itellya on FamilyTreeCircles - journals

itellya on Family Tree Circles

sort: Date Alphabetical
view: full | list

Journals and Posts


A LOT OF BULL ABOUT GLENROY? (MELBOURNE, VICTORIA,AUSTRALIA.)

I HAD A DREAM! It was an obituary of a member of the Corrigan family and mentioned the Lavars and Corrigans being early settlers on Donald Kennedy's Dundonald Estate,followed by my great grandfather,John Cock, a clever piece of writing by my subconscious,but as I stated only a dream. However,the dream got me started on a Corrigan investigation. One obituary that actually did exist was that of (James Joseph?)Corrigan who was born in 1858 at Greenvale*,educated at the Broadmeadows School and Carlton College and worked in the Education Department, eventually retiring to N.S.W. where he died.
*This was possibly on Dundonald, Gellibrand Hill being partly in the parish of Yuroke, with Swain St indicating the boundary; the Corrigans, who left Adelaide in 1854,may also have been on the Machell brothers' subdivision of 2C, Yuroke. The part of Yuroke near today's Somerton Rd was known as Greenvale from 1869 when school 890 was opened on the Section Rd corner and named after John McKerchar's farm across the (future) road.

Realising that I'd probably written plenty about the Corrigans in my DUNDONALD ESTATE journal, I decided I'd check on Andrew Lemon's claim that Donald and Duncan Kennedy had acquired the Glenroy and Dundonald estates in the mid 1840's.

PARDON THE UNCORRECTED DIGITISATION AND COLUMN LENGTH LINES. I REALLY HAVE TO GET GOING RE THE RED HILL REUNION WHICH IS NEXT SUNDAY BUT I THOUGHT THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION SHOULD APPEAR IN A SEPARATE JOURNAL.

I have always harboured a suspicion that Donald Kennedy was somehow related to the Camerons of "Glenroy". The Camerons have been said about a million times to have so-named their RUN. Andrew Lemon (BROADMEADOWS A FORGOTTEN HISTORY) states that the Glenroy Estate (bounded by the Moonee Ponds Creek, Campbellfield (Camp) Rd, a line indicatedby the eastern boundary of the Northern Golf Club, and Rhodes Pde, was leased by the Camerons from speculators, Hughes and Hosking, from whom the Kennedys bought it in the mid 1840's. Hughes and Hosking had bought the Glenroy Estate in Sydney on 12-9-1838 so if the Camerons did have a run before the purchase it would not have been for very long.

I suspect that Donald and Duncan Kennedy's mother may have been a Cameron*. I wonder if Donald Kennedy or the Camerons actually CLAIMED to have given Glenroy its name or that others, aware of a link that they had with Glenroy (Invernessshire?), just assumed that they had. This obituary is the only trove correction made by the person who corrected the digitisation.

*ANOTHER GOOD GUESS.
Kennedy, Donald Angus

Born 1807 (Glenroy, Lochaber, Inverness-shire.)
Died 29 February 1864. (Melbourne)
Parents: Angus, farmer, and Grace, nee Cameron.
Marriage: Jessie Grace Shannon; no children
Occupation: Pastoralist
Religion: Presbyterian
(Kennedy, Donald Angus - Parliament of Victoria - Re-Member
www.parliament.vic.gov.au › About Parliament › People in Parliament)


I am not saying that claims about the Camerons naming Glenroy are "A LOT OF BULL", although that was my first reaction when I read Donald Kennedy's obituary. However, it is only right that Donald Kennedy should at least be mentioned in relation to the origin of the suburb's name.

