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JOHN PASCOE FAWKNER'S PASCOEVALE, VIC., AUST.

I had hopes of proving or disproving that Pascoe Villa, Pascoevale,which William Smith advertised for sale in the latish 1860's, shortly after the death of his wife (see my WILLIAM SMITH journal), had been his ORIGINAL Young Queen Inn. As usual when I am unable to solve such puzzles, I had a local history dream, in which, as always, I was reading an article. It was written by Edward Butler, great grandson of Edward Butler who built* the Young Queen Inn at Pascoeville.

(* P.16-17,BROADMEADOWS: A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.(In 1839) "Lot number three,of 1.5 acres on the left hand side of the main road not far over the creek, was bought for L 24/9/6 by J.W.Shaw, who---promptly disposed of it to Edward Butler for L44. Butler built-as the title deed expresses it-'a large house and tenement' named the Young Queen Inn in honour of Queen Victoria in the third year of her reign.......(In 1840?)Edward Butler took advantage of the boom by disposing of his property to John Watson for L1300. Watson unloaded it towards the end of the boom,in December, 1842,to the unsuspecting William Smith of St Kilda for L1700. Smith had no one to sell it to but he persevered with the inn for the next twenty-nine years.")

Having had many local history dreams involving trove, I didn't immediately rush to my computer as I once would have. I googled "Edward Butler, Young Queen"(1840-1849) and, blow me down, Edward Butler was running the Young Queen Inn during the 1840's, IN LAUNCESTON, where Fawkner had run the Duke of Cornwall.Whether he was of the prominent Tasmanian legal family has not been discovered.

Keeping the decade limit, I searched for "young queen,pascoevale" and due to trove's quirky ways, this journal's title changed from THE YOUNG QUEEN,PASCOEVALE to PASCOEVALE.


PASCOEVALE.

Pascoevale.-Among the other disasters attendant upon the flood, is the carrying away of the bridge across the Moonee Moonee Ponds at Pascoevale, and the consequent stoppage of communication with the city in vehicles
of any description by that road. Major Firebrace, J. P., who lives in the immediate vicinity, has
brought the matter officially under the consideration of tho Government.(P.2, Argus, 4-12-1849.)

1855
On 1 November, Catholic school 269 opens on the north corner of Glass St. (now Napier Cres.) and Pascoe Vale Rd. (which was known as Ashurst and Firebrace Streets at that time). It closed on 31-11-1874, and the iron schoolhouse, which had also served for worship, was moved to form the first St. Monica's. (VR, St Monica's History, EH)(Annals of Strathmore and Surrounding Areas.)

Major Firebrace was an early squatter in the Bulla area with his home station on the site of the Oaklands Hunt Club's "Sherwood" (Melway 178 C5.)SOURCE: probably D.F.Cameron-Kennedy's THE OAKLANDS HUNT but possibly BULLA BULLA by I.W.Symonds,or THE SHIRE THAT TOOK OFF by Grant Aldous, whose manuscript was probably rejected by the shire because of the tale about George Evans leaving a pistol on the table to remind Big Clarke to keep his hands off the young mistress of Emu Bottom.

Macedon (Deep Creek/Bulla)road had been surveyed in 1847 according to a descendant of E.E.Kenny of Camp Hill but was not yet THE GREAT ROAD TO THE DIGGINGS so Pascoe Vale Rd was probably the route that Firebrace took to Melbourne.


YOUNG QUEEN was deleted from the search terms at this stage but of course still appeared in many of the results. The Port Phillip District was allocated places in the New South Wales parliament but as representatives were not paid and would have to frequently be in Sydney,there was a ground-swell for separation. One of the three Keilor souvenirs has an article called THE PORT PHILLIP FARCE which involved J.F.L.Foster,with Lord Grey,the (Colonial Secretary? in England) being nominated. Little Johnny Fawkner had more to do with the separation movement than I had realised.

THE DISTRICT ELECTION.
* (From the Corio Chronicle)
On Friday, R. W. Pohlman, Esq.,Returning Officer, repaired to the hustings at Geelong, and proclaimed the
result of the voting in the several polling places, for the Electoral District of Port Phillip, to elect a representative in the room of James Williamson, Esq., resigned. The nomination of candidates took place on the 15th February, when the following candidates were put in nomination.William Macarthur*, Esq., of Camden ; John Pascoe Fawkner, Esq., of Pascoevale ; and (with a view to carry out the principle of non-representation)
Arthur Wellesley, Duke of Wellington,who was put in nomination by Mr.Fawkner himself.(P.4, Argus, 16-3-1849.)

(*This was probably the son of the merino breeder who followed Foster as acting governor until Hotham arrived.)

CHILD EXPLOITATION WAS THE ORDER OF THE DAY!
A lad named John Meyers, was brought before the Police Bench on Tuesday charged with absconding from the service of Mr.J. P. Fawkner, of Pascoevale. The lad was only eight years of age, and had been taken away by his parents. He was ordered back, and to pay all expenses. (P.4, Argus, 16-3-1849.)

NEIGHBOURING LANDOWNERS AT WAR.
The Moonee Ponds Creek formed the boundary between section 23 Doutta Galla (south west) and John Pascoe Fawkner's Belle Vue Park in the parish of Jika Jika (north east), from Marks St near the Pascoe Vale bridge to the southern boundary of the Kingsford-Smith Ulm Reserve. Whether Major St John actually lived on "St John's" (as Harry Stevenson's portion of the former was still called circa 1920 when the Aero Club established their "St John's Field" aerodrome) is unknown, but this neighbourly dispute was not about a fence or the creek.

When I first read a report of the libel case about twenty years ago,Fawkner had been found guilty but fined some paltry amount indicating that his action had been considered just, but St John must have appealed the decision, and had the fine raised to 95 pounds. A "St John v Fawkner" trove search will supply the trial reports. Fawkner applied to Latrobe for the fine to be paid by Government and the refusal was criticised by The Argus.
BRIBERY AND CORRUPTION.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 5 December 1848 p 2 Article
... Sir, Your most obedient servant, C. J. LA TROBE. Mr. J. P. Fawkner, Pascoevale. The Government ... 842 words

PASCOEVILLE TO PASCOEVALE.
Observing that all the 1840-1849 results (most of them William Smith advertisements about the refurbished Young Queen,the swept away bridge being replaced and the connection to the new Sydney road -see CLIFFORDS RD journal) were from 1849, I suspected that the locality's name had recently changed so I changed my search to Pascoeville.

Colonial Secretary's Office, Sydney 11th September,1849.
ROADS:
WITH reference to the Government notice of date 13th April, 1848, relative to opening of certain Parish Roads in the District of Port Phillip, and to that described as No. 3 therein, namely :-The Old Sydney or Pascoe
ville
Road leading from Mount Macedon* Road to the New Sydney Road : notice is hereby given (etc.)
(Colonial Secretary's Office, Sydney, 11th September, 1849. ROADS.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Monday 24 September 1849 p 1 Article.)


(*Mt Macedon road is now Mt Alexander Rd with the Pascoeville road leaving it at Moonee Ponds Junction.)

There was only one more result for Pascoeville in the 1840's.
Horticultural Society. On Saturday last a meeting was held at the "Queen's Head Hotel," Queen-street, pursuant to public notice, for the purpose of taking into consideration the propriety of forming a Horticultural Society in Melbourne, embracing in its operation the entire Province. Mr. J. P. Fawkner, of
Pascoeville, was called to the chair, and that gentleman addressed the meeting at considerable length in favor of the proposed institution,pointing out the utility of such societies in causing a praiseworthy emulation among gardeners, and others employed in the culture of our fine soil. (P.2, Argus, 28-11-1848.)


Was this because of faulty digitisation? Did Pascoeville persist into the 1850's? What was the original name for the locality? Delete the limit of only articles from The Argus.
Ah ha!
The Argus had previously been The Melbourne Argus. The name change had come between AUG and November, 1848.

Most of the Melbourne Argus results concerned the proclamation of parish roads as mentioned above (where Pascoe Vale Rd was wrongly called No.3, unless the digitisation was wrong.)
e.g.Colonial Secretary's Office,
Sydney, 13th April, 1848.
ROADS.
HIS Excellency the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, having deemed it expedient to open and make certain Parish Roads, in the District of Port Phillip, viz. :
1. New line of road from North Melbourne to the Village of Bulla, known as the Mount Macedon Road.
2. Proposed Keila, or Portland Road,from the Mount Macedon Road, to Keila Bridge.
3. Occupation Road, leading from the Mount Macedon Road to Taylor and Green's purchases in Bulla Bulla
Parish.
4. The old Sydney or Pascoeville Road, leading from the Mount Macedon Road to the New Sydney Road,(plans etc.)
(P.1, The Melbourne Argus,30-6-1848.)

THOSE ROADS TODAY.
1. Present Flemington Rd,Mt Alexander Rd,Wirraway Rd, Bulla Rd, Melrose Drive, and, from Melway 177 F9, Sunbury Rd.
2. Keilor Rd. Keilor was a gaelic word (whose meaning was given in one of the Keilor souvenirs) for the run of Hunter and Watson, who must have pronounced it as most un-pedantic people do instead of Kee-law. (*I can check it in my dictionary history if requested.) Because of the gold rush, Keilor road became known as Mt Alexander Rd and retained the name into the 1900's.
3. This was Oaklands Rd. Ann Greene was granted a square mile (section 4, Bulla) at the north west corner of Somerton and Oaklands Rd and Taylor section 9,also of 640 acres, a mile further north and across the road. This was later part of the estate of Glenara's Walter Clark who called it Dunalister after his son of M.V.R.C. and black rose fame; it is now called Balbethan.
4.Pascoe Vale Rd.


SALE of LAND.--Mr. W. H. Mortimer sold by auction on Wednesday last, on the ground, at Pascoeville, sixteen allotments, forming in all one acre and a half at 65. The sale was but thinly attended, owing to the boisterous state of the weather. (Port Phillip News.The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (NSW : 1838 - 1841) Thursday 13 August 1840 Edition: MORNING p 3 Article.)

In the Insolvent Estate of John Pascoe Fawkner,of Pascoeville, in the District of Port Phillip.
NOTICE is hereby given that an account and plan of distribution of available assets in the estate of John Pascoe Fawkner, of Pascoeville, the above named insolvent, now lies at the Office of the Chief Commissioner of Insolvent Estates for the District of Port Phillip, at the Supreme Court House, La Trobe-street, Melbourne, for the inspection (etc.) (The Melbourne Argus (Vic. : 1846 - 1848) Friday 25 December 1846 p 2 Article.)

Fawkner sold off the Belle Vue land between Pascoe Vale Rd and Northumberland Rd, a large part of which fronting Gaffney St was purchased by Henry George Ashurst* (after whom part of Pascoe Vale Rd was originally named) who leased it out to such as John Kernan who settled there in 1856 and called it Merai Farm. Fawkner could not be dispossessed of the rest of Belle Vue Park because he put it in his wife's name**.

*COAL. On Mr. Ashhurt's property at Pascoeville, the men employed sinking a well near that gentleman's house have come to a vein of coal eighty feet from the surface ; the vein is three feet thick, and samples of the coal have been brought to town and found to be of excellent quality ;such a discovery we need not say is of the
utmost importance to our province. Herald.(Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899) Saturday 30 July 1842 Edition: MORNING p 8 Article.)

** John Stephen further adds that he is informed and believes that I reside beyond the distance of seven miles; this is a fact which he could have easily tested; equivocation will not do on this point, all I say on the
subject is, that my farm is on the five-mile line from Melbourne, as laid down by the surveyors, and the five-mile land reserved to be sold at an enhanced price joins the corner of my land, or my wife' s land at
Pascoeville. (P.7. Launceston Examiner,1-3-1843.) John Stephen had probably challenged Fawkner's entitlement to stand for public office because of his sentence to hard yakka at Coal River and being outside the residential limit.

BHURR STONE.- Bhurr Stone which, for the purpose of constructing mill-stones, is of the greatest importance, is abundantly found in the neighbourhood of Melbourne, On the banks of the Saltwater River, near' Maine's and Dobson's quarry*, as well as at Pascoeville, on the east side of the valley, it exists in large
quantities, which were discovered about four years ago.(etc.) (P.2,Geelong Advertiser, 18-4-1844.)

The Niddrie quarry,now a residential area, was near the north west corner of J.P.Main's grant,section 12 Doutta Galla. Probably a lot of the metal used by George Holmes to make the road to "Keila" came from Main's Estate.

PASCOEVILLE ROAD IS BETTER!
Carriers between Melbourne and Seymour complain of the heavy state of the roads, especially that via Pentridge; on the other hand the Pascoeville or Young Queen road is in comparatively good condition, arising from the limited traffic thereupon, the former being somewhat shorter. This hint is worthy of note by parties having business upon the line. (P.2, The Melbourne Argus, 15-8-1848.)

CATTLE STEALING.- Pat Connerty, keeper of the town herd, and John McManus, butcher,were placed at the bar of the Police Court,on Tuesday morning last, charged with having received stolen cattle, the property of Mr.
Francis William Cobb*, of Pascoeville, who stated that be had lost, on Tuesday, the 15th instant, seven head of cattle from his station,(etc.)
(The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) Thursday 7 April 1842 p 4 Article.)
Although he was not mentioned by Andrew Lemon, I'm sure I saw Cobb's name in the 1863 Broadmeadows assessments.
*HE MAY HAVE BEEN FAWKNER'S BROTHER IN LAW! (See below.)

