itellya on Family Tree Circles

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This is a reminder to myself to get cracking. I wrote an email to the Queenscliffe Maritime Museum when I was writing the journal about William John Ferrier,Australia wide hero in 1905 and as a result,Lew has been trying to get a letter to me.Phillip Hutchins rang me today and gave me the phone numbers of Lew and of Pat Hutchins,both of whom will have a treasure trove of memories which must be recorded.

Well, I've made a start. Just rang Lew. He is nearly 90 and why do you think he got up at 3 a.m. this morning? No,not his bladder,he was off to fish outside the Heads,just as he has done every day for 70 years. He no longer lives at "Rosebud" in Beach St,Queenscliff as he did for 70 years but is just over the road and the nice lady, hailing from Portsea, who bought "Rosebud" often brings him some soup etc. and tells him,"Lew,don't forget,this is always your home."

William John Ferrier moved to Queenscliff in 1917,before Lew was born and Lew was never taken back to see the second house west of the Murray Anderson Rd car park near the beach. But he did tell me about travelling in the Weeroona to Dromana as a nine year old and his mother pointing to a big tree in the Dromana cemetery near which three Ferrier girls had been buried. Unfortunately the Dromana cemetery records were apparently destroyed in a fire and no death notices concerning these girls have been found on trove.

Just before William Ferrier moved from Rosebud to Queenscliff he helped to save another life,that of Ernie Rudduck of Dromana. Another involved in the rescue was Mitch Lacco who moved to Queenscliff at the same time as the Ferriers. Old Mrs Lacco used to babysit the Ferrier kids who called her Grandma Lacco although she was not related.

Observing Mr Rudduck's plight from the pier, Ewart Brindle, a lad of about 12, rode to Rosebud on a bicycle to seek assistance. A few minute after his arrival William Ferrier and Mitchell Lacco, well-known fishermen, John McLear, grocer, and Brindle were facing the gale in a fishing boat, and being drenched to the skin as the waves dashed over the vessel.

When Lew told me the limited times during which I could ring him because of his very busy lifestyle,I said that he was a bit of a Percy Cerutty and ,of course Lew had seen Percy running footballers up the Portsea sand dunes.
I await the arrival of Lew's letter with great anticipation!

Where did the Hutchins family first settle in Victoria? Phil Hutchins mentioned members of the family being at Sorrento,Mornington and Williamstown. The link is seen in this obituary.

Mr. R. S. Hutchins
The death took place suddenly on Tuesday morning of Mr. Richard Samuel Hutchins at his brother's residence, 40 North Road,Newport. Deceased was born at Mornington 59 years ago and leaves one daughter and two sons
to mourn their loss, his wife having predeceased him. The funeral took place on Thursday afternoon, leaving his residence for interment in the Sorrento cemetery. (P.8, Williamstown Chronicle,16-5-1947.)

The Hutchins family was involved at Mornington by early 1860 when George Hutchins bought two town lots.
(P.5,Argus, 18-2-1860,CROWN LAND SALE.) George also bought his three blocks at Osborne in 1860.

IN the SUPREME COURT of the COLONY of VICTORIA: In Its Probate Jurisdiction.-In the Estate of GEORGE HUTCHINS, late of Osborne, in the County of Mornington, in the Colony of Victoria, Fisherman, Deceased, Intestate.-Notice is hereby given, that after the expiration of fourteen days from the publication hereof application will be made to the Supreme Court of the colony of Victoria, in its Probate Jurisdiction, that LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION of the estate of the abovenamed George Hutchins, deceased, be granted to Harriett Hutchins,of Mornington, in the said colony, the widow of the said deceased.
Dated this 25th day of April, A.D. 1878. (P.3, Argus, 26-4-1878.)

NOTICE is hereby given, that after the expiration of fourteen days from the publication hereof application will
be made to the Supreme Court of the State of Victoria, in its Probate jurisdiction, that PROBATE of the WILL
(dated the thirtieth dav of July, 1940) of ELIZABETH HUTCHINS, late of Empire street, Mornington, in the said
State, widow, deceased, may be granted to Howard Seymour Hutchins, of 26 Bundeera road. Caulfield, in the said
State, salesman, and Donald Richard Hutchins, of Mornington, in the said State, fisherman, sons of the said testatrix, the executors appointed by the said will. (P.9,Argus, 10-9-1948.)

NOTICE is hereby given, that after the expiration of fourteen days from the publication hereof application will
be made to the Supreme Court of the State of Victoria, in its Probate Jurisdiction that LETTERS of ADMINIS-
TRATION of the estate of ROBERT HUTCHINS, late of Mornington, in the State of Victoria, retired fisherman,
deceased, intestate, left unadministered by Elizabeth Hutchins, of Empire street, Mornington, widow, deceased, the administrator of the said estate, may be granted to Howard Seymour Hutchins, of Bundeera road Caulfield, in the State of Victoria, salesman, the eldest son of the said deceased. (P.9,Argus,21-6-1948.)

Unfortunately the two blocks purchased by George Hutchins in the town of Mornington cannot be identified because no crown allotment and section numbers were given and no map is available online,but as Empire St was the inland boundary of the town,one of the blocks may have been on the seaward side of this street. (See my Vale, Mornington journal re the boundaries of the town.)However the land granted to George in the township of Osborne can be identified.

Lot 37. 4a. lr. 32p., £9 15s. per acre, George Hutchins.
Lot 38. 4a. lr. 32p,, £0 10s. per acre, George Hutchins.
Lot 39. 4a, lr, 32p., £5 per acre, George Hutchins.

The map showing suburban lands at Osborne is :
Suburban lands at the Township of Osborne, in the Parish of ...‎

It shows that George Hutchins was granted crown allotments 42 and 43, both of 4 acres 1 rood 32 perches,and crown allotment 38 of 5 acres 0 roods and 21 perches

The south west corner of crown allotment 42 was 19.9 chains (398 metres) from the foreshore and 10.8 chains (216 m) south of Balcombe Creek. I had manipulated the zoom on the Osborne map so that 1 centimetre represented 1 chain and the Melway scale is 1mm to 1 chain. The south west corner of c/a 42 is 60 metres east of the corner of Watson Rd and Wattle Avenue (halfway to Henley Avenue.) Crown allotment 42 and 43 to the east,each had southern boundaries of 6 chains and the south east corner of 43 is exactly the same as that of the John F,Ferrero Reserve. These two blocks had a depth of 742 links (about 148 metres) with a farther fairly clear 80 to 30 metres on the south bank of Balcombe Creek.

Crown allotment 38, whose area was not as stated in the sale report,probably because crown allotment 38 was confused with lot 38, was 15.2 chains (304 metres)east of Maude St and on the north side of Augusta St which met the creek about halfway across George's southern boundary. There seems to have been a ti tree swamp on the road reserve and the south west corner of c/a 38 but owners of allotments further east had about 20 metres between it and the creek to get past this obstacle. Crown allotment 38 is between the Matthew St houses and Citation Reserve as calculated from the distance from Maude St and a frontage of 5.5 chains (110 metres.)

These three blocks were ideal being right on the creek but with clear land where George could pull his boat out of the creek if necessary and spread his nets out to dry. In stormy weather a safe anchorage was provided in the creek,the same as at Mordialloc where many fishermen were noted by the Inspector of fisheries in the 1870's.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 19 February 1875 p 6 Article

This website gives details of George Hutchins, and by clicking on the link*, his parents and his siblings.
Living - Freepages -‎

George Hutchins [Parents*] was born about 1832 in Devon, UK. He died on 10 Apr 1878 in Victoria, Australia. He was buried in Mornington Cemetery, Victoria, Australia. He married Harriet Coxon.

George Smale Hutchins was born about 1800 in Hallurley, Devon. He died in Feb 1871 in Devon, England. He married Jane Sanders on 14 Dec 1830 in Devon, UK.

Jane Sanders [Parents] was born in 1806 in Shaldon, St Nicholas, Devon. She died on 26 Jul 1886 in Newton Abbot, Devon, UK. She married George Smale Hutchins on 14 Dec 1830 in Devon, UK.

They had the following children:

M i John Hutchins died on 19 Apr 1903 in Queensland, Australia.
M ii George Hutchins (details as above.)
M iii William Hutchins was born in 1833 in Teignmouth, Devon, UK. [Notes]
M iv Thomas Hutchins (married in Queensland in 1864.)
M v Samuel Hutchins was born in 1838 in Shropshire, UK. He died in 1917 in Queensland, Australia.
M vi Richard Hutchins was born in 1840 in Shropshire, UK.
F vii Jane Hutchins was born in 1843 in Shrewsbury, Shopshire, UK. [Notes]
F viii Charlotte Hutchins was born about 1847 in Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, UK.
F ix Mary Hutchins was born about 1848 in Stourbridge, Worcestershire, UK.
M x Howard Reynold Hutchins was born about 1850. He died on 26 Jul 1875 in Townsville, Queensland, Australia. [Notes]

Pioneer Graves in the Mornington Cemetery‎

Val Wilson has produced this excellent website. Once you have the home page, click on search and type Hutchins. The third result shows George's landholdings on a map (far more extensive than his grants detailed earlier), states that his first purchase at Osborne was made in 1856 and indicates that he combined market gardening with fishing.

I've found George Hutchins' grants in the township of Osborne because of the map on Val's cemetery website. They were crown allotments 1-4 and 8 of section 1 and crown allotment 12 of section 2.

To get the map online, google TOWNSHIP OF OSBORNE, MOOROODUC.

Pat's eldest son Paul has done considerable work on the Hutchins story including a trip to the church in England where George's siblings, who didn't come to Australia, were buried. Pat knows the spot where George's homestead at Osborne was. Charles Hollinshed stated on P. 42 of LIME LAND LEISURE that the Hutchins family arrived at Sorrento in the 1880's and Pat thinks that is pretty accurate.

Pat's father was Robert William Hutchins,his grandfather was William Hutchins and his great grandfather was George Hutchins. George Hutchins, the early pioneer at Osborne and Mornington was his great great grandfather.
GGF George moved to Williamstown and fished from near its jetty. In Spring and Summer GGF George and his brother,Richard, transferred their fishing operation to the head of the Cameron Bight jetty where a 99 year lease was obtained. Eventually they settled there permanently.

The desire expressed in the email below was also the subject of a request in an email that I sent to the Warrnambool Historical Society. Janet McDonald kindly sent me a large envelope packed with information outlining the tribute paid to the hero of the La Bella tragedy in 1905. This I offer to the Nepean Historical Society,the Dromana Historical Society and the Queenscliffe Maritime Museum. (I'll try to remember to include some excerpts later in the journal such as Western Australia's Memorable Tribute to a Victorian Hero and THE HERO OF THE DINGY, A TALK WITH FERRIER, "NOTHING TO MAKE A FUSS ABOUT.") The latter article's inference that William Ferrier was a very modest man is confirmed in Lew's letter.

Email from me to Queenscliffe Maritime Museum 20-8-2011.
I am trying to have the heritage status of a house in the Rosebud Fishing Village upgraded because of William Ferrier's involvement in the maritime history of Warrnambool, Rosebud and Queenscliff. I would welcome any new information that shows his significance so the house can be elevated in status to "of Statewide significance". If "Rosebud" in Beach St,Queenscliff and the original Ferrier home in Warrnambool are still standing, my attachment might provide a similar service for you.

Undated sheet in the envelope.
Recently an email has come to light from you addressed to the maritime museum. This is now in the hands of Lewis Douglas Ferrier,the last remaining son of William John Ferrier (a historian in his own right.) My name is Ken McNeill and I am a long time friend of Lew. He has quite a lot of information that he could let you have if you will let me know your address. Lew does not have a computer so has asked me to contact you.

As I stated at the start of the journal, Phillip Hutchins contacted me to get the ball rolling and told me yesterday that he was posting the letter; it was in my letter box today.

Lewis Douglas Ferrier born 1-12-1924.
Mr. xxx xxxx.
Dear Friend,
Thank you so much for your correspondence re the home off Jetty rd Rosebud 1905-1916.. Very briefly I will write why I have taken so long to reply.
I am single and on 1st Dec.,I pray I will be 88.I am still fishing,76 years in Tas., Vic., N.S.W.and S.A. waters. I am well. I awoke July last year with great pain in my left eye. I went to hospital for removal of a tumour. Many trips were required and last Wed., I got a clearance.What a great relief to be so grateful to be alive and still be independent to look after myself. Summer months and autumn were quite rough and spring is not as yet very promising,but my 24 foot coutta boat and gear is all ready to go when finer weather will allow me to get up 3 outside the Rip 4 to 5 miles off and home by 11 a.m. safe and sound.I fish single handed. (itellya-That means on his own rather than with one arm as in the case of Thomas Hutchins!)

Now to details. Dad's home is in great condition in Stanley St,Warrnambool,not far from Ferrier St. My present home (at that time still living at "Rosebud")is excellent,built 1916,25 pounds for four unlined rooms. Twelve months later a builder from Geelong lined the four rooms with Baltic Pine from California, U.S. I am the last of Mum and Dad's family,ten sons and seven daughters. Three daughters were buried in Dromana Cemetery under abig pine tree. Mum took four sons and one daughter to see the spot when I was aged 8 in 1832. We went over on the Weeroona and bus from Sorrento to Rosebud. I thank God my memory is great. I do a lot of public speaking.

Dad died 1937. Little did he speak about the past. He was very modest. After a few years Mum used to speak to me. I was the last to leave home,not married. Mum died in my arms aged 76 in 1956. When we used to sit on the front verandah (itellya-at "Rosebud" not Rosebud) and look at the houses opposite, at the back of the back fences,the waves were only 20 odd feet away and mum would say that in some respects wherever she had lived the sea had always been so near.In fact I was born 20 paces from the sea on the front beach near the pier. (At Queenscliff.)

Mum so often spoke of number seven in the house where Dad and family lived. (Is this referring to a lucky number???????? RING LEW. ) He often brought home odd timber etc,large 10 ft long 2 inches of oregon which were used as hatch covers on the small craft or large sailing ships. Dad used to build ship shape rooms as family increased.

I have record of the Ferrier family from 1500 when the family (who are still to be found in east coast of Scotland,"Arbroath". Nephews and nieces have made trips and visited graves and saw"Ferriers ship chandlery shop" built of white sandstone (painted) on the corner of the harbour of Arbroath.

Dad painted *ships, fishing fleet,and Pt Lonsdale pier and lighthouse on the front bedroom wall,still there today,painted 1933 in our home,20 Beach St,Queenscliffe 3225.

(*That was not the only place that William John Ferrier's maritime paintings appeared.Google:
William Ferrier Ship Paintings - Queenscliffe Maritime Museum‎
Apr 23, 2010 - Two William Ferrier paintings from the walls of the South Channel Pile ... of the South Channel Pile Light by lighthouse keeper William Ferrier.)

In 1905,the Victorian government was almost broke as a result of the 1890's depression. Patricia Appleford's RYE PRIMARY SCHOOL 1667 gives one example of its cost-cutting measures. The teacher at the Rye school was asked to record how far each of its pupils would have to travel to attend the Rosebud school instead. The teacher at Rye was worried about losing his job so he didn't exactly lie but pretended that the Albress children would travel via Browns Rd and Jetty Rd so the distance would be almost doubled.

In such dire financial times, William's appointment to the lighthouse service can only be seen as a tribute to his heroism. Surely this is a case for the three Ferrier houses to receive the heritage classification "of State significance".

Without being able to change font size and style,it is hard to show exactly what the memorial from Western Australia's parliament,prominent citizens etc.looks like. I could scan it but with only one image per journal,I'm toying with the idea of a photo montage of the three houses occupied by William John Ferrier and perhaps something from the Hutchins family. Here's the memorial as it was presented in a newspaper. The verse is in a box.

Address-Letter presented for saving life,through His Excellency the Governor of Western Australia by the Life-Saving Society,to MR. WILLIAM JOHN FERRIER of Warrnambool,Victoria,through His Excellency the Governor of Victoria and the Mayor of Warrnambool.

l "And how shall fare our Heroes rare?
l When Heaven's Recording Angel writes his shining, sacred scrolls,
l He gives their glorious guerdon due to Earth's heroic souls:
l And deathless deeds of those that yield their lives the doomed to save,
l Shall stand in song and story long,o'er land and world-wide wave!
l So each good deed shall have good meed"

HEROIC COMPATRIOT,- Your brother and sister AUSTRALIANS resident in this Western part of our Commonwealth have learnt with feelings of the warmest admiration of the rare heroism, humanity,endurance and skill displayed by you on the memorable occasion of the wreck of the ill-fated "La Bella" at Warrnambool, on November 10,1905.

