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AIRPORT WEST, VIC,. AUST.

I just received another query. I might as well share the information. Unfortunately, I must write this journal off the top of my head, with a little help from trove, as I no longer have all the sources that I would have been quoting a decade ago, such as rates transcriptions, the Doutta Galla parish map, Keilor Souvenirs (1950, 1961 and 1963) etc.

Hi xxxxx,

Hope you are well. Just wondering if you know when Matthews Avenue and its associated suburb was built.

The Matthews Avenue referred to is the eastern boundary of Airport West. The western boundary of this suburb is the Albion-Jacana railway line,built in 1928,which separates Airport West from Keilor Park. The suburb was the birthplace of a company called Associated Radio. On a block fronting both Victory and Marshall Streets, the company had a big transmission tower. The company was later bought out by the Australian Broadcasting Commission which called its station 3AR; I trust you've worked out where the two letters in the station's name came from. The transmission tower was eventually replaced by one at St Albans.(Much detail in one of the three Keilor Souvenirs mentioned.)

A BROADCASTING ACTION.
WRIT FOR DAMAGES ISSUED Melbourne, September 11.
Acting on behalf of Alfred Louis Brown, of Rundle-street, Adelaide, Messrs. Madden, Butler, Elder. and Graham, to-day issued a Supreme Court writ, directed against the Associated Radio Company of Australia, of Elizabeth-street; Walter Conder, of Exhibition-street: the Victorian Broadcasting Company, of Queen-street; and J. C. Williamson, Limited, of Exhibition-street. From the Associated Radio Company, the plaintiff claims damages for a breach of several agreements, under which the plaintiff alleges that he was to have the option of purchasing the broadcasting undertakings of the defendant, including an A class broadcasting station license, and all land and buildings and appliances situated and installed on the Victory Estate at Essendon; also all other appliances used for broadcasting, for 10,000. etc. (P.19,The Advertiser, Adelaide, 12-9-1928.)

(The A.B.C. seems to have acquired 3LO from the Australian Broadcasting Co. shortly after June 1932 and 3AR from Associated Radio during 1933.Associated Radio was being sued by creditors in 1935.

ANSWER TO THE QUESTION.
The Morgan family of Niddrie - National Library of Australia
catalogue.nla.gov.au/Record/1751713
Available in the National Library of Australia collection. Author: Morgan, Richard, 1917-; Format: Book; 157 p. : geneal. tables, maps, ports. ; 21 cm.

This book should be available from the Brimbank or Moonee Valley library system and contains a subdivision plan of the property. Matthews Ave was one of the streets shown but was only a short street, not a through street from Keilor Rd to the northern boundary. Treadwell Rd (part of which in the aerodrome is called Nomad Rd) extended to Bulla Rd creating the Triangular estate of small farms*, Mrs Ford's lolly shop etc. This probably accounts for the bottleneck described in the following article. In about 1943, the Tullamarine Progress Association discovered that Bulla Rd was to be closed because of Airport expansion. Matthews Ave might have been extended because of the closure of Treadwell Rd at this time as well.
(*The late Jim Hume, long-time President of the Broadmeadows Historical Society, lived on one of these farms.)

Tramway Extension.
Reference to a proposed extension of the Essendon tramway service to the aerodrome led to the shire engineer (Mr. Pullar) remarking that no official announcement had been made. He understood the extension might be along either Bulla road, Treadwell road or Matthews avenue, but that he had no definite information. Cr. Parsons considered Treadwell road to be better than Bulla road. Wherever trams went, the district extended and developed. The council should fight for Treadwell road. As long as the aerodrome was served the military did not care which route was followed. The Bulla road extension was not warranted. If Bulla road were adopted, the line should not go past the aerodrome for reasons of safety. With the existing parking trouble it would only create a death trap. The line might go up through the centre of the plantations, but not through the bottle-neck past the aerodrome. The council should use its influence to prevent that. There were enough bottle-necks in the metropolitan area already. Cr. Davis said he understood the trouble was caused by inability to get sufficient buses. Cr. Parsons: I was told the tram would be running up Bulla Road in five weeks. It was decided to write to Cr. W. Parks .(Essendon Council), local representative on the Tramways Board, asking, him to take action to prevent a line being put through the Bulla road bottle neck at the aerodrome. ((P.3,Sunshine Advocate, 7-8-1942, KEILOR COUNCIL.)

Re the following article-
If I remember correctly, Martin St was on "Niddrie", as most of the "valuable building blocks" would have been. One of the houses that would have to be removed would have been the homestead built by Sam Mansfield on his grants on section 16 Doutta Galla (near the present south-west corner of Essendon Airport (Melway 16 C9 roughly.)

KEILOR SHIRE COUNCIL. A deputation of Parliamentary and Municipal representatives of Keilor and Broadmeadows shires waited upon the Minister for Air and Civil Aviation (Hon. A: S. Drakeford), last Friday. Dec. 4. They presented a petition from 330 people directly concerned, and the plea of the ratepayers generally of the two shires, that the proposed expansion of the Essendon Aerodrome and its activities, which would be a disturbing element, be not proceeded with. The Keilor Shire contends that the proposition will be very detrimental to the shire, as many good building blocks will be used and a number of the ratepayers' houses will have to be removed. (P.4, Sunshine Advocate, 11-12-1942.)

It can safely be assumed that Matthews Ave had been made to a reasonable standard to the northern boundary of "Niddrie" by the time the tramway opened.

SOLDIERS IN NORTH WANT ACTION
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Friday 14 May 1943 p 12 Article
... Essendon station and the aerodrome. The first tram on week days will leave Eliza- beth st at 6.13am and ... Chinese Legation in Australia. ESSENDON DROME TRAM BEGINS SUNDAY The tramway extension to Essendon aerodrome will operate from Sunday, Mr H.-JI. Bell, chairman Tramways Board, said yesterday. Trams will ... 313 words

The reason for the name of Airport West was the proliferation of industry associated with the aerodrome such as N.I.C. (National Instrument Company) which fronted Matthews Ave.




It might surprise many people that Airport West had its own hotel in the 19th Century. It was called the Travellers' Rest Hotel and sat on a nine acre block (today bounded by Matthews Ave, Dromana Ave, Louis St and a line just south of Rood St) owned by J.B.Howse. (Titles Office Volume 29 folio 783.)The Oaklands Hunt often assembled at the Travellers' Rest, four times in 1899.

The hotel was described as being in Tullamarine (as were James Sharp's "Hillside" and Maurice Crotty's "Broomfield" on the south side of Sharps Rd) because the land between the aforementioned farms and Niddrie, Spring Park and Springfield (fronting Keilor Rd and extending to the line of Spence-Fraser St) had no locality name. The Thomas family took over Hillside in about 1943 and renamed it Carinya Park,the property becoming the home of the Tullamarine Pony Club. Joe Thomas's wife, Edie, was living at 160 Matthews Ave, East Keilor in 1954, probably while Joe was extending the old Hillside homestead. I haven't time to check now but the condolences she had received were probably related to the death of their young son Barrie, after whom Barrie Rd on part of Carinya Park was named.

THOMAS - Mrs E THOMAS and Family 160 Matthews avenue Keilor East and Relatives wish to THANK friends for beautiful floral tributes letters telegrams cards and personal expressions of sympathy in their recent sad be- reavement. (P.19, Argus, 4-9-1954.)



FIRE AT TULLAMARINE.
AN HOTEL DESTROYED
A fire broke out at 23 minutes past 3 a.m. on Sunday at the Travellers' Rest Hotel Bulla road, Tullamarine of which Mr E.J. Wilson is the licensee, The building was a wood and iron structure, one- storey, and contained nine rooms. A firm hold was established by the flames, and the efforts of four hose carts and 14 men with hand pumps failed to save it from total destruction. There was no insurance on the building, which was the property of Mr J Howse. The contents, destroyed were insured for 100.(P.6, Argus, 4-12-1899.)



Somewhere I have written details of Airport West being officially so-named decades after the name came into common useage. Hopefully I'll find these details. One of the aforementioned souvenirs had a big article about Airport West.You could access these souvenirs through the Keilor Historical Society.

Luckily I had quoted part of the Airport West article in my other QUINLAN journal and I have pasted it below.