Edward Butler did run the Young Queen.I had wondered about that.

Prisoners of the Crown. On Saturday morning Mr Butler, of Pascoeville, was fined 20(s.?) for permitting a prisoner of the crown to drink on his premises. (The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) Saturday 23 January 1841 p 2 Article.)

HOW DID PASCOEVILLE BECOME OAK PARK?
The fruit and forest trees imported from England in 1839 and planted at Pascoeville, have grown very luxuriantly.The forest trees,; as horse chestnut, oak, maple, lime, sycamore, acatia, alder,walnut, and edible Chesnut (which last is showing blossom) have made wonderful growths.
(Geelong Advertiser and Squatters' Advocate (Vic. : 1845 - 1847) Saturday 8 November 1845 p 3 Article.)

Joseph English bought Fawkner's remaining portion following the death of Eliza (nee Cobb*) Fawkner's widow, and enlarged or replaced Fawkner's homestead. The Morgan and Knight (related) families were involved and I have just spotted Pine Avenue which might indicate the location of Fred Morgan's "The Pines".Later Hutchinson, owner of a flour mill at Glenroy,bought the property and renamed it Oak Park.

Oak Park Reserve - Victorian Heritage Database
vhd.heritage.vic.gov.au/places/result_detail/59161?print=true‎
Remnant trees on the site, including an oak, cypresses and peppercorn trees, have been estimated to date from Fawkner's residency. The park's close proximity ...

Fawkner was no great lover of native vegetation and the document recording his lease of portion of the property to his father in 1841 states that the lessee: "shall and will fell cut down grub up and otherwise destroy and remove all the native indigenous trees wood scrub and underwood whatsoever growing or to grow upon the said land or any part thereof except fruit trees or such trees as are or shall be marked...for ornamental hedgerows or boundary marks." (P.17 BROADMEADOWS: A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.)

P.W.Welsh who handled sales of village blocks for Fawkner "inferred that Fawkner's planting of orchard, gardens and nurseries was in someway a village work (instead of being part of his private farm,which it was): etc."
(P.17 BROADMEADOWS: A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.)

I wonder if the following trees had been intended for "village works" and Fawkner changed his mind in order to get a certificate of discharge on his insolvency.Apart from a variety of fruit trees, they included:

Forest Trees, of two sorts, Oak and Maple; these trees were also imported from England, at great cost and risk, and at severe loss, only about twenty remain on sale. As these trees will only be taken from the ground upon the order of the buyer, they may ensure their good state, and as they will not be liable to damage by sea water, or the saline deposition incident to a sea voyage, and as every care will be taken to preserve the roots as perfect as possible, parties buying will find these cheaper even than those sold by auction, for there they
must pay for them, faulty or good.Orders will be received at my residence, in Flinders Lane by Mr E. Vernon, Grocer; or at the Orchard, Pascoevale, by Mr Wm. Martin. Trees ordered and paid for will be delivered in town (on Saturdays only ) free of expense to the purchaser.
(P.4, Geelong Advertiser and Squatters' Advocate, 16-5-1846.)

PASCOE VALE.
The earliest use of Pascoe Vale in family notices was in 1854 in the death notice of a pioneer who had settled in Victoria in 1803.

WHAT'S THAT ITELLYA, HAVE YOU GONE STARK RAVING MAD? DOES THE YEAR 1835 MEAN ANYTHING TO YOU? EVEN THE HENTYS WERE WAY AFTER 1803. HANG ON,DO YOU MEAN THE SORRENTO SETTLEMENT?

DIED.
On the 24th inst., at Pascoe Vale, John Fawkner, Esq., in his 84th year, father of J. P. Fawkner,Esq., M.L.C.
P.4, Argus,25-9-1854.)

JOHN PASCOE FAWKNER, CHAMPION OF THE YOEMAN FARMER.

WE WANT LAND!
Just think,this letter was written at Pascoe Vale.

THE BEST WAY TO ESTABLISH A COLONIAL YEOMANRY.
Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1847 - 1851) Tuesday 21 August 1849 Edition: MORNING p 1 Article.


My time researching in the Titles Office showed me how much land was in the hands of a very small number of people. Many of the gold miners had been farmers, a large number of them having been tenant farmers in Ireland. They did not have the money to buy the large crown allotments that became available when parishes had been surveyed. In the parish of Will Will Rook,north of J.P.Fawkner's Belle Vue grant a huge area of land was bought by speculators, Hughes and Hosking, and later became part of the Kennedy estate.Much land in the parishes of Tullamarine and Bulla was alienated in square mile blocks.

Later land acts tried to prevent big landowners from obtaining so much land in grants but the use of dummies, and possibly loopholes enabled James Hearn, W.A.Blair, Charles Gavan Duffy, James Ford, James Purves, the Cains and Professor Hearn to buy huge tracts of land between Balcombe Creek's mouth and Portsea on the Mornington Peninsula for example.

Former squatter he may have been, but John Pascoe Fawkner had a great affection for yoeman farmers. He made a plea to the government to help them obtain freeholds in 1839, and a decade later he was sick and tired of the lack of action. You must read the letter. When Townships were established, suburban blocks were provided,but often multiple blocks were snapped up by such as Frederick Dawes Wickham at Horseshoe Bend near Keilor and William Allison Blair at Rye.

The only real efforts to establish closer settlement that came from Government were caused by the 1890's depression and the aftermath of war. The first effort was probably an attempt to remove beggars from the city (as one does before the Olympic Games are conducted!) Village settlements gave these people a chance to be self-sufficient and to pay off their land on easy terms.

After world war 1 an obligation to servicemen led to the establishment of soldier settlements in many areas.
By the 1930 depression the government probably decided it was easier to put the unemployed on susso projects such as Coburg Lake and the Great Ocean Road.Father Tucker's village settlement at Carrum Downs is discussed in my GORDON BOYINGTON journal.

However it was mainly the death of big landowners and the burden of death duties that caused many big landowners, such as Sir Rupert Clarke of Rupertswood and the family of William Taylor of Overnewton at Keilor, to ask the Crown to resume their huge estates. The Closer Settlement Acts circa 1900 finally achieved what John Pascoe Fawkner started in 1850, shortly after he wrote the letter,at the top of today's Oak Park Court;to give people the chance to buy their own small farms, not because they were out of a job or they had served King and Country but as a right.

Tulip Wright (section 3 Bulla) and Charles Gavan Duffy (the Irish Land Rights hero) did subdivide their grant fairly early but I doubt that their motives were as pure as good old J.P.F.,THE CHAMPION OF THE YOEMAN FARMER AND CLOSER SETTLEMENT.

Details of the many pieces of land bought by J.P.Fawkner on behalf of his co-operative members are given in several other of my journals.

JOHN THOMAS SMITH AND HIS ELECTORS, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA, 1852.

As I no longer have notes or maps, this journal comes entirely from memory.It is prompted by a McCracken search on Trove, the National Library of Australia's digitised collection of newspapers, and an article headed NORTH BOURKE on page 5 of the Argus of 20-1-1852. (Apologies. The date should read 20-12-1852.) In short, the article is about a meeting of electors resolving to ask John Thomas Smith to vacate his seat as a member of the legislative council for North Bourke.The intention of my journal is to give detail of most of the people involved.

SMITH.
J.T.Smith, seven times Mayor of Melbourne,arrived from Sydney to teach at George Langhorne's mission for the aborigines on the Botanical Gardens site. He soon became a businessman and received grants for land at Green Gully near Keilor in the parish of Maribyrnong; North Essendon,and Kensington (including the State School site) in the parish of Doutta Galla and what became the Ranelagh Estate, Mt Eliza, at the north west corner of the parish of Moorooduc.
At the time of this meeting, he was probably living in Melbourne,possibly in the oldest surviving house in Melbourne, photographed by the wonderful MUZZA OF McCRAE. He later built Ascot House in Fenton St Ascot Vale. In the early 1860's, he was a foundation member of the Borough of Essendon and Flemington and became one of the three M.L.C.'s for West Bourke. He was accused of bribing voters with inducements such as oranges that he grew; his orchard was probably near Cranwell St, North Essendon not far east from the Irish Dr Harbinson's orange grove (Melway 16 E12.)The Fitzroy Historical Society website states that he was also an alderman in that area.His portrait can be seen on the internet. Edward Wilson, editor of the Argus, constantly criticised J.T.Smith.(Sources: The Stopover That Stayed" Grant Aldous;parish maps; Keilor Centenary Souvenir 1950? eMelbourne past and present website under Mayoralty etc.)

MCDOUGALL.
Robert McDougall's biography must have been in Victoria and Its Metropolis for me to know so much of his movements. I believe he spent 10 years on Glenroy, which seems to have been divided into three farms: from Camp Rd, heading south, Pasture Hill, Bayview Farm and Glenroy Farm. Glenroy farm extended south to Rhodes Pde. John Kerr much later purchased the other two farms and built Glenroy House or Kerrsland which still stands as part of Penola College. Glenroy was so named by the Camerons, the original squatters, and they were still on Glenroy at this time as well so it is not clear which parts Mc Dougall and the Camerons had.
Robert McDougall later leased the Aitken Estate (section 8 Doutta Galla and possibly part of section 7 as described in the Thomas Miller (sic, Millar) journal) before moving into his newly- built "Arundel" mansion (Melway 4,G11) in about 1872.Unfortunately the Arundel mansion was ruined by Robinson's "fenestrations" circa 1950.
Robert was a foremost proponent of the Booth breed of Shorthorn cattle; as a result Harry Peck, in "Memoirs of a Stockman", stated that he and his neighbour, Harry Stevenson of "Niddrie" (Melway 15 K and 16 A 8-10)were bitter enemies, the latter being an advocate of the Bates strain. Ironically, Murray River steamer owner, McCulloch, who followed John Cochrane on Glenroy Farm, was also a prominent breeder of shorthorns.
You might well ask how McDougall and Stevenson could be neighbours. The answer is that they had other adjoining land on St John's grant (23 Doutta Galla), Stevenson near Strathmore Heights and McDougall near Strathmore North, both properties extending south into Essendon Aerodrome, which was originally called St John's Field.
The McDougalls also bought Warlaby, section 11 of the parish of Bulla Bulla (Melway 384 J8.)They probably owned it by 1888 when the first meeting of the Oaklands Hunt followed a trail from Warlaby laid by Farquhar McRae (not McCrae but possibly related)who was in charge of the hunters on "Glenara". "Warlaby",640 acres or a square mile, extended north to a western extension of Craigieburn Rd, which separated it from the Brannigans' St Johns. Due east of Warlaby was "Oaklands" which gave Oaklands Rd its name and north of that farm was Harpdale whose beautiful homestead (circa 1992) still bore the Brodie name set in tiles.
Warlaby was the home of Robert McDougall's son, Alexander (Sandy) who married Sandy Smith's daughter and moved to Western Australia in the early 1900's. Sandy Smith owned a mansion, Coilsfield, which was demolished to build the Essendon Hospital; he had earlier farmed near the Aitken Estate. (Sources:Victoria and Its Metropolis; Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History" Andrew Lemon; Keilor rates; "The Stopover That Stayed" Grant Aldous; Doutta galla parish map, Bulla rates and parish map, Bob Blackwell re farm names; "The Oaklands Hunt" D.F.Cameron-Kennedy; "Bulla Bulla" I.W.Symonds; various essendon histories; videotaped visit to Jack Simmie's Harpsdale; "Early Landowners: Parish of Doutta Galla" Ray Gibb; K.B.Keeley's architectural thesis on Arundel.)