WITH every knowledge of the awful danger which you were incurring,and without any other promptings than those of your own noble nature, you repeatedly and voluntarily exposed yourself to what seemed almost certain death in order to save the lives of wrecked fellow creatures in their direst peril who were utter strangers to you.

UNAPPALLED by the fact that the terrible fury of the storm, and danger of the situation had prevented, and
was still preventing, even the specially-equipped and fully manned life-boat from rendering aid to the doomed few left on the wreck,you undauntedly went out several times alone, and with only one oar, to the rescue in your own small and comparatively frail dingey.

WONDERFUL to record, and to your eternal renown, you not only succeeded in thus saving several lives; but whilst engaged in steering your very small boat shorewards, by one oar in a fierce gale and mountainous sea, you displayed still further bravery and the tenderest humanity, by stripping clothing from your own body, and covering one of the rescued, who seemed dying from cold.

THE PRESS and the Public throughout Australasia have vied in their praise of your splendid acts.
WESTERN AUSTRALIA thus adds its heartfelt tribute.

YOU furnish another striking evidence that there are working among us, heroes- men,women , and children-who can win the truest glory by risking their own to save life at the Wreck, the Mine,the Explorer's Track,the Burning Building, aye,in Hospitals, and at our very Hearths and Homes.

IN many a castle and hall there hang swords and similar trophies presented in recognition of valorous acts performed amidst battle-smoke "for King and Country" and extolled in despatch and martial record.

YOUR intrepid rescue,accomplished in times of peace, and in order to save life, istypicalof our highest national characteristics,and by it you have not only restored to their friends those trembling on the verge of eternity,but you have done signal service to the honour of your country.

NOBLE deeds such as these of yours go to keep our Empire a beacon-star for the generous emulation of Mankind, and they make us proud of living in strengthful unity as brother and sister Britons and Federated Australians under its righteous flag.

WE have very great pleasure and pride in sending to you this Address-Letter as further testimony to the admiration felt for you by the PEOPLE OF AUSTRALIA.

WHEN, in our own or distant lands, there may be dire danger by wreck or otherwise, may God again give the guidance of a FERRIER!



(Extract from THE LOSS OF THE LA BELLA IN THE WARRNAMBOOL HARBOUR, 10TH NOVEMBER 1905 compiled in 2005 by Marie Boyle a member of the Australian Institute of Genealogical Society, Warrnambool area, included in the material sent to me by Janet McDonald.)
The "young fisherman" as he is somewhat familiarly termed, William Ferrier,was yesterday induced to break through his modest reserve and engage in a conversation concerning the interesting details which eventually led up to the distinction he has won as the hero of the dingy. It was evidently not a very congenial task,for like most men conspicuous for their bravery in perilous conditions, he has an innate dislike of talking about himself. Besides this he is a man of tender feelings, and would, therefore,prefer not to dwell more than necessary on the terrible tragedy with which he was so closely associated. However,the interviewer's congratulations on the recognition of his heroism by the Governor-General and the State Governor, and the explanation that it was in no spirit of sensationalism, but a desire to stimulate in others the qualities of self-sacrifice and courage,that he was asked to give his version of what took place,finally overcoming his objections, and he replied to the questions addressed to him as follows:-

"I am a native of Warrnambool, and am 25 years of age. I have a wife and two young children. I have been connected with fishing for the last 14 years. About half past ten on Friday night, Constable Trainor called me up. I was in bed and asleep at the time, and,as luck would have it,I had my left hand tied up with a poultice on it.I think I must have poisoned it somehow. However I got up and went down to the breakwater with Trainor.

When I got there I found that the whale boat had left for the wreck. I therefore got my dingy and asked two of the hands standing by to come with me to the rescue.Their names are James Patten and John Mitchell. They at once agreed to come and off we went. When we got as far as the deep hole we could see the wreck, but could not see the whale boat. My companions suggested that the boat may have taken the crew off and gone back to the breakwater.However,we went on towards the ship and could hear the men cheering us. Then the lifeboat came into view. It had been substituted for the whale boat by this time, and the pilot told us to come aboard to take the place of his volunteer men, and we did so. They were volunteers,you understand, and we belonged to the regular crew. We pulled outside the reef and got as near to it as we possibly could.We then dropped anchor.

There was a terrible sea running, and there was no clear channel to the vessel,for any length of time,during the whole night. A few seas broke under the stern of the lifeboat, and we thought we were near enough to the reef. We were about 5 or 6 lengths off the ship then,as far as I can judge. At any rate we were near enough to speak to the men and get an answer notwithstanding the roaring of the breakers. We came in at 3 o'clock to take in two or three fresh men, and then went out again. We came in again at a quarter to five. You know the rest- how we tried the rocket apparatus without success,and how we decided to go off again.

When the rockets failed, I said to Trainor, "How would it do if I took the dingy and got a line attached to her from the lifeboat and let her drift to the wreck?" What I meant was that the men on the ship could get into the dingy one or two at a time and we would then pull them to the lifeboat with the line. Trainor replied, "Go to the pilot and ask him." So I went to the pilot and told him my proposal. He agreed. I jumped into the dingy and lashed a pair of oars in her. I had another pair free but as there was only one rowlock I had to scull her by the stern with a single oar. It was intended that the lifeboat would tow me out but whilst she was getting ready Trainor came up and told me things were desperate aboard the ship and that the men would be washed off before we got there if a minute was lost.

So I decided not to wait for the lifeboat and went off by myself. We didn't carry out the arrangement about letting the dingy drift to the wreck, because just at that time two of the crew were washed off the ship,and I thought the lot would go. I therefore thought it would be better for me to do what I could with the dingy in helping to save the men if they got washed off. I was able to get along faster than the lifeboat, and picked up the captain ahed of her. The lifeboat then took in the second man. I pushed up to the stern of the ship. I did this because I knew the lifeboat was more awkward to handle in a heavy sea than a dingy, and because I thought a dingy could do the work more quickly. I saw that the last man was just about done, and that he didn't seem able to help himself.

When I saw him in this terrible plight my first impulse was to dart up to him, jump aboard the ship and support him until the lifeboat could reach us. I meant to let the dingy go adrift,because I knew I wouldn't have time to fasten her to the wreck. As luck would have it,however,the gunwale of the dingy somehow got jammed under the stern timbers of the ship and was fixed there.

I saw that the man was tied around the waist with a stout rope with which he had been lashed on board, and that he was also getting tangled up in the line which the lifeboat had thrown to him. I don't know whether I put one foot on the stern of the ship or not. It was then close to water's edge,but I got hold of the man,cut his ropes adrift and then he fell into the boat. I then sculled out of the surf and gave the man to the lifeboat.That is all. There is not much to make a fuss about,is there? I am a bit surprised to find myself suddenly looked upon as a hero. I did nothing out of the way. Any other man in my position would have done the same.

Asked if he felt any sense of the risk he was running,Ferrier at once replied, "I didn't think about the risk. Isaw the man on the wreck,and I felt he had to be saved.I realise now there was a bit of a risk about it, because the ship was surrounded by a mass of floating timber and things,and if you pitched into the water and sank beneath that mass of woodwork you might have some trouble in getting to the surface again. Anyhow,that didn't happen so it's all right,and you needn't say much about what I did at all. Yes,I have received the telegrams sent to the Mayor by the Governor-General and the Governor of Victoria, and I need not tell you I am very proud to get them ,although,I think, they have placed far too high a value on my services,and I suppose they will become a sort of heirloom.

Ferrier was then asked what he thought of the work done by the lifeboat in view of the adverse criticism that has been passed by some of the public. "All I can say is that I think everything that could possibly be done was done. The pilot was very cool right through,and was always ready to listen to any suggestions that might be made. Then,how about John Fisher,the coxswain. He is as experienced as anyone here on the water,and knows the bay as well as anybody.He isn't the man to shirk a little risk,I can tell you. If he thinks a certain place can be reached,he is the man to get there in spite of everything. I don't think there is any justification for reflections passed on the conduct of the lifeboat. It only wanted one sea like those that were running to swamp her, and she certainly would have been swamped had she gone nearer than she did.

(The above is quoted verbatim from pages 18-20 of Marie Boyle's THE LOSS OF THE BELLA IN THE WARRNAMBOOL HARBOUR, 10TH NOVEMBER,1905, compiled in 2005, a century after the incident. I have taken the liberty of providing bite-sized paragraphs.)

In the above account,William Ferrier gave some idea of the conditions on that night. Those who have never been on a reef may not understand his use of "seas" and "water's edge". The La Bella apparently was stuck quite close to the offshore side of the reef where the energy harnessed within relatively harmless swells is transformed into explosive breakers or seas which would have enough force to smash a ship to bits (producing the mass of woodwork described above) and to sweep crewmen overboard. On a decked ship this water can run off through the scuppers but a boat like a dinghy or the lifeboat could sink quickly if enough water accumulated inside it. All of the rescuers would have been drenched and possibly been shivering with cold (as was the man to whom William Ferrier gave his coat,as mentioned in the Address-letter.)

Included in the material forwarded to me by Janet McDonald is the following description of the scenario.

Some idea of the fearful force of the breakers as they dashed against the ill-fated ship may be formed from the fact that the anchor,weighing a ton and a half,was wrenched from its fastenings and shot clear over the side of the vessel,while a massive donkey boiler was unshipped amidships and sent spinning right up to the weather side of the house near the bows,whilst the ship was lying at a steep incline. It was,therefore, carried bodily uphill,as it were, by the resistless force of the breakers.

The men were frequently stretched out horizontally under water,being swept off their legsby the rush of their current, and were only saved from going overboard by their rope lashings and clinging tenaciously to the railing.The house on deck, around which the battered group took refuge, was built of iron and firmly rivetted to its foundations, and just as the men cleared from the wreck one of the sides buckled up into a shape of a letter V.

(It is unclear whether the above came from Marie Boyle,Philip J.Gray (THE BARQUENTINE "LA BELLA",1976) or another author.)

Remember that time you got a rose thorn in your thumb and you couldn't do the simplest thing that involved the use of this thumb for a week or more without a rush of pain shooting right up your arm. Imagine if your whole arm was infected or poisoned. You'd probably feel the same intensity of pain but constantly. The arm would be completely useless. To use it for any task would be agony. One account said that Ferrier had it lashed to his mast (so it could at least stop him being swept overboard,I suppose.)

Ever tried rowing a boat in breakers. Now imagine doing it with only one oar AND WITH ONE ARM! Do you remember rowing an inflatable boat near the shore and a wave suddenly flipping it over or filling it with water. Ferrier made much of the lifeboat being certainly swamped if it was taken too close to the wreck but surely a lesser sea could have swamped his own frail craft. Imagine the pain William John Ferrier was feeling when Constable Trainor summoned him from his bed. It would have caused him pain just to get a shirt on. How much pain did he suffer during the long hours of extreme exertion during the rescue?

In fact, I brand William John Ferrier a LIAR! He said, "I did nothing out of the way. Any other man in my position would have done the same." Damn certain I wouldn't have!

If William John Ferrier's modest heroism is not enough to win a heritage status of Statewide Significance
for his houses at Warrnambool, Rosebud and Queenscliff, I think the whole system stinks. I am proud to claim him as a Rosebud resident! I gave Simon Lloyd,the shire's heritage planning officer, information about William and his house, requesting that it be given statewide heritage status. He has resigned but I will contact his replacement,Mr Kelly,and the municipalities at Warrnambool and Queenscliff in the hope of having all three houses and the ship paintings in the Queencliffe Maritime Museum accorded a status of STATEWIDE SIGNIFICANCE because of their connection in the theme of VICTORIA'S MARITIME HISTORY.

Anyone requiring sources can private message me so we can arrange a chat.

P.1.Robert Ferrier was born 21-2-1798 in Farnell, Angus, Scotland, and died 13-7-1855 in St Vigeans,Angus. He was christened on 24-2-1798 in Farnell and buried in July 1855 at Marywell,St Vigneans,his occupation given as weaver. He married Ellen (Helen} Milne,daughter of James Milne and Jane Anderson, on 10-6-1820 in Arbroath,Angus,Scotland.

Ellen was born in 1799 in Scotland and died 29-3-1881 in Marywell,St Vigneans.

P.2. Their children were:
1. William Ferrier born about 1821,Angus,Scotland.
2. David Ferrier, b. 1822, Arbroath,Angus.
3. Robert Ferrier b. 1823 Arbroath,died 1824,Angus.
4. Alexander Ferrier b.1827 Arbroath, died 11-2-1901 Arbroath.
5. Not named Ferrier b.1829 and died 1829,both Angus.
6. George Ferrier, b.about 1830 Arbroath (Forfarshire), died 4-7-1856, Warnambool.
7. Elizabeth Ferrier b.about 1831 Arbroath.
8. John Ferrier b. 21-4-1832 Forfarshire/Arbroath, died 18-5-1900 Warrnambool.

George Ferrier, their sixth child (b.about 1830) married Julia Sweeney in 1853 in Warrnambool. Julia was born in Cork,Munster,Ireland in 1832 and died in September 1909 in Geelong.

Report from Warrnambool Examiner of 8-7-1856 re inquest into the death of George Ferrier,a small farmer at Wangoon, (which is described in comments but does not give his brother's name.)John Ferrier gave evidence that he was a boatman for HM Customs and that his brother,George, was intoxicated,and after having a cup of tea at John's house*, George asked if John would accompany him home. The accident happened very near to George's house when George said "Gee" and the horses got out of control and ran up against a stump. (*Henna St,Warrnambool in 1856-see below.)

P.3. George was 36 when he died and was buried in the Presbyterian section at Warrnambool on 6-7-1856.He was described as a labourer in 1854 but as a farmer in 1856. (If I remember the article in comments correctly,he'd made a successful trip to the diggings!)

Their first child, Ellen was born on 17-3-1853 and died in the same month. Her grave has not been found. A second child ,also named Ellen,was born in Warrnambool on 25-1-1854.After George's death,it is possible that Julia returned to Ireland and married James Carey,later settling near Geelong.

P. 3-4. John Ferrier (child 8 above,born 21-4-1832,died 18-5-1900 Warrnambool)married Catherine Mary Dowling 11-1-1855 in the Roman Catholic Church in Warrnambool. The daughter of Hugh Dowling and Ann Biggers, she was born 26-4-1833 in Clane,County Kildare, Ireland and died 22-10-1912 in Warrnambool. They were living in Henna St,Warrnambool in 1856.

John became a boatman with the Customs Department in June 1854 and became a highly regarded coxswain in the 1860's before losing his job in 1865 for being Len Dunk (Rosebud cockney rhyming slang!)The incident regarding the counterfeit sovereigns in 1855 has been previously mentioned in the journal or comments but it's nice to know that the charge was abandoned and John was discharged with no imputation on his character.

P.5. In 1863, John and others were praised in regard to the wreck of the Golden Spring (as I have mentioned previously),also the Peveril, and in 1864,he rescued the harbour Master from drowning at the wreck of the "Fair Tasmania". (William John Ferrier had no choice in 1905; the family tradition set by his grandfather demanded heroism!)

Is this just unbelievable coincidence? You will recall that John's sister-in -law,Julia (nee Sweeney) is believed to have married a James Carey. The crew of the rescue boat at the wreck of "Fair Tasmania" were coxswain,John Ferrier and John and Richard Carey !

In April of 1878 the first attempt to open up shipping business between Port Campbell and Warrnambool was tried. Messrs R.and C.Patterson chartered John Young's lighter,a small cargo boat,the "Asia". Carrying a cargo of general merchandise,she was manned by two efficient and popular lightermen,John Mitchell*(in charge) and John Ferrier Senior. The trip was a success. During October 1880,John captured a gigantic albatross on a reef near the island. In 1886, John,a laborer, and Catherine were living at 1 EDINA ST. John died at 69 as a Roman Catholic having been a labourer**,fisherman and farmer and was buried at Warrnambool on 20-5-1900.
(*The Mitchell and Ferrier names have been linked in at least two rescues. **At the time of a rescue about which I have written recently,John was described as a stevedore,so that might be what is meant by labourer.)

P.6.Catherine was 22 years old and working as a housekeeper when she married John. She may have been known as Mary as she was buried as Mary Catherine Downing, She seems to have come to Australia on the "John Bunyan" in November 1852 from Kilkenny. She was 20 years old,Roman Catholic,single and engaged to work for Mr Trainor at Kilmore. (How did John meet his future bride? I suspect that it has something to do with Constable Trainor being at Warrnambool in 1905. Was he a descendant of Billy Trainor who rode in the first Warrnambool Cup? See: THE EARLY DAYS OF WARRNAMBOOL. SOME INTERESTING REMINISCENCES.
Warrnambool Standard (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Saturday 13 July 1918 p 4 Article.)