So it can be seen that this quote from the article AIRPORT WEST WAS OAT FARMS in PROCLAMATION OF THE CITY OF KEILOR 29-4-1961 was based on fact:
The 260 acre farm of Dr. Morgans father (i.e. NIDDRIE) and the farm of a neighbour, Maurice Quinlan, occupied much of what is today Airport West and the airport. (Niddrie was actually 249 acres but thats another matter.)

The part of Airport West south of Fraser St houses was originally three crown grants; heading west from Treadwell Rd, they were Niddrie, Spring Park and Springfield.

NIDDRIE.
Niddrie was crown allotment 17B of the parish of Doutta Galla, consisting of 249 acres, situated entirely on the northside of Keilor Rd between Treadwell Rd and the midline of Grange Rd and Bowes Avenue. Although this name, bestowed by Harry Stevenson, crept south to describe the present "locality" of Niddrie (Nicholson and J.P.Main's grants), both Niddrie primary and high schools used the name. My 1999 Melway shrewdly described the location of Elstone Ave as being in both Airport West and Niddrie but Cameron St as being in Airport West only.

Between 1843 and 1851, the Scottish settler, Thomas Napier (18021881) purchased the Keilor Road land covering Niddrie and Airport West. In 1869, Napier sold this 249-acre (1.01 km2) land to Henry Stevenson (18101893). By 1871, Stevenson had built a house he named Niddrie, after his birthplace of Niddrie, a suburb of Edinburgh, Scotland. After his death in 1893 the property was transferred to his wife Elizabeth who sold it to Patrick Morgan eight years later.

A Keilor East Post Office opened on 1 July 1947 and was renamed Niddrie around 1956. The Niddrie North office opened in 1960, though it was known as Airport West from 1974 until 1982.[4] (Niddrie wikipedia.)

Who ever wrote this entry in wikipedia can be excused for thinking that Thomas Napier's grant straddled Keilor Rd and included the area now known as Niddrie.

SPRING PARK.
Spring Park was crown allotment 17A of the parish of Doutta Galla,consisting of 193 and 3/4 acres, adjoining the western boundary of Niddrie and extending west to the line of Olive Grove, Hansen Reserve being in its north west corner.It was granted to spirit merchants, Owen Connor and Patrick Phelan but they became insolvent. Angela Evans and colleagues told (in KEILOR PIONEERS: DEAD MEN DO TELL TALES) how Phelan's daughter had married Connor's son and Springfield (see below)evaded the creditors' clutches. Owen Connor had returned to Ireland but sent a letter written with an Irish accent! William and Sarah Connor shared with James Harrick the farming of the Keilor Park area for many decades.

CONNOR. On the 27th August, at her residence,5 Williams-road, Moonee Ponds, Sarah, relict of the late William Connor, of Keilor, aged 58 years. (P.1, Argus, 28-8-1903.)

DILLONCONNOR.On the 24th April, at St. Monica's R.C. Church, Essendon, by the Rev. Father Nolan, James, only son of James Dillon, 84 Napier-street, Essendon, to Ellen (Nelly), eldest daughter of Sarah and the late William Connor, "The Franklyn," Keilor.
So that's where William and Sarah Connor lived! The Franlyn was actually the Sir John Franklin Hotel, built by Henry Eldridge on the east corner of Keilor Rd and Collinson St, Keilor Park.

Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Monday 14 December 1857 p 8 Family Notices
... The Funeral to move from his residence, Sir John Franklin Hotel, Keilor-road, this day, Monday, at twelve o'clock noon. JOHN DALEY, Undertaker, corner La Trobe and Spring Streets, Melbourne. ... Funeral Notices. --- THE Friends of Mr. HENRY ELDRIDGE are re- spectfully invited to follow ... 62 words



The last to farm Spring Park as an entire farm was William Johnson. The Johnson family also owned Glendewar and leased Cumberland before moving back to Glendewar(probably when Alexander McCracken's beautiful Cumberland homestead was burnt down;its ruins can be seen at Melway 178 C12.)

JOHNSON. On the 28th September 1913 at "Glendewar," Tullamarine,James Alexander,the dearly loved third son of Mrs. W. and the late William Johnson,late of "Spring Park," Essendon aged 39 years.(P.1, Argus,30-9-1913.)

The McNamara brothers had farmed Spring Farm and other parts of Airport West for many years so it is fitting that Spring Park is bisected by McNamara Ave.
Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Thursday 23 July 1903 p 1 Family Notices
... farmer, who died at Spring-park, Essendon, 23rd July, 1901. "May her soul rest in peace." -(Inserted ... Mary E. McNamara, who died at Sping-park, Essendon, on July 23. R.I.P. (In- serted by her ... B. Ballantine, F. M. Robertson and G. B. Cabena.) McNAMARA.--In ... 636 words

Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Thursday 29 October 1903 p 1 Family Notices
... missed (Inserted by her lov- ing husband, John T. Lee.) McNAMARA.--In sad and loving remembrance of our affectionate father, Patrick McNamara, who died at "Spring-Park," Kesendon, October 29, 1896.

An advertisement of the subdivision of the Spring Park Estate into 44 small farms appeared on page 1s of the Independent (Footscray) on 20-3-1915. The so-called plan shows Spring Park enormously out of scale, with Morgan's "Niddrie" seeming to have a twentieth of the road frontage shown for the Spring Park Estate. Edwin Roberts was the developer; hence Roberts Rd.

The sale of the Spring Park Estate caused problems for Patrick Morgan of Niddrie, who wanted to continue farming.
Mr. P. Morgan, who owns 250 acres adjoining the property recently cut up and sold by Mr. Roberts, was also in attendance to object to the assessment of his land. The land was valued by the State at 19 per acre, and he contended that the assessment was unfair and should not have been accepted as a basis for making the shire valuation. Cr. Delahey: In order to exist as a shire we were compelled to increase valuation. Mr. Morgan said the increase in his case was from 240 to 380, and the valuation was prospective. He bought the land at 14 per acre, and that was as much as it was worth to-day. The land did not return more now than when it was bought. It was simply valuing a farm as if it were cut up in building allotments. , Cr. Parr: The land adjoining has been submitted to auction and brought high prices. The question arises whether Mr. Morgan is using the land to the best advantage. Mr. Morgan contended that he was using the land to the best advantage. Cr. McFarlane: It has been publicly stated that you have refused 40 per acre for the land. Mr. Morgan: I have never received such an offer. I bought it 15 years ago at 14 per acre. It is simply farming and grazing land. Cr. Parr: The same might be said of land in Buckley Park. If Essendon annexed this territory, I wonder what the valuation would be. Mr. Morgan said that probably many of those who bought the land adjoining his property would never go through with their payments. The auctioneers told them to buy by the acre and sell by the foot. The Land was boomed, and values were inflated by its proximity to the Essendon boundary. Cr. White: And Essendon claims that our values are too low. Mr. Morgan: I do not think I could get 25 an acre cash for my land. In my opinion even the old valuation was too high. The matter was referred to committee...etc.
(P.1, Essendon Gazette and Keilor, Bulla, and Broadmeadows Reporter, 18-1-1917.)

SPRINGFIELD.
Springfield was crown allotment 18b of the parish of Doutta Galla,consisting of 151 acres and adjoining Spring Park on the west, extending west to the corner of Keilor Rd and Roberts Rd. Thus it was part of Edwin Robert's Spring Park Estate.

NORTH OF FRASER ST.
EXTRACT FROM MY "EARLY LANDOWNERS:PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA" (NOT A JOURNAL.)
SECTION 22.

The boundaries of section 22 are indicated by: Thomas St/Barrie Rd, Sharps Rd, Nomad Rd. and the Fraser/ King St. midline. Information regarding its occupants comes mainly from Keilor Shires rate records except for lots B and D, which were in Broadmeadows Shire.

ALLOTMENT F of 147 acres between Fraser St. And Parer Rd., was granted to early squatters, A.Wright and J.& T.Crighton in 1848 and in 1868 it was being farmed by John Commons. Its eastern boundary was the same as for allotment E.

ALLOTMENT E consisted of 128 acres and extended north to Moore Rd. In 1868 it is likely that Sam.Mansfield had lot E as well as his 56 acres in section 16 and 87 acres in 22c as another property of 130 acres is listed. At the turn of the century, Robert G.Stevenson was leasing lot F, part of St Johns between Bulla Rd and Treadwell Rd (Wirraway and Nomad Rds.), lot E (which was mistakenly called lot G) and a few small blocks between Bulla Rd. And a now-closed road*. This gave him a total of 329 acres.