THE LATE MR. DONALD KENNEDY.
The community should not readily let slip
the memory of the man whose remains the
grave this day receives. We have among us
too few of the stamp of Donald Kennedy to
be entitled to pass over his death with a scant
word of comment or regret. It is a custom
conceived in a spirit of justice, that when
men die who have done their generation good
service, their obituary should not be ranked
with that of the multitude who have left the
world no better for their existence than they
found it. We are too young as a com-
munity to have acquired the material
for a pantheon ; public life is too quick
and changeful among us, and public charac-
ters shift to and fro too fleetingly on the
stage, for the public writer to catch the
lineaments of the actors, and stereotype them
for the contemplation of posterity. But
though there is no room as yet for a national
Plutarch, though it may be premature to keep
a registry of our heroes, we regard it as
the duty of those who are responsible for the
cultivation of the public mind, to call atten-
tion to events that point a moral for our
everyday life. The recognition of worth and
merit is not limited by chronology. The
death of its social benefactors has always its
lesson for society. A superficial glance at
the records of Mr. Donald Kennedy's career
would probably fail to detect any of that
noisy prominence which is the presumptive
evidence of social and political vitality
amongst us, but those who looked beneath the
unostentatious demeanour have found a
solidity and a sterlingness and a conscien-
tiousness of character that the possession of a
Parliamentary tongue does not necessarily
guarantee. No man in his generation has
used his influence with more sobriety and
moderation, or been less ostentatious of his
power, yet every one who is conversant with
our history can own to occasions when no
man's power and influence have been
more felt, in the form of a timely hint,
a wise suggestion, or a quick-witted cau-
tion. His active career as a public
man really commenced in 1853, when
be contested the representation of North
Bourke with the late Mr. Burnley. There
is some archaeological curiosity attached to
the history of the transaction. His address
to the electors had been issued while he was
in Sydney, but the effect of his personal can-
didature had been to secure him a very flat-
tering majority. It so happened, however,
that under the crude and unwholesome elec-
toral system of those days, no provision had
been made for taking the poll at Bacchus
Marsh. A Government Gazette Extraordinary
remedied the oversight by appointing a
subsequent day for voting, but the re-
sult was that the election was reversed,
and Mr. Kennedy was sacrificed to
the blunder of a returning officer. He was,
however, afterwards nominated to a seat in
the Council by the Governor, some twelve or
eighteen months before the publication of the
new Constitution, and continued a member
of that body till its dissolution. He was elected
in 1856 for the Southern Province. Though
he died a member of the Upper Chamber, his
name may not be familiar to those who look
only to Hansard for the measure of a public
man's success. The turbulent arena of debate
was not the scene of his activity. His intel-
lect, a not unmasculine one, was in every
way equal to the occasion, but a more than
ordinary graceful diffidence of disposition dis-
inclined him for demonstration. But that he
did not shrink from the responsibilities of a
public station is shown by the fact that he was
a commissioner of the savings banks, deputy
governor of the Colonial Bank (of which he was
one of the projectors), a director of the North-
ern Insurance Company, a member of the
Managing Committee of the Model Farm, and
for many years president of the Port Philip
Farmers' Society. The story of his private life is
soon told. He was a native of Glenroy, Lochaber,
Inverness-shire, son of Mr. Kennedy, of
Leinachar, and he had paced some thirty
years in Sydney and Victoria, when disease
of the heart suddenly closed his career on
Monday evening. He has left a widow, a
daughter of the late Captain Shannon, but
no family, to inherit the large property or
the Moonee Ponds, which he has named
after his native valley
. His good name is an
inheritance that belongs to the state, not
very rich, unfortunately, in such bequests. In
every capacity of his career, he is entitled to
honourable mention in the death-list of its
citizens. His circle of friends was a wide
one, for his large heart was never closed to
the appeal of the most transient friendship
while his tenants and underlings will have
to regret the loss of a kind and considerate
landlord. He will, we believe, be buried from
the house of Dr. Motherwell, in Collins street,
at four o'clock p.m. this day, and we may
expect that the esteem and affection which
he won for himself throughout life will be
reflected in the respectful interest that will
be testified at the last office which can be
done for worth and merit, however rare.
(P.5, Argus,2-3-1864.



RIVALRY.
The Melbourne, Sydney rivalry exists still today with the convict city trying to pinch the grand prix. The Holden,Ford rivalry results in great numbers of Australian men ,donning red or blue to indicate their tribal loyalty,especially when Bathurst draws nigh,a tradition likely to end because of free trade.

Another rivalry,just as intense, existed between Shorthorn breeders. There were two strains: Booth and Bates. Robert McDougall was a supporter of the Booth Strain and even named his Oaklands Rd property (Melway 384 J8)
after Major Booth's shorthorn stud in the old country. Robert is mentioned in the following article but the writer failed to mention that Robert had started breeding his prized Booth herd in the 1850's on "Cona",part of the Glenroy Estate, before leasing Aitken's Estate between today's Essendon and Avondale Heights. He moved onto Arundel circa 1870 after his (unfortunately fenestrated) mansion was built.

Harry Peck mentioned that Henry Stephenson of "Niddrie" (west of Treadwell St corner and north to Fraser St in Airport West)was a Bates supporter (just like William McCulloch,below) and that the Booth/Baines rivalry was so great that Henry and his neighbour, Robert McDougall, refused to speak to each other. Stephenson and McDougall (of Niddrie and Arundel respectively) did not actually live next door to each other, those properties being miles apart, but had adjoining land on section 23 Doutta Galla. Stephenson's 300 acre portion being near Strathmore Heights and McDougall's near Strathmore North. McDougall would have often seen his eastern 200 acres
decades earlier while travelling between Melbourne and Cona along the old Sydney road.

Thus one of the reasons for "A LOT OF BULL" in the title of this journal.


