itellya on FamilyTreeCircles - journals

itellya on Family Tree Circles

sort: Date Alphabetical
view: full | list

Journals and Posts


HINDHOPE ESTATE (PART 3, First Ave, Thomas St, Rosebrook St), ROSEBUD,VIC., AUST.

The land north of McCombe St and east of Rosebrook St was referred to as section A in the 1919 assessments. This was the second stage of the subdivision first advertised in 1914, the 70 "seaside" lots north of McCombe St being placed on sale in 1913 when the Hindhope Villa had 39 acres of grounds remaining. As Section A was the rest of Hindhope except for 14 acres west of Rosebrook St,it can be concluded that the land east of Rosebrook St consisted of 25 acres. Frederick Allan Quinton bought many blocks near the Hindhope Villa block (lot 95 and 96) but Alexander Mackie Younger's first wife bought the 14 acres of grounds, which might account for the absence of lots 19 to 32 on the subdivision plan,which makes no mention of section A.

Those assessed in 1919 on land in section A were:
A.L.Adcock, Red Hill, 6, 7, N.A.V. 2 POUNDS!; H.Cairns 14, c/o Mrs Papper, 433 George St.,Fitzroy; Mace, Wangaratta, 84, 85,86; W.R.Mullens 17, 18, c/o Jennings Rosebud; J.Patterson,Rosebud, 13; Mrs Emily June Ada Nethercote, Hawthorn, 12.
Not all of the above gained title. H.Cairns could have been Harry or Helen, neither of whom died for some time so the partly paid-off block may have been sold because of financial difficulties or an offer that couldn't be refused. The Mullens and Jennings family were related by marriage as shown in part 2. L.Adcock of Red Hill was occupying 42 acres and buildings on crown allotment 20C Wannaeue (at Melway 190 D 11-12) in 1919. I can find no Cairns/Papper connection so perhaps the Fitzroy family was leasing the block. Mr Mace's full name is below.

All lots below were transferred from the developer, Arthur A. Thomas to the buyer.

SOUTH SIDE OF McCOMBE ST.
LOT -- DATE--- TRANSFERRED TO.--- FRONTAGE--- NOW
1 --- 14-9-1923--- Elizabeth Lyng --- 100' 10"--6 First Ave.
2 --- 14-9-1923--- Elizabeth Lyng---- 50'------As above.
3 --- 27-3-1922--- Margaret Agnes Mott--50'------No.1 McCombe St.
4 --- 20-5-1924--- Arthur Nichols ----- 50'------No.3.
5 --- 8-7-1925--- Charles Nichols -----50'------No.5.
6 ---15-11-1916--- Leonard Frank Adcock-50'------No.7.
7 ---15-11-1916--- Leonard Frank Adcock-50'------No.9.
THOMAS STREET------------------------------------------
8--- 25-8-1924 --- William Alderson *1--50'------Unit 1 and 2, No.11 McCombe St
9 ---25-11-1937---Harold Thomas Devine--50-------No.13.
10-- 7-8-1921 --John Forrest Kilpatrick-50'------No.15 west to middle of drive.
11-- 7-8-1921 --John Forrest Kilpatrick- 50'-----No.17 and west half of drive.
12--16-4-1920-Emily Irene Ada Nethercote- 50'----No. 19.
13---27-4-1921--- James Kilgour Rae --- 50'------1/21 McCombe St (west to pillar between carports), and 5 and 6 of 1A Rosebrook St behind.
14---18-11-1921--Alfred Freeland Gibbs---50'-----2/21 McCombe St (east to pillar between carports),and 3 and 4 of 1A Rosebrook,fronting Rosebrook.
-------------ROSEBROOK STREET (THE NORTHERN 160 FEET TO THE BEND)-----------
15--- 9-3-1921 ---Gladys Iris Jennings---50'-----Plaza Car Park to east kerb of entry/exit separator.
16--- 9-3-1921----Gladys Iris Jennings---50'-----to diagonal crack in footpath west of entry/exit.
17---19-12-1923---Edward Adolph Mattner--50'----west to pedestrian crossing sign.
18---19-12-1923---Edward Adolph Mattner--50'----west to double veranda pole outside post office.


*1. William Alderson lived on a Rosebud Fishing Village block, and being a Carlton supporter, wasresponsible for the colours of the Rosebud Footy Club jumper. It was changed to incorporate a light horizontal panel for one year because old Mr Dark had trouble spotting the players in the late afternoon but a return to the Alderson design was demanded.
*2.The Jennings family's background is discussed in my journal about connections between the Rosebud and Geelong areas.

As mentioned previously,lots 18-32 were probably allocated to the 14 acres of "Hindhope Villa" grounds transferred to Elizabeth May Younger on 17-8-1918.This eventually became "Hindhope Park" on 5 acres (now the Plaza), and house blocks on Boneo Rd, Maybury St, Donald St and the west end of Hope St.

It is possible that lots 18-32 were intended to front the west side of Rosebrook St with lots 19 and 20 fronting McCombe St west of lot 18, each with a frontage of 50',between points 200 and 300 feet west of Rosebrook St. Lots 21 to 31 would have run uphill from the bend in Rosebrook St with frontages of 50 feet and depths of 160', except for lot 21 which would have had a frontage of 100' because of the angle of the south east boundary of lots 15-18.

The reason for the above assumptions is that the sketch of title for Elizabeth May Younger's purchase on 17-8-1918 indicates that Hope St extended 160 feet west of Rosebrook St and that a lane 550' long went due (magnetic) north almost to the rear boundary of lot 18, with another lane veering left 191 feet from the end for 213 feet until it reached a point 100 feet west of the south west corner of lot 18, from which it ran parallel to lot 15-18 boundaries to meet McCombe St at a right angle.

No such lanes were planned for the first stage, north of McCombe St, or the second stage, east of Rosebrook St; they would have been intended for the purpose of a sanitary service.Postscript-There do seem to be back lanes in the other areas mentioned. In residential areas without sewerage, the toilet was built on the back fence line and the nightman would drive along the back lane and replace the full pan with an empty one.It would be interesting to find out where the shire of Flinders dumped its "fertiliser".
Essendon's was dumped on Cam Taylor's "St John's" which became the original (north) part of Essendon Aerodrome.
I wonder if trove will tell me when a sanitary service commenced in Rosebud.

It hasn't but by 1910 Dromana and Sorrento had a sanitary service and Portsea was demanding one. This may have influenced Thomas to include the lanes west of Rosebrook St, but the influence may have come from Miss Alice Currie.

WOMEN TO WOMEN A FAMILY HOLIDAY BY THE SEA Summer Respite for Country Folk PRO VESTA.
It was just before war broke out in 1914 that Miss Alice Currie put before the public a plan providing seaside holi days for country folk on the most economical basis possible, in the hope of raislng funds to bring that plan to fruition. There was every possibility that she would have received the support she asked for but the war intervened and, as with many ...etc.

In a letter which appeared in The Argus on July ? Miss Currie outlined the plan upon which it is proposed to
establish residential seaside camps sanitated and supervised and self-supporting by means of very moderate charges...etc.

When Miss Currie made her idea public in 1914 the plan of an organised residential camp with equipment as simple, plain and standardised as possible and consistent with comfort and efficiency was taken up commercially as a business venture at Rosebud with special terms for country people for the last three years.
(P.13, Argus, 10-7-1935.)

A SEASIDE CAMP.
The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 3 May 1932 p 3 Article
... A SEASIDE CAMP. Miss Alice Currie of Toorak, who will be remembered for her advocacy of sea-side camps has had her ambitions realised In the organised permanent model camp at Hindhope Park, Rosebud, Victoria. The camp has been established by private enterprise and last summer it accommodated ...etc.



EAST SIDE ROSEBROOK ST DOWNHILL FROM HOPE ST.
LOT ---- DATE ----TRANFERRED TO ----- FRONTAGE--- NOW
33 ---11-3-1924 --Frederick Allan Quinton 50' --- 25 Rosebrook with 8 Hope St in eastern half.
34 --- As above ------------------------- 50' --- 23 McCombe.
35-- Application in 1993, Woodward -----50' --- No.21.
36---19-6-1925- Margaret Jennie Edwards --50' --- No 19.
37 --- 13-5-1927-- Harold Liversidge -----50' --- No.17.
38 --- 18-6-1924--Harold John Corry ------50' --- No 15.
39 --- 23-5-1923--Edgar George Hughes ----50' --- No.13.
40 --- 8-3-1923 --James Kilgour Rae ------50' --- No.11.
41 ---As above ---------------------------50' --- Southern 50' of No. 7 to peg near brick wall.(Could be number 9 but no number is displayed.)
42----As above ---------------------------50' --- Northern 33 feet of No.7 and north to middle of 1/5 gate.
43 ---As above----------------------------50'---- Remainder of No.5.
44 ---As above----------------------------50' --- No.3.
45 ---As above but 46' 4.5" frontage and 3' easement on north side. No. 1 Rosebrook St.

THOMAS ST (UPHILL WEST SIDE)
LOT-----DATE----TRANSFERRED TO ------FRONTAGE --- ----------NOW
8 McCombe side boundary 146'3.5' to bend and another 36'3". Paced out correct.
46 --- 25-9-1923---Ethel Corinth Stewart--128'3"------ No.2,opposite 1, 3, 5.
47 --- 24-3-1918---Walter Burnham --------50'--------- No.4,opposite north part of 7.
48 --- 24-3-1918---Walter Burnham --------50'--------- No.6 opposite south part of 7& No 9 drive.
49 --- 12-8-1927---Ethel Corinth Stewart--50'----------No.8 opposite No.9 between drive and south boundary.
50 --- 8-4-1925----David Brownhill Bruce--50'----------No.10 opposite No.11.
51 --- 16-4-1925 --Mary Jane Hill --------50'----------No.12 (new double storey at front) opposite No.13.
52 --- 21-6-1920 --Lily McBean------------50'----------No.14 opposite north half of 15-17.
53 --- 21-6-1920---Lily McBean------------50'----------No.16 opposite south half of 15-17.
54 --- 11-3-1924---Frederick Allan Quinton-50'---------No.18 opposite No.19.
55 --- Ditto------------------------------50'----------No.20 opposite No.21.
56-----Ditto------------------------------50'----------No.22 opposite 23.
57 --- 15-4-1921--Minnie Irene Waterhouse-50'----------No.24 opposite 25.
58 --- 4-3-1924---Frederick Allan Quinton-50'----------No.26 opposite 27.
59 ----Ditto------------------------------50'----------No 28 (and Hope St back unit) opposite 29.
HOPE ST-----------------------------------------------------------------

LOT 95.
The title for the Hindhope Villa block of 1 acre 1 rood and 39 perches was for lot 96 (now 46, 48 and 50 First Ave)and lot 95 whose north and south boundaries were the same as the front and back fence lines of the houses on the south side of Hope St. The southern boundary adjoined lot 60 (which was directly opposite the east end of Hope St) but went west another 20 feet so the Hindhope Villa residents could access the 14 acres of "grounds" west of Rosebrook St via Hope St.