PARDON MY IGNORANCE!
Some people whose names were included in the article lived outside my area of research, which started as Tullamarine, but expanded rapidly due to Bob Blackwell and George and Syd Lloyd. These surnames are Budd, Kyle, Guthrie and Reynolds. I have seen the name Guthrie and "Glengyle" which ring a bell but not very loudly. If I remember correctly, Reynolds was mentioned by Richard Broome in "Between Two Creeks", the history of Coburg. The names of Reynolds Pde and Reynard St, near Coonan's Hill may have been connected to this pioneer. Incidentally, Pentridge was the original name for Coburg and was changed during a royal visit in (1869?) to honour the Royal name Saxe-Coburg, which was changed to Windsor due to anti-German sentiment during W.W.1. Many families of German ancestry anglicised their surnames during W.W.1, such as the Groenberger family that was running the Junction Hotel at Tullamarine (SOURCE:Gordon Connor, whose testimony, like that of Colin Williams' also 99 at the time, can be taken as GOSPEL.)
POSTSCRIPT-GUTHRIE. I had a dim recollection of seeing the name, Guthrie, in relation to the Bulla area (Glenn & Guthrie?) and near Keilor Village. A search on trove revealed that Alexander (and J.) Guthrie had a farm called Glengyle, one mile from Keilor.They were living there in 1851.
I had a dim connection in my brain of Guthrie with Thomas Bertram and it proved to be correct. The Argus of 15-4-1854 reported on page 4 that Elizabeth, the second daughter of the late Murdoch Campbell of Scotland had died at the residence of Thomas Bertram Esquire, Glengyle, near Keilor.
The ford over Deep Creek, on Arundel Rd, which provided access to Keilor Village (where the Mansfields drowned in 1906 because the partly built Arundel bridge had been swept away) was known to all as Bertram's Ford.The ramp leading to the ford can still be seen between the house on the Browns Rd corner and the river(Melway 14 H2.)
Section 1 of the parish of Tullamarine was granted to R.H.Bunbury in 1842 but K.B.Keeley believed he was a dummy bidder for Colin Campbell who was the owner from 1843 until 1851 when he sold it to Donald Cameron. Two parts of "Arundel were sold off before Argus editor, Edward Wilson bought it in 1854; farms that were later known as Ellengower (or Ellengowen, I could not decipher the Keilor rate collector's writing) and Turner's. Was Colin Campbell a brother of Elizabeth Campbell and Thomas Bertram's wife?
Either of these farms could have been Glengyle. Ellengower was the Browns Rd area and the ramp passed through it, making the naming of the ford a foregone conclusion if Bertram had owned it. Turner's, later bought by the McNabs of Oakbank, (as was the land at Melway 4 B11)is situated between the east-west section of McNabs Rd and the river (4 D-F 12.) The decision on which was Glengyle rests on the description of Glengyle being one mile from Keilor. Bertram's Ford was about a mile from Keilor while Turner's was at least 2 1/2 miles.Therefore Glengyle, occupied by the Guthries and Bertrams, would have been in the horseshoe bend bisected by Browns Rd (Melway 14 G2.)
My suspicion of a connection with the Bulla area also proved to be correct so I'll go one step further and suggest that there was some sort of connection between the Guthries and Peter Young of Nairn, who will be discussed later. Alexander Guthrie Young, a colonist of 52 years died in 1891 at the age of 59.
(The Argus 9-12-1891 p.1) Alexander Guthrie obviously moved from Glengyle to the Bulla area. Mrs Alexander Guthrie gave birth to a son at Bulla Bulla, Deep Creek on 1-5-1859.(A.3-5-1859 p.4.)
Alexander Guthrie died at Togarf, Sunbury at the age of 70 on 27-11-1880. (A. 29-11-1880 P.1 and 8.) Togarf was obviously a farm and his widow, Ann, exhibited her Ayrshires with success at many shows. She died at Murtoa at the age of 80. (A. 27-9-1901 p.1.)
Postscript. Having obtained a map of Bulla Bulla parish, I can state that A& J. Guthrie's grants, issued in October of the years stated, consisted of section 14 (1852,503 acres), 22, part 4 (1854,135 acres 3 roods 10 perches) and 23 part 2 (1854, 384 acres 37 perches.) As I no longer have my Bulla rates transcriptions, I have no idea whether his farm (Togarf)remained this size.These grants were in the area shown on Melway map 383. I would imagine that they had been squatters before alienation and that section 14 was the homestead block and pre-emptive right. Section 14 was bounded by Southern Plains Rd, the line of Gellies Rd continued south almost to Emu Creek, and this creek on the south and west. A now-closed road, leaving Sunbury Rd opposite the east boundary of Craig and O' Grady's grant (Shepherds Lane), crossed Emu Creek in the east side of 383 D7, and travelled through the grant to the west end of Southern Plains Rd. This would have to be the private road to Daameeli; this property is on Richard Brodie's grant, 24(1). This road was the eastern boundary of 23 (2) and Emu Creek was the eastern boundary of 22 (4). The former fronted Sunbury Rd, the latter Gellies Rd and both Lancefield Rd.The tributary shown in Melway 383 B-D7 was about 100 metres (5mm on the map)north of the boundary between the two allotments.
Finally, although my memory is not too hot about what you say to Jan if things don't seem fair, it is pretty reliable concerning local history. I stated earlier that I had vague memories of seeing "Glenn and Guthrie" somewhere. Joseph Dubois returned my material yesterday and while looking for something else I found it!
In the Annals of Tullamarine (a large part of "Tullamarine: Before The Jetport").
1863. (After mentioning that James Sharp was leasing 40 acres of Chandos from J.C.Riddell and was to move to Hillside four years later.)Broadmeadows' rate records list the following Tullamarine residents east of Bulla Rd from the present bridge to Nash's Lane:
H.J.Brown and Glenn & Guthrie (Camp Hill), E.Dunn (Viewpoint), J.Maconochie (Stewarton)Love and Sharp as above, C &J.Nash (Fairview), W.Wright (Sunnyside), R.Beaman (Broombank), J.Foster, T.Anderson, R.Mitchell, T.Wright, P.Kettle, J.Gawley, J.Wright, J.Hendry (store, later P.O. too), C.Evans (shop.)

One last thing. Applications for occupation licences were invited on page 1 of The Argus of 11-6-1847.The various parcels of land were numbered but no location was given other than parishes. Alexander Guthrie had leased 640 acres in Will Will Rook for the previous two years. I checked the parish map on the internet, but there were no dates for the issue of grants. Then I remembered that Joseph had returned my material. According to "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History" only two grants were not issued in 1838. They were sections 5 and 2. Alexander Gibb purchased section 5 in 1848 after leasing the 640 acres for some time (Page 20) so Alexander could only have been leasing Box Forest, granted to John Pascoe Fawkner in 1850 (on behalf of his co-operative.) This square mile, bounded by the Northern Golf Club, Hilton St/ Box Forest Rd, the cemetery and Boundary Rd is now named after a Broadmeadows Shire Councillor, circa 1927, Cr Rupert Hadfield.



PETER YOUNG.
In "Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History", Andrew Lemon mentioned George Langhorne conducting Free Presbyterian services at Peter Young's Nairn and how the United Presbyterians had caused problems. Andrew's source was obviously Peter Young's letter published on page 4 of The Argus of 19-2-1851.
Here are the headlines about Peter Young. He was a very proud Scot with a good knowledge of the "land o' cakes" and a love of poetry. He was on the front foot when situations needed correcting. He was a stalwart of the Free Presbyterians and a member of the Order of Oddfellows, working hard to advance the former and defending the latter group from unjustified criticism. Above all he was an expert farmer, and I mean an EXPERT. He seems to have moved to Clyde Park, Westernport before his death.

As I have the Bulla Bulla map now I'll tell you about Nairn before I detail the trove articles. See Melway map 384. Peter Young received the grant for Section 8 (a square mile/ 640 acres) on 26-11-1848. He added the 130 acre 7B on the other side of St John's Lane on 18-9-1851. (St John's lane led to the Brannigans' "St John's Hill", not heaven!) The William Inglis and Son thoroughbred horse sales complex is in the south east corner of section 8 and the end of the public section of St Johns Rd indicates its north western corner. Allotment B of section 7 is between St Johns Rd and Deep Creek; the southern boundary was the now closed road in C-E 12 and the northern boundary is indicated by 110 St Johns Rd.

TROVE- A CHRONOLOGY.
While reading Isaac Batey's fascinating historical articles in the Sunbury newspaper, I half-noticed his reference to a Mr Young being ( a squatter?) near Essendon in the early days (probably 1847.)This could have been Peter Young. I will start with an advertisement that Peter placed in The Argus (as I thought, soon after arriving), which outlines his past.He was actually in Victoria by 1842!
All items are from The Argus unless otherwise specified: 1846-8 was the Melbourne Argus.

24-9-1847 page 2. Peter announced that he was setting up as an auctioneer and commission agent. He said that he had been land steward for the Marquis of Breadalbane (in Scotland), an experimental farmer and land steward for A. Speirs, the M.P. for Richmond (Tasmania), superintendent of the Government Domain farm in Van Dieman's Land and latterly superintendent of J. and W. Macarthur's stations. Peter must have arrived in Melbourne by 1846 or very early 1847. A letter he wrote to the Port Phillip Gazette was republished in the Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (12-6-1847 page 4.) There had been an outbreak of black leg in young cattle near Port Fairy,to which no solution had been found,and Peter wrote from the Crown Hotel outlining his method that had worked so successfully in New South Wales in the winter of 1837. He had been in charge of 8000 cattle and the sudden death of cattle 20 miles away was put down to snake bites until Peter arrived and diagnosed black leg after dissecting a carcass.

27-1-1847 page 1-2. Peter made a toast at the Robbie Burns Festival that was a virtual history of Scotland and occupied 4 1/2 columns of The Argus.

28-5-1847 page 2. SEYMOUR. Preparations are being made for the sale to be conducted by Mr Peter Young on the 24th. This was to be the first ever in the township.Peter was auctioning well before the advertisement appeared.

1-6-1847 page 2. An excited report of the sale was given. The correspondent told of Peter's plans for regular sales.

3-8-1847 page 2. A DANGEROUS NUISANCE. At the close of business at the Police Office on Saturday, Mr Peter Young informed the Mayor of the cattle, horses, pigs and goats in Latrobe St West and no constable ever being seen to control this. The Chief Constable, who had earlier ignored Peter's complaints, was huffy but the Mayor instructed him to send two constables and impound these animals.

30-11-1847. The Seymour correspondent understood that Peter had intended to conduct quarterly sale but none (bar the first) had come off yet.

20-4-1849 page 4. Peter complained that he hadn't been getting his Argus or Patriot.He was now on Nairn.

19-4-1850 page 3, column 4. FOR SALE. Seed wheat and potatoes of a very superior quality grown from seed of last year's crop at Warrnambool. On sale by the undersigned, Peter Young, Nairn, Deep Creek.

27-4-1850 page 2. BIRTH. At Nairn, parish of Bulla Bulla on the 25th, Mrs Peter Young of a daughter.

8-1-1851 page 2.(Original correspondence to the Mt Macedon paper.) Peter said that up until the end of 1850 mail had been picked up at Mr Wright's Bridge Inn but the mail run to Mt Macedon now went through Keilor. (This is of interest because it seems that Tulip Wright did start the Lincolnshire Hotel's construction during 1851. Donohue applied for the Bridge Inn licence in 1851 but his application was postponed because of the filthy state of the Bridge Inn. (See THE HOTELS NEAR TULLAMARINE journal.) It may have been because Tulip had left, abandoning his hotel, that the route was changed.)Peter complained that 500 residents near Bulla now had to pick up their mail from Melbourne or Gisborne, stating that only about 5 people lived on the new route between Keilor and The Gap. (He was talking about William Taylor of Overnewton, James Robertson of Upper Keilor,possibly the Page Brothers of Glencoe-I'll have to ask Isaac Batey if they were still there; their drinking might have seen them off by 1851, and one or two others.) P.S. Edward Page advertised the homestead block in 1859. (The Argus 27-6-1859 page 2, column 2.)


10-2-1851 page 2. Peter hasn't given up. He now accuses two magistrates of using undue influence to change the mail run. One magistrate was certainly William Taylor; I'm not sure if Robertson was a J.P. too. His son, James, was and another son, Francis, was a member of parliament.

19-2-1851 page 4.Peter wrote a letter about Langhorne teaching Sunday School at theschoolhouse on Nairn on Sunday mornings and conducting Free Presbyterian services in the afternoon and how the United Presbyterians
were interfering with their fund-raising for a church for Broadmeadows and Deep Creek (Westmeadows and Bulla.)
"Vision and Realisation", the Victorian Education Department history of 1972, mentioned an early school on the McDougalls' "Warlaby" (probably named Oaklands) in a declivity; this may have been a mistaken reference to Peter's school unless another was built on Warlaby later. My memory from reading the book 20 years ago is dim but I think it mentioned two schools with different National School numbers.

31-5-1851 page 2. Another farming problem had arisen, smut in wheat. As everyone would know, when crops are affected, prices rise. Think bananas! Due to his innovative ideas and experience, Peter had worked out a solution and he could have cashed in big-time. He had put down 140 acres of wheat at Nairn the previous year and not one head of smutted wheat had grown due to his treatment of the grain before planting that he had developed 17 years earlier. Peter was not going to keep this a secret and let his colleague suffer. Could you imagine Coles giving Woolworths a helping hand?

25-6-1852. Peter wrote a letter headed "To Improve Crops by Pollen" which showed that he had a thorough grasp of the history of the development of the various types of wheat.

11-8-1852 page 6.Peter Young of Nairn requested permission from those who had donated money for the church in the parish of Bulla (not enough to proceed) to hand it over to the National School, whose establishment had been resolved at a meeting he'd recently chaired.

The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston) 3-11-1852 page 722 (no kidding!) As Peter McCracken , the President of the Port Phillip Farmers' Society was absent (due to the drowning of his young son, William, in the Moonee Ponds Creek near the bottom of Pascoe St, Westmeadows; see McCracken below), Peter Young of Nairn took the chair, filling it most capably, at the function to honour David Duncan's service to the organisation. (See the WILLIAM THOMPSON AND DAVID DUNCAN journal.)

6-3-1868 page 2. Evan McIntosh was holding a clearing sale at Nairn, his lease having expired. Peter may have moved to Westernport but he also could have been conducting a business in Melbourne.

6-5-1895 page 1. H.W.Shepherd married Susan, the daughter of the late Mr Peter Young Esquire of Melbourne and Clyde Park, Westernport.

While trove is a fantastic resource, it does not distinguish between the surname Young and the opposite of old, which led to many wasted hours. I did not find any other family notices or references to Clyde Park, Westernport apart from the 1895 marriage of his daughter.