Catherine died at the age of 89 and was buried at Warrnambool on 23-10-1912. She and John were married by Father Slattery. The children of John Ferrier and Catherine Mary Dowling were:
1. Ann Jane Ferrier b.12-7-1855, d. 15-2-1865 aged 10,buried 15-2-1865 at Warrnambool.
2.George Ferrier born and died 6-7-1856. May have been buried with his uncle George on 8-7-1856 or in the grave in which Ann (above)was buried in 1865.
3. George Ferrier b.5-7-1857, d.20-11-1934 Perth,W.A. [Obituary inserted on page 9.]
4. John Robert Ferrier b.4-8-1858, d.21-4-1950 at Warrnambool.
5.William Alexander Ferrier b.25-1-1860,d.15-7-1888,burial possibly recorded as Alfred.
6. David Patrick Ferrier b.21-4-1861, d.23-8-1928.
7. Mary Elizabeth Ferrier b.23-4-1863,d.1919 South Melbourne.
8. Alice Catherine Ferrier b.14-7-1864,d.1921 East Melbourne.
9. Annie May Ferrier b.12-4-1866, d.1949 Northcote,buried Melbourne.
10.Stephen Hugh Ferrier b.10-8-1867, d.1-10-1954.
11.Alfred Edward Ferrier b.21-4-1869, d. 1942 Fitzroy.
12. James Peter Ferrier b.18-6-1871,d.5-3-1936. Married Sophia Mitchell(b.1874,d.1912 Fitzroy)1895 Warrnambool.
13.Winifred Ellen Ferrier b.10-10-1872,d.11-11-1872.
(All events at Warrnambool unless otherwise stated.)

John's brother George (b.Arbroath about 1830)had a daughter,Ellen (b.25-1-1854 Warrnambool) who married Daniel McCarthy 1871 in County Clare, Ireland.
(Her mother Julia,nee Sweeney is thought to have returned to Ireland and become Mrs Carey as in bold type on page 3.)Their son,George William McCarthy was born in 1873 in Sandhurst (Bendigo)in 1873 and died in 1950 at Wangaratta. Their daughter,Mary Ellen,was born and died in Melbourne in 1876, surviving only 10 months. Ellen was buried in the Eastern Cemetery,Geelong.

John and Catherine's third child and eldest son,George (b.5-7-1857)became a solid plasterer when he left school and some of his work survives today,mainly the ornamentation in the (Warrnambool?) Town Hall ,now called the Performing Arts Centre. (I presume that more work in this trade took him to Melbourne.) George married Elizabeth Wilson on 19-8-1879 at 4 Henry St., Fitzroy. Their first child,Alice Muriel Ferrier was born on 9-8-1881 at George St, Stephney, Adelaide, and it was at Norwood,Adelaide that John Wilson Ferrier (4-9-1883) and Florence Jane Cathcart Ferrier (4-6-1886) were born.

The fourth child,Gertrude May Ferrier was born at Henry St.,Fitzroy,most likely Elizabeth's mother's home,on 18-5-1887. By the time their fifth child, George Grey Dixon Ferrier, was born on 17-7-1889, George and Elizabeth's home was in Botanic Rd., Warrnambool.
George's sixth child was Hugh Alexander Ferrier, born on 13-7-1889 at Springs Gardens,perhaps the Botanical Rd. house. By the time their seventh and last* child, Wilfred Harry Ferrier was born on 9-1-1895, they had moved to Lake St,Perth. George died on 20-11-1934 and Elizabeth on 6-6-1945,both being buried in Karrakatta Cemetery, Perth. (*Two more children seem to have been found See next page.)

Their great grandson, Richard Ferrier and his wife,Julia,of 8 Glendale Avenue,Hamersley,W.A. supplied information about George working in South Africa for about five years from approximately 1900. Let's have a look at George's obituary.

The Late Mr. George Ferrier.
The funeral of the late Mr. George Ferrier, a highly esteemed resident of Cottesloe, took place in the Presbyterian portion of the Karrakatta cemetery on November 21. The late Mr. Ferrier was born in Warrnambool 78 years ago and came to this State in the nineties, and later went to South Africa, returning to Western Australia in 1908. He left a widow and a grown up family of four sons and three daughters. The cortege left his residence at 8 Griver-street, Cottesloe and his remains were laid to rest in the presence of a large gathering of friends.
(P.9,The West Australian,23-11-1934.)

George and Elizabeth's children; birth details are given above.
1. Alice Muriel did not marry and was cremated after her death in Perth on 1-1-1975,her ashes released to the wind.
2.John Wilson did not marry and died on 20-2-1967; his ashes are in the Rose Garden, Perth.
PAGE 10.
3. Florence Jane Cathcart died 18-8-1947 Perth and was cremated.
4. Gertrude May married William Peacock of Perth in 1926 but had no children. Died 28-10-1955 in Perth. Cremated and ashes in Rose Garden,Perth.
5. George Grey Dixon died 25-1-1960,Claremont,W.A.
6. Hugh Alexander (born 1889) died 6-8-1897 in Perth where he was buried.
7. Wilfred Harry died 10-11-1967 in Manning,W.A. and was cremated.
8.Robert Louis Ferrier b. 5-7-1897,Lake St., Perth , d.11-7-1992,Perth.
9.Dorothy Isabella Ferrier b.5-9-1899,Aberdeen St, Perth, d.8-1-1900 Perth and buried Perth.

JOHN ROBERT FERRIER was the fourth child and second son of John Ferrier and Catherine (nee Dowling.) He was the grandfather of Lewis Ferrier, Queenscliff's barefoot fisherman and Laurence Ferrier of Warrnambool who compiled this genealogy. J.R., born in 1858, married twice and died on 21-4-1950 in Warrnambool.

His first wife was Eleanor Conn (daughter of William Conn and Catherine, nee Morrissey) who was born on 23-5-1857 in Mt.Taurus*,Woodford,via Warrnambool. They married on 30-6-1880 in the Presbyterian Manse,Warrnambool.
(*Mt Taurus was accidentally written as Mt Taurut on an early map as explained in a comment under the journal.)

It was after Eleanor's death on 8-6-1920 at 5 Stephen St,South Warrnambool that J.R. married again in 1923, aged about 65. His second wife,Georgina Hurst nee Phin, was born about 1877 in Victoria and died in June 1963 in Warrnambool.

J.R. and Eleanor must have lived at 1 Edina St with J.R.'s father, John, because the 1884 voters' roll described both men as labourers of that address. (N.B.The notes for John Robert Ferrier referring to the voters' roll describe the younger labourer as John Robert Junior but J.R. did not have a son called John Robert (see pages 12-13) so the labourers were John (b.1832)still living at 1 Edina St in 1886 (see page 5), and his son,John Robert (b.1858.)

J.R.'s father, coxswain of the harbour master's boat, had rescued the captain's wife and four year old daughter at the wreck of the "Fair Tasmania"on 27-5-1864.
PAGE 11.
John (J.R.) had bought a grave before his death but there is no headstone because his estate had passed to the Hirst (Hurst on P.10)family which would not pay for one.

John Robert Ferrier,a Presbyterian, was aged 91 and his last occupation was given as farmer when he died (21-4-1950.)His military record shows that he had also been a fisherman and labourer. He was buried at Warrnambool.

The large Conn family lived at Dennington. Ellen's father was a blacksmith and two of her sisters became Mrs Hart and Mrs Goodreid. Ellen's middle name may have been Elizabeth. The corner of Conn's Lane and the Princes Highway west of Dennington was known as Conn's, and Blacksmith's, Corner.When Eleanor married,she had been living a servant at Winslow. (Mt Taurus,near which Eleanor was born, is near Winslow.)

Eleanor's birth place was recorded as Koroit (birth certificate 1857 15758). N.B. This differs from the birth place given on page 10 (reg. 12994). It is likely that she was born at Mt Taurus and the birth was registered at Koroit. Eleanor's parents seem to have been Church of England adherents.

J.R.'s second wife,Georgina Hurst nee Phin had six children by her previous marriage. Doreen said they called her Grandma and she was a lovely lady.Aged 86 when she died,she was buried,on 28-6-1963, in the Presbyterian section of the Warrnambool cemetery in grave 41 in row 34.

PAGE 12.
The children of John Robert Ferrier and Eleanor Conn,with events at Warrnambool unless otherwise stated, are:
1. William John Ferrier b.25-1-1881 d. 19-12-1937 Geelong Hospital
2. Ellen Catherine Ferrier b.7-11-1881 d.25-6-1912
3. Winifred Annie Ferrier b. 26-2-1883 d.8-11-1912
4. Albert Stanley Gordon Ferrier b.4-6-1885 d.2-2-1887
5.Alice Meta May Ferrier b.20-5-1887 d.1953 Parkville
6.Stephen Alfred Ferrier b.1-10-1891 d.1-7-1970
7.David Ferrier born and died 6-4-1892
8.Harold James Ferrier b.2-3-1893 d.Feb. 1957 Stawell
9.Madge Evelyn Ferrier b.1-10-1895 d.1-9-1967 Brunswick (married Syd Ellis who unloaded coal at the Warrnambool breakwater until it was no longer transported by ship and then moved to Melbourne to continue as a wharfie. Both buried at Warrnambool.)
10. Joseph Edward Ferrier b. 12-4-1897 d.1898 buried 11-2-1898

PAGE 13-14
John Robert Ferrier's brother, David Patrick Ferrier, a plasterer, (see top of p.7) married Sarah Rebecca Jewell and they had seven children all of whom died in Warrnambool except the fourth,Leo Patrick who died in Melbourne. Details available on request.
PAGE 14.
John Robert Ferrier's sister,Mary Elizabeth Ferrier married William Alexander Swanston at South Melbourne and had seven children born in that suburb,where Mary and William died in 1919 and 1894 respectively. Details available on request.

PAGE 15.
John Robert Ferrier's sister,Alice Catherine Ferrier married a local of about 28, Charles Bolden, in Warrnambool in 1890 and their four children were all born there in 1891-5. Charles must have sought employment in Western Australia during the depression and was buried at Fremantle on 6-1-1896. Alice died in East Melbourne in 1921 and only the third child,Joseph Charles Bolden, died in Warrnambool,aged about 83. The first two, Dorothea (Mrs McGrath) and Gladys died at Parkville and the fourth,Fred, died at St Kilda. Details available on request.
PAGE 15-16.
John Robert Ferrier's brother,Stephen Hugh Ferrier, married Alice Sarah Carter,a local girl,in Warrnambool in 1892.Alice's mother,Charlotte (nee Davies) may have been Welsh and influenced Stephen and Alice's Wesleyan leanings. The first three of their children were born 1893-1898 in Warrnambool but the fourth,Annie May,(b. 1900 Victoria) may have been born elsewhere,although the third,Charlotte, died in Warrnambool on 19-1-1900. It is known that Stephen was at Queenscliff by 1907 (his boat having escaped its moorings)and their first was buried there in 1909.All four of their offspring died of T.B., aged 16, 27,13 months and about 22. Stephen and Alice died in Warrnambool in 1954 and 1967 respectively. Details available on request.
PAGE 16-17.
John Robert Ferrier's brother,Alfred Edward Ferrier, married a local girl, Julia Frances Kennedy in 1896 in Warrnambool.Three and possibly all of their first four children were born in Warrnambool between 1896 and 1901 but the next three were born between 1904-9 in South Melbourne.

PAGE 20. WILLIAM JOHN FERRIER (see child 1 on page 12)married Frances Elizabeth Aikin 1902 in Victoria.
Frances, daughter of Joseph Aikin and Emily (nee Pout) was born in about 1882 in Queenscliff and died in Queenscliff on 25-8-1959.

"After shifting to Queenscliff,Bill would return to Warrnambool every year for the May races. He would stay at his brother, Stephen's home. Of note wasthe fact that he wore a bowler hat. His son,Val, would do the lighthouse check around Queenscliff and was a bit of a character as his nephew, Jack Ferrier said.
(DETAILS OF THE LA BELLA RESCUE-available elsewhere.) This is the citation for the award,taken from the 1906 annual report of The Royal Humane Society of Australasia.

WILLIAM JOHN FERRIER, of South Warrnambool,fisherman, aged 25 years,who rescued GEORGE MYLUS and RICHARD PAYNE,Captain and Seaman of the barquentine "La Bella" from drowning,at Warrnambool,on November 10. FERRIER assisted, as a member of the lifeboat crew, all night,in attempts to rescue the sailors. Next morning, in his dingy,he sculled out,accompanied by the lifeboat. The ship was breaking up,and the lifeboat was impeded by the floating timbers, which had come out of the wreck. FERRIER sculled on ahead into the breakers, and single-handed, got the captain into his dingy,and rescued him; subsequently he rescued PAYNE as well.

Soon after the rescue, William moved from Warrnambool to live in.....
PAGE 21.
....Queenscliff on the Bellarine Peninsula. The Ferriers at Queenscliff and Apollo Bay are his descendants. All his sons were involved in activities that had a nautical vocation. (DETAILS OF WILLIAM'S DEATH-already recorded.) In 1874,a three roomed octagonal pile light house was completed by Robert McColl of Little Bourke St. It was situated 4 kilometres off shore from Rosebud in the south channel. William and Frances lived there and operated the light house on a rotating 3 month roster system."(DETAILS OF SHIP PAINTINGS INSIDE THE PILE QUARTERS AND GENEALOGICAL DETAILS FOR WILLIAM AND FRANCES.)

1.George William Valentine Ferrier b. 1903 Queenscliff* d. 30-3-1989 Victoria.
2.Ellen Isobel Ferrier b.1906 Queenscliff d.15-7-1927 Queenscliff.
3.William John Ferrier b 3-3-1907 Rosebud d. 1-11-1979 Apollo Bay.
4. Alice Edna Ferrier b.10-12-1908, Mercer St, Queenscliff ----
5. Frank Bernard Ferrier b.21-2-1911 Rosebud d. 11-8-1996 Pt Lonsdale (hostel).
6.Stephen Alfred Ferrier b.24-6-1912 Rosebud d.16-11-1990 Victoria.
7. Colin Lester Ferrier b.1913 Dromana --------
PAGE 22.
8.Jack Ferrier b. 1916 Victoria d.1970 Ballarat.
9. Allan Nelson Ferrier b.11-2-11-2-1920 Queenscliff d. 31-10-2010 Ann Nichol House Portarlington.
10. Mansley Edwin Ferrier b.19-12-1922 Victoria d. 21-6-2002 Victoria.
11. Olive FrancesFerrier b. about 1923,place not known d. 1971 Norlane,Geelong.
12. Lewis Douglas Ferrier b. 1-12-1924 20 Beach St,Queenscliff and still fishing outside the Heads in his "Rosebud".
13.Geoffrey Bruce Ferrier b.about 1925 d. August 2006.No details available.

*The first birth indicate that William and Frances were living in Queenscliff before the 1905 rescue. The second may have occurred while William was serving at the Cape Schanck lighthouse and Frances probably spent the latter part of her confinement at her mother's house. I was under the impression that William had 17 children altogether and he stated after the rescue, "I am a native of Warrnambool, and am 25 years of age. I have a wife and two young children." This means that another child was born in 1904 or early 1905 and she must have been one of the three girls that Frances told Lewis was buried in the Dromana Cemetery. Two others were probably still born on the Pile light or at 858 Pt Nepean Rd (NUMBER SEVEN)Rosebud,perhaps in 1909,1914 or 1915.


I've been bombarding Pat Hutchins' eldest son, Paul, with articles including an insolvency case in 1857 which may have involved (Osborne pioneer) George Hutchins and his brothers and their mother's possible move to Australia. Hence Paul's reference to a clue in this email which just arrived.

From our tree

George Smale Hutchins.

Born 1801 and Died 27 December 1870 (We saw it on his headstone at St Nicholas in Shaldon, Devon,England). He was an Excise Officer. He married Jane Sanders in 1830 and was Buried 31 December 1870.

George Smale and Jane had 10 was George.
Georges Hutchins B:1832 had a younger brother William John born 1834 Devon died 1862 in China. (Another clue perhaps??) His other younger brothers, Thomas born 1836 in Devon died 1887 in Maryborough Queensland John born 1842 in Shrewsbury Shropshire England & died 1903 in Bundaberg Qld and Howard Reynolds born 1850 in Stourbridge England & died 1875 in Townsville Qld. Other siblings were Richard, Sam, Jane, Mary Selina, and Charlotte Eliza.