The north west corner of was in the middle of Windella Ave and from this point I followed the line of Thomas St south for 180 feet (60 paces.) I came exactly to the bend in Windella Avenue. Bends in an otherwise straight road can only mean two things: (1)dodging an obstruction such as a boggy patch or a too-steep gradient or (2)a boundary between two subdivisions (i.e. Hindhope and The Thicket.)

Windella Avenue to this bend (the southern boundary of numbers 5 and 2 Windella Ave)is wholly on lot 95 as are 1, 3, 5 Windella and the front lawn of No.2 in front of the carport.

THOMAS ST (DOWNHILL EAST SIDE.)
60 ---11-3-1924--Frederick Allan Quinton--50'-------------No.31 opposite Hope St.
61---Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------No.29 opp.28.
62 --Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------No.27 opp.26.
63---Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------No.25 opp.24.
64---Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------No.23 opp.22.
65---Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------No.21 opp.20.
66---Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------No.19 opp.18.
67---Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------No.15-17 (vacant part from northern boundary to north side of gate),opposite No.14.
68---Ditto--------------------------------50'-------------Southern half of 17 including driveway and house, opposite No.16.
69---8-7-1925----Bell Frances Hill--------50'-------------No.13,opposite No. 12.
70---6-8-1925---Robert Percival Wall------50'-------------No.11,opposite No. 10.
71---25-2-1929--Elsie Bowerman Leigh------50'-------------No.9 south of its driveway,opp. No.8.
72---2-6-1947---Roy Marcus Dark-----------50'-------------No.7 south from said part of tree to south side of No.9's driveway),opposite No.6.
73---23-8-1926--Lucy Alice Thompson-------50'-------------northern part No.7(south to northern edge of nature strip tree), opposite No.4.
74---23-3-1926--David Hamilton -----------50'---------------No.5 opp. south part No.2.
75--29-9-1924-QUINTON(Allen Lawrence,Norman Frederick)-50'--No.3 opp. central third No.2.
76--22-1-1926---William Alderson----------47'10"-----------No.1 opp. north (almost) third No.2.
Side boundary of 7 McCombe,155'9" to bend and another 26'1"the present garage) to William's block.

FIRST AVENUE (WEST SIDE UPHILL FROM McCOMBE ST.)
Side boundary of lot 1 (McCombe St)----- 101'10". Now 6 First Avenue.
77---11-6-1928---James Nichols ----------125'7"--- 8 First Ave (75 feet)and No.10 (50 feet.)
78---15-4-1925---Gertrude Espie----------50'-------No.12.
79---30-6-1927---Hugh John Parkes------- 50'-------No.14.
80---30-6-1927---Hugh John Parkes------- 50'-------No.16.
81---23-8-1926---Lucy Alice Thompson---- 50'-------No.18.
82---7-4-1926----Albert Woolley Craig----50'-------No.20.
83---15-6-1926---Janey Isabella Watts----50'-------No.22.
84---19-2-1919 --Arthur Reginald Mace----50'-------No.24.
85---Ditto-------------------------------50'--Part 26-8 south to .5 metre past power pole.
86---Ditto-------------------------------50'-----south half of 26-8.
87---11-3-1924---Frederick Allan Quinton-50'------No.30.
88---Ditto-------------------------------50'------No.32.
89---Ditto-------------------------------50'------No.34.
90---Ditto-------------------------------50'------No.36.
91---Ditto-------------------------------50'------No.38.
92---Ditto-------------------------------50'------No.40.
93---Ditto-------------------------------50'------No.42.
94---Ditto-------------------------------50'------No.44.
95---(9-1-1923 Annie Cameron,(12-3-1926 Keith McGregor)Mortgaged to Alex Mackie Younger 30-12-26 and discharged on 31-3-1927, (31-3-1927 Gilbert Livingstone Culliford), (31-3-1927 The National Permanent Building Society).
These transfers also involved lot 96 to the west,lots 95 and 96 comprising the homestead block of one acre one rood and thirty nine perches,virtually one and a half acres.The frontage of lot 95 was 180 feet. Numbers 46, 48 and 50 each havea frontage of 60 feet with the southern fenceline of No.50 indicating the boundary between Hindhope and The Thicket. No. 50 First Avenue is the Hindhope Villa.

LOT 96 AND THE NORTH SIDE OF HOPE ST.
96---- (See lot 95 above.) The western boundary is virtually on Windella Ave running 170 feet south from a spot 20 feet across Thomas St which I just realised is named after the developer, Arthur A.Thomas)in line with the front fence line of houses on the south side of Hope St to a spot level with the back fence line of those houses. Details re occupancy of lot 96 are given before the start of THOMAS ST,EAST SIDE.


97----11-3-1924--Frederick Allan Quinton--50'--- the western 30 feet of Windella Ave, 1 Hope St west to the middle of the third fence panel, and most of No.2 Widella Ave to the south.
98----3-7-1954---Denzal Victor Victor Purser-50'---- The western part of 1 Hope St.
99----11-3-1924----Frederick Allan Quinton---50'-----3 Hope St
100---Ditto----------------------------------50' ----5 Hope St
101---Application 1993,Woodward--------------50'-----7 Hope St.(The application would have been to create dual occupancy for 7A,also on lot 101,at the back. Includes the 7A driveway.)
102 and 103? --11-3-1924---Frederick Allan Quinton---- 150' (to about 10 feet past the line of west side of Rosebrook e.g. the Plaza fence.) Nos. 9,11 and 13 Hope St, all with 50' frontages. 103 is confusingly written straddling the line 10 ft west of Rosebrook St[ rather than within a block as all the other lot numbers were.

LYNG, MOTT, NICHOLS,ADCOCK, ALDERSON, DEVINE, KILPATRICK, NETHERCOTE, RAE, GIBBS, JENNINGS, MATTNER, CAIRNS, DARK, QUINTON, WOODWARD, EDWARDS,LIVERSIDGE, CORRY,HUGHES, RAE, STEWART, BURNHAM, BRUCE,HILL,MCBEAN,WATERHOUSE, WALL,LEIGH, DARK, THOMPSON,HAMILTON, ALDERSON, NICHOLS, ESPIE, PARKES, CRAIG, WATTS, MACE, PURSER,

3 comment(s), latest 4 years, 11 months ago

HINDHOPE ESTATE ROSEBUD (VIC. AUST.) PART 2- NTH SIDE McCOMBE ST.

Information about crown allotment 14, section A,Wannaeue, the farms (Hindhope, The Thicket) and the subdivision of Hindhope can be found in my EARLY ROSEBUD and HINDHOPE ESTATE (Part 1) journals.

The dates below come from title documents and addresses from the 1919 assessment.

Lots 36-39 fronted Boneo Rd,each having frontages just over 50 feet. They now comprise the car park over McCombe St from Red Rooster and Gloria Jeans. Much of Charlie Burnham's lot 39 has been taken for the left turn lane from Boneo Rd,obviously the reason Red Rooster relocated from that site.

Lots 36 and 37, adjoining the fishing gear and furniture/giftware shops, had a frontage of 107 feet 4 inches and the title was transferred from the developer,Arthur A.Thomas to Norman Pern of Fairfield, N.S.W. on 14-1-1915.
Norm also bought lots 30 and 31 (discussed in part 1) and was assessed on all four lots in 1919.

Lot 38 had a frontage of 53 feet 8 inches,practically to the McCombe St kerb where cars turn left. The title was transferred to William Thomas Charge (whose address in 1919 I forgot to record)on 16-5-1916.

Lot 39 had frontages of 53 feet 5 inches to Boneo Rd and 220 feet 10 inches to the north side of McCombe St. Charles Burnham gained title to this block on 31-3-1926. Charles and his brother, Walter, were fishermen who moved from Sorrento to Rosebud in about 1913. Walter built a house on the foreshore at the end of Boneo Rd and the brothers built a jetty from ti-tree nearby. This jetty appealed to a teenaged Arthur Boyd, who became a famed artist and the 1995 Australian of the Year. Arthur painted the jetty from the east and from the west. Photos of the jetty can be seen in Peter Wilson's ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD which is available for loan. One shows Arthur's painting and the other Lois Burnham (Walter's daughter and Peter's mother) sitting on the jetty as a youngster.

Steve Burnham's website contains Vin Burnham's recollections of Rosebud in the early days. Click on ABOUT THE FAMILY.

McCOMBE ST BLOCKS (North side.)
All blocks to First Avenue have frontages to McCombe St of 50 feet except for lot 70 which was only 32 feet 9 inches wide. Many blocks are now part of the car park so I will describe what they adjoin in lots 1-33, such as the Op Shop etc.