The Glenroy Herd.
By Demetrius.
In travelling by the overland route from Sydney to Mel
bourne, could one view the Eurrounding country within 10
or a dozen miles of the Southern metropolis, which unfor
tunately the night journey does not admit of, he could not
but admire the evidently rich pastoral country, lightly
timbered and rolling in appearance, dotted here and there
with bright and airv looking homesteads of a better class
description, a district which has long been recognised as
much for its strength as a far nine; and grazing neighbour
hood, as for its close proximity to Melbourne. The overland
railway at this point 'runs throngh some estates of consider
able importance, and again allowing that we have tho
advantage ot daylight, the leading residences can be readily
recognised. Away to tho right, and nestling prettily on a
hill side is Mre-. Donald Kennedy's, Dundonald House ; a
mile or two down in the valley and the housetops of Broad
meadows village is seen, while a few miles further to the
westward and Mr. Robert M'Dougall's Arundcl estate is
observed, in turn arc viewel the Glenrcy homestead close by
the railway line, and with Mr. Robertson's Aberfeldie Park,
the last estate is swiftly passed prior to entering the suburbs
of Melbourne.
Much could be said about the pretty farming neighbour
hood did space but permit, and on this occasion I mu6t
content myself in the description of an estate, which will
unquestionably be of great interest to most of my readers
throughout this colony. Glenroy has been long noted as a
grazing property considerably above the average, but since
its occupation by the Hon. Williain M'Culloch,' a gentle
man who has within late years entered extensively into
importing and breeding a high description of shorthorn
pedigree stock, it lias greatly come into notice with the
cattle broodei'B of this and tlie neighbouring colonies.
Having received an invitation from Mr. M'Culloch during
the recent Victorian National Agricultural Society's Show,
to have a look at the Glenroy herd, 1 gladly accepted, inas
much as this estitc is one of the most celebrated of its class
within easy distance of Melbourne. Glenroy is situated
within a mile of tbe Broadtneadows railway station— and
comprises uu extent of 730 acres. Since its purchase by the
present owner, no expense has been spared in improvements,
all of which are noticed to be of a convenient and service
able description. The soil comprises a strong white clay
for the most part, showing in places some rich chocolate
patches, both varieties of which are highly suited for the grass
pasturage on which in a great measure the working of the
estate depends.
In adopting the breed of high class pedigree cattle as a
speciality at Glenroy, Mr. M'Culloch, evidently with the
experience of former years, acted on correct principles in
visiting England to secure the very best description of
cattle that could be procured in the mother country, and the
success attending his trip is only too generally known. ' 1
spent fully two years,' remarks Mr. M'Culloch, ' in a
critical examination of the leading herds, and in attending
every shorthorn sale of importance before I made those
selections which now form the Glenroy herd.' The result
of his observation ultimately turned in favour of the Bates'
strain, and although the venture has proved a costly one,
selections from the most valuable of the Eirklivington
tribes were decided on. Ambitious to found such a herd in
his ' adopted country ' as should rival the leading herds of
England and America Mr. M'Culloch spared neither time,
labour, nor expense in getting together his present fine herd,
and after the leading purchases had been completed it was
pleasing to know that the most experienced and impartial
judges had pronounced the dictum, that, in the possession
both of high lineage and personal merit, the collection is
one which takes the highest rank in any country. A visit
to Glenroy is most interesting throughout. In the first
place everything is conducive to pleasantry. Mr. M'Culloch
as a host has few if any equals, while the homestead
appointments are so complete that no difficulty or unusual
effort is incurred in viewing the stock, ranging from the
magnificently bred bull — Duke of Underley 5th— down to
the smallest and moat helpless heifer calf. Fhe cattle sheds
are of the most replete description, brick-built, well lighted,
high in the walls and having asphalted floor. Thev
contain 27 loose boxes for young bulls, besides two boxes
attached to the stud bull paddocks for the use of Duke of
Underley 5th and Duke of Oxford 31st. There are also
24 stalls used for shorthorn cows that are milking, but all
cattle are turned out at night, summer and winter, except
young bulls and newly calved cows.
Our steps were first directed to these sheds where very
hoice looking young bolls ranging from yearlings down
wards were on view. They are principallv the progeny of
the two Sires Duke of Underley 5th and Duke of Oxford
31st, out of the leading imported cows belonging to the
herd. It would be preposterous to attempt to particularise
the appearance of some eight of these perfect little noble
men ranging between the ages of six months and 12
months' old — suffice to say that in point of lines and
general appearance the greater number of them show pro
mise of becoming in the future the most famous exhibition
cattle of the colony. In keeping with the rule adopted by
the most celebrated breeders in England Mr. M'Culloch
does not exhibit his stock at the various agricultural