His son George Hutchins was

B: 24/10/1832 Teignmouth Devon

D: 8/4/1878 Brighton Victoria (See detail of inquest in Steve Johnson's contribution.)

Law Stationer

M: Harriet Cox 28/9/1855 in Sydney.

Their children were:

George B:1858 Williamstown M: Elizabeth Garlick 1880

Richard B: 1860 Osborne D: 1944 Mornington

William B: 1864 Osborne D: 1864 Osborne

Robert B: 1865 Mornington D: 1939 Mornington

Mary Jane: B: 1867 Mornington

Annie Louisa Cox B: 1869 Ballarat D: 1870 Ballarat

Ann Charlotte B: 1870 Osbourne D:?

Thomas(One Arm Tom) B: 1872 Mornington D:19/6/1953

Henry B: 1874 Mooroduc D:1874 Moooroduc

Catherine Charlotte B: 1877 Fitzroy

Jane B: 1856 Sydney D: 1862 Osborne

Sydney Howard B: 1875 D: 1937?1957? Dromana

John Coxon B: 1862 D: 1934

George (fisherman)B: 1858 Williamstown married Elizabeth Garlick 1880 and had 7 children

William George (Bill) Hutchins (fisherman) B:1884 Mornington D c 1943 (and 6 others.. I have their details if relevant)married Ellen Elizabeth Onge 1906 who lived at the house opposite Camerons Bight (Newberry Hill). They had Robert William(Mick) Hutchins (fisherman) (only child)B:1907 D:18/8/1971 who also lived at Newberry Hill and also had the house/fish shop at the head of the jetty on the beach at Camerons Bight.

He had 3 children Phillip Gray (Pat) Hutchins (fisherman) who lived at Willunga opposite Camerons Bight B: 1931, Phyllis B: 1934, and Kathleen B:1933 D:31/8/84.

Phillip Gray(Pat) has 3 boys, Paul William (me), Phillip Mark and Adrian Peter.


HUTCHINS, KEVIN JAMES : Service Number - VX52137 : Date of birth - 03 Jan 1921 : Place of birth - MORNINGTON VIC : Place of enlistment - ROYAL PARK VIC : Next of Kin - HUTCHINS MARY

HUTCHINS, MAURICE JOHN : Service Number - VX4421 : Date of birth - 03 Aug 1917 : Place of birth - MORNINGTON VIC : Place of enlistment - BRIGHTON VIC : Next of Kin - HUTCHINS THOMAS

HUTCHINS, WILLIAM THOMAS : Service Number - VX4470 : Date of birth - 28 Apr 1919 : Place of birth - MORNINGTON VIC : Place of enlistment - BRIGHTON VIC : Next of Kin - HUTCHINS THOMAS

HUTCHINS, WILLIAM THOMAS : Service Number - V215777 : Date of birth - 28 Apr 1919 : Place of birth - MORNINGTON VIC : Place of enlistment - MORNINGTON VIC : Next of Kin - HUTCHINS ELLEN

Hi xxx,
I will have a look tomorrow if I have any information on the Hutchins. It appears Robert is the brother of Thomas (both fisherman of Mornington) There are two Thomas Hutchins who died in Mornington 1953 and 1948 (according to Wills & Probate). A lot of the Hutchins boys joined the Royal Australian Navy. I assume that the Hutchins from Sorrento and Mornington are related
I have been working on The Second World War enlistments on the Mornington Peninsula. Send me any details that you can.

HUTCHINS.On June 10, at her son's residence, Empire street, Mornington, Elizabeth, loved wife of the late Robert, and dearly beloved mother of Howard, Grace (Mrs. W. Humphries, Moonee Ponds), Maggie (Mrs. J. Coates, Traynor's Lagoon), Robert, Don, and Alex (deceased), aged 86 years. -In God's care.


26th June 1909, Mornington & Dromana Standard p.2
Mr Howard Hutchins, son of Mr R. Hutchins, of Mornington, has been successful in passing the examination for the Royal Australian Engineers, and left Mornington last Monday to take up his duties at Swan Island. Mr Hutchins was the champion quoit player of the Mornington ?(Lodge)? and also a coming footballer.

Service Number: 3043 Royal Australian Navy
Born Mornington 20th September 1895
Next of Kin: Maisie

The Argus 27th January 1950, p.11
HUTCHINS.-On January 26 (suddenly), at. Mornington, Robert Sydney, loved second eldest son of the late Robert and Elizabeth Hutchins, of Mornington, loving brother of Howard and Grace (Mrs.Humphries), Margaret (Mrs. Coates), Donald, and Alec, (deceased), late R.A.Navy, aged 54 years. Fondest memories.

27th June 1914, Mornington Standard, p.3
Wedding Bells.
HUMPHRIES-HUTCHINS. A very pretty wedding was celebrated on Wednesday afternoon, 17th inst., the contracting parties being Miss Grace Hutchins, eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs Robert Hutchins, of Waterloo Place, Mornington, and Mr William Humphries, third son of Mr and Mrs Humphries, of Riddell. The ceremony was performed by the Rev, G. Carson, and the church was crowded with friends and acquaintances of the bride. The bride, who was given away by her father, looked charming in a gown of white silk with train, with the usual wreath and veil, and carried a shower bouquet of white chrysanthemums. The bridesmaids, Miss Maggie Hutchins (sister of the bride) and Miss M. Humphries (sister of the bridegroom),were both attired in white silk, with pale blue caps, and carried shower bouquets. After the ceremony break- fast was served at the residence of the bride's parents, and as the happy couple left by the afternoon train for the city the station was crowded with friends who showered confetti most liberally. The bride's a travelling dress was a navy blue costume with tango velvet hat.

12 April 1878, The Argus p.6
An inquest was held on Wednesday by Mr. Candler, at the Plough and Harrow Hotel, South Brighton, on the body of a fisherman named George Huchins, 46 years of age, residing at Balcomb's Creek, Mornington. It appeared from the evidence that deceased was driving home quite sober, and when at South Brighton he pulled the near rein, causing the cart to go on to the footpath. The jerk threw him out on to his head, killing him instantaneously. Information was given to Constable Cowan, who obtained the attendance of Dr Goldstone. He at once pronounced the man dead. The jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

3rd January 1883, South Bourke & Mornington Journal
23rd December, 1882. Before Wm. Grover (Chairman) and S. Lancashire, J. P. Four young men, viz.. W. J. Stevens. D. Allison, Robert Hutchins, and John Hutchins, were charged on summons by Police-Constable Thompson with insulting behaviour in the Main street on Sunday evening, the 17th inst., and stated in his evidence that the defendants with a number of others were congregated near the Atheneum whilst Divine Service in that building was taking place and making use of disgusting and insulting language and annoying passers by. The defendants denied having used the language imputed to them, and the Bench in view of the Christmas holidays, took a lenient view of the charge and dismissed the accused with a caution.

***Obituary for W. T. Hutchins of Williams Road Mornington 2nd December 1948, Frankston Standard, aged 63 years. (Itellya- The obituary, in the last column on page 4 of the Standard,mentions that he lived in Williams Rd and was a long time member of the Mornington (Fire?) Brigade but does not mention service in World War 1. Unfortunately the names of some of his four sons and three daughters cannot be seen. If T.Hutchins on the Mornington Roll of Honour for W.W.1 was Thomas William Hutchins,he would more likely be the one who died in 1953.)

32 comment(s), latest 1 year, 2 months ago

Looking for information about Alexander RASMUSSEN of Tullamarine in Victoria, Australia.

Known as Alec Rasmussen, this highly popular teacher transferred to Tullamarine State School from Couangalt, near Gisborne in 1909.He and his wife Ellen had previously spent time at East Shelbourne and Boyeo according to Ellen's death notice on page 11 of The Argus of 27-3-1948.At the time and probably for quite a few years they were living at 2 Roselea Caulfield. Alec (probably Alexander H.)had been the Secretary of the Tullamarine Progess Association from its formation in 1924 until he retired in 1954 because of ill- health and the members immediately made him the first life member.
Alec organised community picnics in his first three years in Tullamarine as well as having a pioneers' honour roll made for display in the school and suggesting the purchase and donation to the council of a recreation reserve, which I hope to have named in his honour.
I know the Rasmussens, bakers in Castlemaine, were related but I would like to know where Alec was born and raised and what Ellen's maiden name was. Is there any connection between the Richards who married a Rasmussen at Long Gully and the Richards north of Woodlands at Bulla?

In reference to your query in regard to potential ways in which Mr Alec Rasmussen can be recognised within the community,Council officers are currently investigating the possibility of installing a memorial plaque at Tullamarine Reserve. I will advise you again in writing when a final decision has been made on a suitable memorial for Mr Alec Rasmussen.

6 comment(s), latest 10 months, 3 weeks ago


Johnny Ashcroft's "Little Boy Lost", written soon after Steven Walls had been found in the "wild New England Ranges" was a sensation in 1960, and a film about the song's subject was made in 1978. A You Tube video features scenes from the film and Ashcroft singing the iconic song. The video provides an idea of how frantically people searched for the little girl lost and the little boy lost in the first two stories. The Franklinford story is about a man who had disappeared and the affect it had on two other residents.

Owen Cain died on 28-6-1896 at 98 and had been a resident of Rye for 55 years.(Mornington Standard 2-7-1896 page 3.) In 1841, the Mornington Peninsula was occupied by a few squatters and a few limeburners near "The Heads". Owen Cain found plenty of lime just on the Rye side of Canterbury Jetty Rd where he later built "Tyrone" named after his native county in Ireland. Other street names on this estate that recall the Cain family are Neville, Murray and Michael, the first two being maiden names of girls who married Michael and Joseph Cain. As I have searched fruitlessly for my notes regarding this story, I will have to write from memory.

Sarah Ann Cain was four when she disappeared. Perhaps she had woken from a nap and gone looking for her parents; no explanation was given for her disappearance. I forget whether the story was in Lime Land Leisure or Patricia Appleford's "Rye Primary School 1667" but I do remember the source was the McCrae lad at Arthurs Seat, so the events probably took place in 1843. For four days and four nights rescuers had been combing the bush looking for her, some of whom she had seen from a distance. But she hid, thinking that they might be aborigines. When she was eventually found, near dead, she was taken to George Smith's Wooloowoolooboolook Run homestead, where Mrs Smith nursed her back to health. I believe Smith's run was actually the Tootgarook run later sold by Edward Hobson to James and Peter Purves in 1850. As the Hobson journal shows, Edward and his brother were actually at Traralgon (which they named)and if Edward had taken up the lease for Tootgarook, he had probably transferred it to Smith, whose wife was related to Captain Hobson of the "Rattlesnake" (according to Spencer Jackson in his "Beautiful Dromana") and presumably to Edward Hobson.

The little boy lost was not named in the story on page 2 of the Melbourne Argus of 12-9-1848. He was referred to as the two year old son of Mr H.Hayden, tutor at Mrs Greene's "Woodlands".To find the locale for this story, google Bulla Parish map and click on the first site, Kathleen Fanning's Fanning Family History. You will see section 2 at the bottom right hand corner of the parish map and labelled W.P.Greene. William Pomeroy Greene died soon after settling his family on "Woodlands" and the running of the property was done by his widow Ann and their son Rawdon, after whom Rawdon St in Bulla was named. (The Bulla end of Somerton Rd was also named after the family until recently, but some historically ignorant bureaucrat rendered it as Green St and the mistake was perpetuated.)The South west corner of Woodlands is indicated by Melway 177 J9. The angular area just south of the park entrance was the former site of St Mary's, built in 1858. South of Woodlands was Cumberland in the parish of Will Will Rook, whose homestead was built by George Coghill, and south west was Alexander Kennedy's grant (Inverness?)and, south of that, George Coghill's Glencairne, both of which became Walter Clark's "Glenara".At Melway 178 C6, can be seen "Sherwood", home of the Oaklands Hunt Club. This property had been the head station of a squatting run held by Major Firebrace.(This detail is given so that you will understand the part given as verbatim as my notes allow later on.

The boy was lost for the same period of time as Sarah Ann had been. No reason for his disappearance was given either. The 1978 film explained Steven Walls' lack of reaction to his rescuers' calls by an instruction given by his father never to talk to strangers. Perhaps young Hayden had a similar reason for not responding or it might have just been a toddler's natural shyness. Given the child's lack of stamina, he must have hidden to have evaded discovery for 96 hours. (A sudden thought: the rescuers might have found him more quickly by using their noses!)The gentry had turned up for a hunt but Rawdon Greene persuaded them to hunt for a far more precious quarry.

Carriers would have sometimes used dogs to guard their cargo while they slept or quenched their thirst at a wayside inn such as Tulip Wright's near the Deep Creek crossing. By chance a carrier had camped in a spot near Deep Creek, never before used by travellers and his dogs started a chorus of barking that could not be ignored. The tot was probably given a tot when taken to Tulip Wright's inn (presuming that was what was described as a gentle stimulant) and a warm bath helped to improve his condition. The tutor was notified and hurried off to Melbourne to bring Dr James Martin whose expertise helped the boy's recovery from his ordeal, especially the gangrene which had set in.
"Great praise is due to the gentlemen in the neighbourhood for their exertions, particularly Major Firebrace and Messrs R.Greene and Cogle (sic), who during the three days were constantly in the saddle in quest of the child; but to Dr Martin for his prompt and unremitting attention, may be mainly attributed the ultimate restoration to health of as fine a boy as ever engaged the affection of a parent."

This headline was not in any article seen but was implied, especially by the actions of the police. The man who disappeared (as detailed in my Franklinford Chronology) had an alias so he perhaps also felt a need to hide. No doubt Franklinford residents launched a search but it was bound to be fruitless as Brassey possessed far more mobility than the toddlers.
It has not yet been determined whether Franklinford had three stores or one store owned by William Bumstead (the venue for the 1862 inquest) and run by Charles Dyett in 1862 and Martin Minogue in 1867. Minogue wrote to the Mt Alexander Mail (Castlemaine)complaining about the police searching his store and digging up his garden, casting suspicion on him which affected his relationships in the community. Another poor fellow had been put in the Daylesford gaol for 40 days and nights on suspicion. Brassey had been found on a station up country by the police.
By 1882, Martin Minogue was a coach proprietor and drove his coach between Daylesford and Franklinford. Sounds rosey! However, as reported on page 12 of the Argus of 22-11-1882, Martin committed suicide by means of strychnine. He obtained some beer at Colquhonn's (sic)and took it home. His daughter would have been terrified when the poisoning became apparent. Martin explained that the Mail (contract) was not paying and his crops and land had all gone wrong.


Maldon Museum and Archives Association | Caring for the ...

Maldon Museum and Archives holds a wonderful collection of artefacts and historical information from the Maldon District
The Maldon âcollectionâ, comprising old objects and records from the local area, was initially brought together by the Maldon Progress Association in 1966. The collection is now under the custodianship of Maldon Museum & Archives Association Inc., a member-based volunteer-run organisation established in 1992 to bring together the previously separate museum and family history groups.

The collection continues to grow, and our members and volunteers work hard to research, document, preserve and present it in a way which helps visitors to understand the past, reflect on the present and look to the future. Our Association is very grateful for the commitment and huge contribution of time and expertise given by our many volunteers and supporters, and for the financial assistance received for special projects from various funding bodies over the years.

The district settlements covered by the collection include Baringhup, Bradford, Eaglehawk, Gowar, Maldon, Muckleford, Neereman, Nuggetty, Pollard, Ravenswood South, Sandy Creek, Shelbourne, Tarrangower, Walmer, Woodbrook (Chinamanâs Creek), and parts of Eddington and Welshmanâs Reef. Also from 1947 to 1956, the construction settlement for Cairn Curran Reservoir was located at Baringhup.

MALDON was most likely named after Maldon in Essex,the name having been in existence since Saxon times. The town was declared and named in early 1854.

A new Township is declared at Mount Tarrangower, situate 11 miles N. W. of Castlemaine,to be called Maldon, which will be a place for holding Courts of Petty Sessions.
Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 - 1856) Monday 13 February 1854 p 4 Article

A sales notice in mid 1854 alerted me to the fact that land in the parish of Maldon was to be offered for sale and in order to find out about land divisions rather than church parishes, I knew I needed to use County in the trove search term. Also aware that Maldon would be well beyond the county of Bourke, I tried PARISH OF MALDON,COUNTY and it worked. There is a township and a parish map. Have a look!