(* This road left Bulla Rd. at Webb St. to run to the corner of English St. and Nomad Rd., the n.w. Corner of section 16. The 1860 survey map shows this road finishing at the north boundary of 17B. It may have been the original road to the Springs or the old Macedon Rd,which title deeds show to have cut, respectively, though section 15 and section 21.)

Rupert Percy Steele was leasing Niddrie and a memo reveals that Steele had taken over lot F and Maurice Quinlan lot E plus the s.w. Corner of St. Johns.

ALLOTMENT C, between Moore St. And Dromana Ave., granted to J.P.Fawkner, was occupied in 1868 by: Sam. Mansfield 87 acres, J.B.Howse 17 acres and Catherine Howse 9 acres and licenced house. This was the Travellers' Rest (whose location is already described in this journal.) The occupancy of 22C, which contains much of Westfield Shoppingtown, had not changed much in 1900. Sam Mansfield still had 68 acres, J.B.Howse, who now owned John Hall's "South Wait" across Bulla Rd, had 40 acres and Edmund Tucker had the 9 acres on which the Travellers' Rest had stood.

Crown allotment 22A, between Sharps Rd (now Caterpillar Drive) and Dromana Ave,mostly across the railway line from Airport West, was mainly farmed as part of Hillside/ Carinya Park. Joe Thomas sold the majority of the 87 acre block to Caterpillar prior to 1956. The Tullamarine Progress Association was concerned that the Caterpillar factory would mess up the area but Percy Hurren of Dalkeith reassured his fellow members, and he was right.

Extract from my journal MAURICE QUINLAN AND OAKLANDS RD, BULLA.
NORTH ESSENDON comprises about 26 ACRES, situated on the main Bulla road, about 1 1/4 miles from the Keilor road electric tram terminus. This property is beautifully fenced, and bordered with live hedges and groups of flourishing handsome gums. Also, about 160 acres separated by a road. It is proposed to subdivide and submit this latter block into 10 allotments, in areas of from about 9 acres to 28 acres each, thus affording persons in quest of farmlets or accommodation paddocks near the city the opportunity of participating in the distribution.
(P.3,Argus, 26-4-1919.)- RE SALE OF QUINLAN'S FREEHOLDS.

STOCK GRAZED IN RESIDENTIAL AREA At the meeting of the Keilor shire council last Saturday a letter was re- ceived from a number of ratepayers owning land in the Victory Estate, North Essendon, complaining of sheep being grazed continually in portions of the Victory Estate and stating that the practice was unhealthy and offensive. The council decided to ask for the names of the offenders with a view to taking legal action.
(P.6, Sunshine Advocate, 9-10-1936.)

SHEEP AND CATTLE. Sheep grazing on vacant land at North Essendon was referred to in a communication received from F. B. Roberts, who said 1000 acres were concerned, carrying some thousands of sheep. Differences arose between drovers, some of whom left dead sheep lying about. Drovers could not carry on with out supervision. He had bought a property to handle sheep between his place at Mickleham and the Melbourne market, and had tried to keep things shipshape in the district, to avert a crisis.(P.3, Sunshine Advocate, 12-6-1942.)
As this concerned Keilor Council, North Essendon meant on the west side of Bulla Rd, north of the Essendon boundary(which was north of Keilor Rd), so the land being grazed was probably the part of Essendon Aerodrome south west of Bulla Rd (part of which is now Wirraway Rd), and Airport West.

The un-named road separating the 160 acres from the 26 acre triangle described as North Essendon was Treadwell Rd. Both of these properties were described in detail in my earlier QUINLAN journal.

North Essendon land 220 acre
A block of 74 acres of vacant land at North Essen- don, west of the aerodrome, and about half a mile west of the tramline, was sold at auction yesterday for 220 an acre, or 10,280.(P.7,Argus, 20-11-1954.)

ALBRESS/ BENNETT/ MCINTYRE CONNECTIONS, THE NORTH QUEENSLAND ALBRESS STORY, BOXING AND THE TIGERS.

EXTRACT FROM AN EMAIL SENT TO jotreloar, AN ALBRESS DESCENDANT.

In regard to your query, the most important thing, and the reason genealogical sites don't have death details for Maria Albress, is that she was Mrs McIntyre when she died!

Here's the file that I supplied to Jason Albress.

ANTONIO ALBRESS.

My local history research on the Mornington Peninsula began in August, 2010 because I discovered that there was little information about Rosebud available for loan. My desire to write about pioneers who had not been acknowledged led to this entry in my Peninsula Dictionary History about a month later.


ALBRES(S). See pages 25, 26 ,51, 142 of Rye Primary School 1667.

Antonios name was written on the Wannaeue parish map (with the res ending) to indicate that he was the grantee of lot 37B (40 acres) on 16-5-1884 and lot 37 A1 of 50.75 acres on 12-8-81. This land is indicated by Melway 168 K 9 -10.
I believe that Albres was the original spelling of his surname, and, like the Greek fishermen at what became Rosebud, he anglicized his name. Obviously he retained (Portugese?) pronunciation of his name and introduced himself to the limeburning community at the present Weeroona St/ Browns Rd. corner with the re ending as in centre. Thus it is likely that Antonios name would have been written as Albas by any member of the Blair, Page, Sullivan or White families and not just the one whose anecdote was on page 142 of Rye Primary School 1667.
His son (I presume) John Albress was born on 5-2-1895. When he was in Grade 3 (1905 has been wrongly written on the document; it should be 1903), there was a chance that John and his classmates would have to walk to the Rosebud school. The headmaster was asked to provide details of how far pupils had to travel to each school. According to him, John would have to travel 7 miles. Now, as we know, the peninsula is much wider as you go east and Browns Rd gets further from the bay. Eager to protect his position, the teacher visualized Johns route as being all the way down Browns Rd to Jetty Rd. and then north to the School, exactly 7 miles. (Shorter routes are 4.6 and 5.1 miles!)
The eastern boundary of Antonios 90.75 acres is indicated by an extension of Springs Lane across Browns Rd and its road frontage is 360 metres. (18 chains.)
As the photo in Rye Primary School 1667 shows, John (or Julo?) was one of the Rye lads that served in WW1. Antonio Albress died at the age of 68 and was buried in the Rye Cemetery on 2-8-1909. In 1910 Jessie Johnson was occupying the Albress farm and by 1920 it had become part of the 475 acres on which Andrew Leonard Ball of Rye was assessed.
I hope that Antonio Albress will now be given proper recognition as a pioneer of Rye and not get the treatment he did in LIME LAND LEISURE i.e. Dont know him but perhaps he was Tony Salvas.


The following is an extract from my Dromana, Rosebud and Miles Around on Trove.
THE PORTUGESE.
A large number of Portugese came to the peninsula in early days, perhaps at the suggestion of J.B.Were who acted as the Consul for many countries including Portugal (page 83 Lime Land Leisure). Many worked at lime burning for Kettle near The Heads. De Galvin (Portugese Joe) and De Peana (John Grant) were two given nick names by the Scottish captain who brought them out (page 130.) Antonio Albres and Nicholas De Mas settled on Truemans Rd at Melway 168K10 to 169 A 10 and Ascensio De Freitas bought Alfords 83 acre grant (Melway 169 E11) before 1910. Albres pronounced his name, anglicized to Albress, in such a way that it was presumed by oldtimers to be Albas; Hollinshed thought that he was Tony Salvas but they were two different men. See detail about the Albress family in LOOK FOR ONE THING AND FIND ANOTHER.
Two of the Portugese were descendants of former slaves taken to the Cape Verde Islands by the Portugese. They were Emanuel De Santos, who farmed and lit the pier light at Rye, and Joe Peters (Joe the black fiddler) whose descendants may have later run the store at the corner of Ninth Avenue. Bosina, Latros, Peters and Silva were all Portugese or Im a monkeys uncle!
John Lima Moraes, a farmer on the area west of Troon Rd (golf course) by 1910, may have been a descendant of a Portugese immigrant.