society's shows, inasmuch as to prepare the cattle for show
purposes is considered by many to be detrimental to the
general welfare of the herd. This derision, however, has
not prevented purchases from the Glen-oy herd being
placed on exhibition, and bulls bred by 'Mr. William
M'Culloch have secured many high honours in the principal
show yards of the leading agricultural societies of Victoria.
Such purchases have not been confined to 'Victoria alone,
but have secured prizes in Queensland and New Zealand,
and even during the late metropolitan exhibition in this colony
contributed the champion bull, in Mr. A. A. Dangar's Hill
hurst, 6th Duke, a bull which likewise took principal
honours in the leading Northern shows of this colony.
In the»Glenroy herd, considering that the very best
shorthorn strains arc in use, it is not at all surprising that
Mr. M'Culloch should, in selling young bulls obtain some
of the highest ruling prices. The herd is so favourably
known that a minimum price per head is fixed by the
breeder, and even beyond this pome very large prices are
obtained. Nor yet are the heifer calves in point of merit
less important. We were shown some dozen or so perfect
little gems under five months old, as also about an equal
number of bull calves of similar age.
Having looked at the youngsters, the aristocratic bred
bull Duke of Underley 5th was walked out for inspection.
Calved in'October, 1878, he was bred by the Earl of Bective,
and was secured at great cost for the Glenroy herd. He is
of a yellowish white colour, and shows a majestic appear
ance, uniting the grandeur of his distinguished parents.
He is a well-tempered, full-eyed bull, with rich hair and
quality of flesh, and when properly viewed is seen to carry
an imposing frame, and to use a cattle fancier's phrase,
' covers plenty of ground.' Hi; is not only a fashionably
but a soundly bred animal, and as a number of his stock arc
I being procured for this and the adjoining colonies I give his
pedigree as follows : —
Sire Grand Duke 31ft 3837-1, 11. E. Oliver; dam, Duchess
of Lancaster, by 2nd Duke of Treirunter 20022, Colonel
Guntcr; 2 dam,' 10th Duchess of Gi-ncva, by 2nd Duke
of Geneva 23752, J. O. Sheldon ; 3 dam, 5th Duchess
of Geneva, by Grand Duke of Oxford 1G184, Colonel
Gunter; i dam,' Dueliuss of Geneva, by Grand Duke 2nd 121)61,
8. E. BoWen ; 5 dam, Duchess 71st, by Duke of Glo'ster 11382,
Karl Ducie ; 6 dam, Ducuess CGth, by '4th Duke of York 10107,
T. Bates ; 7 dam, Duchess 55th, by 4th Duke of Northumberland
3G19, T. Bates; 8 dain, Duchess 38th. by Norfolk 2377, J.
Wnitaker; 9 dam, Duchess 33rd, by Belvedere 170G, J. Ste
phenson; 10 dam, Duchess 19th, by Second Ilubbak 1423, T.
Bates ; 11 dam, Duchess 12th, by The Earl G4G, T. Bates ; 12 dam,
Duchess 4th, by Ketton 2nd 710, T. Bates ; 13 dam, Duchess 1st,
by Comet 155, C. Colling; 14 dam, by Favourite 252, C. Coiling j
15 dam, by Daisy Bull 186, C. Colling ; 16 dam, by Favourite
252, C. Colling ; 17 dam, by Hubbuck 310, J. Hunter; 18 dam,
by J. Brown's Red Bull 97, J. Thompson.
His dam, Duchess of Lancaster, said to be a very thick
massive cow of beautiful symmetry, is one of the purest
representatives of the Duchess tribe in existence. Tenth
Duchess of Geneva, a very grand cow, and her daughter,
Eighth Duchess of Oneida, were purchased for the Earl of
Bective, at the great New York Mills 6ale in 1873, the
former for 7000 guineas and the latter for 3060 guineas, at
which sale this line of blood was in great demand, 15
Duchesses and Dukes realising the enormous suji of
£55,198 10s., or an average of £3679 18s. Tenth Duchess
of Geneva is the dam of the famous Duke of Underley
33745, who is said to have earned in fees upwards ot £4000.
Her daughter, Eighth Duchess of Oneida, was the dam of
Duke of Underley 2nd 36551, sold to Sir C. M. Lampson,
Bart., for 1750 guineas, and of Duke of Underley 3rd
38196, purchased by the Duke of Manchester, when a calf,
for 3000 guineas.
Another stud bull showing aristocratic lineage was shown
us in Duke of Oxford 31st -33713), calved in July 26, 1874,
and bred by bis Grace the Duke of Devonshire. He is a
rich roan, showing splendid proportions throughout. His
head, which is particularly neat, is supported by a propor
tionate neck. He displays a great depth of fore arm, while
the back, flank, and loins are far from being faulty. He
shows a further perfection in his deep and heavy quarters
and well-fleshed locks. Duke of Oxford 31st is by Sir
Baroa Oxford 4th, dam Grand Duchess of Oxford 11th,
g. dam Duchess of Oxford 5th, g. g. dam Countess of
Oxford, g. g. g. dam Oxford 15th, sire 4th Duke of York
10167, bred by T. Bates. 'Ibis well-known Duke of
Oxford 3l6tis the sire of several prize-taking animals exhi
bited at 6ome of the leading provincial shows in England.
Wild Oxonian, winner of a prize at the show of the Royal
Agricultural Society of Englandat Bristol,in 1878, wasby him,
and at the dispersion of the Shotley Hall herd in September,
1878, his stock were very striking and much admired. He is
descended from a very favourite strain of the Holker
Oxfords, which have gained such renown. His dam, Grand
Duchess of Oxford 1 lth, was sold at the Holker sale in
1874 to Mr. George Moore, of Whitehall, Cumberland, at
whose sale, in 1875, she realised in her ninth year 2000
guineas ; her heifer calf, not three months old, sold at the
same sale for 1000 guineas.
In turn we inspected the third stud bull of the herd,
Grand Duke of Oxford 3rd, by Duke of Oxford 31st
33713, from Grand Ducuess of Oxford 22nd, a cow for