LOT DATE (TITLE) BUYER 1919 ADDRESS BUILDINGS/CHANGES IN 1919.
40 7-9-1915 David Phillips Brunswick
41 7-9-1915 David Phillips Brunswick
42 9-1-1948 Jessie Elizabeth Lightfoot ---
43 9-1-1948 J.E.Lightfoot ---
44 Perhaps trans. to Denzal Clyde Victor Purser 3-7-1954 and sold 13-8-1958./ Chas Cairns,Boneo 29, 45.
45 1-3-1916 Robert Cairns the Younger / Forsyth and Sons lots 28,45,46.
46 8-2-1915. Annie Cath. Anderson / Forsyth and Sons
47 9-8-1923 Ethel May Short --- /Not assessed
48 3-7-1918 Mary Ann Peatey *1 /Not assessed
49 12-2-1937 Margaret Emma Price Stone*2 /Mrs S.R.Stone, Richmond,49,50
50 12-2-1937 M.E.P.Stone /As above.
51 18-6-1946 JENNINGS (Gladys Iris, Fred Rowland,Walt. Herb., Gord. Rob.) / Not assessed
52 10-8-1923 Lily McBean --- / Not assessed
53 10-8-1923 Lily McBean --- / Not assessed
54 11-5-1920 Charles Roger Marsh /J.N? Marsh,Pt Ormond>Brighton Nth, 54, 55, BDS.
--------------------ROSE ST. ---------------
55 16-9-1920 William Dixon Marsh /As above
56 18-8-1941 Georgina Emma Saunders --- / Not assessed
57 Probably unsold and transferred to executors of A.A.Thomas on/after 5-2-1945.No.on plan but not on transfer details.
58 7-2-1922 Margaret Agnes Mott --- / Not assessed
59 27-7-1929 Benjamin John Forsyth --- / Not assessed
60 27-7-1929 Dorothy Pretoria McAlister --- / Not assessed A sis.of Ben and Norm?
61 27-7-1929 Norman Forsyth --- / Not assessed
62 6-6-1950 John Hector Beattie --- / Marg. Ethel Beattie,Brunswick.
63(& 10) 4-9-1915 Harriet Harvie --- / Margaret Harvey, Northcote, 10,63
64 18-12-1917 Annie Catherine Sampson --- / E.Martin*3, Coburg> Rosebud, 7, 8 &BDS, 64,65
Annie Catherine Sampson of St Kilda was assessed on 9 and 64!
65 8-6-1924 John McGregor Dawson --- / E.Martin above
66 8-6-1924 J.McG. Dawson --- Due to the duplication re 64,E.Martin probably had 65 & 66.
67 10-12-1919 Susannah Hansford Canterbury (Could mean in Melb. but possibly Blairgowrie.)
68 23-2-1921 Gladys Ethel Morton --- / Not assessed
69 23-2-1921 Gladys Ethel Morton --- /Not assessed
70 1-9-1916 James Dunstan Page Armadale Frontage of only 32 feet 9 inches.

The distance between Pt Nepean Rd and McCombe St was 400 feet so the depth of blocks fronting each was 200 feet. Some Pt Nepean Rd lots seem to have been re-subdivided with some buildings straddling allotment boundaries. As many of the McCombe St lots are now car parking, I will describe what I can see 200 feet away at the back of the Pt Nepean Rd blocks in order to describe their locations. I will start from Rose St and work west and east to determine the 50 foot frontage blocks, the eastern end of Charlie Burnham's lot 39 and the western boundary of lot 70. Apart from those at each end, the lots have 50 foot frontages (roughly 17 paces); this might help if you have difficulty finding some of the boundaries, such as wall joins in the Safeway building.

LOCATIONS OF LOTS.
Boneo Rd.
Lots 36 to 39, each with a frontage to Boneo Rd of about 53 foot, had side boundaries from 142 feet 11 inches (at the boundary with Total Tackle, Jepara and Panini) to 220 feet 10 inches (the McCombe St frontage of lot
39.)The increase in depths was due to the differing angles of the lot boundaries and Boneo Rd. Lot 39 is now the left turn lane (W) and the east-west section to the bend near the car park entry (E). The eastern boundary of lots 36-9 backs onto the Panini building 10 feet west of its eastern corner.

40. Backs onto the car parking outside the chemist etc and goes west 10 feet past the Panini corner.
41. Backs onto car park two way road (W)and plantation east to no entry sign (E).
42. Backs onto western 2m of Safeway building and entry drive from Pt Nepean Rd, to the NO ENTRY sign.
43. Backs onto Safeway wall from redundant air conditioner downpipe (W) to wall join under floodlight(E).
44. Backs onto Safeway building between two wall joins under floodlight (W)and 24 feet (8 paces)west of loading dock yellow pole (E).
45. Backs onto Safeway loading dock ramp (E) and the dock building to bend in wall (E).
46. Backs onto loading dock building from wall bend/join (W) to east end of Safeway.
47. Backs onto Op Shop (W)and the (Nepean) arcade (E).
48. Backs onto Rosebud Discounts (W) and shop 2, 1395 Pt Nepean Rd (presently vacant) (E).
49. Backs onto Rosebud Homemakers and entry drive to east kerb.
50. Backs onto east kerb of entry drive (W) and Paint Place yard (E).
51. Backs onto yard with David Short signs on fence.
52. Backs onto Roller door (W) and Founds shop front. (E). The roller door part was formerly a separate shop.
53. Backs onto yard full of containers and mattresses, obviously the part of Founds rendered at the front.
54. West corner Rose St, backs onto Cash Deal.
--------- ROSE STREET -----------
55. East corner Rose St, contains Bermuda Bar, and Rose St shops (all vacant.)
56. Barry Plant and car park.
57. Sportspower and car parking.
58. Aldi loading dock.
59. Rest of Aldi building east to line of spouting.
60. East to drain pit cover in nature strip 2m west of Aldi entry/Exit drive.
61. The eastern quarter of the Aldi property to the boundary with First Choice.
62. Adjoins back of western part of First Choice.
63. 14 McCombe St (Rosebud Chiropractic Centre.)
64. West half of vacant land behind Rosebud Square.
65. East half of vacant land behind Rosebud Square.
66. 8 McCombe St to middle of driveway between it and a line of 4 flats.
67. The four flats.
68. Barkies entry drive and the western 3 parking bays.
69. The next six parking bays,perhaps another half bay.Contains telecommunication tower and enclosure.
70. First Avenue corner. Roughly the 4 eastern parking spaces, Nepean Autos and Hotline Electrics.


*1. Mary Ann Peatey married Jack Peatey on 4-11-1884. Their children, John Edward,William Henry,Susan and George were all born in Gippsland and shortly after they returned to Rosebud to live on the beachfront in 1894, twins Mary and Ann were born. They called their house Beachside; it was on the east side of Peatey's Creek which is now a drain running under Murray Anderson Rd. As Jack was almost an invalid,using a walking stick carved for him by Fred Vine, it was mainly Mary Ann who established Rosebud's first produce supply on the Rosebud Fishing Village block. Jack's health improved and he took out fishing parties in his huge coutta boat, one of his best customers being Edward Campbell a Melbourne City Councillor who served as Lord Mayor and had a holiday house on former Lacco land where the Banksia Point development is proposed. Jack and Mr Wong perpetrated a hoax on the Rosebud folk according to Jim Dryden. He pretended his eyes were turned and Mr Wong of the Chinaman's Creek market-gardening family made a hood with slits where his eyes should focus, effecting a miraculous cure.

Jack's parents, George and Susan Peatey, had been settlers on the Survey (Safety Beach area)by 1858 and later bought 100 acres at the east corner of Harrisons Rd (Melway 160 K6) now occupied by wineries. It proved too wet for farming and with a loan from Nelson Rudduck they purchased lot 76 of Woolcott's subdivision,just over 2 acres at the south corner of Jetty Rd and McDowell St. Here they grew onions and spuds from 1888 after repaying the loan.The house burnt down in 1912 and Susan moved to Beachside where she died in 1914.Susan was involved as a midwife in what was thought to be the first birth of a white child in Rosebud, delivering Henry and Ann Bucher's Rose Ann on 8-9-1867. ("Pine Trees and Box Thorns" Rosalind Peatey; Jim Dryden.)

Mary Ann would have bought the Hindhope Block as the best way of utilising the profits from Beachside about which an unknown pioneer (possibly Isabelle Moresby)has noted on the map "Peatys, cows:dairy,poultry slept in trees". Now that's what I call free-range!

*2. The Stones of Richmond may have been related to Fred Vine's wife and daughter. Fred's loyal missus was obviously a widow with a young daughter when Fred married her. After her death Fred moved to a fisherman's hut on the foreshore at Dromana, roughly opposite Seacombe St. The stepdaughter answered to Mary Stone or Mary Vine and Peter Wilson devoted a chapter of ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD to "Polly" Vine, including an excellent photo of her. Fred's move and Mary using Mary B.Stone as her official name probably both arose from the same cause, which is better left unsaid but can be discovered on trove. Some wonderful photos of Dromana fishermen in Colin McLear's A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA include Fred.

*3. E.Martin was probably the proprietor of a shop on the west corner of Boneo Rd (which became known as Martin's Corner.) He probably bought the 5 acre site which now includes the Blue Mini Cafe,a couple of shops to the west and possibly south to the Super Clinic. He may have sold the Hindhope blocks soon after the 1919 assessment to buy the Martin's Corner Land and build his shop which was established in about 1920 according to the late Ray Cairns.

The photo from Steve Burnham's website was taken from the west side of Boneo Rd, probably from near the site of the present Super Clinic. It shows Charlie Burnham's house fronting Boneo Rd and the fish shop behind it on the north side of McCombe St. Red Rooster later occupied the site but was moved to the present location so the left turn lane could be built. On the right hand side of McCombe St is a Hindhope sign.


1 comment(s), latest 4 years, 11 months ago

HINDHOPE PARK AND OTHER ROSEBUD MEMORIES FROM RAY WOOLRIDGE etc., VIC., AUST.

Nothing lasts forever! This is especially true regarding Rosebud which has lost so many of its historic buildings, and far-less so overseas where the Pyramids, Colloseum, Panthanon, quaint villages, ancient cathedrals etc. draw huge numbers of tourists. Aborigines had an incredible connection with "place" and family historians have caught the bug. In today's DESPERATELY SEEKING, one wanted to find out the sites of a hotel and a house in Bendigo. That is why I try to provide precise locations of farms etc, even if it makes for boring reading.

As well as acknowledging and providing details about pioneers, I also aim to raise public awareness of an area's heritage so that people can experience the feeling of "place". To this end, with the assistance of Frank Thom of Rosebud Plaza, I am producing a series of one-page histories of the Rosebud area. The first is about Hugh Glass, The Thicket and Hindhope farms and Hindhope Park, with a photo and newspaper article about Hindhope Park. It is on the noticeboard near Baker's Delight.