ALBRESS GENEALOGY.
Extensive information has been provided by Andrew Thompson and Emma Burkitt on the rootsweb and mundia websites and Cecilias christening at Moorooduc (on 14-9-1884) is recorded on the International Genealogical Index website. I will not repeat it all here, but some detail is necessary so that what I do write makes sense.
ANTONIO ALBRESS was a native of Boa Vista, one of the Cape Verde Islands off the westernmost point of the African mainland. I have given much information about this island on the rootsweb site and also hinted about a French origin for the Albress/Albres surname. A Thompson ancestor was also from the Cape Verde Islands. Many of the islanders are classified as Creole (mixture of African and European ancestry). No doubt this description applied to Antonio (see the article about footy and the Anzac tradition re William Albress of Richmond), Emanuel de Santos (Rye) and Joe Peters, the black fiddler of Rosebud.

(boards.ancestry.com)
Antonio married Maria Bennett, the daughter of Thomas Alexander and Eliza Bennett. The names of two of their children, Thomas Alexander and Cecilia, came from the Bennett family. There are two Bennett entries in the International Genealogical Index (Nos. 3860 and 3863) which probably refer to two of Marias brothers, Thomas and Thomas Alexander, who were both christened at Moorooduc. The parents names are given in two different ways, Thomas and Eliza for the first and T.A.Bennett and Elizabeth for the second. The first was born on 23-9-1860 and christened on 3-11-1861 and the second was born on 30-6-1862 and christened on 15-8-1875. This would seem to indicate that the first Thomas had died soon after a hasty baptism; Thomas Alexanders christening was far from hasty!

Cecilia Albress and these two boys were christened at Moorooduc. This could mean that the Bennett and Albress families were residing in that parish (bounded by Port Phillip Bay, Eramosa Rd, Jones Rd, Tyabb Rd, Derril Rd and Ellerina (Bruce) Rd.) There was a William Bennett who owned Crown Allotment 74 at the south west corner of Bungower and Stumpy Gully Rds, and I seem to remember a T.Bennett having land, perhaps in Balnarring parish. It is more likely that they travelled to Schnapper Point (Mornington) to attend church.

The Cains of Tyrone arranged for occasional masses for the Catholics of Rye with a priest coming across the bay, and a priest from Mornington used to come occasionally to Dromana (until 1869 and the incident at Scurfields hotel!) Antonio and the Bennetts may have attended church at Dromana and a bishop may have visited Mornington to conduct baptisms and confirmations. That would be why Antonio was well-known at Dromana!

The children of Antonio and Maria Albress were posted on mundia by Emma some time ago but two names were missing. These were Cecilia, who married William Medley in 1906, and Maria who married Percival Alexander James (1889-1948.) Those listed were:
Rachel 1878-1920; Thomas Alexander 1880-1917; Pantaleon 1882-1940; Saramphina 1889-1915; Julo 1891-1970; Louis 1892-1982; John 1895-1969; William 1897-? It is likely that Cecilia was born in about 1884 and Maria in about 1887; Maria would have been a bit older than Percy James. Incidentally, a James family had land (C.A. 19A, Wannaeue) right next to the Ditterich Reserve at Main Ridge where Jason Albress continues (with bat and ball) the family tradition of excellence in sport.

The following details have been provided about Thomas Alexander Bennett by descendants of Louis Thompson and Cecilia (Bennett), namely iscant and thommo99.
Thomas Alexander Bennett, born circa 1828 to Charles Bennett (mason/builder) and Margaret (Summons/ Simmons, apparently decoded as Summers), married Elizabeth McMurray in 1855. (Elizabeths family hailed from Belfast, Ireland.) These details come from the marriage certificate of Tom and Eliza(beth). It seems that Toms wife preferred to be called Eliza- see poetic tributes to Harriet Skelton later- and this would explain the different parents names for poor Thomas Bennett and Thomas Alexander Bennett (of the very late baptism.)

Cecilia Bennett married Louis Thompson and thommo99 listed their descendants. Peter Thompson, father of Louis, was born on Fogo Island in the Cape Verde Islands circa 1818-1822. Both Louis and Cecilia died around 1900 and their children were taken in by Rachel (Bennett) and William Thompson.

LOCAL HISTORIES.
In ROOTSWEB and FAMILY TREE CIRCLES, details from Lime Land Leisure, parish maps and rate records have been posted under ALBRESS for the families of Antonio Albress and Tom Bennett. The following two books have no index but I have made my own for each.

RYE PRIMARY SCHOOL No. 1667 by Patricia Appleford.
P. 25. Antonio signs an 1895 petition opposing Rye being made a half-time school with Rosebud. The Government was almost broke because of the 1890s depression and half-time schools were common. One school would operate in the morning and the other in the afternoon, with the teachers lunchtime spent travelling from one to the other.

P. 26. In 1905 there was a move to close the Rye school altogether and make the children walk to Rosebud S.S. The teacher (who was about to lose his job) was required to supply details of his pupils and how far they lived from each school. Who could blame him for bending the truth in regard to William Albress? If William had gone the longest possible way (via Browns Rd and Jetty Rd), he would have travelled 7 miles to reach the Rosebud school. He was 1 miles from the Rye school if he carried an axe to cut an as the crow flies direct path through Blairs dense ti-tree and rabbit infested grants that became the Jennings familys Kariah a decade later. William Albress, born on 15-10-1897, was in grade 1 and lived 1 miles from the Rye School.
(This could be a mis-reading of my scribbled notes; Football sites give it as the 13th.)
P.51. The W.W.1 Roll of Honour, State School Rye, lists the following ex pupils:
E.Myers, J.Albress, G.Carlton, J.Connop, O.Cain, W.Darley, D.Edmonds, N.Edmonds, S.George, J.Hayes, W.Hill, R.Myers, J.McMeikan, R.Perrin.

P.142. James Sullivan employs Antonio Albas to run the kiln south of Weeroona St.
Patricias book mentions Muriel Bennet starting school in 1936 (P.54) and repeats information about young Eliza Bennetts grave in the Rye cemetery and the Bennett property in its present north west corner (P. 124.)

FAMILY, CONNECTIONS, SORRENTO AND PORTSEA by Jennifer Nixon.
P.10. Details of Harriet Skeltons death and burial and two poetic tributes from her loving friends, Thomas and Eliza Bennett.
P. 11. The ten children of Harriet and Edward Skelton are listed. The third, Henry William, married Hannah Bennett.
P. 26-8. H.W.Skelton was born at Point Nepean on 6-5-1843. He married Hannah Bennett in 1869.Soon after the birth of their third child in 1876, they moved to Waratah Bay (Walkerville) where the Hughes boys also relocated.
P.71. Repeats known details.

TROVE. This website was recommended to me by a family historian while I was transcribing rates. It is a digitized collection of hundreds of newspapers prepared by the National Library of Australia and indeed a treasure-trove of information.

MORNINGTON AND DROMANA STANDARD (MDS) 14-8-1909, PAGE 2.
The late Mr A.Albress, whose death was mentioned in last weeks issue, was one of the oldest residents on the Heads. For many years he has been a well-known figure in Portsea, Sorrento and Dromana, where his cheery smile and a genial disposition endeared him to many. He was one of the pioneers of the district, his extended residence of over 40 years earning for him the distinction of one of the Daddies of the Heads, the future of which he regarded as of great promise. He was a native of Bona Vista, one of the Portugese islands in the Cape Verde group, and was in his 68th year. He leaves a wife, four daughters and six sons to mourn his loss.

MDS 7-8-1909, P.2. SORRENTO. Mr Albress of Rye died after undergoing an operation in Melbourne. He was interred in the Rye Cemetery. Mundia.com gives his place of death as Fitzroy. This would probably mean that he died in St Vincents Hospital in Victoria Parade, which the Sisters of Mercy opened in converted terrace houses in November 1893.

THE ARGUS 1-6-1910 page 2, column 5.
Auction tomorrow. In the estate of Antonio Albress, deceased. Charles Forrester& Co. in conjunction with Mr James Rowley of Rye, have received instructions to sell by auction:
All those pieces of land being allotments 37A1 and 37B of section A in the parish of Wannaeue containing 90 acres 2 roods and 30 perches. There is an eight roomed dwelling on allotment 37A1 and about 20 acres are cleared, the balance of the land being covered with light scrub. The property has a frontage of 18 chains to main road and is about 2 miles from Rye.
(See what I meant about needing an axe to reduce this distance to 1 miles?)
THE ARGUS, 21-4-1910, P.4. Those with claims against the estate of Antonio Albress, late of Rye, send particulars.