which Mr. Wni. M'Culloch paid 20GO guineas at the Duke
of Devonshire's 6ale. By referring to the respective pedigrees
it wiil be seen that the sire and dam of this noticeable bull
are very closely related, and that he is further a direct descend
ant of the famous Holker Oxfords, which have of late years
commanded such attention throughout the whole of England.
There are about 40 breeding cows attached to the Glenroy
herd, all thoroughly representative of the leading Shorthorn
herds of England and America, iivery one is a selected
animal, and they comprise the bulk of the stock on which Mr.
M'Culloch spent £30,000, with the ambition to form the
premier Shorthorn herd of Australasia. How well he has
succeeded is only too generally known. The five leading
tribes which Mr. Bates possessed up to the time of his death,
all have place at Glenroy. The Waterloo and VVild Eyes,
no less than the Oxford, form important sections ; and the
American Red Roses, which are equally represented, are
identically of the same stock as the Cambridge Roses. In
turn, we viewed representatives of the Oxford, Wild Eye?,
Kirklevington, Barrington, American Roses, Gazelle, and
other tribes, each one showing quite as perfect and as sym
metrical an appearance as her neighbour. To enumerate
the appearance of these animals would be a labour indeed ;
but, in order to show the excellence of the females and to
show that Mr. M'Culloch exercised considerable judgment
in his selection, a few of the cows will be referred to. In
the first place we will refer to the 2000 and odd guineas
cow, Grand Duchess of Oxford 22nd. As a breeder she has
proved highly successful, and, although now 10 years of
age, shows no deterioration in flesh or general appearance as
compared with her younger companions. She is roan in
colour, of a large heavy frame, yet withal neat, thick, and
fleshy-looking, and might well prove an ornament, not
taking the price into consideration, to any herd. Another
female, Gazelle 26th, is a very showy animal and has been
truly described as 'a pattern cow.'' She is known to all the
cattle-fanciers of England, and without doubt has made a
mark in the Shorthorn annals of the Antipodes. As a
perfect model of symmetry, showing remarkable breadth of
back, great fore arm, tremendous quarters, with beef to the
very hocks, immense depth of brisket, good, in the neck, and
surmounted with a neat and intelligent looking head, she at
once commends herself to the visitor as one of the most
remarkable cows in the Australian colonies. Her perfect
qualities may be more readily recognised when it is stated
that she is the dam of Mr. A. A. Dangar's champion bull
Hillhurst's 6th Duke, already referred to.
We pass from one to the other, hardly knowing which
cow to fix on for remark, so even are their qualities through
out. However we have not far to go before one of the
famous Kirklevington tribe comes under notice. She is a
well-proportioned roan cow, and has contributed a sire to
one of the strongest herds in the western district of Vic
toria. In Kirklevington Duchess 23rd, Mr. M'Culloch has
one of his best cows. The tribe is lineally descended from
a cow by Mr. Bates's famous Royal prize bull Duke of
Northumberland 1940, and has a very high reputation in
England and America, where specimens of this tribe have
realised high prices. Kirklevington Duchess 5th of this
family, bred by Mr. Davies, was sold privately to Sir
Curtis Lampson, Bart., for the sum of 1050 guineas, and
her daughter sold by auction in 1875 for 750 guineas, for
exportation to America. The heifer calf, Kirklevington
Empress 3rd, exhibited by Lord Fitzhardinge, and winner
of first prizes at the Royal Agricultural and Yorkshire
societies' shows in 1878, was of the '.Siddington branch of
this tribe. Yet another instance, and the long lists of the
females attached to this important herd are not nearly
exhausted. May Rose 8th is a red roan cow, calved in
October 1877, and is of the Red Rose tribe, for some years
one of the leading tribes of Shorthorns in the United States
of America, in the hands of that veteran breeder, Mr.
Abram Heniek, of Kentucky. It springs trom some of Mr.
.Robert Colling's best blood, and in the hands of Mr. Bates
was used for crossing the Duchesses. Rose of Sharon,
bred by Mr. Bates, was exported to America in 1834, and
became the ancestress ot this branch of the tribe. Of late
years, since the reimportation of specimens to England and
Scotland, very high prices have been realised upon the rare
occasions on which they have been offered by public auction.
At the Earl of Dunmore's sale in 1875, only two females
were sold for 1950 and 1280 guineas respectively, and speci
mens of this tribe from the Dunmore herd have won honours
at the Royal Agricultural Society of England, the York
shire Society, and at the Smithfield shows.
In another bright green-looking paddock we view a prime
lot of 16 heiferw, varying in age up to 20 months, all
Glenroy bred, and showing that Mr. M'Culloch is extremely
successful, not only in his choice of breeders, but also in his
method of management. The cattle are not in any way
pampered, which commends the herd to buyers, inasmuch
as youngsters of the choicest strains are purchased at Glen
roy and removed to some of the most trying of Australasian
climates, and when subsequently heard of at any time it is
that they are showing more vigorous health and condition
than when browsing on their native heath.
(The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912) Saturday 9 December 1882 p 1036 Article)