This morning while I continued the 1954 Mornington Peninsula souvenir journal, I received a phone call from Ray
Woolridge. This is what he told me.

Hindhope Park was managed by Bill Woodward and his wife, Marge,in 1955-7 and they were followed from 1957 into the 1960's by Fred Parker. Fred's son, Dick, married one of the girls who had holidayed at the Park. (Dick was one of the stars of the Rosebud Football Club and a very good cricketer for years at Boneo. He was the one who suggested that I interview the late Ray Cairns,the Boneo Bradman.)

Ray's family lived in the Preston area and there was a group of families from there that spent their summer holidays at Hindhope since the late 1940's. Ray knows the exact site occupied by Bert Deacon's 21 person "colony" on the foreshore that is mentioned in my 1954 Mornington Peninsula Souvenir journal. Bert, a Brownlow Medalist and Carlton great, was captain-coach of the Bullants and most of his colonists were Prestonites.

At Hindhope there were three good kitchens and eating areas and visitors could use the cabins or provide their own camping (as was the case with the Clemengers' Parkmore near McCrae many decades earlier.) Every summer there would be a golf tournament at Carrington Park (Rosebud Public Golf Course)and the "Hindhope Gift" on New Year's Day.

Later on Ray Woolridge spent his summers at Netherby, now full of home units with entries in McDowell St and Jetty Rd. This was a caravan park run by Don Miller which closed in the mid 1980's. It consisted (wholly or partly) of the 2 acre lot 76 of Woolcott's subdivision of crown allotment 17 Wannaeue,purchased in 1878 by George and Susan Peatey and occupied by them from 1888 when they had repaid Nelson Rudduck's loan.

The closure of Netherby resulted in Ray holidaying at Heather Lodge, situated where Kentucky and the mini golf
are now. It was run by Jack and Audrey Hetherington and closed down in the early 1990's.

Deserting trove, I did a google search for Hindhope Park and found this treasure.
Hindhope Caravan Park | Five Little Lady
janettebruckshaw-healthykids.blogspot.com/.../hindhope-caravan-park.ht...‎

Hindhope Caravan Park
Without Prejudice

On the first night we arrived at Hindhope,for a months long stay, I woke in the middle of the night with an urgent request from Yvette to take her to the toilet block.

We had arrived in the darkness not knowing what to expect. Home left behind in Melbourne for the Summer shores of camping at Rosebud. the cabin was tiny and airless but was adequate for our needs it was more or less a glorified tent.

An enamel sink in one corner and bunk beds, old drawers and a wardrobe. Unbearably hot during the day but we intended to spend all our time outside of it.

My husband had stayed back in Melbourne to work and we had fled a boring old house in Keysborough for the wilds of Rosebud. The traditional Aussie break coming to us at last, a summer holiday on the safe foreshore of the Bay.

I grabbed Yvette's hand and a torch and we walked out into the night sky. Once we reached the bright lights of the toilet block I could see why Yvette was agitated. She was covered from head to toe in Measles. And we were there amongst families for the entire month, no thought of going home entered my brain.

So the next day I told all the people in the communal kitchen at breakfast. we had our own table, a distressed timber construction with long bench seats on either side. The seats were given to be a bit rough and had to be carefully navigated to avoid lethal splinters to the unwary.

We had our own fridge with a tiny freezer and in the massive kitchen there were enough cookers to feed 24 families. I gave all the families the information about Yvette's condition and they all agreed it was fine for her to come in with their children.

She didn't leave the cabin for days and I had to nurse her sore eyes and bathe her head with water from the sink but she was fine again after a few days. Then Debbie went down with it and Alena and Lauren didn't as they had had the measles injection. It was a disastrous start to what would become a regular holiday for us, always just us. No hubby.

By the following week we were really into the swing of things. Fun coming from the other families and their kids and every night at dinner we met up and compared the days happenings.

I took out other kids my girls had befriended and other Mums and Dad took mine with them to Arthurs seat or the Carnival with its swinging Pirate Ship. Coming back hot and sticky with pink and green fairy floss.

From then on we did everything, exploring the foreshore, swimming in the warm water that was almost bath like in its temperature and it was always safe as it was mostly shallows with little ripples that could be body surfed by a 10, 9, 5 and 3 year old child.

We went to the hot concrete pool and the girls didn't like it and we left preferring the sea and sand and the parks with their swings and see saws. But the nights were the best when the kids were sent to faraway tables to play cards and the adults would play Trivial Pursuit or cards and get merrily drunk.

My drink de jour, Spritzers of white wine and soda and ice. I smoked then as did all the others and puffing away and drinking we would endeavour to answer the questions seriously. we would retire to the cabins we all had as late as possible and as tipsy as possible so we could sleep in the hot boxes.

The kids never had a problem sleeping, however, worn out from helter skelter during the day, wind, sun and sea burning their cheeks and then turning them mahogany brown. their Father having olive skin and the girls lucky enough to inherit it.

HISTORICAL HOWLERS in the area north west of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Histories about the area near Tullamarine have featured several howlers because of: vague locality names in the early days, municipal historians confining their research to their own municipality's rate books, and time limits preventing the development of a vast network of family historians/ descendants to check assumptions.
The description Moonee Moonee Chain of ponds, shortened to Moonee Moonee Ponds and later to Moonee Ponds meant anywhere near the whole length of the Moonee Ponds Creek, not the present suburb of Moonee Ponds.
In "The Stopover that Stayed", a history of ESSENDON by Grant Aldous, a terrific description was given of a farm in the Shire of BROADMEADOWS, John Cochrane's "Glenroy Farm" at "Moonee Ponds. This farm was of course at Glenroy, nowhere near the suburb of Moonee Ponds.
In "The Gold The Blue", A.D.Pyke's wonderful history of Lowther Hall at Essendon, Pyke mentioned Peter McCracken farming "Stewarton" at Moonee Ponds. It was only when researching Broadmeadows Shire rates that I discovered that John Cock moved onto "Stewarton" in 1892 and, that soon after, it was renamed as "Gladstone". This farm was section 5 in the parish of Tullamarine, the northern 777 acres of the present suburb of Gladstone Park.It was bought from the Crown on Niel Black's behalf by George Russell. Black, after whom a street in Broadmeadows Township (Westmeadows) was named, represented a syndicate which included Stewart and Gladstone; the syndicate's land in the Western District was also called Stewarton. Gladstone was a cousin of the British Prime Minister.
In "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History", Andrew Lemon stated that McIntosh had left the district because his name had disappeared from the Broadmeadows Shire ratebooks.That worthy pioneer had merely moved a stone's throw to the west into the Shire of Bulla. Andrew Lemon made another wrong assumption ; he thought that the James Robertson who settled at Gowrie Park (north of J.P.Fawkner's Box Forest, now known as Hadfield after Cr Rupert Hadfield) was a Keilor farmer. Poor Andrew did not have the help of the wonderful Deidre Farfor as I did! The three different James Robertson families and their properties will be the subject of another journal.
Here's an assumption of mine. If I'm wrong, perhaps somebody will let me know. Joseph Raleigh established Raleigh's Punt at Maribyrnong in 1850. ("Maribyrnong:Action in Tranquility".)A few years earlier, he was recorded at living at Mona Vale. I have a feeling that Mona Vale was Westmeadows. When Broadmeadows Township's Church of England was built in 1850, it doubled as a school but as an early (1969?) Westmeadows State School history stated, school was earlier conducted on Mr Raleigh's property and of course the township's main east-west street was called Raleigh St.

HISTORICAL ORIGINS OF NAMES OF TRARALGON, VIC., AUST. AND STREETS AND TOWNS IN THE VICINITY.

Unfortunately, although the names of towns, suburbs and streets can recall much of the history of an area, their origins were never officially recorded. The surveyors of townships often named streets after military or naval heroes, surveyors and politicians or senior bureaucrats. Those who know their area's history well will recognise streets named after pioneers such as Alphabetical Foster and Dr Farquhar McCrae at Dandenong because the surname was used. However if these streets bore a christian name of these two holders of the Eumemmering Run, the names might have been John,Vesy,Leslie or Fitzgerald and Farquhar Streets, making their origins much harder to determine.

It was while I was looking for the following account of Traralgon's early history, The River of Little Fish*, which I had read some years ago while researching Edward Hobson, that I discovered another gem.
(* "The River of Little Fish"
www.traralgonhistory.asn.au/rolf.htm
An historical account of Traralgon, written for the boys and girls of the city. First published in 1970. Contents. Foreword - from the author William J. Cuthill.)

I take my hat off to the journalist who wrote the following in 1914. If only the editors of all local papers had shown the same initiative, there would be no need for the guesswork involved regarding the origins of subdivisional street names derived from christian names. I only know the origins of the street names at Tootgarook such as Alma, Guest, Raymond, Ronald and Doig because a woman rang me to tell me that her hairdresser at Canterbury had owned land there and I managed to get in touch with his son. If only all municipalities had been required to record such details about subdivision streets! That is what the journalist did.