I tried googling YOUNG with CLYDE, BERWICK and WESTERNPORT, the last named combination reminding me of a discovery I made at the P.R.O.V. (See SQUATTERS IN THE WESTERNPORT DISTRICT journal.)

A website headed FREDERICK XAVIER TO ARTHUR ZOUCH has the following information.
The Melbourne Times of 23-4-1842 recorded that Peter Young had been granted a publican's licence for the "Bushman" in Sydney Road.The Port Phillip of 21-4-1843 shows that the hotel, once again described as being on Sydney Road was now called the Sugar Loaf Inn. The same paper, on 27-4-1844,stated that Peter had been granted his licence but the hotel was again called the Bushman.
(An alphabetical listing of squatters and their runs, from correspondence with the Governor, which is a different website, lists Peter Young of the Sugar Loaf Run.) Given Peter's purchase of land in Seymour at the first sales, his conducting the first sales in the township and the fact that Sugarloaf Creek intersects the Hume Highway in Seymour, it is reasonable to assume that the hotel was at Seymour and not in modern-day Carlton, Brunswick (or Plenty, Pascoeville near the Young Queen Inn, or Tullamarine near the Lady of the Lake- routes more likely to be called Sydney Road in the early 1840's.)
Rev. Peter Gunn, who became the minister at the Campbellfield's historic Scots Church (Melway 7 H6), had visited the Golburn (River?) area and Peter was among a large number who signed a letter of encouragement and contributed 50 pounds to support his ministry; another signatory was from Sunday Creek, which joins Sugarloaf Creek.(Port Phillip Herald 1-10-1844.)

Peter Young and Elizabeth christened John William in 1843.
Peter Young purchased allotments at the first sale of blocks at Seymour. (Melbourne Weekly Courier 23-3-1844.)
Peter Young was one of 469 voters who qualified by freehold in Seymour in the list of electors in the District of Bourke (Melbourne Courier 8-8-1845.)Peter Young was listed in the (1847?) Port Phillip directory as a settler, Seymour, Sydney Rd.

The website also lists newspaper reports showing that Peter Young was given depasturing licences in July 1843 and October 1844 in the Westernport District.Ah hah, I thought, perhaps Peter had been on Clyde Farm, Westernport before he went to Bulla. Then I remembered my search for a grant (or licence) that Captain Adams of Rosebud was supposed to have been given in about 1841. All such matters were dealt with in Sydney and the Public Records office gave me an index of correspondence. As Peninsula pioneers were referred to as late as 1888 in "Victoria and Its Metropolis" as being in the Westernport District, I concentrated on those entries.

Imagine my surprise to find Barker's Mt Alexander Run (near Castlemaine) described as being in the Westernport District! In view of what has been mentioned before, Peter Young's depasturing licences were almost certainly near Seymour.

Still none the wiser,about when Peter left Nairn, I returned to Trove and tried "Nairn, Bulla, Young, 1850-1867".
Argus 18-4-1853 page 12. Peter was offering Nairn for sale by private contract. He had probably only been there for about five years but how much he had accomplished! The advertisement describes the property in great detail, including the waterfall.For the sale of his furniture, library, stock, vehicles and so on, Peter employed prominent auctioneer, Dalmahoy Campbell (much discussed by Harry Peck in his "Memoirs of a Stockman.) (See Argus 20-5-1853 page 9.)

Argus 4-6-1853 page 8, column 1. Peter offered an incredible variety of grape vine cuttings for sale.

Joseph Clarke of "Goolpala", Saltwater River (Probably the future "Rupertswood")might have bought all of Peter's property north of Melbourne.The Argus of 16-9-1865 reported, on page 2, the sale of the late Joseph's estate: lot 1. Nairn; lot 2.About 9 acres of portions 29 and 30 Doutta Galla near the racecourse (the future showgrounds site near Clarke Ave, Melway 28 F11); lots 3-9. original allotments in the Township of Seymour. N.B. Clarke may have bought the showgrounds land from the grantee, Pearson, who had sold 4 acres to John and David Charles Ricketts in 1851.

The advertisement states that Nairn was split into two farms, leased by Mr McIntosh (300 acres) and Mr Millar (450 acres.) Part of Nairn was to become William Michie's "Cairnbrae". It also stated that Peter had framed the economy of Nairn upon sure principles and described the orchards and so on. In 1860, W.C.Howie had been on Nairn and placed a notice about a black pig that had strayed into his paddock (The Argus 30-6-1860 page 8, last column.)

As we know that Peter was an auctioneer, he may have been a partner of the firm of Young and Timbury,which advertised the sale of the cargo of a ship in The Argus of 18-5-1860 (page 2, bottom of column 4.)
A George Young, from Tasmania was a pioneer near Dromana and might have been related to Peter. (See "A Dreamtime of Dromana".)Peter was certainly not related to Frankston pioneer, Mark Young, who was a Roman Catholic.
As Clyde is near Berwick, J.Young and James Grant Young (Argus 11-7-1883 page 5 and 10-10-1867 page 6 column 3) may have been related, although Mark Young was involved in the Dandenong area before moving to Frankston and they might have been related to him instead.

McCRACKEN.
Peter McCracken farmed on Stewarton from 1846 until 1855.This was the 777 acres of Gladstone Park/Gardens between the Forman St and Lackenheath Dr. corners and extending to the Moonee Ponds Creek, which formed the eastern boundary.I have just spent two hours looking for the death notice of Peter's three year old son, William, in 1852, which I read last night but cannot now find! However, an indication of this death is found on page 722 of The Cornwall Chronicle (Launceston) of 3-11-1852.

One of the extracts from Melbourne papers was THE FARMERS' SOCIETY. The article concerns a presentation of a silver service to MR DAVID DUNCAN OF THOMPSON AND DUNCAN, CORNFACTORS, BOURKE ST, MELBOURNE. (David had been treasurer of the body since its inception.See David Duncan and William Thompson journal.)As the President, Peter McCracken of Stewarton, was absent due to a severe domestic calamity , Peter Young of Nairn took the chair.

Young William had walked with his siblings part of the way to school (at the two year old St Paul's Church of England in Broadmeadows Township at Melway 6 B7.) They would have crossed at the bottom of Pascoe St, where there was later a bridge according to Sid Lloyd, until it was swept away in a flood and required entry to Jim Barrow's Gladstone via Forman St.Young William probably slipped into the creek on the way home. (Extracts from The McCracken Letters provided by Deidre Farfor.)

Peter then had a dairy farm at Kensington, on allotments 19 and 18 of section 2, Doutta Galla, leased from John Robert Murphy, the grantee, from 1855 until 1863.This land lay between Kensington Rd and a line near Tennyson St (Melway 42 K4.)Peter suffered the loss of all his haystacks in 1861 and struggled through 1862 because the grass was poor and the hay expensive. After he had moved to "Ardmillan", his mansion at present 33-39 Ardmillan Rd, and ended his lease on the Kensington land, pork butcher, Samuel Cox, leased the old dairy and from 1874 to 1882 William Samuel Cox ran his Kensington Park Racecourse; when Kensington Park was subdivided, W.S.Cox started a new course on Feehan's farm, where it still stands, extended onto Long John Mooney's grant, and then to Wilson Rd.
(The McCracken Letters, P.5 "Early Landowners: Parish of Doutta Galla" Ray Gibb, "Ardmillan" Ray Gibb re address of the mansion.)

Optimistic reports of the Melbourne and Essendon Railway's meeting appeared on page 6 of the 30-8-1859 issue of The Argus. Directors appointed were George Holmes, Hugh Glass, J. Dinwoodie, C.Bradshaw, J.C.King, Peter McCracken and E.B.Wight. I think Holmes, a major contractor, who was building this line, was the man after whom Holmes Rd in Moonee Ponds West was named. Hugh Glass of Flemington House was a neighbour of Peter's brother, Robert and, with the McCrackens and Robertsons, owned most of the railway's route. Dinwoodie held a mortgage on the Aitken Estate at one time, the Bradshaws owned land at Hawstead and between Epsom and Union Rds, and Edward Byam Wight owned "The Ridge" across present Kensington Rd from Peter McCracken's dairy and the "Temperance Township" triangle mentioned in relation to the Bradshaws.(Early Landowners: Parish of Doutta Galla- titles and parish map, The Stopover That Stayed.)

Peter is known to have been on Ardmillan by 1860; on page 4 of The Argus of 24-4-1860, appeared the death notice of John, the fourth son of Peter McCracken of Ardmillan near Essendon, who had died of croup at the age of 2 years and 7 months.The railway opened at about that time but by 1864 it had to close because of insufficient patronage. No doubt James McConnell had sold his grants at Kensington and Moonee Ponds (bisected by Puckle St)at a good profit but the majority shareholders such as Glass and Peter suffered heavy losses. The former died from an "accidental overdose" and Peter lost Ardmillan.

He'd sold the part east of the railway to Taylor and by 1874, the rest of his estate had been sold, the homestead block to stock agent William Hudson and the western and northern portions to Edward Dale Puckle who sold subdivided land to such as Thomas Jennings Jnr, born in Melbourne in 1837.In a letter, Peter said that one consolation was that his new residence in Powlett St, East Melbourne was at least closer to work. And what was that? I'm going to make you wait.

Peter's brother, Robert, bought Ailsa from Captain Buckley; a letter from "Ardmillan" to Scotland indicates that this took place in April/May 1865, not in 1864 as stated by A.D.Pyke.The property was north of Kent St and went north to the Filson/South St midline. Glass had earlier purchased the Ascot Vale Rd frontage. In 1873, the Essendon Football Club commenced and played on the Ailsa paddock; it is claimed that the club had to move to another ground because the V.F.A. demanded a fenced ground in 1877, but it is more likely that the club moved to the East Melbourne Ground in 1875.John Filson lodged a subdivision plan for the paddock in 1875, naming the main streets after himself and his wife (nee Harding.)

Why didn't the club play at Windy Hill? Most football teams had formed from cricket clubs but Essendon was mainly composed of horse lovers. As most of the councillors were cricket lovers, they refused the "Same Olds" use of the ground. Later the council made the ground available to a V.F.A. club, Essendon Town (later known as Essendon A),which experienced great success in about 1910 when the great Dave McNamara was place kicking goals from 80 yards out and kicked the first century ever.A decade later many of their stars transferred to North Melbourne and the club folded. At last the ground was made available to the V.F.L. club "the Same Olds" which adopted the Bombers as a nick-name when aeroplane manufacturing no longer relied on aeroplane dope.

Ailsa was demolished when the house and a small portion of the land was sold to the Catholic Church. The new buildings functioned as a convent and college/university for a great length of time and recently became a Scientology centre.

The Mar Lodge Estate, adjoining Hoffman's Butzbach (later Croft's Buckley Park)was inherited by Francis Robertson of Upper Keilor, whose brother, James, inherited Upper Keilor and "Spring Hill" which became Aberfeldie. Francis, a bachelor and member of Parliament 1860-1864 and 1868-1886, built the 43 square homestead in 1863. He died at 1 p.m. on 11-3-1886 and the McCrackens bought MarLodge in 1888 according to the Essendon Conservation Study.

Coiler and Alexander McCracken sold 3 acres to the Government on 27-11-1910 for 1000 pounds; this was the original small portion of the Essendon High School site. Gordon Connor, one of the school's early pupils recalled cows grazing right to the high school fence. This continued for almost a decade until Mar Lodge was subdivided in 1919. There would have been no need to mow the grass because, on 7-1-1919,fire destroyed 150 acres of grassland owned by the late Alexander McCracken and tenanted by F.Flanagan.

Before continuing, I had better mention a bit about the McCracken family. It hailed from Ardwell Farm on the Ardmillan Estate in Ayrshire, Scotland. Peter, Robert and Alexander Earle were three brothers involved in the Essendon area and there was apparently a sister, Grace, who married Alexander McGeoch, spirit merchant and died at the residence of her brother, Robert McCracken (The Argus 20-4-1859 p.4.)

Alexander Earle McCracken returned to Scotland in 1857 due to the ill health of his wife Jane. This reminds me of an error that I need to fix in the Thomas Miller (sic, Millar) journal. I stated that Jane had mentioned Thomas Millar's funeral but she had written about a grand festivity on "Miller's Farm"; another family member had written about the funeral.
Mar Lodge extended west from McCracken St to include all present Hedderwick St house blocks.Between there and Hoffmans Rd was Butzbach, granted to William Hoffman, a brick manufacturer. Alexander Earle McCracken was probably the first tenant on Butzbach and within ten months of the grant being issued had built stables with four stalls and a barn.In March 1851, he was building a house which was probably between Croft St and the bend in Price St (Melway 28 B2.)Alexander grew wheat (probably supplied to Barber and Young's flour mill on the Pipeworks Market site at Campbellfield) and the farm prospered but as mentioned earlier Alexander Earle and Jane returned home in 1857.

In a letter dated 14-4-1858, Robert told Alexander Earle that the McAuleys were now farming Butzbach. In the following year, the death occurred of nine year old Grace, the daughter of Mr Alexander Earle McCracken late of Butzback (sic), Saltwater River (The Argus 12-10-1859 p.6.) Not a good year for the McCrackens; little Grace had taken the same journey as her Auntie Grace and the optimism regarding the railway was to turn to heartache within a few years.