1 comment(s), latest 1 year, 8 months ago

A TWELVE YEAR OLD'S DROMANA IN 1917. (VIC., AUST.)

HONORABLE MENTION.
44 Sydney-road, Brunswick.
Dear Cinderella,- 30/5/17
This is the first time I have written to you. I will take for my subject Dromana, a seaside town 44 miles away. First of all we get the boat at Port Melbourne, at about 11 o'clock. Then we start off down the Bay, sometimes calling at St. Kilda and Brighton. After a couple of hours' trip we reach Mornington, and a little further on Dromana. The place I was stopping at is about 500 yards from the beach. To the back of the township there is a mountain, called Arthur's Seat, on the top there is an old lighthouse, from which you can see Melbourne on a very clear day. A little to the east and further down the mountain is the Cairn Memorial of Flinders. It is thought to be standing where he stood on the day he landed. About a mile from the Cairn, there were found three old muskets, which were thought to have been left by Flinders, but it was not so. On the road to Rosebud there is the South Channel lighthouse, and further along still, past Rosebud, there are the graves of three old pioneers, John Silkhorn and two other pioneers. Besides the graves, the site of the first house in Victoria, can also be seen. I think Dromana is one of the most interesting towns in Victoria. There is the beach, the bush, the mountains, and almost everything that can be thought of. In the gullies there are numbers of different wild flowers and ferns; the coral fern is like a piece of coral. One day, while up the mountain, we saw a fox (the first one I had ever seen) that, as soon as it saw us, turned and ran for dear life itself, but afterwards we could hear it barking. Well, Cinderella, I think I will close now, hoping to get a prize.
-I remain, your new friend,
GEORGE TOWNSEND. Age 12 years 6 months.(P.53, Leader, Melbourne, 7-7-1917.)

It was a feeling of guilt that led to the discovery of this letter. A Mr Townsend had saved the life of Henry (William Burdett Coutts) Wilson's son at about the time young George (above)was born. I gave Mr Townsend's name as John in the journal about the possible first recorded use of mouth to mouth resuscitation in Australia (maybe even the world!) I did a search for "John Townsend, Dromana" in the hope that the same incident had been reported using the savior's given name. George's letter was so interesting, I decided to make it the subject of a journal now in case I was unable to re-find it later.

ABOUT GEORGE'S LETTER.
Having seen Silkhorn's name before, I suspected he might have been the first person recorded as dying in Victoria, so I googled "Silkhorn, Sorrento, Collins", the first result being:
Our Great Southern Land: Trivial History October 10
ourgreatsouthernland.blogspot.com/2008/.../trivial-history-october-10.ht...‎

The blogger, Jayne, makes history fun.
1803 Having an itchy foot and time on his hands, Collins decided to set up camp and call it a settlement at Sullivan Bay near Sorrento in Victoria.
This was the first attempt of Europeans parking their posteriors in Victoria.

1803 There's no show without Punch and John Silkhorne got in on the act by upping and dying to become the first bloke to pop his clogs in Victoria, at Collins' settlement camp thingie.. - See more at: http://ourgreatsouthernland.blogspot.com.au/2008/10/trivial-history-october-10.html#sthash.wqZnl7z1.dpuf

The OH NOES gremlins are back. Hopefully,a continuation later.....(One paragraph at a time, but it submitted!)

The other two graves were obviously also from the short-lived settlement at Sullivan's Bay.

Other features in the letter that intrigue me are the muskets found on Arthurs Seat and the (site of) the first house in Victoria. Was there an article about how the muskets actually did come to be there?* I presume that the first house was at Collins' settlement. The following comes from:
Collins Settlement Site (Heritage Listed Location) : On My Doorstep
www.onmydoorstep.com.au/heritage-listing/4653/collins-settlement-site‎

*POSTSCRIPT 25-8-2016.
A RELIC OF EARLY AUSTRALIA.
MUSKETS IN THE BUSH.
ROMANTIC DISCOVERY NEAR DROMANA.
The picturesque discovery among the tangled undergrowth of green bush,
near Dromana (Vic.), of three musket of old design, with their wood work
charred and eaten by bush fires, apparently, recalls an interesting chapter
of Australian history.
If the deductions that have been made are correct, they represent a spot upon which the explorer Matthew Flinders stood more than a century ago, when he first gazed upon the rippling blue expanse of Port Phillip, and believed himself, incorrectly, to be the first white man who had seen the great harbor. The discovery of the muskets was made recently by Mr George Freeman, of Rosebud, Dromana, while clearing the bush for roads upon a property on the famous King Arthur’s Seat. In the course of this work he came across the three muskets, half hidden among the undergrowth, and ‘piled,’ as modern rifles are piled in camp lines, tripod fashion.
The wood work was charred and burnt, and it appeared that the spot must have been used as a camping place. The muskets were of the ‘Lancaster’ type such as the discoverer states were issued and used by Flinders’ party, and a further search is to be conducted in the neighborhood in case other remains are to be found. It is now suggested that the cairn which was recently erected at Dromana in memory of Flinders has been wrongly placed.
If the muskets represent a survival of the Flinders party, they must have
been left there when the explorer made his second voyage of exploration to Australia in the ‘Investigator.’ This voyage was started on July 18, 1801,
the object being the completion of the exploration of the coast of Australia
and the discovery of any harbors. The vessel, a 334-ton sloop, was laden with glittering toys, beads, flannel and other trade articles, and Flinders was accompanied by an able staff of officers and scientists, including Robert Brown, a young Scottish botanist; who subsequently received the highest commendation for his scientific work.
Australia was sighted on December 6, and a slow voyage was made along
the coast, charts being constructed and harbors explored. After leaving Kangaroo Island, Flinders met the French explorer Baudin, in Encounter Bay; and, finally, his ship rolling and plunging after a bout of stormy weather, he sighted the rocky gates of Port Phillip, ringed with white spray, on April 26, 1802.
He thought himself to be its discoverer, but he had been forestalled by a few weeks by Lieutenant J. Murray. The Investigator passed into the
port, and anchored near the site of Sorrento, and on the following day
Flinders, accompanied by Brown and William Westall, a landscape draftsman, rowed from the ship, landing eventually on the beach of Dromana Bay. Thence he climbed the bluff ascent of King Arthur’s Seat, and from this post gazed in astonishment at the wide stretching blue of the harbor.
It may be that the muskets that have been found mark a spot where the
party thus halted. Flinders on the following day crossed the Bay in his boat, and explored what is now Corio Bay, and the neighborhood of Geelong, climbing Station Peak there, and gazing from this eminence over a sunlit stretch of rolling bush and green pasture towards Mount Macedon. He had to leave shortly afterwards, however, for Sydney, and it was on May 8 that the Investigator shook her sails, dipped a courtesy to Port Phillip, and bore the explorer away.
(Zeehan and Dundas Herald (Tas. : 1890 – 1922) Tuesday 24 April 1917 p 4 Article)
N.B. George Freeman's assumption does not seem to have been disputed on trove.
----------------------------------------