TRARALGON NAMES.
The Historical Society of Aus-
tralia is at present engaged on an
investigation of the meaning and
history of place names which are
used throughout the States. Such
an inquiry is interesting, and will
afterwards be of great value to
future historians. But for our-
selves, it may be interesting to do
the same thing in a small way, and
to enquire as to the various names
which have grown up in connec-
tion with our town, and endea-
vour to find out how they came
into being, and if there is any
meaning which they are intended
to convey.
When and by whom the name
Traralgon was given to this local-
ity, I have been unable to find out,
but it was certainly given at a very
early period in the history of the
State. The earliest spelling of the
name is reported to be "Tarral-
gon," a slight variation of the
present form, and the word itself
(by those learned in these mat-
ters) is said to be a native. name
signifying the "river of little
fishes," while the neighboring and
equally familiar name of Loy Yang
is said to mean "big eels."
The great bulk of names which
grow up around a town are usually
in. connection with street names.
These are necessarily many in
number, usually of local origin,
and are frequently used as a means
of perpetuating the names of citi-
zens who have rendered good ser-
vice to the community, and are
considered worthy to be held in
remembrance. Many items of his-
tory are often gleaned from such
a source as this.
When and by whom the first
streets in Traralgon were named
is another question to which I am
unable to give a definite answer.
The oldest township plan available
is dated 1871. On that plan the
following names are printed: Fran-
klin, Seymour, Hotham Kay and
Grey. Possibly they were given by
the surveyor who laid out the
township many years before that
date. Merely as names, they are
very suitable, but they have no
local meaning or significance. Kay
street, as then applied, extended
from the west to the east boun-
dary of the township, and inclu-
ded what is now known as the
Rosedale Road.
The next christening of streets
took place in the latter part of
the seventies, but by whom the
ceremony was performed I have
not been able to discover. While
recently examining an official plan
of the township in the Lands of-
fice, I noticed that the streets
which are now known as Peterkin,
Campbell and Gwalia were named
on it Black, Moore and Bowen.
This was before the formation of
the Traralgon shire, and it was
not done on any recommendation
from the Rosedale shire. As the
Lands department was selling land
in those streets at the time, possi-
bly these names were also applied
by some official in that office. The
peculiar part of the affair is that
the names were recorded nowhere
but on the official plan of the
township, and as they have
not been published since, the na-
mes have been completely lost, and
at a later date the streets were
re-named by the Traralgon shire
council.
In 1884 the Traralgon council
took up the question of street na-
mes, this being the first time that
any local authority had ever taken
the matter in hand. By resolution
the following names were formally
adopted: Argyle, Mitchell, Church,
Breed, Princess, Peterkin, Mason,
Mill, Berry and Gwalia. Shortly
afterwards, but apparently without
any express authority, the follow-
ing were added: Campbell, Ser-
vice, Deakin, George, John, Munro
Flora and High. About the same
time Mr. Peterkin subdivided Loch
Park, named after the Governor of
that time, and the streets in it
received the names of their daugh-
ters: Ethel, Mabel and Olive.
It may be mentioned that Miss. O.
Peterkin's wedding was recently
reported in your columns. Mr.
Breed followed with the Ben Vue
subdivision to the streets of
which he gave the christian na-
mes of himself, his wife and son:
Henry, Ann and Albert. Henry
and Olive were for different por-
tions of the same street, and as it
soon became evident that to have
two names for one street was very
undesirable, the name of Olive has
been gradually dropped, and the
whole length of the street in ques-
tion is now known as Henry street.
Another subdivision at this per-
iod was the Hyde Park, by Mr.
F. C. Mason, to the streets of
which the names of his children,
Charles, Marie,and Rose were gi-
ven, although these names as yet
have not come into general use.
The Templeton Estate gave us
Bourke, Collins, Swanston and
Morrison, although only Collins
street now remains, the rest hav-
ing reverted into private occupa-
tion.
For a period of nearly twenty-
five years, no further action was
taken. The council then again
took up the matter, and formally
adopted the following: Hickox,
Dunbar, McColl, McLean, Living-
ston, Howitt, Bridge, Shakespere
and Tennyson. The Park subdivl-
sion added to the list: Burns, Gor-
don and Moore. Except for some
private subdivlsion names which
have been given since, this com-
pletes the catalogue.
Now, reviewing this list, and se-
lecting the names of those who
were at one time residents, we get
the following: Campbell, Peter-
kin, Breed, Mill, McLean, Mitchell,
Hickox, Dunbar, McColl and
Munro. Howitt may also be re-
garded as a local name, in recog-
nition of the late Dr. Howitt's long
connection with the district, as
a police magistrate. Mr. Munro,
as manager of the Bank of Austra-
lasia, was not a resident of long
standing, although he was a very
active and energetic citizen when
he was here. With this exception,
all the others are pioneer citizens,
with whom the history of Traral-
gon will ever be associated. Only
one of them, Mr. Mill, is still alive,
but in their day and generation
they well and worthily did their
part in the building up of the
town in which we live, and Tra-
ralgon to-day is reaping the fruit
of their labors. Now that they are
no longer with us, it is well that
their names should be perpretra-
ted in the way which has been
done.
Of political names we have Ser-
vice, Berry, Deakin, Mason and
Livingston, each of whom has ren-
dered the State some service, and
are entitled to remembrance.
Franklin, Seymour, Hotham and
Grey are names of officers in the
Imperial service, but who Kay is
in memory of I am unable to say.
The name has no connection with
E. Kay, who, later on, was a pro-
minent resident.
The number of streets having
christian names is large. We have
the Peterkin names, Ethel, Mabel
and Olive; the Breed names, Ann
Albert and Henry; and Mason na-
mes, Charles, Marie and Rose; and
these we can account for. But
where George, Flora and John
came from is uncertain. The name
Flora was given to the Rosedale
road, and never came into use;
George and John are small streets
on the east side of the creek; and
the names are rarely used.
Several names are descriptive of
the physical features of the streets
—as High, Church and Bridge, and
explain themselves.
Poetry is well represented, as
we have Shakespere, Tennyson,
Burns, Moore, and Gordon.
There are other names which
have no local or other significanice
that I know of, such as Gwalia.
Whence it came, or what it stands
for, I cannot say, but the name
Bowen originally applied, repre-
senting the Governor of that per-
iod, would have been better.
Generally, it may be said that
names have grown up here, as they
have in other parts, in a hapha-
zard and disconnected fashion.
Given at different tlmes, and by
different people, without any com-
mon policy, no other result could
be expected. But it is rather to be
regretted that greater use has not
been made of this means of recog-
nising the services which have
been rendered to the community
by public spirited citizens. Besides
those, whose names have already
been enumerated, there are others
who have taken an active part im
the building of the town, and has-
tening its onward progress. But
they are now fading out of re-
membrance, and their works are
being forgotten. Naming a street
is a very, simple, yet very effective,
way of keeping alive the memory
of those people the community
wishes to honor.
A few references may be made
to the over-use of names, Traral-
gon being one which is very much
overworked. In addition to the
Traralgon township, and Traral-
gon Creek, we have TraraIgon
West, Traralgon South and Upper
Traralgon Creek. The latter is
cumbersome and confusing, and
might very well be replaced by
something simpler. Now that the
district referred to as making great
progress with a school, public hall,
and regular postal communication,
it is worthy of having some dis-
tinctive name, which would be all
its own.
Flynn's Creek and Upper Flynn's
Creek is another instance of re-
petition, which confuses a stran-
ger, and is a frequent cause of
letters being misdirected. The lat-
ter name might well be superseded
by something shorter, and more
euphonious, and more appropriate
to the district.
A further instance is Jeeralang.
Originally, it was the name of a
parish only. Now that settlement
has progressed, and schools and
post offices establshed, we have
Jeeralang North, Jeeralang South
Jeeralang West and Jeeralang,
while Jeeralang road is applied to
several different places. Except to
anyone intimately acquainted with
the locality, it is confusing in the
extreme, and to correctly address
a letter is often a problem. It
would greatly simplify matters if
each separate centre, where a post
office or school has been establi-
shed adopted some separate name
of its own. (P.3, Gippsland Farmers Journal (Traralgon), 26-5-1914.)

HISTORY DISAPPEARS TODAY IN ROSEBUD, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

Today, Thursday, 1-12-2011, the huge pine trees were cut down at 858 Pt Nepean Rd, Rosebud. Who planted them is unclear, but it was possibly George Fountain, who at one time owned number 858 and 854. The pines were planted on both blocks and George, a plumber who was the last Mayor of the Borough of North Melbourne before it merged with the City of Melbourne, called his holiday residence "The Pines".
The house at number 858, possibly built by William John Ferrier (subject of another journal), the nationally famous hero of the La Bella tragedy at Warrnambool in 1905, was probably occupied by George until a newer house was built on number 854. Ferrier's block was then sold to the Archers, who were keen recreational fishermen.
I took a mobile phone photo of the two pines, from which most of the branches had been lopped. Hopefully MUZZA OF McCRAE took a photo of these two very old trees with their clothes on and will be able to post it with his other great photos of historical interest.

1 comment(s), latest 2 years, 4 months ago

HISTORY NOTES (1), MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.

10 comment(s), latest 5 years, 7 months ago

HISTORY NOTES (2), MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.

ADAMS James Smith Adams, Mornington butcher and councillor, who had much land on the east side of the peninsula, was killed in an accident.
(P.2, Mornington Standard, 14-11-1895.)

McKAY James McKay, a fisherman at Rosebud near Dromana and popularly known as "Dingy Jemmy", set off in his boat (described in great detail)for Sorrento on the 7th, was seen at Rye with others in the boat, and was believed to have had a watery grave by the 20th. (P.5, column 4, Argus, 20-2-1874.)

WATKIN, SCURFIELD,DAWES, ASSENDER,STORY, MURPHY, GIBSON, BROWN, CARRIGG, STELLA .
All of these names are connected by my efforts to find if Joseph Story, assessed as a hotelkeeper at Dromana in 1875, but not owning one, actually had been granted a licence.

Richard Watkin built the beautiful Dromana Hotel in about 1857 (WRONG; SEE THE DROMANA HOTEL JOURNAL) and its photo appeared in Spencer Jackson's huge advertisement 70 years later; the photo was probably used because a snap of the pub at that time would not have attracted tourists or land purchasers for Spencer's Foreshore and Panoramic Estates; the transition to what we now see would not have been attractive. The present owner, Ray Stella, showed me internal brickwork that survived Lou Carrigg's modernisation.
WATKIN?BANNER.?On the 20th inst., at Mornington, by the Rev. Mr. Abrahams, Henry Watkin, only son of Richard Watkin, of the Dromana Hotel, to Sarah Anne Banner, the adopted daughter of Charles Barnett, Esq. Home papers please copy. (P.4, Argus, 24-6-1872.)

CHARLES BARNETT.
Charles Barnett was granted crown allotment 13 of section 1, Kangerong, a triangular block bounded by Palmerston Ave,Jetty Rd and Boundary Rd. It consisted of about thirty six and a half acres but when Charles was first assessed on it in 1865, it was described as being 34 acres with a 6 roomed house on it.