Township of Maldon, Parish of Maldon, County of Talbot ...

This township site was ignored and settlement sprang up at the junction of tracks leading elsewhere. See the Sydney Morning Herald article in italics under HISTORIC BUILDINGS,

Maldon, Victoria
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Maldon, view from hill.JPG
View of Maldon from the south west, 2009
Maldon is located in Shire of Mount Alexander MaldonMaldon
Coordinates 36°59â²30â³S 144°4â²0â³ECoordinates: 36°59â²30â³S 144°4â²0â³E
Population 1,601 (2006 census)[citation needed]
Established 1853
Postcode(s) 3463
Elevation 320.0 m (1,050 ft)
136 km (85 mi) from Melbourne
38 km (24 mi) from Bendigo
20 km (12 mi) from Castlemaine
LGA(s) Shire of Mount Alexander
State electorate(s) Bendigo West
Federal Division(s) Bendigo
Mean max temp Mean min temp Annual rainfall
19.6 °C
67 °F 7.5 °C
46 °F 598.9 mm
23.6 in
Maldon is a town in Victoria, Australia, in the Shire of Mount Alexander local government area. It has been designated "Australia's first notable town" and is notable for its 19th-century appearance, maintained since gold-rush days. At the 2006 census, Maldon had a population of 1,601.[1]

The district where Maldon now stands was first discovered by white Europeans in 1836, during Major Thomas Mitchell's famous Victorian expedition. It was settled soon afterwards by pastoralists, and two sheep runs were established in the area, at the foot of Mount Tarrangower. In December 1853, gold was discovered at Cairn Curran (the name given to one of the sheep runs), and Maldon became a part of the Victorian Gold Rush.

The goldfield, which was named "Tarrangower Fields" after Mount Tarrangower, immediately attracted an immense number of men eager to make their fortunes at the diggings. Just one month after gold was first discovered, the Chief Commissioner for Goldfields reported 3000 miners had arrived at the diggings. A month after that, a journalist for The Argus reported that the road from Castlemaine to Maldon was lined with the shops of people hoping to make a living of their own from the miners:

The road follows up the course of Long Gully, where the diggings were first opened, for a couple of miles, and is lined on either side by an almost continuous row of stores, refreshment tents, eating houses, doctors' tents, apothecaries' shops, and, in fact, shops of every description.[2]

The same report noted that the goldfield's population had already grown to 18,000, though only about 1000 had taken out mining licences.

Maldon in 1904, seen from the south-west
In 1856 the Victorian government arranged for the settlement to become a town, which was named Maldon. The post office had opened on 14 March 1854.[3]

In 1861, a government census declared the town's population to be 3341, servicing an additional 5,000-6,000 miners at the diggings. At that time it was the eighth-largest town in Victoria, and remained so for the next decade. However, as miners were forced to dig deeper to obtain usable specimens, or as mines ran dry completely, the population began to decline. By 1891, Maldon was reduced to 1,600 inhabitants. Mining of small claims continued through the 20th century, together with sluicing of gullies and tailings. In the 1980s, several new ventures commenced, including an open cut at Union Hill.

Maldon proved to be one of Victoria's richest quartz-mining centres, though with poorer alluvial results than others such as Castlemaine or Ballarat. Quartz mining extended southward through Sandy Creek to Newstead, along to Mia Mia and Muckleford, eastward to Fentimenâs and Smithâs Reefs, and even to the apex of Mount Tarrangower. In all, over seventy reefs were proven to contain gold deposits. Maldon was undoubtedly a poor manâs diggings, with many excellent yields from very small claims.

The Maldon Vintage Machinery Museum houses stationary engines, farming implements, mining exhibits, fire pumps, and objects with links to Thompsons Foundry, Castlemaine.[4]

Modern times

Historic streetscape at Maldon
Today, Maldon's population is more or less stable at around 1,000 people. The town has changed very little since mining operations ceased, though a former bank at the junction of High and Main Streets has been supplanted by a service station. The town was declared a "notable town" in 1966 by the National Trust of Victoria, who explained that:

The township displays overall historical and architectural importance, particularly in its gold town buildings. The significance lies in the variety of building styles, and the area of mining is of interest with one mine still open to the public. Maldon boasts that it is largely unchanged since the 1850s, and has attracted considerable interest from tourists for its 19th-century atmosphere.

Maldon is now sustained by its appeal as a retreat and retirement venue for artists and writers, as well as tourist trade. The town holds several annual fairs, including a Winter Fair, Easter Fair, Art Show, and Folk Festival. Notable landmarks include Beehive Chimney, Mount Tarrangower and fire tower, Lake Cairn Curran, and the railway station. Maldon has its own newspaper, the Tarrangower Times, which was first published in 1858 and is the oldest continuously published newspaper in Victoria. The Maldon Museum and Archives Association operates a district museum and family-history centre in the former Maldon Shire Hall, and a vintage machinery museum.

The minimum-security female prison HM Prison Tarrengower is located to the near north of the township in the locality of Nuggety.


The memorial park at Maldon
The town has an Australian Rules football team competing in the Maryborough Castlemaine District Football League.

Golfers play at the course of the Maldon Golf Club on Golf Links Road.[5]

The town has an annual Easter Fair which includes events such as billy-cart racing, dancing in the street, the Great Aussie Scone Bake, a cemetery walk and the lighting of the Mount Tarrangower tower.[6] The Maldon Folk Festival has been held annually since 1974. (31 October to 3 November in 2008).[7]

In popular culture
Much of the 2007 film Romulus, My Father, set in the 1950s and starring Eric Bana, was shot on location in Maldon.[8] Romulus, My Father went on to win the Australian Film Institute award for Best Film.

Notable residents
Bill Woodfull, former Australian cricket team captain, born in Maldon on 27 August 1897
Joseph Jenkins, the Welsh Swagman, maintained Maldon's gutters and drains for one pound per week from 1885â1894
Henry Handel Richardson, the Australian author, spent some of her childhood in Maldon when her mother was postmistress there, and wrote about the town in her memoir, Myself When Young
Frank Arthur Nankivell, artist.

Plenty of town can boast famous residents but how many of these were named after the town?
William Maldon Woodfull - Australian Dictionary of Biography

Henry Handel Richardson in Maldon Book Sales

Henry Handel Richardson in Maldon. Henry Handel Richardson in Maldon is an illustrated booklet that details the young Richardson's life in the Victorian gold mining town. She arrived in Maldon as Ethel Richardson in 1880 at the age of 10 with her mother and sister, after the traumatic decline and death of their husband and father, Walter Lindesay Richardson. HHR later wrote that Maldon nourished the imagination of the future writer.

The booklet was winner of the 'Best Walk/Tour' prize in the Victorian Community History Awards 2011, sponsored by the Royal Historical Society of Victoria and the Public Records Office of Victoria.

The authors, Peter Cuffley, Helen McBurney, Janey Runci and Geoff Palmer, assisted by the Maldon community, have produced a well-illustrated and carefully researched booklet that contains three walks; the first, which has a clear map, describes 16 buildings that would have been familiar to the Richardsons; the second, focuses on significant cemetery graves from the 1880's period; and the last, records places fictionalised in Richardson's The Getting of Wisdom.
(Henry Handel Richardson in Maldon Book Sales - The ...

This amazing article supplies terrific information that I may never have found through trove. The most staggering fact is that the township of Maldon is not built on the township of Maldon site declared in 1854 which explains the absence of the grid layout so typical of declared townships. It also directs readers on a guided walk around the historic town. Some information (such as Maldon's version of Sovereign Hill and the hill climb)may be out of date.

Maldon - Victoria - Australia - Travel -

Extraordinary historic town which looks as though time has stood still.
In 1966 Maldon became the first Victorian town to be classified by the National Trust. This honour reflects an appreciation of its remarkably well-preserved historic streetscape with its European trees, wide verandahs, flagstone paving, old-fashioned shop fronts, quaint cottages with attractive gardens, and its many stone buildings erected in the heyday of the goldmining era.

The town's genuinely historic feel is quite overwhelming, arising out of its architectural harmony, an extensive restoration program that has avoided tackiness and frippery, strict and divisive controls on building alterations, an absence of grandiosity and the tendency of the shops to reinforce the antiquity of their exteriors with interiors that also bespeak a lost time.

For these reasons Maldon has become a very popular tourist destination, particularly during the Easter Fair. Hence, many of the buildings have been converted into specialist stores designed to appeal to the visitor. Some locals scornfully regard the tourist orientation as the 'commodification of heritage'. At any rate, Maldon is located 138 km north-west of Melbourne via A HREF="VICCastlemaine.shtml">Castlemaine, which is 19 km to the south-east, and 359 metres above sea-level.

Prior to the arrival of the first squatters in 1840 the area was occupied by the Wemba-Wemba people and an Aboriginal station operated near Mt Tarrangower from 1841-1849. However, the town really began when John Mechosk, a German prospector who had already struck gold at A HREF="VICDunolly.shtml">Dunolly, A HREF="VICMaryborough.shtml">Maryborough and Kingower, discovered gold at the foot of Mt Tarrangower in 1853, thereby initiating a rush of some 20 000 diggers who initially devoted themselves to alluvial mining. By the end of 1854 the tide had receded to some 2000 prospectors and a township of sorts had developed around a narrow road.

The settlement was initially known as Tarrangower. A townsite was surveyed in 1854 but the location was rejected and ignored by locals. Consequently the de facto township established by the diggers was surveyed in 1856 (which explains the irregular street patterns which evolved organically as routes between the diggings). It was renamed after Maldon in Essex, England.

In 1856 Nuggetty Reef was uncovered to the north of town and companies entered the picture, supplying the capital to unearth the gold-bearing quartz reefs which proved to be among the richest in the country. In the 1860s Maldon rivalled Bendigo for returns but, by 1870, the gold had begun to dwindle. In the subsequent years mines began to close and the population declined. The last operating mine was the North British which closed up shop in 1926, although the Union Mine was reopened in 1987 to reprocess the tailings.

It is this absence of growth after the late 19th century which has facilitated the preservation of the town's historic features.

Noted novelist Henry Handel Richardson (nee Ethel Richardson) spent a portion of her childhood at Maldon.

The Maldon Camp Draft is held in February and the Maldon Easter Fair in April. In late October and early November, a folk festival is held at Butts Reserve (along the road to Mt Tarrangower) and the Mt Tarrangower Hillclimb (a motor sport event) is held in late October. The Spring Festival occurs in August.

Things to see:
Tourist Information
The Maldon Visitor Centre is located adjacent the shire offices in High St. It is open weekdays from 9.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m daily. Be sure to pick up the brochures which outline walks of the town, tel: (03) 5475 2569.

Historic Buildings - High St (South)
The information centre has two free pamphlets identifying the town's historic buildings. One covers the main commercial district (Main and High Sts) and the other roams more widely.

Start at the southern end of town where the Castlemaine Rd meets up with High St. Head north along High St. The second house on the left is Lauriston House which was built in 1866 for local mining magnate R.D. Oswald. With its Malmsbury bluestone and elaborate timber verandah fretwork it was regarded as the town's finest building at the time of its construction.

At High and Fountain is the Kangaroo Hotel (1866) which, with its timber lattice and iron lacework, was once a staging post for Cobb & Co coaches. Head south along High St passing, on the right-hand side of the road, the former Commercial Hotel (1867), Argyle House (1866), the former Carriers Arms Hotel (1857), the former Bank of NSW (1858), the enormous Robert Cox Motors (built c.1858 as a four-shop complex), the motorcyclists' (formerly the Freemasons' Hall built c.1863 with a 1908 facade) and a former flour mill (1873).

Cross the road and return northwards to the former Royal Hotel which was built as a concert hall in 1857 and extended in 1862 when it became the hotel. In 1975 it was used as a setting in the film 'Break of Day'. All that was required was to cover the streets in dirt and Maldon furnished a plausible 19th-century setting. It is now a restaurant.

Historic Buildings - Main St
The Grand Hotel (1888) marks the start of Main St. It features some elaborate arches, pilasters and balusters. To the right, as you head north-east, are the former McFarlane's Drapery, built c.1867 (the face of McFarlane's brother, the Secretary to the Treasury, once graced the Australian pound note), Cookies Collections (built c.1870 as a hairdressing salon), Goldsmith's Building (1897), Berryman's Bootshop (1895) on the site of an 1857 bowling alley, the former Albion Hotel (1866), Dabb's Produce Store (c.1870), a former butcher's (c.1858), Swann's Buildings (1866) and the grand two-storey facade of the Maldon Hotel (1909) with its delicate verandah lacework and slender cast-iron posts. The hotel extension was originally the stables. Cornflowers was built c.1860 and was later used as the Bank of Victoria. Wearne's Building (c.1895) is currently a residence (note the old kerosene sign on the wall) and Franklin's Building (c.1870), at Main and Phoenix, started as a shoe warehouse.

Diagonally opposite, at Main and Templeton, is a fruit shop which dates from 1866 (note the fence and the sign). Just along Templeton St is Maldon Old Grain Store Antique Market (1864).

Return to Main St and head south, passing, on the right, the quaint old bakery (c.1895) with an 1854 wood-fired Scotch oven, Calder's (1866), originally an ironmongery, Maldon Pharmacy (c.1860), Wade's Building (c.1880), the former Dabb & Co. Store with its ornate door (built in 1859 and now the Maldon Supermarket), and the service station, which is housed in an old ironmongery and a former smithy (both 1858).

Historic Buildings - High St (Middle)
Turn the corner, heading north back along High St. On the right-hand side are Wade's House (c.1865), now a residence, and, at the Francis St corner, Calder House (c.1885), a distinguished residence which is now a restaurant and bed-and-breakfast.

On the other side of High St is the old post office (1870) which, from 1880-86, was the childhood home of noted Australian novelist Henry Handel Richardson. Her mother was the postmistress. Richardson's autobiography Myself When Young (1950) recounts her time in Maldon with great affection.

Walk along Francis St. To the left are the croquet club (1890) and the museum.

Museum and Courthouse
The Maldon Historical Museum, at the corner of High St and Fountain St, has mining photographs and equipment, domestic memorabilia, and archives. It is located in a mellow-toned brick building erected in 1858 as a Market Place. However, this venture was unsuccessful and it became the shire offices in 1865. The hammerbeam arches were added to correct the buckling walls in 1871. It is open weekdays from 1.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. and from 1.30 p.m. to 5.00 p.m on public holidays and weekends.

Behind the museum is the old fire station (1870) and on the other side of the adjacent football oval is the former courthouse (1861).

Historical Buildings - High St (North)
Return to the post office and head north-west along High St. To the left is Robinson's House, a Gothic Revival structure dating from 1866. Over the road, at 50 High St, is the unusual brickwork of Thomas Vivian's House (1862). It sits in the shadow of Holy Trinity Anglican Church (1862-89), a Gothic Revival ragstone structure with exceptional stained-glass windows and an intricately trussed roof. At 54 High St is Tressider's Cottage, a miner's cottage dating back to 1859 which is now a bed-and-breakfast. A little further along is Dr Lisle's House (1857) and over the road is the primary school (1874).

At Hospital and High is Dr Hardy's House (1857) and adjacent is School Cottage (1860) originally a school. Further along High St and on the other side of the road is the arched entranceway of one of the town's grander homes, 'Glendonald', built in 1870 as 'Ethandune'. Continue north past a range of late 19th-century residences to the Adair St corner where there is an Italianate villa with impressive plasterwork.

Historical Buildings - Adair St
At Adair and Chapel is the hospital, built as a one-storey Classical Revival structure in 1860. Patients were allegedly given subterranean water from Eaglehawk Mine as it was believed to have medicinal properties. Just along Chapel St is St Brigid's Catholic Church (1891).

Return to the High and Adair St intersection. On the north-eastern corner is Rule's House (1897). The brick-and-timber house adjacent dates from 1875. At the south-western corner of Adair and Templeton is a corner store and residence (1880s).

Historical Buildings - Templeton St
Heading south on Templeton, to the right, are Brook's residence (1890) with its fine iron lacework, and a typical timber house from the 1880s. Over the road is Chapman's House which was started at some point prior to 1863. The large house on its southern side dates from 1870.

At the south-eastern corner of Templeton and Camp Sts is the former Holy Trinity Parsonage (1863). The original church was to the rear. Just to the south is Lovell's Cottage, a timber house dating from 1860.