The British Government's decision to establish a settlement in southern Australia appears to have been prompted by favourable reports of Port Phillip Bay and concerns about the interest of the French in the area. The colonising party despatched from England comprised military personnel, administrative staff, a few free settlers and a majority of convicts. Some were fortunate enough to be accompanied by wives and children. Lt-Governor Collins led the party of 467 persons.
--------------------------


The settlement was established on an area of land between the Western Sister and Eastern Sister, prominent headlands which mark each end of Sullivan Bay. Most of the settlement was close to the Eastern Sister. Initially a tent encampment, work commenced quickly on building a jetty and other timber structures, including huts. Local limestone was apparently used to construct chimneys for the huts, and for the building of the magazine. As well as barrels set into sand to trap fresh water, wells were dug, as were privies. Land was cleared for the growing of crops, perhaps totalling several acres.
---------------------------------------------


One last point.In A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, Colin McLear said that John Townsend's house opposite the school on the north corner of Ligar St, was still standing. Sadly it has now been replaced by two home units. Being in the Dromana Township (west of McCulloch St), the house might have been a century and a half old! Ligar St is twenty eight eightieths of a mile from the beach= 28 chains=28x22= 460+24 yards=484 yards, which is fairly close to 500 yards, so John Townsend's house was most likely where young George stayed during his holidays.

From J. Townsend, Dromana, drawing attention to the state of the road and water-table fronting his property
at the corner of M'Culloch and Ligar streets. The corner of the latter was a perfect quagmire since the late rain.-Cr Shaw moved that the engineer inspect and report. Seconded by Cr Shand, and carried.
(P.5, Mornington Standard, 6-8-1904.)

BLAIR, DUFFY, SWANN in comment 1.

1 comment(s), latest 3 years, 4 months ago

ABERFELDIE NEAR ESSENDON, VIC., AUST. (HOW SPRING HILL BECAME ABERFELDIE.)

I found this advertisement while researching 22E Doutta Galla re Airport West.

Aberfeldie was originally called "Spring Hill" by James Robertson Snr of "Upper Keilor". When he died, "Mar Lodge" passed to his son, Francis, a bachelor who became a politician,and "Spring Hill" to another son,James. The latter stayed at Upper Keilor to care for his mother but after her death,he built a mansion on Spring Hill and called it Aberfeldie.

TO Let by Tender, on Lease for Seven Years or more, one of the most desirable Farms in the colony of Victoria, and only five miles distant from the city, known as Springhill,
The property of James Robertson, Esq., of Keilor, situate in the parish of Doutta Galla, and consisting of 180 acres of rich agricultural land, entirely fenced in, and at present in cultivation.
A dwelling-house is already erected, and the proprietor of the property is disposed to treat liberally with a tenant who may desire to make improvements.
Entry will be given on the first of March next.
Further information may be obtained on application to G. MILLAR, Estate Factor, 32 Queen-street, Melbourne.

(P.3, Argus,21-11-1855.)

Spring Hill was the most southerly of many properties whose names referred to springs. William Foster called his grants (3 Tullamarine and 21 Doutta Galla) "Springs",probably due to a never-failing spring at Melway 5K12 in what became Edmund Dunn's "Viewpoint",feeding a creek that crossed Broadmeadows Road (now Mickleham Rd) and Macedon Road (now Melrose Drive ) and, following the east boundary of today's Leo Dineen Reserve, passed through the present right of way to meet the western branch of Spring Creeknear the end of Clyne Court. Spring Creek then joined Steeles Creek (which flows through Spring Gully)just south of the boundary between "Springs" and "Springfield" at Melway 15 F7, that point being a water reserve.Another tributary of Steeles Creek starts in Airport West and flows through "Spring Park" to join up just south of the A.J.Davis Reserve.
Wilson and James Anderson's farm on Main's Estate, west of Hoffman's Rd was called Springbank. Dugald McPhail bucked the trend and called his farm (between Rosehill rd and Buckley St)"Rose Hill".