By 1879, Charles Barnett, gentleman, was assessed only on three town lots, having apparently sold the 34 acres; George Robert Dawes, mariner, who was assessed on 34 acres, Kangerong having possibly bought it.As the town lots were not granted to Charles, it is not possible to specify their locations.

BARNETT.?On the 23rd inst., at his residence, Dromana, Charles Barnett, of Tottenham, Middlesex,England, aged 72, after long and painful illness.
Home papers please copy. (P.1, Argus, 28-4-1884.)



William Dixon Scurfield* bought five crown allotments between Permien and Foote Streets, each half acre having a frontage to both streets, starting forty metres from the esplanade, and I believe the Scurfield hotel was on one or both of the half acre blocks fronting the Esplanade (beach road.) The original post office in Dromana, on the west corner of Foote St, was run by Mr Dawes, and later was a home called "Carnarvon". This corner block was purchased by Scurfield and A.Walker on 10-5-1858 and I had a suspicion that Dawes had built Carnarvon there after the hotel, now called the Arthurs Seat Hotel,burnt down in the 1997-8 summer. However, as the last entry in HISTORY NOTES (1)shows, Dawes was alive and kicking(just) at Dromana at least two decades previously.
(*Scurfield was an original purchaser of land in Broadmeadows Township,which is now called Westmeadows. The Scurfield Hotel was the first pub in Dromana and was operated by Richard Watkin before he established the Dromana Hotel in 1862.)

Watkin owned the Dromana Hotel for ages. It was far more substantial than Scurfield's and was the venue for council meetings. The most sensational event at Scurfield's involved a young man being immensely touched by a priest from Mornington, if you get my Derryn Hinch type drift.The last assessment I've seen of Scurfield re the hotel was on 2-9-1871, the 1872 and 1873 assessments having been left off the microfiche. By 1874, George Assender was the publican and he remained for some time. Joseph Story was described as a hotelkeeper in 1875 so he was probably leasing one of the hotels without paying the rates; he paid rates on 30 acres and six town lots.

The Wainwrights took over Scurfield's Hotel in the mid to late 1880's but Catherine's husband died and she married blacksmith, William Allison, who became the licensee briefly before returning to his trade.

The rate collector assessed Lawrence Murphy on both Hotels in 1897-8. The nett annual value of the Arthurs Seat Hotel was 70 pounds in 1897 but only 20 (amended to 10) pounds in 1898. I think you can guess why! I couldn't understand why a publican would want to compete with himself. A former coach proprietor, Lawrence was a model citizen, the prime mover in getting a Catholic Church for Dromana, before moving to Rennison's (The Royal) on the Esplanade at Mornington where he died. I felt guilty about suspecting Lawrence of Arson around.

Then, when I finally found the article about the fire (which started internally, not sweeping down the hill as Spencer Jackson put it in 1927), I found that the licensee was Charles Brown. The rate collector obviously did not read the Mornington Standard.

The licence for the Arthurs Seat Hotel was transferred from Lawrence Murphy to Charles Brown and the licence for the Dromana Hotel was transferred from T.Gibson to L.Murphy. (P.3, Mornington Standard, 3-12-1896.) T.Gibson was probably Tom Gibson, the brother of Walter Gibson of Glenholm; Tom died on 20-9-1900 at the age of 64. (P. 82 A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.)

The foundation stone at the front of the Dromana Hotel is visible to any passer-by on the footpath. The inscription gives the date and states that it was laid by Mrs Lou Carrigg. Funny how a married woman had to use her husband's given name as well as changing her surname! Her name was probably Ellen.

The Dromana Hotel Licence was transferred from Ellen C.Carrigg (executrix of L.Carrigg) to Ellen C.Carrigg. (P.2, Argus, 30-9-1941.)

DARLEY of Flinders.
At this stage I have no explanation why Mrs J.Darley (Sarah Elizabeth) would be the mother of children with the name of Martin. Were they children of Thomas Ormiston Martin? John Saville Darley and Sarah Elizabeth (nee Bear)apparently called their property "The Rest" and this passed to Thomas Holland from Clifton Hill, who seems to have moved to Flinders in 1908. William Edwin and Jane Darley called their property "Hiawatha".

MARRIED.On the 19th March, at Brighton, by the Rev. E. Greenwood, Congregational Minister, George, eldest son of Mr. George Falkingham, of Sandhurst, to Miss Mary Ann Martin, eldest daughter of Mrs. J.Darley, of Flinders, and grand-daughter of Mrs. J. Bear, of Bay-street, Brighton.

On the 19th March, at Brighton, by the Rev. E. Greenwood, Congregational Minister, Thomas, second son of Mr. G. Falkingham, of Sandhurst, to Miss Ruth Martin, youngest daughter of Mrs. J. Darley, of Flinders, and grand-daughter of Mrs. J. Bear, of Bay-street, Brighton.(P.2, Bendigo Advertiser, 23-3-1872.)


DARLEY. -On the 24th March, at Flinders, John Saville Darley, the beloved husband of Sarah Elizabeth Darley, aged 62 years. (P.1, Argus, 26-3-1901.)

FALKINGHAM.--On the 11th July, at Woolton, South-terrace, Clifton Hill, Florence Eleanor Falkingham, beloved second eldest daughter of Ruth and the late Thomas Falkingham, sister of Mrs. T. Holland, Clifton Hill, and Mrs, J.H.Squires, Sydney,granddaughter of Mrs. S.E.Darley, Flinders. (P. 9, Argus, 12-7-1902.)

FALKINGHAM. On the 11th inst., at 3 Marlton-crescent, St. Kilda, suddenly, Mary Ann, the dearly beloved wife of Rev. George Falkingham, granddaughter of the late Mrs. Mary Ann Bear, of Brighton, daughter of Mrs. John S. Darley, of Flinders, sister of Mrs. Thomas Falkingham, of North Fitzroy, Mr. Robert B. Martin, of Parkville, and Mr. Henry A. Martin, of Flinders, aged 43 years. "The memory of the just is blessed."
(P.1, Argus, 18-8-1894.)

DARLEY.--On the 10th August, at Flinders, Jane,dearly beloved wife of William Darley, loved mother of Florence, Annie, Katie, William, Fadille?, and Lionel, aged 57 years.(P.1, Argus,16-8-1929.)

MRS. R. FALKINGHAM and FAMILY desire to return their sincere THANKS to the Residents of Flinders and District Members of Agricultural Society, Cable Staff, and Mechanics' Institute, for Letters of Condolences, Telegrams, Floral Offerings and Proffered Services, to assist them during illness of the late Mrs S. E. Darley.
(P.2, Mornington Standard, 21-3-1908.)

DARLEY.-On the 18th February, at the Rest,Flinders, Mrs. S. E. Darley, relict of the late J. S. Darley, and daughter of the late Mrs. H. A. Bear, Brighton, loved mother of Mrs. Ruth Falkingham, aged 70 years.
(P.1, Argus, 20-2-1908.)

DARLEY -On the 31st March (passed peacefully away) at his residence, Hiawatha, Flinders, William Edwin husband of the late Jane and dearly loved father of Florence, Annie (Mrs Kay), Kattie, William, Saville and Lionel, aged 76 years. (P.8, Argus, 2-4-1938.)

HOLLAND.-Presumed lost at sea. July. 1942. Harry Darley, civilian internee, Rabaul, beloved husband of Winnie, loving father of Fred and Betty, 18 Simpson st.. East Melbourne.

HOLLAND.-Presumed lost at sea. Julv, 1942 Harry Darley, civilian Internee, Rabaul, much loved eldest son of Mrs. T. and the late Thomas Holland. The Rest. Flinders, grandson of Mrs. Ruth Falkingham.

HOLLAND.-Presumed lost at sea. July, 1942 Harry Darley, civilian internee, Rabaul, the beloved brother of Tas. Trav. Bert. Cliff, and Tan, Rena (Mrs. George Smith Flinders), Flo (Mrs. B. G. Feely. Glen Iris). Clarice (Mrs. T. W. Hosking. Shoreham), and Alma.
(P.16, Argus, 5-11-1945.)


O'DONNELL-DARLEY.- Marie Patricia, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. O'Donnell, Clifton, Willaura, to Saville Darley, Currie, King Island, second son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Darley, Hiawatha, Flinders.

WHITE'S HILL ROAD.
WISEMAN'S DEVIATION AND WHITE'S HILL ROAD.
(Email to toolaroo.)
Wiseman's Deviation is the name given to the south end of White Hill Rd, the former south end being Sheehans Rd. I believe that White Hill Rd was actually called WHITE'S HILL RD by those who used it regularly; in A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, Colin McLear called it the Red Hill road.

I had always thought it strange that a place near Red Hill was called WHITE HILL, and thought it was absolutely stupid that the original centre (school, post office, township blocks) of RED HILL was on a WHITE hill.

You can read the full article on page 5 of the Mornington Standard of 29-7-1905 but here's the mention of White's Rd , which was most likely named after Robert White (formerly of crown allotment 18 Wannaeue and later of Crib Point.)