Historical Buildings - Church St
Walk along Camp St to the Church St corner where you will find one of the town's highlights - the former Anglican Penny School where the children once paid a penny a day for their schooling. It was largely rebuilt in 1862 after a storm destroyed part of the original 1856 structure, although the tower and entrance porches remain from that earlier day. The architecture is unusual and eclectic. Over the road is the Welsh Congregational Church (1863 with a transept added in 1901).

Walk south along Church St past the Presbyterian manse (1859) to the Presbyterian Church (1905) at the Edward St corner.

Historical Buildings Concluded
At the north-eastern corner of Edwards and Templeton is the Baptist Church (1896). On the south-eastern corner is Brook's Store (1864).

Across Templeton St, at the Francis St corner, is the former Welsh Baptist Church (1865). On its western side is the former temperance hall (1873) and behind that is one of the town's oldest surviving structures, the former Edwards crushing plant.

Maldon Historic Reserve
The Maldon Historic Reserve constitutes about 2500 ha of public land and forest around Maldon. It was created to preserve the area's goldmining relics, including old shafts, abandoned equipment, mullock and tailing heaps, tunnels, dams, tracks, kilns, cyanide vats, stone walls and the goldmining dredge beside the road to Bendigo, 3 km from the town centre. Some are outlined below.

The box and ironbark forests are regrowth projects as the original woodlands were destroyed by goldmining and farming activities. Bushwalking, forest drives, wildflowers and fossicking can all be enjoyed at Smith's Reef which is signposted to the left off the Castlemaine Rd about 4 km from town.

Beehive Chimney
The 30-metre Beehive Chimney (1862) is located just off the road, near the intersection of Main St and Church St. The Beehive reef was discovered by Cornish miners who named it after a swarm of bees which were, at that moment, settled on a nearby post. There is a picnic area adjacent.

North British Mine
Turn off High St into Parkins Reef Rd which heads south-west. 2 km from town, to the left, is the site where the North British Mine operated until 1926. A walking track leads past numerous ruins including two large stamper batteries and some kilns. There is much to see but some remnants may go unnoticed or unappreciated by the untrained eye so be sure to obtain a guiding pamphlet from the information centre. The forest just to the south contains some old puddling machines and mining holes from the gold days.

Carman's Tunnel
Just past the North British, to the right, is the access point to Carman's Tunnel, a 570-metre goldmining tunnel which was excavated, largely with pneumatic drills, between 1882 and 1884. Despite the extraordinary effort, returns were minimal. For a small fee you can go on an informative, candle-lit, half-hour walk through the dry, clean, spacious, level and easily accessible tunnel from 1.30 p.m. to 4.00 p.m. on weekends, public and school holidays, tel: (03) 5475 2667.

Steam Railway
The town's handsome railway station in Hornsby St was built in 1884 . Two steam trains serve as a static display while another two operational steam trains are used for 45-minute return trips into the Muckleford Forest (a diesel locomotive is used on days of total fire ban). Trips are made on Sundays and public holidays at 11.30 a..m, 1.00 p.m. and 2.30 p.m. and on Wednesdays and Saturdays in school holidays (same departure times). Trains also run every day from December 27 to mid-Januray and from Good Friday to Easter Monday. Ring (03) 5475 2966 for recorded information concerning train times, or call the general office on (03) 54751451.

Nuggetty Ranges Winery
4 km north-west of Maldon, on the Maldon-Sherbourne Road (also known as Bradford Road), is Nuggetty Ranges Winery. Established in 1994, it is a small family-owned winery which produces cabernet sauvignon, semillon and an award-winning shiraz. The cellar door is open daily from 10.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m., tel: (03) 5475 1347.

Yabby Farm
Next to the Nuggetty Ranges Winery, in the Maldon-Sherbourne Road, is the Maldon Yabby and Fish Farm which offers a personalised farm tour, yabbie catching, barbecue and picnic facilities and sales. It is only open to the public in the Christmas school holidays, tel: (03) 5475 1086.

Anzac Hill
One of the best vantage points in town is from atop Anzac Hill which furnishes views of the Grampians, Mount Franklin and Mount Macedon in the distance. You can walk or drive to the summit along Fountain St although it is unsealed, difficult and much further (2.4 km up a steep hill) than most guides will admit. At the top there is a picnic area and a walking track which heads west along a 4WD track to the summit of Mt Tarrangower. If you're looking for an easier option there is an excellent view of the town from the Turkish cannon which is less than a third of the way up the hill.

Mt Tarrangower and Butts Reserve
Mount Tarrangower (570m) is located 2 km west of town via Franklin St. This was the centre of the gold diggings in the 1850s and it was here that the richest quartz reefs were located. Today there is a very good lookout tower (which is illuminated at Eastertime), fine picnic areas and walking tracks to Anzac Hill and Fountain St.

Just off Franklin St, at the base of the hill, is Butts Reserve where there are picnic and barbecue facilities and where a folk festival is held each year in early November. In late October it is also the starting point for a motor race to the top of the hill.

Cairn Curran Reservoir, 12 km south-west via Newstead Rd, is a large and scenic lake which offers good opportunities for water sports, swimming, picnicking and relaxing. There is a sailing club near the spillway.

Porcupine Township
Porcupine Township is an award-winning recreation of an early 1850s gold town located in rugged bushland on the site of the original Porcupine diggings where the first gold discovery between Castlemaine and Bendigo was made. The buildings associated with the original settlement have entirely disappeared but slab, shingle and mud-brick buildings have been relocated from other goldfields and derelict townsites. These include a two-storey barn, an hotel, an undertaker's, miner's huts, a blacksmith's, a general store, a carriage repository, a doctor's surgery and a bowling alley.

You can go for a ride in a Gold Escort, pan for gold, feed the emus or take a trip on the Little Toot train which does a circuit through the original diggings. There are actors in period costume, a resident artisan working in pioneer style, a licensed restaurant, a motel and self-contained cottages. The 'village' is located 2.5 km from the post office at the corner of the Maldon-Bendigo Rd and Allans Rd, tel: (03) 5475 1000.

Maldon's pioneer cemetery (1857) contains the graves of over 200 Chinese goldminers from the early days of the town. There is a Chinese oven where incense was burned for ceremonial purposes, Chinese headstones, a caretaker's cottage (1866) and a rotunda (1900). Jonquils grow in profusion in springtime. To get there follow the Maryborough Rd for 3.8 km then turn right at the women's prison.

Sold Price for 1 Cnr Camp & Church Street Maldon Vic 3463

1 Cnr Camp & Church Street Maldon

âWelsh Congregational Churchâ 1863/1901

This charming church, where services were conducted in Welsh until 1893, has been servicing the community for over 120 years.
In continuous community use since 1863, this historic church forms part of the rich history of Maldon. A delightful building constructed of locally sourced materials including rich red brick and wonderful old timbers, it is in good condition and sited on approximately 1011sqm.
Superbly positioned on an elevated corner block and overlooking the historical township, this is a wonderful opportunity offering the astute buyer many lifestyle options.
- Classified by the National Trust at Local Level Significance (B4034)
- Included in the Mount Alexander Heritage Study (stage 2)

Sold Price for 11 Church Street Maldon Vic 3463
11 Church Street Maldon
Penny School 1856/1862

The Maldon former Church of England Denominational School No.413, today known as the Penny School, is of historical importance for its association with the early provision of education to the burgeoning population in the Central Victorian Goldfields.
The building is one of a small number of early substantial buildings which are integral to the history of the Maldon Township. This charming building is in good condition and constructed of locally sourced materials including stone, brick and timber.
Since the Penny School's custodianship by the National Trust of Australia (Victoria) in 1983, it has been used by the community in a multitude of ways.
For the last 12 years the Penny School has operated as a commercial venue hosting functions including weddings, art exhibitions, community events and projects.
It has kitchen and bathroom facilities, heating and cooling.
Located on approximately 4349m2, on an elevated corner site overlooking the township, this is a rare opportunity to secure something very special for a commercial venture, Bed & Breakfast, weekend retreat or permanent living.
- Classified by the National Trust at State Level Significance (B2035)
- Classified by Heritage Victoria on the Victorian Heritage Register (H1382)
- Included on the Mount Alexander Heritage Overlay (H071)(PHOTO)

Maldon - Anglican Diocese of Bendigo


The lone but not alone grave of Elizabeth ANSET Maldon, Victoria ...

Search results for '' - Digitised newspapers and more - Trove
THE BOILER EXPLOSION AT MALDON. ... (1843-1914), Joseph Thomas Bawden; Text last corrected on 17 December 2013 by janilye ... MALDON. The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 23 June 1897 p 9 Article: Abstract: ..

In 1967, I ran from Landseer St, Castlemaine to Maldon to attend the Easter Show while my future wife's family drove and discovered on a very hot day that the shade provided by roadside trees was not as great as I had imagined. At the Show a little girl's eye was pecked out by a magpie.

Before teaching at Maldon in 1967, I had taught at Franklinford,Phillip Whitlock being one of my pupils. His dad moved the family from Mt Franklin to Maldon during that time and I taught Phillip again at Maldon.

Steven Burchell was a great kid and I believe he became a talented stilt walker. The Burchell family had been in the area for a considerable time,apparently coming from near Talbot by 1900.
Private W. Burchell who has been home on final leave prior to going to the front, was entertained by the residents of Baringhup, and Tarrangower and presented with a pocket wallet and wristlet watch, for which
he suitably returned thanks. (Mount. Alexander Mail (Vic. : 1914 - 1917) Monday 1 November 1915 p 4 Article)

Steven's father seems to have been Reg and his mother Joyce,a Castlemaine girl.
(Annual Report 2007 - Maldon Hospital

Many references are to mines, gold escorts etc.which will not be included here. My emphasis here is on early residents (whose family folklore makes vague reference to "the diggings"*) and noteworthy events.
*As the surnames list has limited capacity,priority will be given to surnames of those pioneers whose descendants are unlikely to know of a connection with Maldon. Those descendants who know of a connection are likely to read the journal anyway.

GENERAL POST OFFICE -The following notice was issued at the Post office yesterday -Maldon (Tarrengower) -On and after the 6th inst., and till further notice a weekly mail for Maldon will be closed at this office every Thursday at 5 :30 p.m. , and the return mail will arrive every Saturday, at 12 noon -Fryers Creek etc.
(P.5,Argus, 8-4-1854.)
N.B. Any reference to Maldon before 1854 will be to Maldon in Essex, Maldon's Punt (apparently on the Murray near Albury, hence Tarrengower in brackets in the notice to prevent confusion) or the Maldon Plate in horse racing. Fryers Creek was sometimes rendered as Friars Creek in early days by those not aware of Mr Fryer.

DEPUTY REGISTRARS. - The Government Gazette announces the appointment of the following gentlemen to the office of Deputy-Registrar:-Mr George L. Hutchinson, at Hepburn; .....Henry Nathaniel L. S. Kentish, at Maldon ; etc.
(Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Vic. : 1851 - 1856) Saturday 22 April 1854 p 4 Article)

If Mr Thomas Waters, of Harton, Bedfordshire, will forward the whereabouts of William Howard Birt, (whom he promises to take care of), to Mr. John Howard, Maldon Post Office, Tarrengower Diggings,he will oblige.
(P.2, Argus,31-5-1854.)
There must have been some desperation because the advertisement was inserted numerous times in different forms. This must have been another of Mrs John Howard's brothers.
PETER HOWARD BIRT, who came out on the ship Calabar, Captain Moodie, will oblige his sister by writing to her, at Maldon Post Office, Tarrengower. (P.2, Argus,29-5-1854.)

DIED. On the 13th instant, at Maldon, Tarrengower diggings, from the accidental discharge of a fowling-piece,
Mr. Humphrey Jones Evans, late of Llambdr, North Wales.(P.4, Argus, 19-6-1854.)

INSOLVENTS.William Henry Ritchie, storekeeper, of Maldon, near Castlemaine. The causes of insolvency are stated as depreciation in value of goods and pressure of creditors. Amount of debts, £2099/6/1 ; assets £932/9/8.
(P.5,The Age,5-12-1854.)

Two peninsula pioneers held the office of postmaster at Melbourne,Ben Baxter before he established Carrup Carrup (at Baxter) and Alexander McCrae after an unsuccessful short tenure on the Arthurs Seat Run. It was the latter who received a letter signed by numerous residents of Maryborough griping about their poor service. The present Maryborough residents could hardly complain about their absolutely beautiful railway station.

......4. That the inhabitants of Maldon and of Avoca (at neither of which places does the population, during the summer season, approximate within about one-fifth of that of Maryborough)enjoy the advantage of postal communication with Melbourne and Castlemaine twice a week.etc. (P.5.Argus, 21-12-1854.)

I only played at Maldon once, with my wife's uncle Roy Portwine of Castlemaine. Roy hit a beautiful drive right down the middle of a fairway and despite a lengthy search, we never found the ball. Maldon,like Castlemaine,had its fair share of magpies* and its likely that one rescued its "baby" or the ball went down a burrow.
*At Castlemaine's course some very clever maggies had set up home in some gums overlooking about three fairways and would swoop you just as you commenced your downswing. And they knew when you were foxing! When running around Maldon's footy ground I did plenty of backwards running although I was playing footy,not umpiring, at the time. It was essential to keep an eye on the maggies nesting in the south west forward pocket. The little girl who had her eye pecked at the Easter Show at the ground was indelibly etched into my memory.

30603 Maldon Golf Club Bendigo District 6 holes in virgin bush club called Tarrengower Golf Club
Club records

30603 Maldon Golf Club Bendigo District Original 1913 Relocated to site owned by Dabb and Co in North
Maldon. ? holes Club records

30603 Maldon Golf Club Bendigo District 1st change. Extended to 9 holes and land purchased in 1924 and
1935. In 1939 additional land purchased and course extended to 18 holes. Club records.
(GSA Vic-Country courses-by District 17.2.10for Website use ...

Legend: Maldon is also the birthplace of Walter Travis, "the most successful amateur golfer in the U.S. during the early 1900s, a noted golf journalist and publisher, an innovator in all aspects of golf, a teacher, and a respected golf course architect." - See Wikipedia - Walter Travis.
( Maldon Golf Club - 1 - Golfer

3 comment(s), latest 7 months ago




This is the first time I've written about something that never existed (as far as I know.)I have suggested that coastal town historical societies and like bodies compile a roll of honour of maritime heroes who performed rescues at their towns and that an annual MARINE HEROES DAY could be held on November 10-11 when William John Ferrier performed his heroic rescues at Warrnambool in 1905.

City of Kingston historian,Graham Whitehead,thinks it is a good idea and suggested that the late Jack Pompei of Mordialloc would be a good nomination. It should be fairly simple to compile a roll of honour for each town. A trove search "rescue, name of town" should produce plenty of results. This is the case for my Mordialloc search but there is a snag. Whether it was lazy reporting or modesty on the part of the rescuers, the saviours in some cases were identified only as lifesavers.

POSTSCRIPT.3-6-2014.My aim was to show the sterling role of fishermen such as William John Ferrier in saving crews of wrecked vessels. However there were few examples of this in regard to Mordialloc because "watering places",as they were called,past Rosebud from where the shipping channel headed straight to Melbourne, were well away from the route of most vessels. In fact, James Purves had great trouble getting his insurance paid on the "Rosebud" following its stranding in 1855,because insurers claimed that the area was on the east coast of the bay (not covered by the policy) rather than the south. See: " The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 29 November 1855 p 6 Article... the wreck was lying most decidedly on the southern coast, and not on the eastern. The captain of the ... considered the spot where the vessel was wrecked to be the eastern coast. The south coast, if tiny part could "

What the results for Mordialloc do show is social change. The sea was only thought of in regard to transport. Then the affluent citizens of Marvellous Smellbourne escaped the heat, dust, smell,smoke and rat-race lifestyle to relax by the seaside for the lengthy SEASON. Due to prudish regulations,this mainly meant rolling up the trousers enough to paddle in shallow water. The sea views and cool breezes were the main attraction.

Those not so well off could later enjoy a day visit by steamer to Sorrento and other far flung watering places thanks to such as Richmond's George Coppin (whose son was one of our heroes.)They too would enjoy a paddle,the cooler weather,sea views and the fresh air.

As regulations were relaxed regarding bathing costumes, swimming became possible and of course many non-swimmers or weaker swimmers, as well as boat owners, were getting into trouble. Lifesaving Clubs were formed to deal with this problem, some quite early but most when increasing ownership of cars made seaside visits easier. Where there was no lifesaving club, onlookers had the choice of tut-tutting when they saw someone in trouble or following the tradition of William John Ferrier.

