peter Safar wrote the book ABC of resuscitation in 1957. In the United States, it was first promoted as a technique for the public to learn in the 1970s.
(Wikipedia.)

John Townsend(or perhaps his father) may have been one of the first people in Victoria to save a life using mouth to mouth resuscitation about 70 years before the technique was introduced in Australia.

In A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, Colin McLear wrote the following about John Townsend.
P. 74. John Townsend (1840-1918) seems to have been a jack-of-all-trades. At one time he farmed where a Rosebud golf course is now situated on the slopes of Arthurs Seat. He also built houses and ran an early store in Dromana,in what had been George McLear's butchers shop. He lived on the (south)corner of Ligar and McCulloch Street opposite the State School,in what old-timers call Townsend's. The old house still stands. John is believed to have shot the last dingo on the Peninsula on the Anderson property (Barragunda)at Boneo (Cape Schanck).

John helped Simon,commonly called "Simon the Belgian" fence his land on the side of Arthurs Seat.

P.84.Charlie Dyson married a daughter of John Singleton and one of their children became Mrs John Townsend.(Does this tie in?)

P.120. John Townsend was one of the bondsmen for a loan of 300 pounds to build St Mark's Church of England in Dromana.

P. 126. An entry in George McLear's notebooks in 1880 advises that Townsend paid 35 pounds for the church....John Townsend was a man of many parts, among them a sometime builder. Perhaps he had a contract to re-erect the church...
(The above relates to the relocation of the Methodist Church from a site in Heales St to the Esplanade.)

MOUTH TO MOUTH.
Harold Wilson, eldest son of Mr and Mrs H. W. Wilson. of M'Culloch street, Dromana, had a very narrow escape from drowning last Saturday week. It appears the little fellow, in company with a small lad named Stanley Evans, was playing on the banks of a waterhole close to where Mr. Wilson is erecting his new slaughter house, and in some way he slipped into the hole, which had at least 5 feet of water in it. The other boy being un- able to render his unfortunate play mate any assistance, had the presence of mind to run down to where Mr Townsend and the Messrs Wilsons were at work, and informed them what had happened. They immediately hurried to the hole. Seeing no trace of the child, the father plunged in, and succeeded in bringing to the surface what he considered was the lifeless body of his son. However, Mr Townsend,who acted with judgment,was quickly at work, vigorously blowing his warm breath into the little fellow's lungs, until he slowly began to regain consciousness. Mr.G.M'Lear, who lives close to where the accident happened, was sent for, and rendered valuable assistance, but had it not been for the artificial respiration resorted to by Mr Townsend, it is doubtful whether the boy would have recovered.(P.5, Mornington Standard,10-12-1904.)

The wikipedia entry for Mouth to mouth resuscitation describes how it was developed in 1957 and was promoted in the U.S.A in the 1970's.

John Townsend's grants near Rosebud were crown allotments 31D and 31C,section B in the parish of Wannaeue. The former, consisting of 37 acres 1 rood 15 perches is bounded by Bayview/Old Cape Schank Rd,roughly the north-south part of Leura Crescent and Waterfall Gully Rd. The latter, of 100 acres and 2 perches adjoined it on the east and extended to the full length of Rosebud Avenue.(Melway 170 G 4-5.)

Early Horton Tasmania Settlers
and family from around the world
John Townsend

1865-1923

Gender: male
Birth: 1865 Dromana, Vic, Australia (More...)
Death: 1923 Melbourne, Vic, Australia (More...)
Parents

Father: John Townsend
Mother: Allison Mitchell
Family 1

Partner: Susannah Caroline Hanson (1864-1906)
Marriage: 1887 Dromana, Vic, Australia (More...)
Children

Elsie Townsend (1890-)
Jessie Allison Townsend (1892-)
Ellen Carolina Townsend (1893-)
John Leonard Townsend (1894-1951)
Arthur Gould Townsend (1899-)

It is possible that Susannah Caroline Hanson was a niece of Christian Hanson,who in 1887 was first assessed on one of William Hopcraft's grants in the parish of Balnarring on the east side of Tucks Rd at its northern end.
Hec Hanson's MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN makes it clear that she was not Christian's daughter. Her father or brother was possibly Charles Hanson,who with John Townsend was a member of an early dramatic company in Dromana, the Black Gulls. (Harry Wilson,probably the father of the boy saved by John Townsend, and George Townsend were also member.) The Townsends of Mornington may be related.

FLINDERS AND KANGERONG
SHIRE COUNCIL.
---------------
[Present, Crs Downward, (president), Baldry, Brown, Griffiths, Hurley, Wilson and Stanley.
REVISION COURT.
The Council sat as a Revision Court for the purpose of revising the voters' lists. The applications of T. M.
Dorley. and John A. Crichton were entertained. Those of Alfred P.Beecher and Charles Hanson, were disallowed.
(P.2, Mornington Standard, 4-8-1892.)

EXCERPT FROM "Old Peninsula Days, Plays and Players"
Standard (Frankston, Vic. : 1939 - 1949) Thursday 21 February 1946 p 9 Article.

Mr. Harry Wilson. As a ? to these items was "Uncle Tom's Cabin in Five Minutes," the parts? in which were played by Mr. John Townsend (Simon Legree),Mr Chas. Hanson (Uncle Tom), and Mr Fred. Mellor (Little Eva).

2 comment(s), latest 4 months ago