MAURICE QUINLAN AND ABERFELDIE.
Bookmaker Maurie died in 1918 and his residence, the Aberfeldie mansion, was advertised for sale along with part of Airport West and many farms near Bulla.


"ABERFELDIE", Essendon, the residence of the late Mr Quinlan consisting of handsome bluestone dwelling, containing 9 rooms, bathroom, pantry,scullery, and large vestibule, bluestone stable (5 stalls, loose box, feed room, harness room), man's quarters, and sheds. Land 300ft frontage west side Aberfeldie street situated within ten minutes' walk of Essendon railway station, off Buckley street, and commanding a position that is entitled to be designated as superb.
(P.3,Argus, 26-4-1919.)

Anyone wishing to know more about the mansion or the development of Aberfeldie should visit the Essendon Historical Society's Courthouse Museum at Moonee Ponds.

ABORIGINAL VOCABULARY (HODDLE- LANGHORNE.)

The purpose of this journal is to encourage people to share their knowledge of aboriginal words that have entered the English language as place names or in other ways, such as Yakka.(See Itellya's Sources journal.) No doubt the actual meaning of many words was misinterpreted by those who recorded them. I have read that aborigines used words for places that were really an expression of what happened there, such as frogs growling, water rushing and that words were repeated for emphasis. I think it was surveyor Wedge who first noted the word "Yarra" and presumed that it was the aboriginal word for the freshwater river. I believe that he and his dusky friend were standing near the waterfall near Queen St and Yarra Yarra might have been describing the water's movement.

"Maribyrnong : Action in Tranquility" states that Maribyrnong is a corruption of the aboriginal phrase for I can hear a ringtail possum. A Footscray history said that Cut Cut Paw, the parish name, meant a clump of she-oaks. Symonds says in his "Bulla Bulla" that the parish name meant two hills.I wonder if there is any connection with the fairly common "bool" suffix as in Warrnambool. Another history (Lenore Frost?)stated that Wonga (Wurundjeri) meant bronze- winged pigeon and the Bunurung ( there are a dozen versions of the spelling) used the word for Arthurs Seat, where as Colin McLear says in "A Dreamtime of Dromana", the bronze-winged pigeon kept to scrubby areas, searching for seed in small grassy clearings.

A Victorian or Australian history (The Settlers?) said that Robert Hoddle accepted 100 aboriginal words as compensation from the missionary to the aborigines, George Langhorne, who had used that number of fence posts belonging to Hoddle. (See more about Langhorne in the J.T.SMITH AND HIS ELECTORS journal, in relation to Peter Young of "Nairn", whose details I'd better add before you read it!)
I have found the origin of over 200 street names on the Peninsula, but have met a brick wall regarding seemingly aboriginal names for streets south west and north east of the Boneo/Eastbourne Rd intersection at Rosebud.They do not even resemble the vocabulary on the Bunurung website and the Shire's aboriginal consultant says that the names have been plucked from all over Australia. Perhaps somebody has come across these words.(See google map.)
I hope that many people add their comments.

12 comment(s), latest 2 years, 1 month ago

ADDITIONAL FRANKLINFORD SURNAMES.

The following surnames occur in the end section of the original FRANKLINFORD journal after the section covered by FRANKLINFORD 1-4. They were listed in FRANKLINFORD 5 and FRANKLINFORD 6, which, for some unexplained reason, were "under review".

ADDITIONAL SURNAMES IN "1888 geography with the Melbourne Hunt."

ADDITIONAL SURNAMES.
CONNOR, MCNAB, WILLIAMS, HEAPS, LLOYD, BLACKWELL, REDDAN, NASH, LEWIS, PARR, WALDOCK, SMITH, SNOWBALL, SWAN, TAYLOR,BOYD, ROBINSON, BEALE, FULLARTON, MORRIS, FAWKNER,DUHY, CURRY, CROOKE, MILLAR, McINTYRE, DUTTON,MORAN, HENDERSON,COX, COLLIER, MORGAN,STEELE,JOHNSON, THOMAS,McNAMARA, LAVERTY, McCORMACK,BRANNIGAN, REDDAN,GRIST, COCK, LOFT, O'NIAL,RIDDELL,HAMILTON,HOWSE,McDOUGALL,BUTLER,GREEN,KILBURN, RORKE,BEAMAN,MOUNSEY,BLANCHE, CAMPBELL, DENHAM, MILBURN,HURREN,GILBERTSON, DOYLE,MURPHY,FOX,GERAGHTY, HENDRY, MANSFIELD,DONOVAN, SPIERS, ELLIS,LOCKHART,BREES,PETER, ROWE,HANDLEN,WILLIAMS,TENNIEL,SAGE,JUDD, GOODWIN,PURVIS,HOLLAND,SEELEY