I thought I'd get the ball rolling. Here we go! l/s=Lifesaver; *=previously mentioned.
The Royal Humane Society used to consider the degree of risk in determining awards but I'm sure that if I was being rescued my gratitude would be just as great no matter the circumstances. Agree?

Sir: During the sudden squall in the Bay on Sunday last, which capsized a large number of yachts along the eastern shores, many rescues were made. This rescue work among watermen is an unwritten law.A unique case to the contrary happened off the Aspendale beach on Sunday. I would like to hear from persons who witnessed this incident of a motorboat passing a capsized crew without making any attempt at rescue, or even a word of encouragement.
-W. TEMPLETON, Hon Sec, Mord 12 Sq Metre Sailing Club (26 William st, Mordialloc).P.3,Argus,28-1-1947.

HARRY NEAL(Mordialloc),MR H.MYERS (Melbourne). News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Tuesday 17 March 1936 p 6; The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1933 - 1954) Tuesday 17 March 1936 p 13 Article.
Townsville Daily Bulletin (Qld. : 1885 - 1954) Wednesday 18 March 1936 p 6 Article

ROBERT JOHNSON, aged 28, fisherman, who rescued a father and child from drowning at the Brighton pier on December 26a bronze clasp to a medal previously awarded. P.6, Argus,5-7-1887.

PATRICIA RILEY,13, SGT.D.PLAISTER(l/s). P.3,Argus,28-12-1943.

Alice Mallard, aged 19, who saved a girl from drowning at Geelong on March 1a bronze medal.P.6, Argus,5-7-1887.

MR.G.T.GARDNER (Mordialloc), GEORGE ROBBINS (North Fitzroy), JAMES WATSON (Lakes?) Daily Herald (Adelaide, SA : 1910 - 1924) Wednesday 15 January 1919 p 7 Article.

SYLVESTER JACK POMPEI, Mordialloc. Vic, for service to marine search and rescue activities in Port Phillip Bay.
Australia Day Honours,P.6,The Canberra Times, 26-1-1987. Order of Australia Medal.

PATRICK O'DEA, 14, Malvern. Bairnsdale Advertiser and Tambo and Omeo Chronicle, Saturday 7 January 1888 p 3.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 20 April 1888 p 5 Article (Bronze Medallion,Aspendale.)
MISS JEAN McLAREN. The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) Monday 31 January 1949 p 1 Article.
GORDON GRIEVES l/s. P.6,Argus,2-1-1945.
CLAUDE QUIST. l/s. P.6,Argus, 2-1-1945.
Claude Quist, of the Mordialloc Lifesaving Club, ran more than half a mile toward Parkdale at lunchtime
yesterday and then swam 150 yards to the rescue of three girls.etc. P.3,Argus,22-3-1948.
The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954) Monday 27 February 1950 p 1 Article.
MESSRS. E.ALICA, A.SINGLETON, J.MILLAR, T.BALL l/s. P.16,Argus,7-12-1944.
JAMES THOMAS MURRAY (Newport Workshops).P.10,Argus,4-1-1926.
WILLIAM HALKERSON,71, East Brunswick. P.8, Barrier Miner,4-1-1945; The Argus, Friday 5 January 1945 p 5.
HARRY NEAL (at Apollo Bay). News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954) Tuesday 17 March 1936 p 6 Article
ERNEST MITCHELL (Fitzroy), LEMS HENN. P.6,Argus, 14-2-1916.
MISS MARIE AGNES CONROY (Mordialloc). Barrier Daily Truth (Broken Hill, Tuesday 7 January 1941 p 4 Article.
G.T.GARDNER (Mordialloc). See Lakes Entrance.
TEDDY SWORDS,14, Dandenong. Daily Herald (Adelaide, SA : 1910 - 1924) Saturday 8 December 1923 p 7 Article.
P.11,Argus, 4-12-1923.
ALFRED DIXON (Carlton). Cairns Post (Qld. : 1909 - 1954) Monday 13 April 1936 p 7 Article (Alfred's name.)
Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954) Thursday 16 April 1936 p 3 Article. (Mordialloc pier.)
FREDERICK HILSDEN COPPIN (Richmond, George's second son.) P.6,Argus,4-8-1881; P.11,Argus,17-9-1881 (certificate from Victorian Humane Society.)
ALBERT ALEX. STEPHENS, aged 12, who saved a boy from drowning in Mordialloc Creek on March 6, a bronze medal. P.6, Argus,5-7-1887.
GEORGE COOTE. -One of Victoria's most outstanding life savers, George Coote, of Mordialloc, 25 miles from Melbourne, carried an unconscious man on his back in a mile swim to shore at Mordialloc today.etc.
Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954) Monday 27 February 1950 p 4 Article.
The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954) Tuesday 28 February 1950 p 1 Article.
ALEX.FERGUSSON (at Mentone.) The Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954) Saturday 17 April 1943 p 3 Article.
P.3, Army News,Darwin,21-4-1943.
MR.F.WALKER (Korumburra). P.6,Argus,27-2-1900.
R.GARRARD (Olympic wrestler), J.BAILEY, R.JOHNSON,E.ALLICA*, l/s. P.2,Argus,21-3-1939.
JEAN McEACHERN, young l/s. P.3,Argus,28-12-1943.
CLAUDE QUIST*,JOHN CARTER l/s. P.5,The Mercury,Hobart,12-3-1951.
DOUGLAS NORMAN,14,Malvern. P.9,Argus,18-2-1916.
MISS MARY HOWARD.P.4, Argus,15-12-1908.
EDWIN HARRY,Mordialloc scout (at Mentone). P.9,Argus,14-3-1927. (silver cross.)
MR. LESLIE WATKINS,L/S Pres., at Mentone. P.15,Argus,13-1-1947.
MARGARET CAREY,16. P.3, Argus,15-11-1951 (photo.)
JOHN ARIES,14, P.4,The Canberra Times, 30-12-1939.(Saved 13 stone woman.)
Frankston and Somerville Standard (Vic. : 1921 - 1939) Friday 1 May 1936 p 1 Article.

MR H.FURZE, Leongatha. P.8,Argus,8-7-1913.

Gippsland Times (Vic. : 1861 - 1954) Wednesday 15 June 1887 p 3 Article

LOUISA RIPKEY, aged 15, who rescued a boy from drowning at Point Nepean on January 19a silver medal and
JAMES MOORE, aged 28, mounted constable, for assisting Miss Ripkey in the previous casea bronze medal.
both P.6, Argus,5-7-1887.

MESSRS. W.BREEN, G.MARABELLA (MIRABELLA?), W.MOUCHEMORE (at Torquay.) P.7,Argus,11-11-1936.

MR.C.P.GARTSIDE M.L.C. P.5,Argus, 6-2-1951.
EDWARD GLOVER 3rd mate of dredge.P.11 Argus, 11-2-1926.

MESSRS. W.BREEN, Q.MARABELLA (MIRABELLA?), W.MOUCHEMORE (Queenscliff.) P.7,Argus,11-11-1936.

Charles Dingle, aged 25, mate of the steamer Investigator, who saved a man from drowning at Warr- nambool on March 1a bronze medal. P.6, Argus,5-7-1887.

WILLIAM DUNN,12. [ re-find source!!!!!!!]

3 comment(s), latest 10 months, 3 weeks ago


PETER.âOn the 23rd inst., at her residence, Chandos, Broadmeadows, Mary, relict of the late John Peter,
formerly of Tubbo Station, New South Wales, aged 73 years. R.I.P. (p.1, Argus,25-9-1884.)

Funeral Notices.
The Friends of the late Mrs. MARY PETER are invited to follow her remains to the Spencer-street railway station (en route to Wanga Wagga Cemetery).
The funeral will leave her late residence Chandos,Broadmeadows, THIS DAY (Friday, the 20th inst),at half-past 11 o'clock.(P.1,Argus, 26-9-1884.)

Chandos was one of the street names that I suggested for the Alanbrae Estate,the subdivision of "Willowbank" north of Kenny St and the old Broadmeadows Township, now known as Westmeadows.

John Peter bought "Chandos" from the grantee of sections 6 and 15, parish of Tullamarine, John Carre Riddell, the transaction recorded in the memorial volume 170 folio 2. It was part of Riddell and Hamilton's Camieston Estate. It fronted the west side of today's Mickleham Rd from the midline of Londrew Ct. and Freight Rd.(where it adjoined the Junction Estate) north to the Moonee Ponds Creek. Its western boundaries were Derby St (where it adjoined the one acre blocks in Hamilton Terrace)and Wright St (west of which were blocks of about 6 acres that were consolidated into farms such as Wallis Wright's Sunnyside and Charles Nash's Fairview.)

I had always assumed that Bent St in Broadmeadows Township was named after Tommy Bent, politician, but perhaps it was named after Ann Peter's brother.

BENT - On the 10th inst, at the residence of his sister, Mrs. J. Peters, Broadmeadows, John Bent,aged 68 years, NSW papers please copy. (P.1, Argus, 21-2-1880.)

THE Friends of the late Mr. JOHN BENT, are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of interment, Keilor Cemetery. The funeral will move from the residence of Mrs.J Peters, Broadmeadows, THIS DAY, 21st inst., at 3 o'clock. (P.5, Argus, 21-2-1880.)

The children of Broadmeadows Township had a favourite swimming hole on Chandos that they called Peterson's Hole. Rate records revealed that nobody named Peterson occupied Chandos so the hole most likely got its name because Mary Peter's son swam there.

Consisting of 467 acres, Chandos was mainly in section 6. John Cock who was leasing Gladstone (formerly Stewarton and now the northern 777 acres of Gladstone Park) bought Chandos from the Peter Estate and divided it into three farms which became known as Wright's "Strathconan", Bill Lockhart's "Springburn" and Percy Judd's "Chandos Park" of 142, about 188 and 123 acres respectively, Judd's being in section 15.


1 comment(s), latest 4 months, 2 weeks ago


Refer to my earlier QUINLAN journal and the ones about AIRPORT WEST and ABERFELDIE.

At Quarter past Two O Clock. At SCOTTS HOTEL MELBOURNE.

In the Estate of the Late Mr Maurice Quinlan

"WARLABY" is a noble property, consisting of about 648 ACRES having an elegant W B villa, containing 8 lofty rooms thereon with beautiful return verandah surrounded by handsome jarrah picket fence, has also extensive bluestone cattle sheds, stabling, loose boxes, milking sheds, men's quarters, and piggeries.It is situated at Oaklands Junction, in the centre of a flourishing farming district, and renowned for hunting and sport. The country is of volcanic nature, sweet and sound for stock of all descriptions, and is about 7 miles west of Craigieburn railway station and 10 from Essendon by fine metalled road right to the gate.

ST JOHN' S HILL adjoining Warlaby" and Mr Dennis Brannigan's estate, contains about 235 ACRES mostly volcanic land having extensive frontage to the Deep Creek with rich flats and banks thereon admirably adapted for dairying and mixed farming. There is a W.B. house and extensive outbuildings on the property, but in a state of disrepair.

AIREY'S BLOCK, adjacent to the above, is situated on the Wildwood road, about 5 miles from Sunbury, and contains about 18O ACRES of sound grazing and cultivation land having extensive frontage to Deep Creek, with rich irrigable flat thereon, equal to anything in the county of Bourke. This property is fenced and subdivided. Subject to lease expiring 31st March, 1921.

DONNYBROOK. contains 780? ACRES of sound volcanic country, situated on the main Sydney road, about l8 miles from Melbourne, and within 1 mile of the Donnybrook railway station. It is well fenced and permanently watered by the Merri Creek, which forms its eastern boundary. It adjoins the famous Hayesmount Estate of Mr W.Hayes. There is a small W.B. cottage and very fine stockyards erected on the property.

NORTH ESSENDON comprises about 26 ACRES, situated on the main Bulla road, about 1 1/4 miles from the Keilor road electric tram terminus. This property is beautifully fenced, and bordered with live hedges and groups of flourishing handsome gums. Also, about 160 acres separated by a road. It is proposed to subdivide and submit this latter block into 10 allotments, in areas of from about 9 acres to 28 acres each, thus affording persons in quest of farmlets or accommodation paddocks near the city the opportunity of participatlng in the distribution.

"ABERFELDIE", Essendon, the residence of the late Mr Quinlan consisting of handsome bluestone dwelling, containing 9 rooms, bathroom, pantry,scullery, and large vestibule, bluestone stable (5 stalls, loose box, feed room, harness room), man's quarters, and sheds. Land 300ft frontage west side Aberfeldie street situated within ten minutes' walk of Essendon railway station, off Buckley street, and commanding a position that is entitled to be designated as superb.

It is almost superfluous to make further comment on this fine group of freeholds. The brief description given will suggest the importance and value of each property to be submitted. They represent the effort and judgment of one whose knowledge of lands in the county of Bourke was universally recognised.etc.
(P.3,Argus, 26-4-1919.)

The un-named road separating the 160 acres from the 26 acre triangle described as North Essendon was Treadwell Rd. Both of these properties were described in detail in my earlier QUINLAN journal.

"Donnybrook" probably included Donovans Rd north of which the Merri Creek is further from Sydney Rd and a 780 or 730 acre property could fit between the road and creek.

I owe my knowledge of these farms to the late Bob Blackwell who drove me all around the district telling me about its history. If you google FANNING FAMILY HISTORY, click on MORE BULLA PARISH MAPS on the right hand side and go to the second map,you can join me on my tour of the area. Right click on VIEW to enlarge the map.
Section 1 was alienated in these small blocks,probably having been the town common or perhaps a timber reserve originally.Section 2 was William Pomeroy Greene's "Woodlands" on which his pre-fabricated house still proudly stands as the focus of Woodlands Historic Park (the Dundonald homestead on Gellibrand Hill and the Cumberland homestead not making the cut!) The east end of Somerton Rd linking with Bulla Rd was named after the family but somehow was rendered as Green, and is now just called Somerton Rd.Rawdon St in Bulla is named after his son.Greene St led to Hunter's "Lockton"(5A), north of which was Captain Airey's grant (5B). If my memory is correct David Patullo of "Craigbank" (across Emu Creek) owned Airey's for quite some time.

Section 4, east of Lochton and Airey's was granted to Ann Greene, W.P.Greene's widow. I think Walter Clark of Glenara bought it as part of the Clark Estate and I am unaware if it ever had a name. Across Oaklands Rd is section 3, granted to Bulla's pioneer, Tulip Wright.This was subdivided quite early with the Daniel (of "Narbonne") and Carroll families being early settlers. James Musgrove, a famed implements maker, settled in its south west corner.

Section 8 and 7B were granted to Peter Young who is mentioned quite extensively in one of my journals,and called his property "Nairn". Section 9 was called "Dunalister" by Walter Clark when he purchased it. The name was possibly associated with Walter's son,Alister,breeder of the black rose and Chairman of the Moonee Valley Racing Club until his death. Bob Blackwell later managed the property until it was sold and when the new owner decided to call it Balbethan, Bob used the name for his farm at Elmore.

Cameron's section 11 became Robert McDougall's "Warlaby" from which the Oaklands Hunt Club's first event (a paper trail laid out by Farquhar McRae) commenced in 1888. Section 10 was "Oaklands" which gave the road its name. I.W.Symonds' "Bulla Bulla" states that the Brannigans owned St John's Hill(17A) and they certainly did as Maurice Crotty (later of Broomfield on the HONDA corner of Sharps Rd and (now) Keilor Park Drive) worked for the horse-mad Brannigans before moving to the "Springs" at Tullamarine. St John Rd(off Wildwood Rd) was a short cut to the property. The Brannigans had obviously moved to 17B by the time of the above sale.

Section 18 was Harpsdale, Dyson Holland's closer settlement farm (18A)being called "Dunoon" if I remember correctly what Jack Simmie told me over 20 years ago. Jack showed me the Brodie crest set into the floor tiles near the entry of the Harpdale homestead.


In 1912-13, a Seaford farmer was the last to occupy the 57 acre Hindhope Estate at Rosebud, bounded by First Avenue, Pt Nepean Rd and Boneo Rd and extending south to Hindhope Villa (50 First Avenue) and all Hope St house blocks. When section A was subdivided shortly afterwards the developer (Thomas)obviously wanted to honour John McComb*, but unfortunately the surveyor called the first street on the estate McCombe St.