So, thats why I couldnt find details of the death of Antonios widow!
Maria Albress did not die!
THE ARGUS, 24-5-1930, p.15.
The probate of the will of Maria McIntyre, married woman, deceased, late of 11 Rogers St, Richmond, will in 14 days be granted to Louis and William Albress, labourers, both of 11 Rogers St, Richmond, sons of the deceased.
No reference to a McIntyre- Albress wedding could be found in trove but Frederick Vernon McIntyre of Richmond, a young man who got into trouble in 1939 might have been Marias second husbands son.

SPORTS, STYLE, SPIRIT, SINGERS AND STRIFE.
(Google anzac, Richmond, albress.)
Excerpt from Australian football and disputes over the Anzac legend, a talk given in Richmond.
I spent my adolescence a few streets south of here, within earshot of the roar of the MCG crowd. One of my domestic jobs was to carry the slops of an elderly man, a retired waterside worker of West Indian descent, down to the backyard privy behind the mulberry tree. I can still remember the press of his chocolate-skinned hand as he gave me a two shilling coin as a thank-you. When he died I was bequeathed his upstairs bedroom. His name was Billy Albress. He played eight senior games in the last two years of the war, 1917 and 1918. Only Richmond and three other clubs, Carlton, Collingwood and Firzroy, played on during the war.
Billy Albress was a typical Richmond player. He was born locally, but of distinctly non-white background, and sport was his only means of earning some social mobility. He remained a waterside worker his entire life, and died in his late sixties. He was a Richmond six footer (to borrow a phrase from Victoria Park), standing just five foot eleven inches, wiry and athletic. His brother and sister lived locally also, and he was part of a tight kinship group, children of Nellie and Pantelon, described in the genealogical records as a labourer. No Albress served in the Australian military in the Great War. (Talk by Prof. Robert Pascoe on 24-4-2009.)

The mistake about being West Indian is understandable. Id never heard of the Cape Verde Islands until I read about some of our Portugese peninsula pioneers. It is possible that Bill was born in Richmond. Perhaps Tom and Elizabeth Bennett were living there and Maria was staying with her parents towards the end of her pregnancy. (Perhaps the birth was at the four year old St Vincents.) Ray and Charlie Cairns of Maroolaba near Pattersons Rd in Fingal were born at Grandma Nevilles in South Melbourne and spent their first ten days there. This ensured that medical help was readily available if it was needed. There is no doubt that Billy Albress was the last child of Antonio and Maria Albress. In a post, I wrote that his brothers played for Richmond City but these Albress stars (circa 1939) would have been Antonios grandsons. I also made a mistake about Bill playing for Port Melbourne.

(Google albress, richmond, click on AFL Tables.) This confirms that Billy was Antonios son. He was 180cm tall and weighed 83 kg.

MORNINGTON STANDARD 9-4-1904 P.5.
Albress won the Sheffield over 130 yards, collecting the 10 pounds first prize, at the Sorrento Sports. Dromana ran their Sheffield over 150 yards, perhaps a little beyond the preferred distance and P. Albress could only manage a second in the second heat. (25-5-1905 p.5.)

MDS, 18-9-1909 p.3. Sorrento v Dromana. The latter was a bit short of players; Myers and T.Albress were useful substitutes for Dromana. Myers probably lived next to the Rye school.
THE ARGUS, 23-9-1935, P.15. Richmond City won the first semi final of the first grade of the Victorian Junior League, defeating South Kensington and Albress kicked 2 goals.
28-7-1937, p.5. L. and T. Albress were among Richmond Citys best players.
10-3-1939, p.20. L.Albress, living in Richmond, is to play in Richmonds practice match.
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Any time the lady folk had for leisure was probably spent dreaming up and manufacturing their outfit for the next dance or ball- and how to display their culinary skills in the plate they would take. Any dreaming the men did would have involved the mouth -watering supper that was their highlight of the dances and balls. Newspapers gave accounts of the dresses worn but perhaps the correspondents were too fearful of a hip and shoulder to inspect the food too closely!
MS, 29-7-1897, P.3. Rye Jubilee Ball with a description of the outfits worn by Miss Rachel Albress and others. (Also see the 11-7-1903 concert re dresses.)
MS. 3-1-1901, p.3. Seraphina Albress won a handwriting competition for girls at the Kangerong (Dromana) Show.
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As concerts had packed programs, it was rare for any performers to be accorded an encore. One such performer to be received enthusiastically was the Peninsulas Don Quixote, Sidney Smith Crispo of Manners Sutton (Canterbury/ Blairgowrie) and Eastbourne. For a young Albress girl, receiving an encore must have been a huge thrill. Cecilia, Saramphina and Rachel all enjoyed singing.
See Mornington Standard: 30-5-1895, p.2; 20-12-1900, p.3 (the encore); 11-7-1903, p.4.
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It would be a rare pioneering family that did not have a member charged with an offence such as insulting behavior and of course strife can refer to accidents.
M.S.9-12-1905, p.2. P.Albress and J.J.Kennedy were charged with insulting behavior and fined.
Argus, 22-3-1923, p.7. Louis Albress, a wharf labourer of Gipps St, Richmond, was charged with stealing a wallet that a woman had dropped. When asked if it was his, he, and a woman that was with him, were said to have replied that it was. However, the man involved was not Louis at all and the case was dismissed.
Argus, 13-3-1933, p.19. John Albress, of Gipps St, Richmond, was fined for not disclosing his wifes earnings when he obtained sustenance.
An incident involving William is discussed in a separate section about our travelling sportsman.
Argus, 9-10-1939, p.5. Raymond Albress, 8, saw his mate slip into the Yarra near Richmond and drown.

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THE EXAMINER ( Launceston). 13-1-1938, p.5. The Tamar. Mr W. Albress of Richmond was reviving his spirits by holidaying with Mr V. Frost at Birralee. I wonder if one of Antonios daughters had married Mr V.Frost. The Examiner (page 2 of the.22-4-1913 issue) listed Albress as one of the horses in a race for hacks; the name of the horses owner was not given but its a strange name for a horse isnt it?
THE ARGUS. 6-11-1950, p.5. Antonio Albress, 21, of Richmond and five other youths from Melbourne walked to Rupertswood for the 20th Eucharistic Festival.


The Queensland branch.
It is uncertain when this branch was established but the move was probably prompted by the opportunity to find work during the depression of the 1930s. Newspaper articles do not provide certainty about who led the move but I believe it was Pantaleon who died in 1940. What causes the confusion is that when Beryl Jean Albress married Donald Arthur Gulliver in 1948 she was called the daughter of the late Mr A.S.Albress but when she made her debut in 1946, she was called the daughter of the late Mr. P. Albress.