MEETING AT BALNARRING. : A meeting of the East Riding rate payers of the shire of Flinders and Kangerong, convened by Crs Davies and Buckley, was held on Wednesday evening to consider the advisability of buying land and constructing a deviation at White's hill.- A majority of the ratepayers put in an appearance. Cr Shand moved that Cr Davies take the chair.-Cr Davies objected and moved that Mr Buckley take the chair, which was carried unanimously. The Chairman, in opening the meeting, said the ratepayers had been called together to consider the proposed deviation. As the proposed work was at the extreme end of the riding, many of them might not at first be in favor of spending so much money, but when they considered the state of the existing road, and the amount it would cost to effectively repair it, and also the distance those using the road were from the station, and that they would be content with buying the land and fencing it, and not doing much more for 12 months, he thought it was an expedient thing, and that they should strain a point and construct the devia tion. (Applause.) He then called on CrDavies to give his views. Cr Davies said that, in conjunction with Cr Buckley, he had called the meeting. When the new engineer (Mr M'Kenzie) was appointed he was instructed to take the levels. He did so, and reported favorably. Then the councillors of the east and centre ridings, accompanied by the engineer,visited the place and inspected it, and as far as the proposed deviation was concerned, from what he could see, it would be a good road. He considered it would cost at least ?100,and he did not think they were justified in spending it. The old road had cost them more than ?100 already. The best way would be to repair it, doing a little every year, according to what money they had. .Mr Buckley said that the old road would cost so much to effectively repair that they would not save much. He would like to have the deviation, but thought it should be subsidised by the centre riding. Cr Shand said there was a lot of talk about the centre riding using the road, but, as a matter of fact, only the two M'lroys and Smith used the road; Cr Davies said there were other roads that required deviations, and if they did that one they would have to do others. Mr Gibson (to Cr Davies) : Which do you think would be the best road- the old one or the deviation ? Cr Davies: If the old road was not repaired the deviation would be the best. Mr M'Kenzie said it seemed rather strange for him to be addressing a meeting like the present, but he thought that the ratepayers should know how the matter stood. He had taken the levels, and found the gradient of the old road was 1 in 9. That was far too steep and consequently caused the maintenance of the road to be a difficult matter. He might tell them that, under his certificate, he was not allowed by Government to pass a road with the grade steeper than 1 in 11, and,if they metalled the old road, if he stuck strictly to the law, he could not pass it. The grade in the deviation would be about 1 in 20, and there could be no comparison between the roads. He could assure them that the work would not cost more than ?100. and, seeing that the metalling of the old road would cost nearly as much, and provide a much inferior road, he would strongly advise the deviation. Mr Gunn:-What would you do with the storm waters? Mr M'Kenzie: Allow them to take their natural course. Mr Gunn : -Into Mr Jones' land? Mr M'Kenzie : Yes, if that is the natural course. Mr Hurley: You say that the land and forming will cost ?90. "' Mr M'Kenzie : The whole cost will be less than ?100. Cr Shand : As there is so much talk of money, I will guarantee that the users will clear the road, and, if required, form it. - Mr Stanley said he had been against the deviation, as he thought it would cost too much, but he had had a look at the road, and it was in a fearful condition, and as the engineer stated the cost would not be more than ?100, and as those who used the road were offering to help, he thought that they should do like, Mr Bent and help those who helped themselves, and make the deviation. Mr M'Kenzie could assure them the cost would not be more than he had stated, and there was ?25 in hand which was placed on the estimates for that hill, and which any ratepayer could compel them to spend there, and adding that to the ?15 placed on the estimates last year and not spent, made a total of ?40 available for the work. and would not leave a great deal to be provided. Cr Buckley. was concerned in the convening of the meeting. He thought that as the money was to be spent at one end of the riding, and largely for the benefit of the next riding,that they had a right to be consulted and would like to see them give a straight out vote on the subject. According to the survey. the deviation when formed would make a real good road and he was in favor of it if the centre riding would provide half the cost of the land and fencing. The east riding was in a rather bad position, as it had to spend three quarters of its rates in making roads for other ridings. There was Cr Nowlan always agitating for a little more metal on the coach road, and Cr Shaw and Shand agitating for the road in question. He thought that perhaps at the next council meeting these gentlemen would place ?25 or so for the deviation and if so he considered they should make it as they might never have the chance of obtaining the land again. When the road to Dromana was made through the centre riding, this riding had to subsidise it. (My text corrections end here.) Theni there was ? 25 in band that year and ?15 from last. Cr Davies said this ?25 was not put on for White's hill but for the whole road. 't Cr.Buckley:iThnioa money.wa " on the estiiaiites speciatly for lj Mr Parrell said two cou rr ie flatly, contradicting e:iih bt. F.e: ? haps Mr M'Kenz'e could idifori"'hep ? which was righti. '! Mr M'Ksnzte' said the nmoney ? jib put on for Whites'. Hill. Mr Oswin, send;' said when he? was in the` council "he moved that th, Dunn's Creek. bridge hbe raised, arid obtained ?14 " from the east riding towards it. That was all the isubsidis= ing that the east riding had doiie:' :Mr Morris said 'the Cyclonie -feding could be: erected, posts and all, for ?36 a mile; so that the 40? chains riquired could not cost ?25. Cr Ose in said that, owing to so many, s.eake a and interjectors; Itt was difficult to know what. to aay" and what" to leave out.:: :He'would like to poltit out that Cr Davies'couild iot 'logieilly be against the' deviation, :?as hi i: iily reason seemed to ?be that those w'ho used :it: aiere :mostly: ri'eidentis -:- f. another' riding. ' It' :seemed r'ath"er absurd on Cr Davies' part to advance this reason, seeing ,hat, largely 'thro'gh OCi Davies' agency, ?120 per''annumr for the' last 8 years hli'd 'ben eperit on the coach road, notwithstanding that the maijority of the people using it were Fliiders'" residents. He (the speaker) admitted that the coach road should be properly maintained, but thougbht that. 'sometimes.it got a little more than its share. ' On' entering the council, he 'made a pledge- that: he " would' con scientiouisly carry out his dutiei to the best of his ability, and, 'as a straight main he intended to do so. He thought his colleagues were in rather' a curioui fix; as they bad been appointed :a' a committee to inspect the deviationp and, instead of reporting to' the council, they had called a meeting of ratepayers to n'struct them in their duties; but, still, he thought they were sincere in their action. Last year they allotted ?15 for metal for -the- hill, but as the contract price was high, they thought there might be a ring amongst' the contractors, and .declined to let the work. That year there was ?25 ayaii able, but they agreed"'not to spend the money until they had settled about the deviation, and in the coming estimates ?20 would hbe a fair thing, making a total of ?60, so .the ratepayers could see for themselves that the deviation would not cost so much, afterall. They all knew that when he gave a pledge he stuck to it. He pledged. has word that if the deviation was constructed it would be done : without robbing any other, portion of the riding of any money it was jus'lv entitled to. He considered that Crs Davies', and Brick ley, instead of asking the. ratepayers to advise them, should have 'formed a, ,opinion: otheir own> anna iven. the Cr.Buckley had been in favor of -t every time it was brought. up, if 'the centre riding would sub'idise it. SCr Oswin: Yes,' you are in favor of it with a condition. . Mr. Van Suylen was the only tenderer for t.,e metal on -Whites' Hill and his price was'4s 61-a v ry' fair one-and t:here was no nrng. Cr.Oswin did not say 'that there was, buint that therm might have been.' Cr Shand : Here is Cr.Davies with' 300 acres, of land; and paying 30s rates, and he (the speaker) -was paying ?12. :He had a metal road 'from his place.to the station, and he obj-eted to them having a li tie metal.. ' " The Chairman : Please do. not make any personal 'remarks.:: 'Mr"Farrell said they had ,heard:: the' views of councillors and thni engineer, and all those for and again-t it, and he thoughththe best th;ings. would be to leave itin Ihe.hands of .he conncil' as tIhey could be sure= hey ` would consider Ie ,,ist er judicially and give all fair r,.iment. He w,'uld move to that Sffrct. Or Davies:. Oh..I.; on't think. that' is rieht at all. I am against it and think that this meeting is.. ... Mr Farrell :I bee to point out to Mr Davies that he, is one. o` the oenncillors into whose hands we leave SMr James seconded the motion., Mr Oswin sen, supported the motion. Ee thotuht the.' councillors "should manage the business of thd'.- council; and accept the resoonsiblity. If they.did wrone I:ey cohld find them out at election tite ?"The nio ion wa carrited bi. 2i otes

BARNES.
Plenty of sources state that Barnes was about the only gold miner to make much money at the Tubbarubba diggings. The following gives his initials and the duration of his mining lease.

APPLICATION FOR A MINING LEASE OF PRIVATE PROPERTY. In pursance of the Act of Parliament 54 Victoria, No. 1120, it is hereby notified that after the expiration of one month from the date hereof it is intended to grant the lease undermentioned, subject to such excisions, modifications, and reservations as may be necessary. CASTLEMAINE DISTRICT. 81, ST. ANDREW'S DIVISION. No. 3067. To expire on 3rd October,1910, W. W. Barnes, 25a. Or. 31p., Bull Dog Creek, parish of Kangerong. H. FOSTER, Minister of Mines. Office of Mines. Melbourne, 20th June, 1896.(P.2, Mornington Standard, 25-6-1896.)

HILLIS
HILLIS.
See the end of the RINGROSE entry in my journal DICTIONARY HISTORY OF RED HILL(rates information and comments.)

Extract from Dromana, Rosebud and Miles Around on Trove.
GOODBYE OLD FRIENDS. (Mornington Standard 19-9-1895 page 2.) A large crowd attended the funeral of Mr Hillis, an old resident of Red Hill. Mr C.Roberts of Main Creek, another old resident, also died recently.
William Hillis whose surname was often written as Hillas, had ?Summer Hill? at Main Creek north of Wilsons Rd and land adjacent to Henry Dunn?s ?Four Winds? on the top of White Hill near the McIlroys Rd corner. (The Butcher, the Baker, The.) Roberts Rd follows the track used by the Shands to transport timber from their saw mill to Red Hill. (Keith Holmes.)

I had thought that Hill was the nickname of William Hillis, in whose name grants in the parish of Wannaeue were issued but the following genealogical information shows that William James Hillis was the first child of Hill Hillis. Hill was the brother-in-law of James McKeown and was probably the reason that McKeown moved from Warrnambool to Red Hill. Hill seems to have selected 50 or 54 acres of land that was granted to James McKeown (see rate information below.

HILL HILLIS
Hillis, Hill b. 1817 d. 1895 Dromana Victoria Gender: Male
(Parents: Father: Hillis, Frank Mother: Collins, Margaret)
Spouse: McKeown, Sarah b. 1822 d. 1900 Dromana Victoria Gender: Female
(Parents:Father: McKeown, William Mother: Collings, Mary Ann )
Children: Hillis, William James; Hillis, Mary Ann; Hillis, Sarah Jane; Hillis, Odessa (b. 1864 Victoria
Gender: Female); Hillis, Hadassah


Hillis, Frank Spouse: Collins, Margaret Children:Hillis, Hill

McIlroy, Joseph Marriage: 1877
Spouse: Hillis, Sarah Jane b. 1857 Belfast d. 1898 Dromana Victoria
Parents:Father: Hillis, Hill Mother: McKeown, Sarah


Davey,
Spouse: Hillis, Mary Ann b. 1846 d. 1920 Malvern Melbourne
Parents: Father: Hillis, Hill Mother: McKeown, Sarah


White, Robert
Marriage: 1899
Spouse: Hillis, Hadassah b. 1864 d. 1927 Prahran Melbourne
Parents:Father: Hillis, Hill Mother: McKeown, Sarah

SOURCE:LUGTON FAMILY AND CONNECTIONS.) Thank you Tony Lugton!