When Essendon F.C. started playing at Ailsa, Robert's 17 year old son, Alexander, a 17 year old Scotch College student, was its first secretary. Peter's son, Coiler or Collier, was the team's first captain. Alexander was to become the first President of the V.F.L. until shortly before his death in 1915. He was to become prominent in the Oaklands Hunt Club. He purchased "Cumberland" whose homestead ruins can still be seen at Melway 178 C12. After-hunt festivities were generally held at Cumberland, Alister Clark's "Glenara" or the Inverness Hotel until the club purchased "Sherwood". The Tullamarine community picnics, organised by its schoolteacher, Alec Rasmussen, were conducted on the 880 acre Cumberland, in 1909, 1910 and 1911. After Alexander's death, the Johnsons of "Glendewar" across the creek lived in its beautiful homestead but had to return to a humbler home when the Cumberland mansion was destroyed by fire.

Cumberland had a strong footy connection because of Alexander McCracken but also because of Thomas Wills, the grantee (of section 5 Will Will Rook?), an overlander, who was the uncle of Tom Wills, footy's creator, and Colden Harrison, codifier of the rules in 1866 and called the father of football.
("Running With The Ball" ? and A. Mancini.)

Cumberland was Alexander's country retreat but his real home was "North Park", now the Columban Mission on the south side of Woodlands St, Essendon. His cousin, Peter's son, Coiler (obviously named after Coiler Robertson of La Rose) built Earlsbrae, which is now part of the Lowther Hall school. Coiler got into finncial difficulty and left for Bourke in New South Wales. (See "The Gold The Blue for extensive detail.)

COILER ROBERTSON, LA ROSE. See the journal about the 1847 Port Phillip Directory to find details about the "La Rose" Robertsons, the farm's location and two other Robertson families in the area.

4 comment(s), latest 2 years, 9 months ago

JOHN TOWNSEND, DROMANA, VIC., AUST. : FIRST TO USE MOUTH TO MOUTH IN AUSTRALIA?

In 1954, James Elam was the first to demonstrate experimentally that cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was a sound technique and, with Dr. Peter Safar, he demonstrated its superiority to previous methods. Peter Safar wrote the book ABC of resuscitation in 1957. In the United States, it was first promoted as a technique for the public to learn in the 1970s.
(Wikipedia.)

John Townsend(or perhaps his father) may have been one of the first people in Victoria to save a life using mouth to mouth resuscitation about 70 years before the technique was introduced in Australia.

In A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, Colin McLear wrote the following about John Townsend.
P. 74. John Townsend (1840-1918) seems to have been a jack-of-all-trades. At one time he farmed where a Rosebud golf course is now situated on the slopes of Arthurs Seat. He also built houses and ran an early store in Dromana,in what had been George McLear's butchers shop. He lived on the (south)corner of Ligar and McCulloch Street opposite the State School,in what old-timers call Townsend's. The old house still stands. John is believed to have shot the last dingo on the Peninsula on the Anderson property (Barragunda)at Boneo (Cape Schanck).

John helped Simon,commonly called "Simon the Belgian" fence his land on the side of Arthurs Seat.

P.84.Charlie Dyson married a daughter of John Singleton and one of their children became Mrs John Townsend.(Does this tie in?)

P.120. John Townsend was one of the bondsmen for a loan of 300 pounds to build St Mark's Church of England in Dromana.

P. 126. An entry in George McLear's notebooks in 1880 advises that Townsend paid 35 pounds for the church....John Townsend was a man of many parts, among them a sometime builder. Perhaps he had a contract to re-erect the church...
(The above relates to the relocation of the Methodist Church from a site in Heales St to the Esplanade.)

MOUTH TO MOUTH.
Harold Wilson, eldest son of Mr and Mrs H. W. Wilson. of M'Culloch street, Dromana, had a very narrow escape from drowning last Saturday week. It appears the little fellow, in company with a small lad named Stanley Evans, was playing on the banks of a waterhole close to where Mr. Wilson is erecting his new slaughter house, and in some way he slipped into the hole, which had at least 5 feet of water in it. The other boy being un- able to render his unfortunate play mate any assistance, had the presence of mind to run down to where Mr Townsend and the Messrs Wilsons were at work, and informed them what had happened. They immediately hurried to the hole. Seeing no trace of the child, the father plunged in, and succeeded in bringing to the surface what he considered was the lifeless body of his son. However, Mr Townsend,who acted with judgment,was quickly at work, vigorously blowing his warm breath into the little fellow's lungs, until he slowly began to regain consciousness. Mr.G.M'Lear, who lives close to where the accident happened, was sent for, and rendered valuable assistance, but had it not been for the artificial respiration resorted to by Mr Townsend, it is doubtful whether the boy would have recovered.(P.5, Mornington Standard,10-12-1904.)

The wikipedia entry for Mouth to mouth resuscitation describes how it was developed in 1957 and was promoted in the U.S.A in the 1970's.

John Townsend's grants near Rosebud were crown allotments 31D and 31C,section B in the parish of Wannaeue. The former, consisting of 37 acres 1 rood 15 perches is bounded by Bayview/Old Cape Schank Rd,roughly the north-south part of Leura Crescent and Waterfall Gully Rd. The latter, of 100 acres and 2 perches adjoined it on the east and extended to the full length of Rosebud Avenue.(Melway 170 G 4-5.)

Early Horton Tasmania Settlers
and family from around the world
John Townsend

1865-1923

Gender: male
Birth: 1865 Dromana, Vic, Australia (More...)
Death: 1923 Melbourne, Vic, Australia (More...)
Parents

Father: John Townsend
Mother: Allison Mitchell
Family 1

Partner: Susannah Caroline Hanson (1864-1906)
Marriage: 1887 Dromana, Vic, Australia (More...)
Children

Elsie Townsend (1890-)
Jessie Allison Townsend (1892-)
Ellen Carolina Townsend (1893-)
John Leonard Townsend (1894-1951)
Arthur Gould Townsend (1899-)

It is possible that Susannah Caroline Hanson was a niece of Christian Hanson,who in 1887 was first assessed on one of William Hopcraft's grants in the parish of Balnarring on the east side of Tucks Rd at its northern end.
Hec Hanson's MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN makes it clear that she was not Christian's daughter. Her father or brother was possibly Charles Hanson,who with John Townsend was a member of an early dramatic company in Dromana, the Black Gulls. (Harry Wilson,probably the father of the boy saved by John Townsend, and George Townsend were also member.) The Townsends of Mornington may be related.

FLINDERS AND KANGERONG
SHIRE COUNCIL.
---------------
[Present, Crs Downward, (president), Baldry, Brown, Griffiths, Hurley, Wilson and Stanley.
REVISION COURT.
The Council sat as a Revision Court for the purpose of revising the voters' lists. The applications of T. M.
Dorley. and John A. Crichton were entertained. Those of Alfred P.Beecher and Charles Hanson, were disallowed.
(P.2, Mornington Standard, 4-8-1892.)

EXCERPT FROM "Old Peninsula Days, Plays and Players"
Standard (Frankston, Vic. : 1939 - 1949) Thursday 21 February 1946 p 9 Article.

Mr. Harry Wilson. As a ? to these items was "Uncle Tom's Cabin in Five Minutes," the parts? in which were played by Mr. John Townsend (Simon Legree),Mr Chas. Hanson (Uncle Tom), and Mr Fred. Mellor (Little Eva).

1 comment(s), latest 3 years, 1 month ago

JOHN YEWERS EARLY RESIDENT OF MORNINGTON AND KALKALLO, VIC., AUST. AND DISCOVERER OF COAL AND GOLD.

FROM AN EMAIL TO VALERIE WILSON O.A.M.

Just in case a Yewers descendant asks what you know about John Yewers at (the original) Donnybrook, renamed as Kalkallo Township after a new Donnybrook sprang up near the north eastern railway in about 1872. Donnybrook Rd was the southern boundary of Kalkallo Township (a 1954 map of which is available online.)

http://www.hume.vic.gov.au/files/0458f312-c19c-4792-9b31-9e2300c38ee2/21-23_Mitchell_St_Kalkallo.pdf

EXTRACT FROM MY JOURNAL:
http://www.familytreecircles.com/early-landholders-in-the-parish-of-moorooduc-j-p-fawkner-vic-aust-54490.html

19.YEWERS.
John Yewers was granted crown allotment 5 Moorooduc, consisting of 159 acres 3 roods and 9 perches. It was between Sunnyside Rd and Manmangur Creek (the eastern boundary of the Mornington Golf Club.) This property became known as "Sunnyside".

It is uncertain at the moment whether John had much to do with crown allotment 5. His purchase may have been for speculative purposes like the house blocks he bought at Donnybrook in 1855. His hotel would have kept him busy.

December 25th, on board the Yarra Yarra steamer, on her passage to Launceston, Emily Hayson Yewers, youngest daughter of Mr. John Yewers, late of the Albion Hotel, Bourke street.(P.4, Argus, 5-1-1853.)

Was Henry's presence at Somerville in 1859 linked with John's application for a licence for the Yewers' Family Hotel being refused? (P.6, Argus, 2-3-1859.)

Not deterred, John was running the bridge Hotel at Echuca in 1865 when he became insolvent.
(P.6, Argus, 6-2-1865.)

John was not the father of Henry, so they might have been brothers.


On page 17 of THE BUTCHER THE BAKER THE, Bruce Bennett provides the following information about the Yewers family.
Henry Yewers was among the first subscribers to the Somerville school in 1859. Henry had a butcher's shop in Main St, Mornington by 1869.In about 1873, Robert Lawson Yewers was a butcher at Mornington while Henry at Somerville and Alf at Yarraville carried on the same trade. Robert also owned the Somerville shop and had slaughteryards and land at** Moorooduc.
* Probably on c/a 5. Bruce several times failed to distinguish between the parish of Moorooduc and the locality of Moorooduc (based on Jones Corner.)

Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Wednesday 13 March 1878 p 1 Family Notices
... YEWERS-GROVER.-On the 7th inst, at the residence of the bride's parents, by the Rev Jas Caldwell, Robert Lawson Yewers, of Footscray, to Mary Ann, second daughter of Mr W Grover, of Mornington ...
(William Grover was a builder and built Beleura for James Butchart.)



Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Saturday 23 March 1878 p 1 Family Notices
... months. YEWERS.-On the 22nd inst, at his son's residence, Nicholson-street, Footscray, Henry Hayson Yewers, late of Mornington, in the 69th year of his age. ... 422 words


MORNINGTON. - Councillors Jones* and Yewers were proposed, and the voting being equal, the decision by lot fell to Councillor Henry Yewers. (P.10,Argus, 19-11-1874.) Henry became the Shire President.
*Cr Jones was probably Alfred Jones of the Almond Bush Stud at Somerville,English-born but resident in Canada from the age of about 10, and one of the three Canadians who gave Canadian Bay its name.

WHICH JOHN YEWERS?
Publican, confectioner, government geologist? The geologist best shows a connection with Mornington and Donnybrook, having found gold near the Plenty in 1851 and coal near Schnapper Point in 1856, (the year after OUR John was granted his land nearby. Were they all the same man? The one who married Emily and whose daughter, Ada, married Fred Thiele was John Haysom Yewers.

http://www.ancestry.com.au/.../john-haysom-yewers_64235039
John Haysom Yewers
Born in Hampshire, England on 24 Mar 1816 to Henry Haysom and Elizabeth Emm. John Haysom married Emily Moss and had 9 children. He passed away on 26 Jul 1879 in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Family Members
Parents: Henry Haysom 1781-1827 Elizabeth Emm 1789-1867
Spouse(s) Emily Moss 1822-1895
Children
Henry Edward Yewers 1851-1886 Mary Elizabeth Yewers 1845-1917 Amelia Yewers 1848-1885 Alfred Haysom Yewers 1849-1934
Makalia Haysom Yewers 1849-1951 Emily Haydon Yewers 1852-1853 John Haysom Yewers 1854-1916* Ada Haysom Yewers 1857-1942 Harriet Yewers 1859-1892

Another connection between John Yewers' family and the peninsula was his daughter, Ada's marriage to a member of one of Doncaster's earliest pioneers. Doncaster isn't on the peninsula but Charles Thiele, one of the pioneers of the Red Hill Village Settlement, was killed on the Eaton's Cutting road between Red Hill and Dromana in the early 1900's and about 50 years later one of the family still living at Doncaster tempted fate by falling off a ladder at his holiday home at (Rosebud?)

THIELE—YEWERS - On the 20th June, ot St. Jude's Church, Carlton, by the Rev. Julius Lewis, Ambrose Frederick, third son of John Gottlieb Thiele, of Doncaster, to Ada, third daughter of the late John Yewers, late or Carlton. No. cards. (P.42, Leader, 3-8-1889.)
This marriage notice helped me to fill the gaps in the death notice of Ada's mother.

(YEWE)RS.-0n the 11th October, at the residence of her (daughte)r, (Ada*), Mrs F. Thiele, Doncaster, Emily Yewers (relict of) the late John Yewers, in her 73rd year. Interred (1)3 th. inst..(*Marriage notice , Leader, 19-10-1895.) Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918) Saturday 19 October 1895 p 35 Family Notices

The notice of 15-10-1895 on P. 1 of the Argus is almost identical .
YEWERS.—On the 11th inst., at the residence of her son-in-law (Mr. Fred. Thiele), at Doncaster, Emily, relict of the late John Yewers, in her 73rd year. A colonist of 48 years' duration. Interment on 13th
inst.