The first mention of the family in Queensland was on page 2 of the Brisbane Courier on 21-1-1937. A.Albress had gained a 3rd class engine drivers certificate at Mareeba.
On page 2 of its 30-11-1945 issue, the Townsville Daily Bulletin reported that Private A.S.Albress of Ayr, previously listed as a prisoner of war, had died. (See details after trove information.)
The Cairns Post of 5-9-1946 reported on page 6 that Miss Beryl Albress, the second daughter of Mrs and the late Mr P. Albress of Mossman was one of the debutantes, describing her dress in detail. One would presume that this was Beryl Jean Albress who married Donald Arthur Gulliver in the Mossman Methodist Church but who was described on page 6 of the Cairns Post of 18-2-1948 as being the daughter of Mrs and the late Mr A.S.Albress. Her maid of honour was the brides sister, Mrs K. Craven. By the greatest stroke of good luck, the unhighlighted article above this one concerned a marriage that had taken place in the same church on Monday, 26 January. Keith Craven had married Maree Grace Gilligan Albress, the eldest daughter of Mrs and the late Mr A.S.Albress.
Before I deal with the name of Maree and Beryls father (A.S. or P?), I must mention that Marees third given name offers interesting possibilities. It is possible that the girls mother had been a Gilligan and I know of two ways that the Gilligan and Albress families may have become acquainted. Many peninsula lads tried their hand at the diggings and Antonio might have done so too, passing through Keilor on the way, just as I believe John Sullivan from Rye did. Due to the huge number of Irish workers building the Mt Alexander and Murray River Railway in 1858, St Augustines at Keilor was commenced at an early date. Irish pioneers near Bulla such as the Crotty, Reddan, Brannigan and Gilligan families would make the long journey to St Augustines very regularly and Antonio may have met the Gilligans after mass.
Thomas and Catherine Gilligan settled on 60 acres at the south west corner of Bungower and Jones Rd near Somerville and the widowed Catherine obtained the grant for crown allotment 61A, Moorooduc in 1882. As speculated earlier, Antonio may have attended mass at Mornington on a fairly regular basis since Dromana did not have its own Catholic Church till Lawrence Murphy got things going in the early 1900s. The Sullivans in Tyabb parish, the Gilligans and the Albress family might have become acquainted at the Mornington Church.
As both Pantaleon and A.S.Albress had died, it is hard to decide which report was accurate. A.S. was born in 1904 (according to a source) so assuming Maree was about 20, A.S. would have only been about 20 when she was born, highly unlikely.
The Cairns Post of 13-2-1948, page 5 article about rents being raised by the court, shows that Mrs P.M.Albress was renting a shop in Mill St, Mossman. Although it was usual for widows to use their own initials rather than their husbands, I presume that she was Pantaleons widow. Pantaleon was born in 1884 so if he was Maree and Beryls father he would have been about 44 when the girls were born, hardly too old.
Using a bit of guess work for the girls birth years, and assuming that Pantaleon was the father, that would make his children A.S.(1904, when Pantaleon was 22), Maree (1926?) and Beryl (1928?) so there should have been quite a few children born between A.S. and Maree.
Page 3 of the Cairns Post of 21-8-1947 reports a boxing tournament at Mossman as a fundraiser. In one bout M. Ah Wong was beaten on points by J.Albress. As their weights were, respectively 7 stone 6 pounds and 7 stone 5 pounds, they were either midgets or boys of about 13. J (possibly John) could have been a son of A.S.Albress. The Albress lad playing minor junior Rugby League for Southern Suburbs against Babinda was probably the young boxer.(C.P. 5-5-1950, p.3.)

A.S.ALBRESS.
Arthur Stanley Albress was born in Melbourne in 1904. (pipl)
The Australian War Memorial gives the following details.
A.S.Albress. Service No: QX24479. Rank: Private.
Unit: Australian Army Ordnance Corps. Theatre: Malaysia.
Casualty: P.O.W. Location of camp: Borneo.
The A.I.F. Project adds:
Cemetery: Labuan Memorial, Malaya. Details: 19/06/45.*
Son of Moira Albress, husband of Pearl Mavis Albress of Home Hill, Queensland.
*Mundia gives Arthurs year of death as 1944.

PLACES. Mossman (originally Mosman but changed to avoid confusion with the Sydney suburb) just up the coast from Port Douglas and quite close to the Daintree where the Gullivers were from. Mareeba (meeting of the waters) is at the confluence of the Barron River and two other streams on the Atherton tableland a bit south of due west from Cairns. Ayr is south east of Townsville about half way to Bowen and Home Hill is 12 km further on.

THE TRAVELLING SPORTSMAN.
Billy Albress played eight games for Richmond in the V.F.L. during the 1917 and 1918 seasons. At that time and for many decades afterwards, there was little money in it and most players worked all Saturday morning, requiring a rapid trip to the ground especially when playing away.
Jock McHale was a boss at the Carlton and United Brewery and there was one celebrated occasion when he made a worker, who was due to play against Collingwood, remain at work later than usual on the Saturday morning. There were no two- hour warm ups in those days. It may have been because of tiredness that Billy never cemented a spot in the team.

By December, 1918, Billy, by occupation a combination of tanner and shearer was up near Yea.
There was an entertainment at Glenburn followed by a dance. Two men caused a disturbance at the door and for some reason, although he was not involved, Billy kicked over a kerosene tin in which water was boiling for the supper cuppa. Billy had sung at the concert and had been asked to sing between dances but must have felt guilty and had travelled home in such a way that the police would .not spot him. Although evidence showed that his behavior had not been as bad as the charges suggested, Billy was still fined. (Yea Chronicle 12-121918, p.3.)

Billy was back in town by 1920 and was one of Port Melbournes best players when they beat Essendon As 11-11 to 6-14. (Earlier known as Essendon Town, the V.F.A. team which played at Windy Hill enjoyed great success circa 1911 when Dave McNamara played for them but were in decline by about 1920 when the Jolimont Railway Yards construction started, forcing Essendons V.F.L. team off the East Melbourne ground and the Essendon Council gave the Same Olds the use of Windy Hill at about the same time that planes (not bombers yet) started landing at the northern end of what is now Essendon Aerodrome. (Argus, 24-5-1920, p.11.)

By Easter of 1921, Billy seems to have been working in the Western District, perhaps as a shearer again. It was time to test his athletic ability against the best in the country. At the Stawell Gift, he entered the Stewards Purse, a race over the distance of 220 yards. He did well too, winning the seventh heat and the second semi final. (The Register, Adelaide, 30-3-1921, p.8.)
Some Horsham Times articles have not been digitized yet but it seems that Billy might have been appointed as Minyips coach and was in good form (17-6-1921, p.5.) He may have remained in the district and was set to compete again at the Stawell Easter Gift. For the Sprint Handicap, over 75 yards he had a mark of 6 yards with the back-marker on 2 yards and the front markers on 12 yards. (The Register, 6-4-1922, p.11.)
By the winter of 1923, Bill must have been working near the Murray River, as he was playing for Ebden Rovers and forming an effective combination with the coach, Condon.
(Wodonga and Toowong Sentinel, 13-7-1923; 20-7-1923, p.3.) It is possible that Bill only played the two games for the club as he was not named in the team in early August. Perhaps when Bill was working in an area, the coach, knowing of his reputation, would invite him to play for whatever period he would be around.
Was Bill working in a shearing gang? He competed at the Sale Athletic Carnival seven months later. He won the Longford Purse, a handicap race over 440 yards. Running off a mark of 22 yards and giving his competitors generous starts, he won his heat easily in 52 seconds. Despite strong opposition he won the final and collected the 30 pound purse.
By the winter of 1924, Bill was again playing for Minyip. He showed his fitness by rucking right throughout games but once again, it looks as if he has only played a couple of games.
(Horsham Times, 1-7-1924, p.3; 19-8-1924, p.5.)

THE NORTH QUEENSLAND STORY (FROM ANOTHER EMAIL.)
Dear XXX thank you for your reply it is much appreciated I looked up the mentioned site and found the information very interesting. I am one of the Queensland mob of which there aren t too many . We ve known that we have descended from Antonio and that he came from the Cape Verde Islands for some years but to get some information about their personal lives is amazing. As you were kind enough to email me I would like to add some information to clear up some things that were unknown. We come from Antonios daughter Maria who gave birth to an illegitimate son named Arthur Stanley Albress. As there was no father named on the birth certificate he was given Marias last name. He married Pearl Mavis Rushby and had three children at a young age Beryl Jean, Marie Grace and my father John Stanley Albress, he was the one mentioned having a boxing match in 1947. he would have been about 17 and was a small wiry man when he was young so the weights would have been correct. So as far as we know there are no other Albresses in north Queensland apart from us descendants of Arthur Stanley so I guess it was him that migrated north for whatever reason.Arthur Stanley was killed in 1945 in the sandakan marches at borneo during the second world war. His son John, my father, is 81 years old and the only remaining child of Arthur and is interested in finding out this information so thank you once again.

A TOAST TO THE ALBRESS FAMILY, PIONEERS OF RYE.

Heres to Antonio, the lad from Boa Vista Isle
Who gave the whole peninsula his genial smile;
He earned the title Daddy of the Heads,
And kept adding rooms to fit in all the beds.

Heres to Maria who milked and cooked and sewed
While hubbys dark skin glowed at the kiln just up the road.
Heres to the Albress boys, at sport much to the fore;
Heres to the Albress girls whose voices we adore.

Pioneers we were: Sullivan, Cain, Rowley and Wells,
Skelton, Clark, Watts; none of us were swells.
How sad we were to see you go,
Our good old mate, Antonio. 12-11-2011.