Colin McLear throws more light on the Hillis-McKeown connection
but the name of Hill Hillis's wife will need to be checked.On page 86 of A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA,
Colin stated:
James McKeown migrated to New Zealand in 1853 and then to Warrnambool in 1856. His sister, Mary,had married
Hill Hillis in Ireland in 1846 and migrated to Red Hill in 1855 and taken up farming.


The following were found in a search for the death notice of Hill Hillis's wife/widow.
HILLIS- WISEMAN.---On the 1st November, at tho Presbyterian Church, Dandenong, by the Rev. H. A. Buntine,
George P. third son of W. J. Hillis, Trafalgar, to Ethel D., only daughter of the late James Wiseman, Ascot Vale,
and sister of T.B . Wiseman, Bass.(P.59, Leader, Melbourne, 8-12-1917.)

HILLIS?WISEMAN. ?Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Hillis announce with pleasure the 25th anniversary of their marriage,
celebrated on November 1, 1917. (Present address, 3 Hastings street, Burwood.)
(Although there seems to be no connection to the Red Hill area, I am extremely confident that there is!)

HISTORY OF SCHOOLS IN VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA: SCHOOL NUMBERS.

It probably seems to some that I spend every idle moment thinking of a new journal to write but that's not how they come about. They usually come about from a chance discovery. Right now I could be writing a new journal called Mr Roger's Tramway at Blackwood because of such a discovery while I was trying to find out when Greendale State School was established to verify my suspicion that Greenvale State School had kept its Common School number in 1872. Instead,one side-track being quite enough,the article was emailed to Margot Hitchcock.

This journal had its genesis in about March 2014 when I heard that the Dromana Historical Society and R.S.L. had received a joint grant for a Centenary of the Gallipoli Landing project. Rosebud's Anzacs were not to be included in the research so I wrote the ROLL OF HONOUR,ROSEBUD journal. I showed it to the Rosebud Primary School Principal, Tony Short, and he thought it would be great for the school captains to carry the Roll of Honour in the Anzac Day march but it was too hard to get off the wall.

Today I called on Tony to see if the Roll of Honour would be carried this year.Like myself, Tony hadn't realised just how tall and heavy it was and thought some sort of cross bar arrangement would be needed but that even then it might still prove too difficult for children to carry. He loved my suggestion of a large photograph of the Roll being carried instead.I showed him my ROLL OF HONOUR, ROSEBUD journal and later he asked me about how long Red Hill had existed. I replied about 1862 and he asked me what the school number was. I said that I didn't know and he had to ring the bell to end recess.

While I was reading Barry Wright's memories of Red Hill, I saw the Red Hill State School number and immediately realised that Tony must have assumed that school numbers (like car regos)could indicate vintage, which they would, FOR SCHOOLS ESTABLISHED AFTER 1872. But it may be no guide at all to the respective ages of say, the Ascot Vale and Wonthaggi schools if both became state schools in 1872. Indeed,if the Ascot Vale school was called Bank St State School,it would have a completely different number!

Some people may wonder why their historic school has a high number while relatively new schools have a very low number. Greenvale Primary school, built in recent decades on the subdivision of Hughie Williamson's "Dunvegan" has a very low number, No. 890. This was a rare case where a brand new school was given the same number as its predecessor (at the west corner of Somerton and Section Rds.)

In nearby Tullamarine, there were three old schools: the former Wesleyan School 632 at the bend in Cherie St, the Tullamarine Island school(number 519 but given as 619 in a source quoted later) and the Seafield school No. 546. Tullamarine Island children attended the Bulla or Holden schools when a reduction in numbers caused a closure;it operated twice so that might account for two different numbers (or 619 could be a typo.) The Island children used Paul Tate's Ford to cross Jacksons Creek on their way to the east end of McLeods Rd where the Holden School stood and when the second Island school on Bulla Park closed they crossed Deep Creek on Bedford's swing bridge to reach the second Bulla School in School Lane.

In 1884 schools 632 and 546 were replaced by S.S.2613 Tullamarine on the north corner of Bulla Rd and Conders Lane (north corner of Melrose Drive and Link Rd.) Again in 1961, this block being acquired for the airport,a new school was opened at the corner of Broadmeadows Rd and Dalkeith Avenue, occupying two LTC (Light timber construction) buildings which were clad with brick a decade later. Once again a new number was employed. Such a high number might lead people to believe that Tullamarine children had been uneducated for about 106 years!

Without wanting to present a history of education in Victoria, I will give a very short summary.Anyone could open a school in early days. Probably one of the earliest on the Mornington Peninsula was on Jamiesons Special Survey near Wallaces Rd (Melway 160 J 4)in the 1850's. Churches opened their own schools in populated areas and when they started asking for state aid only one of them would be chosen as a NATIONAL school based on the Irish model with a curriculum agreed by most denominations. In 1862, with schools coming more under state control, this time called Common Schools, Robert Quinan's school at Dromana was chosen over Daniel Nicholson's but when Quinan committed suicide through shame at not being able to balance the Shire's books (in his part time second job)Nicholson ended up with the job anyway. The Moorooduc school opened as a Common School in a church building near the south east corner of Mornington-Tyabb and Moorooduc Rds. Its number was 825 but its replacement at Jones Corner in 1880 or shortly after was called State School 2327.
Moorooduc Port Phillip Eastern region 825 3 308
Moorooduc Port Phillip Eastern region 2327 3 374

In 1872, the Education Department was established under the leadership of the revered Frank Tate. Schools were called State Schools and numbered in alphabetical order. Common schools probably kept their numbers. Did Greenvale keep its Common School number,given to it in 1869? Yes,or its number would have been higher than Greendale's school,which became a state school in 1872.

The following has saved me a visit to the Rosebud Library to consult VISION AND REALISATION.
No Title
The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 - 1918) Saturday 14 December 1872 p 2 Article
... in consequence of the bad attendance; third, to the Sunday school, at which, he stated, only two ... . Messrs. John Brady and William Courtney are gazetted members of the Greendale School committee.

It is likely that the Greendale school was a private affair until after the Greenvale Common School opened in 1869, and that it became a Common School in about 1870,retaining its common school number in 1872.

GREENDALE,
(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)
The school opened in Mr. Graham's barn by Mr. Chamon on Monday last, has been fairly attended during the past week, and will doubtless be a large school ere long.(P.3, Bacchus Marsh Express,15-2-1868.)

Greendale Central Highlands region 918 2 708
Greenvale Port Phillip Western region 890 3 50
In the alphabetical index of Victorian schools the first number is the school number with the second and third numbers being volume and page numbers in VISION AND REALIZATION.

Vision and realisation : a centenary history of state ... - Trove
trove.nla.gov.au/work/8440127
Headteachers of all the schools in existence in 1971 were asked to submit a history of their schools. The boss at Tullamarine's Dalkeith Avenue school was lucky to have plenty of descendants of pioneering families, and the Methodist Church centenary souvenir of 1970,to tell him about all the early schools in the area. All schools in existence in 1972 were given a copy of VISION AND REALISATION. Hopefully all copies from now-closed schools were donated to municipal libraries.

ALL Victorian Schools by name AND number
genealogyworld.blogspot.com/.../all-victorian-schools-by-name-and-nu...

Select this website and then choose one of the two alternative links down the page a bit:

Victorian Schools sorted by name
Victorian Schools sorted by number

Just to wrap up, what do these tell us?
Yabba Yabba Goulburn region 2483 3 817
Yabba Yabba South Goulburn region 2609 3 822
Yackandandah Upper Murray region 692 3 914
Yackandandah Upper Murray region 694 3 914
Yundool Goulburn region 1833 3 787
Yuroke Port Phillip Western region 548 3 41

Here's my guess.
The third,fourth and sixth schools started as Common schools in the 1860's and if they became state schools, they kept their common school numbers. The third school closed and later reopened,perhaps in a new building, as the fourth school. Yundool was probably the last school (alphabetically) to be established as a state school in 1872. Yuroke was established very early and was probably National School 548. Originally known as the Chalmers Institute,it was situated on Mickleham Rd across the road from the Dunhelen gates and was the venue for the meeting in 1857 at which the Broadmeadows Road District was formed. The first and second schools were probably established in the late 1870's or early 1880's.

Okay that wasn't all guesswork. Twenty seven years of local history research allows information to become a story. Like this one.

Jessie Rowe was a much-loved teacher at the Holden school and was given a big farewell circa 1903,when she left to teach at Tullamarine S.S. 2613. Within a few years she was resigning from the Department because she was marrying Frank Wright of "Strathconan" and was given a fond farewell again but with less sadness because she wouldn't be leaving the district. However before she left she had the unenviable task of telling her pupils of the drowning of William Mansfield and his son Willy at Bertram's Ford near Keilor in 1906. A Mr Rodgers took over from Jessie; all the pupils disappeared one hot lunchtime for a swim at the bone mill and, behaving stupidly, Colin Williams cracked his head open near the end of 1908. Colin was still recovering when school started the next year and was dismayed by tales of the new very strict teacher. The same teacher who organised community picnics on Alexander McCracken's Cumberland in 1909-1911,was secretary of the Tullamarine Progress Association 1924-1954, sent him a post card when Colin was serving overseas thirty or more years later,presented Broadmeadows Shire with the Tullamarine (Melrose Drive) Reserve, organised the Pioneers Roll still proudly displayed in the foyer of Tullamarine Primary School and has been honoured by the City of Hume with a plaque attached to a boulder at the Melrose Drive Reserve,a teacher named Alec Rasmussen.

3 comment(s), latest 3 years, 2 months ago