The following shows that John Haysom Yewers was the peninsula pioneer. Henry Haysom Yewers was obviously his brother. Robert Lawson Yewers' death at Footscray in 1914 meshes with Bruce Bennett's statement that the family later moved to Footscray.

Henry Haysom Yewers

http://www.ancestry.com/.../henry-haysom-yewers_61933533
Born in Hampshire, England on 1814 to Henry Haysom and Elizabeth Emm. Henry Haysom married Mary Lawson and had 8 children. He passed away on 1878.
Family Members
Parents: Henry Haysom 1781-1827 Elizabeth Emm 1789-1867
Spouse(s) Mary Lawson 1818-1883
Children: Robert Lawson Yewers 1839-1914 John Henry Yewers
1842-1898 Walter Alfred Yewers 1844-1934 Hannah Amelia Yewers 1845-1914 Kate Ellen Yewers 1850-1934 Mary Jane Yewers 1852-1914 Otto William Yewers 1854-1854 George Thomas Yewers 1855-1921

YEWERS.— On tho 26th July, at Melbourne, John Haysom Yewers, a colonist of thirty-six years' duration, in .the sixty-fourth year of his age. (P.142, Illustrated Australian News, 30-8-1879.)

*The above was one of only two results on trove for John Haysom Yewers. Both were family notices although I did not impose this limit. Let's try J.H.Yewers. All results concerned the butcher in the second (and later) death notice, who was the son of the colonist of 36 years. The son was on the staff of the Lands Department in 1912 and is pictured with his colleagues. Perhaps the father was a government employee too!
OFFICERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CROWN LANDS AND SURVEY.
Punch (Melbourne, Vic. : 1900 - 1918; 1925) Thursday 27 June 1912 p 21 Detailed Lists, Results, Guides Illustrated

WAS JOHN HAYSOM YEWERS THE GOVERNMENT GEOLOGIST WHO DISCOVERED COAL NEAR SCHNAPPER POINT IN 1856 AND DID HE FIND IT ON C/A 5, MOOROODUC, THE FUTURE SUNNYSIDE?
I measured the distance along the highway from Main Street to Sunnyside Rd. It was exactly 16 cm. On Melway maps 3+, each mm. represents one chain (and 160 chains is exactly TWO MILES.)

The discovery of coal at Snapper Point,
which we lately noticed, has now been
confirmed. Last week Mr. Norton, from
•Melbourne, visited "the place, in one of his
small steamers, accompanied by a party
of gentlemen from Melbourne, and about
TWO MILES north of the point, they found
Mr. Yewers and half a dozen men busy
excavating a soft clay shale that " cropped
out" behind the granite so common in that
part. The coal was in thin irregular laminae
from a film to an inch in thickness.
The seams were irregular in thickness, and
not in one continuous bed; but the coal
looked pure, and was said to burn well.
(P.1, Gippsland Guardian, 22-8-1856.)

WHAT A STORY THIS HAS TURNED OUT TO BE, ALL BECAUSE OF A HOUSE IN KALKALLO TOWNSHIP.
The following confirms that John Haysom Yewers (or should we say John Haysom?) was the pioneer of Donnybrook (renamed Kalkallo). His namesake son was born there in 1854. He didn't keep c/a 5 Moorooduc for long.

FOR SALE, at Schnapper Point, that splendid FARM belonging to Mr. John Yewers, fronting the Bay, containing 100 acres fenced in, and 50 acres under cultivation, adjoining Mr. Cobb's farm, bounded by two Government roads 3 chains wide. Apply to Mr. John Yewers, Tennyson-street, St. Kilda. (P.8, Argus, 1-11-1858.)

http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=4767522&id=I15120

ID: I15120
Name: John HAYSOM
Given Name: John
Surname: HAYSOM
Name: John YEWERS
Given Name: John
Surname: YEWERS
Sex: M
Birth: 24 Mar 1816 in Hampshire, England
Death: 26 Jul 1879 in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia 1
_PPEXCLUDE:
_UID: A63DCE8017E8D611835DB1DEC322F1328E5D
Change Date: 16 Jan 2013 at 09:13
Note:
John was convicted of house breaking and burglary in July 1834 and sentenced at Southampton to 14 years in Tasmania. It is not known why he added the name YEWERS but a genealogist on an online discussion re convicts said that it was not uncommon for convicts to do that especially before birth certificates came in - and not only convicts but others too.
John arrived on the "Waterloo" on 2nd March 1835 and was assigned to the wharves to work. His convict history makes very interesting reading including being on bread and water, in solitary and also at one stage hard labour in chains. So he was a very cheeky boy. Anyway he settled down and was given a ticket of leave in 1843. Shortly before this he had applied to be married which was granted and he married Emily Moss daughter of a convict, but herself free.
He left Tasmania and moved to Victoria and became a publican and obviously made money in the gold rush era as he went back to see the family in England and probably encouraged them all to emigrate. The "Mississippi" was mainly filled with Haysoms of one sort or another. He was also on the "Mississippi" passenger list with his son. (Source: D. McDonald & V. Maine)




Father: Henry HAYSOME c: 22 Jul 1781 in Burghclere, Hampshire, England
Mother: Elizabeth EMM b: Abt 1789 in Isle of Wight, Hampshire, England

Marriage 1 Emily MOSS b: Abt 1822
Married: 13 Mar 1843 in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia 2
Change Date: 12 Jan 2011
Children
Has Children Henry Edward YEWERS b: 22 Dec 1843 in Hobartown, Tasmania, Australia
Has Children Mary Elizabeth Haysom YEWERS b: 29 Sep 1845 in Hobartown, Tasmania, Australia
Has Children Amelia Haysom YEWERS b: 1848 in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Has Children Alfred Haysom YEWERS b: 1849 in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Has No Children Makalia Haysom YEWERS b: 1849 in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Has No Children Emily Haysom YEWERS b: 25 Dec 1852 in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Has Children John Haysom YEWERS b: 1854 in Merri Creek, Victoria, Australia !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Has Children Ada Haysom YEWERS b: 1857 in Collingwood, Victoria, Australia
Has No Children Harriet YEWERS b: 1859 in St Kilda, Victoria, Australia
Has No Children YEWERS b: 1859 in St Kilda, Victoria, Australia

Sources:
Abbrev: BDM Victoria, Australia
Title: BDM Victoria
Page: 1879/ 8433
Quality: 3
Abbrev: BDM Tasmania, Australia
Title: BDM Tasmania, Australia
Page: 383/ 1843 RGD 37

JOSEPH HARPER, WHEELWRIGHT, SPRINGS (near Keilor), VIC., AUST.

Joseph Harpen, the Springs
I was wondering if you have ever come across a Joseph Harpen of the Springs during your research? My great grandmother Catherine Guilfoyle was an Irish orphan assigned to him in 1849. In addition, Susan Guilfoyle was assigned to James Robertson of Portland in 1849. Do you know if he is connected to the James Robertson of La Rose?

Marcia, Ignore the first paragraph.
It's not much fun researching HARPEN on trove because most results are for happen, Harper and sharpen. I was going to link Harpen with Keilor or Doutta Galla but there seemed little prospect of getting a result, and based on one result and your mention of Portland,I entered Camperdown and Springs. There were probably scores of properties and places called Springs and it is possible that Joseph Harpen was at Springs near Camperdown.

Given that there were three totally unrelated James Robertsons within a few miles of Essendon (La Rose and Trinifour near Essendon; Upper Keilor and Aberfeldie; and Gowrie Park near Campbellfield), I would not even dare to suggest a relationship between Jimmy of Portland and the others. But you never know!

HANG ON, HANG ON, HANG ON!!!
What if the name of Catherine's employer in 1849 was Joseph HARPER? Joseph Harper was the wheelwright at the Springs in 1848 and 1849 and was up on a charge of dudding a servant. This does not mean that he was on the Foster estate stretching from Tullamarine to Keilor Park and if it did, there was no indication whether he was at the north end like David O'Nyall of the Lady of the Lake or on the road to Keilor.


For the delivery of the above mares and cattle, separately or conjointly to the under-signed, or Mr. Joseph Harper, Wheelwright at the Springs, the following rewards will be paid viz. :-2 for the mare without foal and each of the three bullocks ; and 3 pounds, for the mare with foal.
WILLIAM O'NEIL,
Springs, Mount Macedon Road. September 19, 1848. (P.3, Argus, 26-9-1848.)

Mount Macedon Road doesn't help much to specify Harper's location because it was used to describe the road to Keilor and the one to Deep Creek (Bulla), and even Pascoe Vale Rd (the road to Sydney past the Young Queen Inn.) However William O'Neil is another matter.

A former policeman, called Gay Lothario in Angela Evans'"Keilor Pioneers: Dead men do tell Tales",William leased "Leslie Banks" from the Fosters for many years; Leslie Banks was across Fosters Rd (now Keilor Park Drive) from Springs, on the Maribyrnong River's banks, between the lines of Sharps Rd and Spence St. Soon after, the part of the Keilor Township in today's Horseshoe Bend Park was alienated in 20 acre lots, with lawyer F.D.Wickham securing most of them, but William O'Neil soon owned all of the horseshoe bend. This makes it likely that William O'Neil and Joseph Harper were operating on the road to Keilor rather than today's Melrose Drive.

It seems that Joseph Harper had moved to Kyneton by 1856.(P.5, Argus, 25-10-1856.)
He may have been an innkeeper at Woodend in 1852:
CAUTION.
LOST on the (I8th?) of November, between the Five Mile Creek, Mount Macedon, and Jackson's Creek, Two Cheques on the Union Bank of Australia. One on the 4th November, No 23, for 215/10 s. do. on tho 10th, No 43, for215/15s; drawn in favor of Joseph Harper,innkeeper, of the Woods End Inn, Five Mile Creek. (etc.)
(Signed) JOSEPH HARPER. (P.8, Argus, 16-11-1852.)N.B. WOODS END looked like WEEDS BAD, due to a surplus of ink, so I hope my guess was right.

JOSEPH PORTA: the first manufacturer of bellows in Victoria, Australia.

Joseph Porta was of Italian origin but his family was resident in England, perhaps near Birmingham, and he emigrated to Victoria from there.By about 1861 he had received the grant (title from the Government) for Crown Allotment 63 Moorooduc near Somerville. Within a couple of years he became insolvent and became a cab driver in Mornington by 1866. In this year he was also making bellows, probably in Mornington. As the PORTAMOULDINGS company history explains, he established his Little Lonsdale St factory in Melbourne in 1868.
I have extensive information from Trove which I am willing to provide to people who have read the PORTAMOULDINGS website.Joseph's family was related by marriage to the Bennetts of Mornington.

1 comment(s), latest 1 year, 3 months ago

JOSEPH WILLIAM HAZLEDINE OF PICOLA, ROSEBUD AND DROMANA, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

JOSEPH WILLIAM HAZELDINE (sic) OF ROSEBUD AND DROMANA.
This journal is based on my post of August 11, 2015 on the HISTORY OF DROMANA TO PORTSEA Facebook group page, followed by many Hazledine descendants (who informed me that the usual "el" spelling, which I've deliberately left in the title of the post, is wrong.) At the time having conducted special rate research, I attempted to submit a journal but internet connection issues prevented this.

Joseph William Hazledine Jnr. married Lizzie, daughter of Rye's Michael Cain, and many Hazledine descendants still live in the area. One, John, wrote an article in the Rye Historical Society's White Cliffs which includes a photo of J.W.H.Jnr, his son (Neville) and grandson (John.)
'White Cliffs' - Rye Historical Society - Weebly
ryehistoricalsociety.weebly.com/.../july-august-september_2013_color.p...
.... My father's name was Neville Joseph Hazledine.


From A Dreamtime of Dromana.
P.67. On 22-11-1888,Mr Hazeldine's black mare was served by George McLear's Gay Lad and left in the paddock with him. The horse was required in about a fortnight for drill practice. (G.McLear's account book.)
P.53-4. When H.B.Simon died, his house, which was situated about 230 yards above Boundary Rd, was purchased by the Shire Rate Collector, Mr Hazeldine, who moved it onto his land in Foote St, Dromana and with his family took up residence therein. His descendants occupied it until comparatively recently (stated Colin)when it was removed to make way for the new Roman Catholic Church.
P.166. Ticky Hazeldine was a member of the Dromana footy team in 1946 and is in the back row in this photo.
P.195.Ticky Hazeldine delivered meat orders on his horse and cart.

SHEPPARTON, MONDAY.
At the ordinary monthly meeting of the Shepparton Shire Council today a letter was received from Mr. Charles W. Morgan, of Echuca, on behalf of Mr. J. W. Hazeldine, State school teacher at Picola North, applying for the payment of £250 for a libel contained in a letter written by the secretary of the council to the Minister of Public Instruction in November, 1882, in connexion with rates due to the council. It was resolved to place the matter in the hands of the shire solicitor.(P.7, Argus, 3-7-1883.)