THE ATTACHMENT IS PART OF THE WANNAEUE PARISH MAP ON WHICH I HAVE PAINTED TWO WOBBLY ARROWS TO SHOW ANTONIO'S GRANTS. ALICEA CAMPBELL IS A GREAT GREAT GRAND DAUGHTER OF ANTONIO ALBRESS.


5 comment(s), latest 1 year, 7 months ago

Antonio Albress was a pioneer of the Mornington Peninsula in Victoria. (See also ALBRESS,BENNETT, McINTYRE etc journal.)

Antonio Albress was a pioneer of the Mornington Peninsula in Victoria, Australia.He was a grantee of 90 acres, whose eastern boundary was over Browns Rd from Springs Lane (which is the western boundary of the Moonah Links Golf Course.) His grant is now part of the locality of Fingal but was not in the parish of Fingal, being crown allotments 37 A1 and 37B of the parish of Wannaeue. (The Wannaeue map is available online.)His name was recorded on the map as Albres, which was probably the original spelling.
(Les Albres is a region in France, which suggests that one of Antonio's ancestors may have been French. As there is no mention of the Cape Verde Islands being under French control, perhaps this Frenchman from Les Albres had been on a ship sunk by Sir Francis Drake who did a bit of hunting in those parts.)

The two grants between Antonio's grant and the 2011 site of the Truemans Rd tip were 37B1 (Nicholas De Mas, probably another Cape Verde Islander) and 38A (Edward Russell.) I will not repeat Albress information posted on Rootsweb by thommo99 and Emily Burkitt and the details about probate.On rootsweb, you will also find details from newspapers accessed on trove. One of these (Mornington and Dromana Standard, 14-8-1909, p.2) states that Antonio came from the Cape Verde Island of Bona Vista. This was the English version of the Portugese Boa Vista (and was used for places in Canada and Brazil.) English presence on the island is indicated by an 1819 book of sailing directions that called the main town "English Road". It was probably this presence and the fact that J.B.Were, who had land near Cape Schanck, acted as the Consul for Portugal that resulted in Cape Verde Islanders such as Emanuel de Santos of Rye and Joe Peters of Rosebud coming to the Peninsula.

Boa Vista has the native name of Bubista, and the nickname, Ihla das Dunas (Island of the Dunes.) It is the third largest of the Cape Verde Islands, is 455 km west of the the Africa mainland's westernmost point, is fairly flat with its highest point being at only 387 metres and has the smallest population of all the inhabited islands. Being fertile at the time Antonio (or his parents) left, the island was fertile and supported much agriculture but now it is called Cape Verde's desert island.Antonio's given name was probably very common on the island, given that one of the three "mountains" and Ponta (point)Antonio on its north coast bear the Saint's name.


17 comment(s), latest 3 months, 2 weeks ago

ANZAC DAY 2013, ROSEBUD AND TULLAMARINE, VIC., AUST.

LEST WE FORGET.

At dawn outside the Rosebud R.S.L.
I thought of the boys who went through hell.
For King and country they crossed the water.
The grieving parents, siblings, son and daughter.

I recorded every Broady, Tulla, Keilor and Bulla name
But I no longer have them; what a shame!
Major Murphy moved the monuments at the first places two
To the old windmill site and Dalkeith Avenue.

The Lane boys of "Gowrie Park" (where planes rise and dip),
Alf Cock who died on a torpedoed ship,
Send offs where the old Beech Tree had been
During W.W.1 for the lads from Tullamarine.

Jack Hoctor, born in the coach house,who lit the lamp,
Tramped up the hill from Broady Town to the camp
To give Bro mother's cooking and her wishes best;
The lads were released to help the harvest.

Rosebud's Honour Board hangs in the school primary.
Fred Hobley's brother won a medal for extreme bravery.
Leongatha and Rosebud honoured the Hobley boys
Who suffered the mud, gas, pain and ear-splitting noise.

ART AND HISTORY: . EUGENE VON GUERARD and Walter Clark's "Glenara", Bulla, Victoria, Australia. TOWNSHEND SOMERVILLE.

Artists left a valuable historical legacy in the days before photography developed. The "Australia Sketcher" artists were kept busy recording images of places, such as a view of Mt Martha and Safety Beach from Arthur"s Seat; these can be seen on trove. The Peninsula and other "Artists' Trails" let us compare present day scenes, viewed from the spot where the artists sat, with reproductions of their paintings.

The N.G.V.pamphlet about the Von Guerard exhibition in 2011 contains reproductions of mountain scenes near Kosciusko and the western District but the ones that captured my attention were those of Cape Schanck and Walter Clark's Glenara (Melway 177 C9); the latter on page 2 which is attached.

THE FOLLOWING IS AN EXTRACT FROM "EARLY LANDOWNERS: PARISH OF TULLAMARINE", WRITTEN LARGELY FROM MEMORY."
Later additions to the text are written in italics.

SECTIONS 16 and 17.
Section 16 was granted to Archibald Walker who sold the 533 acres to William Coghill on 7-7-1842 for 1040 pounds. On 16-5-1856, William conveyed the part of section 16 s/w of Bulla Rd to George for two (several?) sums of 10 shillings each and the natural love and affection he hath and beareth for the said George Coghill.

As it is now two years since I have been able to access the computer, both my enthusiasm and my ability to recall facts or access notes at the drop of a hat have almost disappeared. Therefore, I hope you will forgive me if the rest of this history is somewhat abbreviated. I think that is preferable to the information not becoming available.


Section 17, consisted of part A (435 acres) and part B (448 acres). As the Bulla road ran through 17A, from Oaklands Junction (where a southern extension of Oaklands Rd would meet Perimeter Rd inside the airport) to where a dotted line now meets Sunbury Rd at Melway 177, F/9, the north eastern corner became the Inverness Hotel paddock of 58 acres, rather than part of Glenara, (although it was still owned by the Clark family). This paddock was generally leased by the occupant of the Inverness, such as Patrick Condon in 1879 and 1882. By 1915, bookmaker, Maurice Quinlan had bought this paddock (as well as huge tracts of the Glenara Estate up Oaklands Rd) and was leasing it and the hotel to Eleanor C.Gibb, who was later to move to the Essendon (Grand) Hotel. Another to run the hotel was Bridget Madden, the sister of Maurice Crotty of "Broomfield", through which Tullamarine Park Rd now runs.
Glenara consisted of 1030 acres and was owned by Alexander Clark in 1914. It consisted of the part of section 16 conveyed to George Coghill the part of 17A excluding the Inverness Hotel, and 17B.
As I no longer have my notes and maps, the following relies purely on my memory. George Goghill called his farm Glencairn. The dam at 177 D12 was known to the pioneers as the Glencairn dam. Walter Clark, who was the next owner, renamed the farm Glenara. Coghill, remembered by street names in Broadmeadows (Westmeadows) and Bulla Townships, also owned Cumberland, and if I remember correctly, built the Cumberland mansion whose ruins are at Melway 178 C12. In about 1850 Coghill, like Joseph Raleigh at Maribyrnong, built boiling down works to convert near-worthless sheep into tallow.
Walter Clark bought much land up Oaklands Rd as well as Glenara. One portion of this land was called Dunalister, after his son, Alister. When a later owner of this property wished to rename it Balbethan, the late Bob Blackwell used the name for his property near (I think) Elmore.
While in London, young Alister Clark chanced upon the Chelsea Flower Show and fell in love with roses. Bulla Bulla gives great detail of his fame as a breeder of roses. Alister also loved horses and as well as being closely involved with the Oaklands Hunt, he was the first Chairman of the Moonee Valley Racing Club from its inception until his death. Two of this clubs highly regarded races were the Tullamarine Handicap and the Alister Clark Stakes. Alisters Vice Chairman, J.B.McArthur, and the Rundles (later owners of Glenara) were members of the Hunt as well.
Alister was adored in the community and Lilly Green, who with hubby Cec used the closed Junction Hotel at Greens Corner (Mobil site) for a garage and store, said that serving Alister with petrol was the highlight of her time there. Alister served for years on the Bulla Shire Council (many as President) and the Bulla School Committee.