*The Shire of Flinders rates until 1919-20 are available on microfiche in the local history room at the Rosebud Library. Gregory Rigg and his wife Eleanor had 29 acres each in 1911-12,having purchased one block from the Randalls (who gave Hindhope its name)some years earlier and the other later from an unestablished vendor. Names of ratepayers were listed alphabetically and there was no Rigg entry in 1912-13. A search of every entry in the West Riding established that John McComb, Carrum, (assessment number 1152)who was assessed on part crown allotment 14, Wannaeue (nett annual value 25 pounds)was occupying Hindhope. From memory,I'm sure Ramsay and Nora Couper still had "The Thicket", the other 54 acres of crown allotment 14 between the present Hope St houses and Raper's Lane (Eastbourne Rd.) Also, newspaper articles make it clear that the Riggs owned Hindhope and I have titles documents recording change of ownership of Hindhope from the Riggs to Arthur A.Thomas of 19 Queen St Melbourne.In 1913-14 John McComb's name had been entered (and that's probably where I got the description of "Seaford farmer") in its appropriate place under M, but it was crossed out and replaced by that of Thomas. The above makes it clear that John McComb leased Hindhope from the Riggs for a year. It is possible that the lease was cancelled by agreement between the Riggs and John McComb and that it had been a condition of the sale to Thomas that the first street was to be named in honour of John and his pioneering family. The Riggs and McCombs could well have been friends. Arthur A.Thomas probably didn't know John McComb, otherwise he might have detected the incorrect E at the end of the street name on the subdivision plan for Block A. Many street names honour longtime owners of land in the area but there would be few that recall people who LEASED the land FOR A SINGLE YEAR. Therefore the people who decided the name (probably the Riggs)must have had a special reason. Was it to honour a family which was among the earliest pioneers of the Mornington Peninsula? What would even a young child make of the logic of a statement such as: McCOMBE ST IN ROSEBUD IS NAMED AFTER JOHN McCOMB, A DECENDANT OF A PIONEERING FAMILY OF FRANKSTON. Perhaps we could have Wedgee,Daveye and Wellse streets too, to honour other Frankston pioneers! The big hill south of Frankston could be renamed Olivere's Hill to continue the joke!

Lovers of historical accuracy, especially Frankston residents who are proud of their town's history, should contact the Mornington Peninsula Shire in great numbers to demand that the spelling of this street name be corrected. Read about this pioneering family. There are several photos.
N.B. South Melbourne was known as Canvas Town,the Governor having had the area surveyed for a tent city to cope with the incredible influx of new chums who had been lured by the prospect of striking it rich at the diggings; permanent dwellings were fully occupied despite outrageous rents. Emerald Hill was South Melbourne's second name.

Grace McComb Was Frankston's Florence Nightingale
Tribute to Oldest Family of District Pioneers
An inscription on the stone wall of the main entrance to the Frankston Cemetery reads: "This entrance was erected in August, 1926, by grateful friends, to the Memory of the late Mrs. Grace McComb for her goodness," while on a grave just inside the entrance appears the words: "Erected to the Memory of Thomas and Grace McComb, Pioneers of Frankston, 1852."

Only a period of a few months separated the arrival of the first settler in Frankston, Mr. James Davey (Oliver's Hill), and the McComb family, whose first home was a tent on the beach, near the Fernery, held under a Miner's Right, at payment of £10 per year to the Crown. The noble deeds of Mrs. Grace McComb, as maternity nurse, and only "doctor" for 40 years in Frankston district, establish the everlasting glory of her name as the greatest woman in all Frankston's history

Frankston's Florence Nightingale.
"Lives of Great Men."
Her husband, Thomas, and all members of the pioneer McComb family, have likewise left their mark of fame on the scroll of district history, progress, and achievement, to be admired by a grateful public and generations
to come.

An Adventurous Scotswoman.
Far back in 1833, a young Mate on a windjammer, Thomas McComb, sailed in his ship to Tasmania from Greenoch (Scotland). Thomas liked Tasmania so much that he did not return to Scotland with his ship, but transferred to a Government boat at Port Arthur. Here he married his wife, Grace, a Tasmanian girl, on August 20, 1844.
At the outbreak of the gold rush at Forest Hill (Castlemaine), Thomas McComb came to the mainland to prospect for gold, but finding it too expensive, he returned to Tasmania, and came back, with his wife and family, in 1851, to Melbourne, where their fourth child was born.
MR. HARRY McCOMB (photo.)

Dear Rents Then, Too.
Evidently rents were dear, long before the present 1949 era, as the McComb family paid £1 per week for one room in Bourke Street, Melbourne, in 1851. Ejected from the room by a "tough" landlord, they were forced to pitch a tent on the banks of the Yarra. Thomas McComb got a job in charge of a lighter on the River Yarra, and the family moved to Emerald Hill (now South Melbourne). When Grace McComb developed "Colonial fever" a doctor advised residence at the seaside, her husband bought in with a company of fishermen, and came to live at Frankston, in a tent near the Fernery, by permission of Mr. Wedge, who rented the ground from the Crown.

Three Great Veterans.
For the wonderful story written here, "The Standard" is grateful to the three surviving members of the McComb family (there were originally 11 children). They are Mr. Harry McComb, 87 years, and Miss Agnes McComb, 84 (both of 26 NolanStreet, and Mrs. Martha Grace Pitchford, 82 (William Street).Despite their great ages, all are hale and hearty veterans, who have worthily upheld the tradition, of their famous parents. And so we continue their fascinating story:

Nursed Frankston's First Baby.
Only the day after the arrival of the McCombs in Frankston, a baby arrived to the Davey family,and Mr. Davey made an urgent call on Mrs. Grace McComb, who safely delivered the "new citizen" to Frankston. The nurse had a
hurried walk up the steep and rough Oliver's Hill of those days,(then known as "Old man Davey's Hill"-itellya)
but she was to be richly rewarded, for the strenuous exertions of the night journey to the top cured the "Colonial fever." The first McComb baby born in Frankston was Helen (deceased). Frankston in those early days
was a great place for visitors, who used to journey up from the Heads on foot, or per horseback, and some by boat. Mrs.McComb had a busy time serving them with meals.

First Land Sale.
The first Frankston land sale was a wonderful affair, with a big crowd. Many of them had walked all the way to Melbourne where the sales were held. Thomas McComb found the land too dear at the sale,but later bought five acres in William Street, on which he built his home.

Grand Fishing Tradition.
Fishing and wood-cutting comprised the only employment in Frankston in those early days, and the fishing industry, pioneered by Thomas, has continued down the ages to the present day in the McComb family, with
popular "Old Ted" McComb (grandson of Thomas McComb Senr., and son of Thomas McComb Junr.) and his sons ably
carrying on the great sea tradition of Frankston. In his retiring years, Thomas McComb, who died in 1889, at the age of 81, performed the duty of lighting the lamp on the Frankston Pier. Grace McComb died in 1915, at
the grand old age of 88, and with the noble record of Australian womanhood referred to above.

Only Two Shops.
For many years there was not a formed road or a fence in Frankston district, only sand tracks. For a very long time, there were only two shops in Frankston -Yockins in Davey Street, and Patterson's in High Street. Mr. James Davey had the first hotel - the old "Bay View" (now the Grand).

The First School.
The first school was a Common School, at the rear of the present St. Paul's Church of England. Carrying a baby in her arms, Mrs Grace McComb trudged round the sand tracks till she obtained the 20 signatures required for the first State School, on its present site. The three surviving McCombs were amongst the first children at the first school. The first teacher was a former tutor employed by the late Mr. Frank Stevens (Oliver's Hill), now
Grimwade's property.

Blacks' Camp at Mechanics'.
Tribes of blacks came to Frankston whenever the eels came down the Kananook Creek. They camped in mia mias, under a big honeysuckle tree, on the ridge in front of the Mechanics' Institute, and always had a large
pack of dogs. One son, the late Jim McComb, was one of the founders of the Mechanics' Institute in Frankston, when "penny entertainments". were a feature of its early revenue activities. Jim was later Shire Engineer at Lilydale. Brother Joe was a great student of politics, and a keen member of the Taxpayers' Association, with Mr. Charles Gray. John had a successful career on the railways, retiring as a roadmaster. His death occurred
at 84 years.

Each of the three surviving veterans were loath to speak about their own achievements, but from here and there we pieced together a series of wonderful facts.

Founder of Housewives' and Baby Welfare.
Miss Agnes McComb, whose house and effects were totally destroyed by fire two years ago, was treasurer of the Housewives' Association (which she founded) for over 20 years, and retired from the position only last year.
Miss McComb was also the prime mover for a Baby Health Centre in Frankston, and went round, as first secretary, for 12 months, till the Centre was established.

Her sister, Mrs. Pitchford, is known as a great Red Cross worker. All three, like the McCombs before them, and other relatives, are keen members and workers for the local Methodist Church, and have always helped to their utmost in all movements for the benefit of the district, and its community.

Where Were "Those Good Old Days?"
Mr. Harry McComb told "The Standard" representative, wistfully, that he wished the present time had been his hey-day, as in his time men never got very much, either in work or wages. He spent 16 years as Shire foreman, but prior to that had to leave the town in search of work.

A Fine Cricketer.
In his day, Harry McComb was a noted cricketer; cricket being always his hobby. He played for many years with the Frankston team, since its inception (from
approximately 80 years ago), when the present Cranbourne (Cranbourne Rd? Possibly Samuel Sherlock Reserve,where the new Peninsula Aquatic Centre now stands-itellya) Oval was cleared. His best year was at the age of 19, when he won the batting average trophy (a bat given by Mr. Lawrence, a MR. TED McCOMB. (photo)Mordialloc banker) with an average of 54 runs for five matches (prior to leaving the district). His brother Joe, with an average of 51 for seven matches, won the trophy given the same year by the Fishing Company. Harry was an opening batsman, for Frankston, with the late famous Jack Sadlier (first bank manager).
Harry generally tossed with Sadlier as to who would go in first. Harry was also a good left-hand bowler.
Harry McComb played later with the Contemplar Lodge team, Prahran, for three years. On the wall of the McComb home is a large framed group of cricketers, with Harry's photo in the centre. The inscription reads: "Victorian
Lodge Cricket Club, 1889. presented to H. McComb, (Captain) as a token of esteem for past services rendered.

Best Footballer and Cricketer.
Asked for his opinion of the best footballer and cricketer in Frankston's history, Mr. Harry McComb declared enthusiastically and unhesitatingly for "Joker" Cameron (football), and Ben Baxter (cricket).

A Symbol.
The tides will wash away many things from Frankston beaches for generations to come, but the great honored name of McComb is indelibly written in our sands for all time, and as a symbol for all who will follow them as
citizens of Frankston. (P.43, Frankston Standard, 5-10-1949.)

Let's hope that one day the Rosebud street named after this pioneering family will bear the correct name!


It's not often that I base a new journal on just one incident. There are six people mentioned in this story, an Australia-wide hero in 1905, a renowned wooden boat builder, an un-named Greek fisherman, the son of a circa 1871 Dromana pioneer, a boy who saved a life shortly before leaving for America (1918) and achieving fame and the son of one of the PIONEERING NEIGHBOURS NEAR CARRIGG ST,DROMANA.

The funny thing is that I would never have found this story if I had not been contacted by Shah about her ancestors who arrived in Rosebud in about 1938. Her father had not known Bill Chatfield of Rosebud West to be a fisherman and I told her that Bill's fishing operation was taken over by a Swede,but like Vin Burnham in his memoirs of life in early Rosebud,I couldn't remember his name. (I just remembered that it was Axel Vincent!)

In the hope of finding it,I did a search for "Rosebud, fisherman" on trove.


DROMANA, Saturday.
A strong easterly wind, a choppy sea, A motor engine in need of repair, and a lucky escape were the chief features of an unpleasant experience which befell Mr Ernest Rudduck, a well-known grocer of Dromana, on the Bay last evening. Intending to have the engine repaired at Rosebud Mr Rudduck arranged with an elderly Greek fisherman to tow the boat, but he started from the Dromana pier alone shortly before 6 p.m., presumably
through a misunderstanding. The Greek failed to overtake the boat, and as the wind increased in force, Mr Rudduck was soon in difficulties. A return to Dromana was impossible, and to continue to drift meant increasing the danger of his already perilous position.

Observing Mr Rudduck's plight from the pier, Ewart Brindle, a lad of about 12, rode to Rosebud on a bicycle to seek assistance. A few minute after his arrival William Ferrier and Mitchell Lacco, well-known fishermen, John McLear, grocer, and Brindle were facing the gale in a fishing boat, and being drenched to the skin as the waves dashed over the vessel.

When the motor boat was reached it was drifting rapidly in the direction ofthe Heads, and had the rescue been delayed the incident might have been attended by still more unpleasant effects. The fishing boat, however, towed it safely to the Rosebud jetty, where the little group of watchers congratulated Mr Rudduck on his escape, and warmly commended the rescuers on their skilful handling of the boat in the trying circumstances.

Ferrier and Lacco are noted for their fearlessness at sea. Some years ago when the barque La Bella was wrecked offWarrnambool, and when all others considered it suicidal to attempt a rescue, Ferrier rowed to the scene of the disaster in a dinghy saving three of those on board. For his courage the citizens presented him with a purse of sovereigns.
(P.4,The Ballarat Courier, 24-1-1916.)

Ewart Brindle was more likely on the pier to sketch vessels sailing past rather than fishing. It hardly seems to have been a day for fishing. Twenty or so years after leaving Dromana,he produced a fabulous map of Dromana that is a history on its own. This map is available from the Dromana Historical Society. With such fabulous recall,his omission of his heroic deed from his recollections of his days as a schoolboy at Dromana, must have been due to modesty. See my journal THE FAMED MELBOURNE BRINDLE.

Much information about Fred and his stepdaughter Mary B.Stone (a.k.a. Polly Vine)is given in Peter Wilson's ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD. Fred was one of the original grantees in the Rosebud Fishing Village but was associated with Dromana from early days,Vine being one of the original names on the Dromana State School roll in 1873,the Rosebud school opening a decade later. Fred later lived in a hut on the Dromana foreshore,roughly opposite Seacombe St. How would I know this? Melbourne Brindle's map,of course! There is a photo of Mary in Peter's book and one of Fred on page 73 of Colin McLear's A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.

Son of Nelson and Jane Sophia Rudduck, Ernie expanded the family business to Rosebud and when the shop was burnt in a bushfire, he soon replaced it. He leased the shop to Rosebud residents. Nelson was the grantee of two Rosebud Fishing Village blocks and donated one of them for the Methodist Church. Three reminders of the Rudduck family in Dromana are the beautiful two-storey Piawola, on the highway just east of Arthur St, Karadoc St on "Karadoc" (as is also the vacant paddock donated by the family for the Dromana Bush Nursing Hospital) and Ruddock Square on the foreshorejust east of the Pier.

See my journal WILLIAM FERRIER: AUSTRALIA-WIDE HERO IN 1905. William sailed out to the wreck with his disabled arm strapped to the mast. Despite this error,the article does credit to the journalist.

I've written a journal about the Laccos. Fort Lacco married a King girl whose sister married a Greek fisherman who probably died after their son, Tony, was born. His mother, Emily, later became Mrs Durham and Tony adopted this surname. Emily later owned Fort's Rosebud Fishing Village block on the east side of Durham Place. Tony's grand daughter was Judith Mavis Cock,better known as Judith Durham of The Seekers. The Laccos are revered as builders of wooden boats and the Rosebud Chamber of Commerce has installed a wooden statue of Mitch Lacco on the Murray-Anderson Rd corner, just across that road from thesite of his boat building premises. Mitchell St may have been named after Mitch.

John McLear married Janet Cairns of Boneo and settled just east of the Dromana Hotel. With Harry Copp and Dohn Griffith,he was one of Dromana's professional fishermen. As he was about 70 at the time of this incident,and died in 1918,it was more likely his son, John (Nip), aged 32, who took part in the rescue. I quote from page 104 of A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.

John (Nip) lived out his life at his father's home.He was Ern Rudduck's right-hand man in the (Dromana) Jetty Store for forty years or more and roved to him in the local football team.... In earlier days he had fished with his father. At one stage he drove Rudduck's grocery cart around the mountain bringing supplies to customers.

As Ernie Rudduck's wife's family seems to have arrived in Dromana not long before W.W.1, the four heroes probably also ensured the lives of Ernie's three children: Rene (Mrs King)who died at Mt Martha in 1988, Grenfell, a very prominent architect honoured by a plaque near Lake Burley Griffin in Canberra, and Jack, who starred in sport and academics at Wesley College and was the school captain before becoming a pioneer of the great Australian outback. Jack was killed in 1956 while accompanying his sick youngest daughter on a Flying Doctor plane; it crashed in a violent storm and all aboard were killed.(A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.)

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