POULTRY.-Cochins-First, J. W. Hazeldine, Picola.Common Cochins-First, A. E. Kinsey; second. J.W. Hazeldine. Dorkings-First, J. W. Hazeldine.
White-crested Polish-First. A E. Kinsey. Polish (othervariety)-First, J. W. Hazeldine. Black Spanish-First, A E. Kinsey; second, J. W. Hazeldine. Bantams First, James Malono, Moama. Golden Hamburgs First. J. W. Hazeldine; seoond, T. Taylor. Silver Hauibunra-First, T. Taylor. Silver-spangled Hamburgs-first, J. W. Hazeldine; etc.(P.31, The Australasian, 15-8-1885.)

BOARDS FOR HEARING OF REASONS AGAINST FORFEITURE OF LICENCES. [coming soon]
Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918) Saturday 19 October 1889 p 9 Detailed Lists, Results, Guides
... — Benjamin White, 133 a., Kunat ICunat. Echuca, 29th October, at 10 a.m.— Joseph W. Hazeldine, 11 a., Picola,

DROMANA.
The ordinary fortnightly meeting of the Literary Association was held on Monday
last in the Mechanics' Institute. The proceedings took the form of a mock parliamentary election. There were five candidates desirous of representing the electors of the County of Mornington. Messrs Brady and Wright stood in the Free trade interest, whilst Messrs Hazeldine and Heather were Protectionists, and Mr T.Chapman was the nominee of the Temperance party.
(P.3, Mornington Standard, 19-10-1889.)

When the late John Vans Agnew Bruce Jnr's northern portion of Jamieson's Special Survey (from coast to Bulldog Creek Rd between lines indicated by Ellerina Rd and Martha Cove Waterway) was advertised for sale, Joseph William Hazeldine, was the local agent.
It is part of the celebrated Jamieson's Special Survey, in the parish of Kangerong, and the land will be pointed out by the driver of the coach from Mornington to Dromana, or by Mr J. W. Hazeldine, electoral registrar and agent, Dromana. (P.2, Mornington Standard, 26-12-1901.)

Mornington Peninsula Football Association.
A meeting of delegates of the above Association was held at the Grand Hotel, Mornington, on Monday night last, the president (Mr L. Harrison) in the chair. The following delegates were also present :-Messrs W Odgers and T. Hutchins (Mornington), H.Firth and W. Monk Somerville), J.Griffith and Hazledine (Dromana), Oswin and Callanan (Balnarring), Pearce and Wilson (Hastings), H.Noble and McLaurin (Tyabb), A.Bartlett (Sorrento).
In the absence of Mr H. Menck (who is at present in ill-health), Mr Hazeldine was appointed secretary pro tern, on the motion of Messrs J. Griffith and H.Firth. etc. (P.3, Mornington and Dromana Standard, 21-8-1909.)

DROMANA.-CORIO, superior Accommodation, near beach and golf-links; terms moderate; garage. Mrs. Hazeldine. (P.12, Argus, 28-3-1916)
So Joseph's wife, Mary Margaret Hazeldine (nee Hamilton?), former teacher, really did become a boarding house keeper!

OBITUARY
MR. J. W. HAZELDINE.
The death occurred on Friday of Mr. Joseph William Hazeldine, aged 82 years, at his residence, Dromana. Mr. Hazeldine settled in the Dromana district 48 years ago and was a State school teacher at Rosebud for NINE* years. He was a teacher in the service of the Education Department for 28 years. Until his death he was registrar of births and deaths at Dromana. The funeral took place on Saturday. Requiem mass was celebrated by the Rev. Father O'Sullivan, who also read the burial service.
Burial took place in the Dromana cemetery**. The casket was carried by his six sons. The pall-bearers were Cr Wilson, Messrs. A. W. Farrell, L.Carrigg, J. Matthews, A. Cooper, B.Wilson, J. Moraes, and G. Brown. The funeral was conducted by Mr Hector Gamble, of Frankston. Mr. Hazeldine leaves six sons and four daughters.(P.1, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 30-8-1935.)

* From my ROSEBUD POST OFFICE post.
LOUIS ANDERSON AND JOSEPH WILLIAM HAZELDINE.--------Louis Anderson was appointed postmaster at Rosebud on 22-9- 1890, following the resignation of teacher Joseph William Hazeldene who started at Rosebud State School on 20-9-1886 and conducted a post office at the school (as he had done at Picola) from 38-3-1889 to September 1889, retiring as a teacher at the end of the year. "Although Louis Anderson was postmaster for the next seven years, regretably no one today has ever heard of him. Early records of the school show that the post office continued to be conducted from the school and the head teacher who replaced Mr Hazeldene at the beginning of the school year in 1891, Mr Frederick Cooper Green, was appointed postmaster on 11-5-1897 and continued in the role, despite the control of Post and Telegraph passing to the Commonwealth on March 1,1901, until he left the school at the end of 1901.
(The above would indicate that Joseph William Hazeldine was at Rosebud State School only for four years. However 48 years before 1935 would have been 1887 and he might have started at the school then. It is also possible that Mr Green started at Rosebud State School in 1897 and the last digit has been misread as a 1. However the latter theory is disproved by the following extract from the report of a Flinders and Kangerong Shire meeting.

BOARD OF HEALTH.
A. G. Clayton, teacher, Flinders, wrote asking permission to re-open his school, which had been closed owing to prevalence of whooping cough.- There being no objection on the part of the health officer, the re-opening wassanctioned.
From F. Green, Rosebud, reporting two cases of whooping cough. Received.
(P.2, Mornington Standard, 7-4-1892.)
The obituary indicates that Joseph's wife, Mary Margaret, had pre-deceased him so the information would have come from their children. It is possible that it was Mary Margaret Hazeldine who taught at Rosebud State School for nine years. Her occupation was given as teacher as late as the 1910-11 assessment (and perhaps in 1911-12 which I skipped) before her description changed to boarding house keeper in 1913-14.

**DROMANA CEMETERY.
These are the only Hazeldine details recorded from headstones.
HAZELDENE Barbara M 11/10/1941 9/08/1993 Hus Edwin
HAZLEDINE Robert Roy 18/08/1948 18/07/1993
HAZLEDINE Ronald Roy 6/05/1921 25/03/2000
HAZLEDINE Doris Lillian 2/03/1918 11/08/2002
It could be assumed that Mary Margaret was also buried at Dromana. Their headstone was probably destroyed by the terrible 1939 bushfire.

History - Rosebud Primary School
www.rosebudps.vic.edu.au/index.php?option=com_content...1...
The Education Department announced in November 1886 that a school house with a teacher's residence attached would be built on the recently acquired land. The plan of this building was the standard design being built throughout Victoria in this era. It consisted of a 24 foot by 16 foot school room with iron gable roof and a small gabled front porch. A four-roomed teacher's residence was attached running at right angles to the school room. A skillion verandah ran the length of the dwelling. The whole building was clad in weatherboards.On April 7th, 1887 the school furniture was moved from the leased building and placed in the new schoolhouse. Presumably the Head Teacher, Mr Joseph Hazeldine, moved into the residence. He had four school-age children of his own enrolled at the school.
About this time, wandering cattle were a problem because they liked to sleep the night in the shelter of the school building. The school site was bare of vegetation and Mr Hazeldine promised to plant shelter trees if the Department would fence the property to keep out the cattle. In 1888 a split post fence with three rails was built around the school site. It had a large and small gate facing the Main Road and cost £26, half of which was paid with local funds.
A large rotting stump of a cypress tree just inside the front fence is all that remains of Mr Hazeldine's "shelter" trees.

ABOUT THE HAZELDINES.
Comment from Jenny Skelton.
Dad told me about a man called 'Ticky' Hazeldine when I showed him my form 2 photo from High school, he went on to say that 'Ticky' had heart problems, (thus the) nickname. He worked for my uncle Jack Wilson Butchers.
N.B. Melbourne Brindle's map of Dromana shows that Ewart called one of his friends "Chap Hazie". This was probably one of Ticky's brothers.

We've seen one of Joseph's interests, which probably provided much eggscitement. He should have sought counsel before taking on this old adversary, but there again counsel WAS his adversary.
A chess match between two old antagonists, Mr Frank Counsel and Mr J.W. Hazeldine, which had been pending for some time was played last week. The conditions were the best 4 games out of 7. Mr Counsel proved too good
for his opponent, winning the first 4 out of 6. Mr T. Bryan acted satisfactorily as umpire. (P.2, Mornington Standard, 5-5-1898.)

JOSEPH'S FRIENDS.
One would assume that his pall bearers were among his closest friends,i.e.
Cr Wilson, Messrs. A. W. Farrell, L.Carrigg, J. Matthews, A. Cooper, B.Wilson, J. Moraes, and G. Brown. Cr Wilson would have been Henry Burdett Coutts Wilson whose son almost drowned at Dromana circa 1906 while he and Mr Townsend (who saved the boy using mouth to mouth half a century before it was invented) were building the slaughteryard shown on Melbourne Brindle's map. Henry took charge of the Sorrento butchering operation after acting as a footy umpire (as Joseph also did.) B.Wilson would have been Ben. A.W.Farrell served as Shire Secretary of the F & K and Mornington Shires; he is in the photo (displayed in the Dromana Museum) taken in 1928 when the Old Shire Office was first used. Lou Carrigg owned the Dromana Hotel from about 1914 and remodelled it in 1927; he was a stalwart of the Dromana Football Club and Joseph served as the club's delegate. James Matthews was an early builder who married a descendant of Sarah Wilson as detailed in Petronella Wilson's GIVING DESTINY A HAND, and was badly injured. A. Cooper, whether the surname was spelt Cooper or Couper, was probably a Rosebud pioneer. (Ramsay and Nora Couper were early owners of The Thicket.) John Lima Moraes may have been another Cape Verde Islander; In 1910 he was farming on 10.5 acres on 31A Wannaeue (southern portion of Rosebud Public Golf Course) and in 1919 he was also farming another 53 acres nearby, possibly William Hobley's grant, now occupied by Firway Grove and Burunda Rd. G.Brown was possibly a son of Charles Brown who was running the Arthurs Seat hotel when it burnt down in early 1898.

THE TWO HAZELDINE HOUSES IN DROMANA.
When Joseph retired from teaching and moved to Dromana, possibly in early 1897,he leased crown allotments 1 and 3 of section 2, Township of Dromana from J.F.Hughes of Castlemaine. Crown allotment 3 had a 20 metre frontage to both Foote St and McArthur St starting 40 metres from the Esplanade and was granted to Alexander Haldan on 16-11-1859. Crown allotment 1 on the western corner of the Esplanade and Foote St was purchased from the crown by R.Walker and W.D.Scurfield on 10-5-1858 but had probably been sold at a tidy profit to Haldan soon afterwards because Alex. was running the township's post office by the end of 1858. Scurfield's hotel was erected at the same time on the east side of Foote St and being run by Richard Watkin (who later established the Dromana Hotel in 1862)by the end of 1858, in conjunction with selling Arthurs Seat timber.

In the mid 1880's, there was a petition organised by George McLear to extend the township's eastern boundary from McCulloch St toward the pier but such a formality wasn't needed when Walter Gibson took over the position of post master and constructed a granite post office fronting the Esplanade not far west from Pier St and Rudduck's Jetty Store. The Haldans ran a guest house called Dromana Villa in the old post office. The building was later owned by George Dawes, who used to buy gold, but he had a serious accident and sold it to Hughes.

So it was Dromana's original post office, probably enlarged to become a guest house, which the Hazledines occupied from 1897 until 1902 when Joseph's name was written under occupant but then crossed out. Melbourne Brindle noted that pre-1918 the house was called Carnavon and occupied by Ricketts, later Hughes.The house survived until the 1950's when it was replaced by a granite house called Carnarvon. The Flemmings found many ink wells in the garden; there weren't biros 1858-1886! A modern building now stands on the west corner of Foote St where the Hazledines first lived in Dromana but the second Carnarvon was not demolished, instead being extended with a granite wall still visible under the carport.

In 1903, Mrs J.W.Hazledine was assessed on 5 lots and building, Dromana. The 1907 rates describe Mary Margaret Hazledine as a teacher who was assessed on 3 lots Foote St, while Joseph, who'd apparently sold 8 acres to Nelson Rudduck, was leasing, or had maybe bought, 11 acres (McRae, sic Estate) from law firm, Stribble. Some of McCrea's land was the site of their second house, "Corio", H.B.Simon's old house.

MARY MARGARET HAZELDINE'S BOARDING HOUSE.
It is mentioned above that in 1906-7 Joseph William Hazeldine was assessed on 11 township lots, a note indicating that this was the McRae Estate.Early in my research, I thought Dr McCrae might have been Dr Farquhar McCrae, the brother of Andrew McCrae of the Arthurs Seat Run. I now know that it was this fellow.

Biography - William McCrea - Australian Dictionary of ...
adb.anu.edu.au/biography/mccrea-william-4072
William McCrea (1814-1899), medical administrator and naval surgeon, was born on 14 October 1814 in County Tyrone, Ireland. His father died before William.
I will not detail the location of all of his grants in Dromana Township, just the ones in connection with the boarding house.
1913-14.
Mary Margaret Hazeldine, boarding housekeeper, 1.5 acres and building,crown allotments 7,8,10 section 1.
Section 1 was bounded by the beach road, Permien St,Clarendon St and Foote St. Many blocks near the Beach Road were granted to William Dixon Scurfield whose hotel was being run by Richard Watkin by 1858. Crown allotment 7, 8 and 10 were granted to Dr William McCrea in August 1856.
C/A10 had frontages of 50 metres to the north side of Clarendon St and 40 metres to the east side of Foote St. Lots 8 and 7, each having a frontage of 20 metre to both Foote and Permien Sts were north west of lot 10 (and 9 on the Clarendon/ Permien corner.) Lot 10 is now the site of Our Lady of Perpetual Help Catholic Church, the new Catholic Church for which the Hazeldine home was demolished, that is, the former home of Henry Bernard Simon mentioned at the start of this post. As seen above in an advertisement, the boarding house was called "Corio".

Melbourne Brindle's map calls this "Chap" Hazeldine's house. In the middle of lots 8 and 7 is a cross linked by an arrow to the following text: SCENE OF THE CHAFF CUTTING CONTEST OF THE CENTURY. OLD "DAD" (NOT TOO BRIGHT) WAS THE VICTIM - CHAP HAZEY WAS THE MASTER-MIND!

HAZELDINE. — On the 13th November, at her residence,"'Corio," Dromana, Mary M., the dearly beloved wife of Joseph W. Hazledine, and loving mother of Mrs. Hurrey (New Zealand), Joe, Mrs. Fleming, Bert,Norman, Reg, Queenie, Lewis, Mary and Jack: aged 58 years. R.I. P.
Immaculate heart of Mary,
Your prayers for her extol.
Oh, Sacred Heart of Jesus,
Have mercy on her soul.
(P.5,Tribune, Melbourne, 23-11-1916.)

JULIE ANTHONY (DON'T CALL HER BETTY), FAMOUS AUSTRALIAN SINGER, AND HISTORICAL FICTION.

My subconscious tries to help me by producing historical fiction in the form of dreams which are so believable because I am actually reading text during the dream and that text makes perfect sense because it agrees with what is stored in my memory. These local history dreams are a by-product of being a TROVE junkie. Not one of these dreams has proved to be true but strangely they always lead to a discovery that would never have been made without the dream. That is why I still get on the computer as soon as I wake up in the hope that the dream might be true,because it was such a great story; I know that even if it wasn't true,there'll be a consolation prize.

Last night's dream was that Julie Anthony had found the story of William John Ferrier,whom she called Australia's greatest hero,so fascinating that she planned to turn it into an historic novel. That made perfect sense. Julie Anthony had spent holidays at Rosebud where Ferrier had lived for about a decade after becoming a hero and the former soldier who took her, and the object of her affection, on fishing trips might have regaled them with the story of the 1905 hero while they waited for a bite. That much could be true,although there's no proof of the story being told to them by George Jarry. There is absolutely no proof that Julie Anthony wrote a book about Ferrier!

At least I can prove that Julie Anthony was a famous Australian singer.

Julie Anthony (singer)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Julie Anthony
Birth name Julie Moncrief Lush
Born 24 August 1949 (age 64)
Lameroo, South Australia
Genres Jazz
Occupations Singer, entertainer
Instruments Vocals
Years active 1960s2000s
Associated acts The Seekers
Julie Moncrief Lush AM OBE (born 24 August 1949 in Lameroo, South Australia), better known as Julie Anthony, is an Australian soprano and entertainer. She sang the Australian National Anthem at the Opening Ceremony of the 2000 Sydney Olympics with Human Nature.

She has also sung with The Seekers, first taking the place of Judith Durham as the lead vocalist in the song "The Carnival Is Over" for the Closing Ceremony of Expo '88. Later, Anthony became a member of the group with Bruce Woodley, Athol Guy and Keith Potger.

Anthony starred in both the Australian and West End productions of Irene in the mid-1970s.

At midnight between 31 December 1987 and 1 January 1988, in celebration of the start of Australia's Bicentennial year, Anthony sang the Australian National Anthem "Advance Australia Fair" on the national broadcaster, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, which continued to show the recording of her performance at the close of broadcasting for many years afterwards, until the broadcaster introduced 24 hour broadcasting.

Anthony is among the most awarded of Australian entertainers. She was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) (1980)[1] and a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) (1989)[2] and has been voted by her peers as "Entertainer of the Year" three times and "Best Female vocalist" 11 times. She also appeared in commercials for St.George Bank from 1974 until 1999.

Artist Biography
b. Julie Moncrieff Anthony, 23 August 1951, Galga, South Australia. Anthony was born in Galga (population 15) and raised on the family farm. In her teens she began singing with a local band and in 1970 won an amateur television talent quest. Her victory and the first prize ($600 and a trip to Tasmania) led to regular appearances on the Adelaide Tonight Show. She moved to Sydney, making television appearances and performing on the club and cabaret circuit, and eventually embarking on international tours. An engagement at the Hong Kong Hilton in 1973 was followed by the lead role in the Australian production of Irene. Three years later she starred in the UK version at the Adelphi Theatre. The Play and Players of London honoured her with the Best Newcomer (Actress) award for 1976. She returned to Australian television and appeared in three national specials, and in the same year she married her manager Eddie Natt. In 1977 she won the Sammy and Penquin awards for Best Television Variety Performer. Tours of America followed and Anthony worked with Bill Cosby, Roy Clarke and Merv Griffin. In 1980 she was awarded an OBE for services to the entertainment industry. Three years later she accepted the role of Maria in The Sound Of Music; following a season in Sydney, the show successfully toured major and regional centres.

For the 1988 World Expo held in Brisbane, Anthony was invited to sing with the re-formed Seekers, joining the group as lead singer from 1988-89. In 1988 she sang the national anthem at the official opening of Australias new Parliament House. The same year she returned to the stage in I Do!, I Do! In 1990, she was awarded AM in the Order of Australia for services to the entertainment industry. In 1994, Anthony further demonstrated her versatility by teaming with jazz musician Don Burrows (reeds/flute) for tours, including a successful appearance at the Jazz and Blues Festival at the Gold Coast International Hotel in 1995. A year later she returned to cabaret with a season at the Tilbury Hotel in Sydney. In her extensive repertoire she demonstrated great conviction, whether singing Amazing Grace or material ranging from Stephen Sondheim to the Beatles. In June 1996 she accepted a cameo role as a band singer in the Bruce Beresford film Paradise Road, starring Glenn Close and Jean Simmons. Julie Anthony is one of the best and most durable theatre and variety performers in the post-war Australian entertainment industry. She has won the prestigious Mo Award for Entertainer Of The Year three times, and Best Female Variety Performer nine times. An admirable singer and engaging personality, she has successfully blended her career and family duties.

DID YOU SPOT THE DIFFERENCE?
Galga is a tiny farming settlement (that might or might not have a pub)which is 145.1 km from Lameroo,just under three hours away by car. Lameroo is obviously the regional centre so the birth may have been at its hospital or the birth may have been registered there. So the place of birth is not a problem. But the date of birth certainly is!


How did I know about George Jarry and the fishing trips at Rosebud? That was certainly not in any Julie Anthony biography.


EXTRACT FROM MY JOURNAL "ROSEBUD ROLL OF HONOUR,1914-1918."
It cost George (Jarry)ten bob a year to join the RSL at The Old Green Mill in Melbourne. He then took a soldier settlement farm at Willaura for 3 or 4 years before selling up and coming to Melbourne where he purchased an international truck and carted bricks for approximately 15 years. Moving to Rosebud in 1939 George spent the years of the Second World War cutting and carting wood for those in need and essential services. Later buying a 24 foot fishing boat the Georgie (named by a friend after the manageress of the local hotel at the time) George carried passengers on fishing trips up until his retirement in 1963 and it was during this time that he met Ed Natt who was to become the husband of Julie Anthony and when Julie was honoured on This Is Your Life in July 1978 George appeared as a guest.

This website has a photo of Julie with George on his 90th birthday.
(Peter (George Henry) Jarry 605
www.tunnellers.net/profiles___photos/jarry_peter_605.doc
For reasons unknown, when George Henry Jarry enlisted in the A.I.F. he used his ..... In 1939 he moved the family to Rosebud to a small holiday house he had built ... One of his fishing companions was Eddie Natt who married Julie Anthony.)

Historical fiction is supposed to be based on fact. Only one of the birth dates can be correct! So if anyone wanted to make a movie (historical fiction)about Julie, the correct birth date would be needed.

THE CORRECT BIRTH DATE FOR JULIE ANTHONY. THEY CALLED HER BETTY!
BIRTHS
LUSH. On August 24, at Lameroo Hospital, to Betty and Les a daughter (Betty Moncrieff). Thanks to Dr.Cock and hospital staff. (Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954) Thursday 1 September 1949 p 44 Family Notices.)

KEILOR COUNCIL HISTORY (VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.)

THE CITY OF KEILOR RATES FEW MENTIONS IN A GOOGLE SEARCH. IT WILL NOW.

"In July 1975, when Keilor Council was sacked, and an administrator appointed,it was the first council to get the axe in the 133 years of local government in Victoria. (COUNCIL SACKINGS MAY GAIN FAVOUR, P.9, The Age,23-3-1981.)

Keilor was first incorporated as a road district on 3 March 1863. It became a shire on 22 December 1871, and was proclaimed a city on 29 April 1961.[2] Its boundaries were relatively stable throughout its existence.
On 15 December 1994, the City of Keilor was abolished, and its area divided by the Maribyrnong River and the Albion-Jacana freight railway line; its eastern section was merged with the City of Essendon, to form the newly created City of Moonee Valley, while its western section was merged with parts of the City of Sunshine, including St Albans, to form the newly created City of Brimbank. Melbourne Airport and a small section of Tullamarine, north of Sharps Road, were transferred to the City of Hume.[3]

Wards
The City of Keilor was divided into three wards, each electing three councillors:
Doutta Galla-Tullamarine Ward
Maribyrnong Ward
Niddrie Ward

Suburbs

Airport West
Avondale Heights
Calder Park*
Essendon West
Kealba
Keilor
Keilor Downs
Keilor East
Keilor North
Keilor Park
Kings Park
Melbourne Airport (shared with the Shire of Bulla)
Niddrie
St Albans (shared with the City of Sunshine)
Sydenham
Taylors Lakes
Tullamarine
* Suburb gazetted since the amalgamation. (Wikipedia.)

The Keilor district celebrated three milestones and souvenirs were published for each, relying on anecdotes from old residents in 1950, but if my memory is correct,most of the 1961 and 1963 content was compiled by Garnet Price,the City Engineer, who obviously had a love for the area's history. Garnet had moved to Sunshine,I think, before the sacking, with Bill Carlyle now the City Engineer.

The celebrations were:
1950-Centenary of the proclamation of the Village of Keilor;
1961-Proclamation of the City of Keilor;
1863-Centenary of the municipality's beginnings as a Road Board.

I will start with the years before the sacking because I know that I will find plenty of information up to the 1950's on trove. You will find the following nowhere else.

The city's accountant was Charlie Nicholls, who with Cr Leo Dineen had been on the V.F.L. umpiring list and was one of the first council officers to whom Leo introduced me upon my election in 1974. His son, Matthew, is now a senior A.F.L. umpire and officiated in the 2013 grand final.

The Tullamarine Progress Association had good support from Keilor councillors,Leo Dineen attending almost every meeting and Cliff Harvie many times but not as regularly because he was a stalwart of the Tullamarine Youth Club held in the same esteem as Ken Boots,Dave Axon, Trev. and Val Mason etc., in the mind of those who knew. A year or two before the sacking, the members of the municipal employees' union involved in collecting garbage went on strike.

Residents forced out of tip [coming soon]
The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995) Monday 12 November 1973 p 3 Article
... hundreds of residents out of the Keilor tip yester day after locked gates were cut open by two councillors. The two councillors used bolt cutters to allow about 250 residents to dump rubbish on the tip. The striking men, mem bers of the Municipal Employees Union, made some people carry their rubbish ... 136 words

Bins were full to overflowing and full of maggots, surrounded by garbage bags torn open by dogs and also full of maggots. I rang the M.E.U. secretary,a Mr Cole,I think,and gained his permission to collect Tullamarine's rubbish and take it to the tip. With the support of Carol Wright and many other volunteers, and Dave Calder's truck,this was done. There was a situation when we arrived at the tip, but it was soon resolved and the stinky mess was dumped. Judging by the above article,other areas did not have the same luck. I would not know which councillors cut the chains. I hadn't read the article of course,not having the Canberra Times home-delivered!
(It would not surprise me if one of them was blind!)

My memory is slipping because I can only remember eleven of the councillors at the time of the sacking,it might have been JIM Allen. The Tullamarine ward was represented by Leo Dineen,Leo Tadgell and Ray Gibb, Doutta Galla Ward by Neil Heinze, Neville Free and Peter Horman, Niddrie Ward by Nancy and Peter Kirschner and Dom. Cavallo,the Mayor,and Maribyrnong by George Seitz,Eric Allen and ?. (That was the missing one, not Jim Allen, a former councillor after whom was named a reserve that still exists because I was not a wheeler-dealer despite Eric Allen's efforts to make me one. Politics!

J.H.ALLEN RESERVE.
TO BE CONTINUED when I finish farms near Tulla and William Smith.(KEILOR PARK REP., UNUSUAL SPLIT, KELLY V PRICE)

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