I.W.Symonds' "Bulla Bulla" has much information about the Clark family. If I remember correctly, Walter Clark died in a buggy accident at about the time that Eugene Von Guerard painted the scene in the painting. The reason it is described as being near Keilor is that from 1854, Keilor Rd (known as Mt Alexander Rd) became the main route to the diggings, much money having been spent to build Brees' bridge and improve the surface. Logically, the artist would have taken that route, stopped at Keilor for refreshments and then taken Arundel Rd (part of which is now named after Jose Borrell)across Bertram's Ford and through "Arundel", finally driving north along the present McNabs Rd past Barbiston, Victoria Bank, Oakbank, Aucholzie,Seafield, Roseleigh and Gowrie Park until he reached the southern boundary of Glencairn at Melway 4 G2. Then he would have chosen a spot which placed Mt Macedon almost in line with the homestead.One can imagine the curiosity of the McNab, Ritchie, Mansfield, Grant, Farnes, and Gray children to see a stranger in their quiet backwater. I bet they followed and watched him at work from a respectful distance. The Grants of Craigllachie and Loemans of Glenloeman, on Tullamarine Island, probably gawked from across Deep Creek.

Amazingly although the two families were so prominent, the Shire of Bulla rate collectors could never seem to work out which ones were Clark and which were Clarke (of the Jackson's old run, where Rupertswood was built.) Interestingly, the buildings between the Glenara homestead and Mt Macedon are probably on Lochton where Bain opened a flour mill in 1856, the year that Walter Clark bought 17A and Glencairn.(Lochton, whose old homestead was still standing when occupied by Reddan descendants circa 1999, is located at Melway 177 C4; aborigines used to pick-a-back children from Lochton across the creek on their way to the original Bulla school near the bridge.)

TOWNSHEND SOMERVILLE, about whom much information is given in my SOMERVILLE journal,was married at Glenara, the residence of Walter Clark. This would indicate that he and Walter were close friends. (Illustrated Australian News, 4-12-1871, page 223, accessed through TROVE.)


Arthur BOYD (born 1920, AUSTRALIAN OF THE YEAR IN 1995) and HERITAGE PROTECTION FOR 62 ROSEBUD PARADE, Rosebud, Victoria.

As can be easily found in the Australian Dictionary of Biography, this Arthur was a member of an artistic family. His grandfather, also named Arthur Boyd, came to Australia via New Zealand. The family became established at Murrumbeena, with one of the properties being Open Country where young Arthur's father, Merric, became a famed potter. When Merric's mother died in late 1936, young Arthur went to live with his grand-father at what is now 62 ROSEBUD PARADE, ROSEBUD. Young Arthur's maternal grandmother, Evelyn Gough, an early advocate of equality for women, had owned a house on the foreshore (Rosebud Fishing Village)since 1905 or before. With tuition from his grandfather, the teenager painted many scenes in the Rosebud area (10 known so far)until 1939 when his grandfather's ill health forced a return to Murrumbeena. Merric and Bloomfield are two common given names in this Boyd family and I suspect that they were maiden names of women that married into the family. Two of young Arthur's paintings featured Charles and Walter Burnham's jetty at the bay end of Boneo Rd; the view from the east gracing the cover of Robin Boyd's book. The house at 64 Rosebud Ave has been demolished so the Mornington Peninsula Shire must immediately protect the house that the 1995 Australian of the Year occupied, as a teenager launching a fabulous career. Honour this noted family's connection with Rosebud!

As two of Arthur's paintings, HOUSE AT ROSEBUD and INTERIOR LIVING ROOM, ROSEBUD had been sequestered on gallery websites, finding the house was difficult. Ben Boyd, a descendant of Arthur's, answered a plea for help emailed to his sister and it was mainly due to his titles searches that the house was granted heritage protection.

The newspaper article might have helped a bit.
A LOCAL historian wants a Rosebud house where renowned artist Arthur Boyd once lived to receive heritage status.

It was when he began researching Rosebuds history that he discovered the link between the Boyd family of painters, potters and writers and the house at 62 Rosebud Parade.

The retired primary school teacher had already written extensively about different aspects of peninsula history when he read that the Boyd presence in Rosebud started in 1905 through Arthur Boyds grandmother, Evelyn Gough.

EXTRACTS FROM EMAILS.
I have advised the owner of 62 Rosebud Parade that I intend to apply a heritage overlay to the property; this process takes some time, and in the meantime I am exploring what the future of the cottage could be in a practical sense, for example what could it be used for.

It may be that the owner is willing to sell the property to someone - or some organisation - interested to preserve it for its Arthur Boyd history.

Do you know of any persons, or organisations, that might have in interest in the cottage, to purchase or to use?

I would appreciate any leads you can give me.

The Bundanon Trust, The Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, University Arts Departments, or some umbrella group for Art Societies (if such exists) might be able to get a Government grant to buy the property and employ a live-in manager. I envisage groups of artists, from interstate or country or even metropolitan areas, staying in the house for a reasonable fee for a week or so to follow an expanded Artists' trail and execute their own works of our Peninsula beauty spots. Failing lack of interest from the above organisations and success in obtaining grants, there are many artists living on the peninsula who would probably jump at the opportunity to buy a house with such bragging rights and conduct it as a B&B for clients as described above. They could pocket income from guests for accommodation and conducted tours (the trail, good locations to paint) as well as soaking up inspiration from the many different artists that Arthur Boyd's house would attract. Local traders (shopkeepers) would benefit from the extra tourists that this very different guest house would attract.

1 comment(s), latest 2 years, 8 months ago

AUSTRALIA-WIDE HERO IN 1905: William John Ferrier of Warrnambool, Queenscliff and Rosebud.

William John Ferrier was a hero. Apparently suffering with an injured arm and conditions so bad that he had to lash himself to his mast, he performed a heroic rescue when the La Bella was wrecked near Warrnambool in 1905. He was a fisherman at this stage and was awarded the Humane Society's gold medal for his bravery. Between 1905 and 1915, he was the lighthouse keeper of the South Pile Lighthouse in Port Phillip Bay. During his time there, he owned the historic house at 858 Pt Nepean Rd on crown allotment 7 of the Rosebud Fishing Village, which had been granted to Thomas Coppard, a member of the Queenscliff Fishing Co. It is probable that the Government had given him this job as a reward for his heroism. While at the lighthouse, he painted ships on the timber interior which are shown on the Queenscliffe Maritime Museum website. Both Warrnambool and Queenscliff have a continuing Ferrier presence. William and his wife seem to have retained an affection for Rosebud as they gave this name to their house in Beach St, Queenscliff. Lew Ferrier's fishing boat was also given this name and played a prominent role in the opening of the renewed harbour in recent years.
When William (having gone back to fishing) died in 1937, all the flags in Queenscliff flew at half-mast.
Ferrier, a great name in Victoria's maritime history!

BASKET DAVEY MILBURN OF KEILOR :VICTORIA'S FIRST IRRIGATOR!!!!

David Milburn of Keilor is officially recognised as the first irrigator in Victoria. (Victorian Year Book 1973.)
As I am about to gain access to DHOTAMA, much information will then follow but in the meantime, readers might care to google "David Milburn, irrigator" and see what pops up. The first irrigating was done on his original purchase, Grange Farm, about which details will be supplied when I can access the Grange Farm entry in the dictionary history.

One of the pioneering families connected by marriage with the Milburns is the Tate family of Pleasant Vale which occupied the western side of Tullamarine Island, (subdivided by J.P.Fawkner)and extended across Jacksons Creek into the parish of Holden where the Tate children attended school after the Tullamarine Island school on Bulla Park closed. (Tullamarine Island is between Deep Creek and Jacksons Creek with Loemans Rd providing access.)The Pleasant Vale homestead was accessed via Cooper Rd and was directly in line with McLeods Rd across Jacksons Creek in the parish of Holden.

While the history of the Milburns revolved mainly around market gardening (orchards with peaches a Keilor specialty until the Spanish invasion of Borrell, Vert and Cuartero introduced crops of cauliflowers, tomatoes etc), it might surprise even the Milburns that David Milburn had Mrs Kilburn's 400 acre ("Fairview"x) "Fairfield" in about 1880.It is likely that this property,north of Sharps Rd and west of Broadmeadows Rd in Tullamarine, was used by David for hay growing or grazing. It was later owned by another pioneer of the Keilor area, James Harrick, before being divided into Brightview and Dalkeith.

BLACKWOOD JOTTINGS (1)

BLACKWOOD RESERVOIR.
Cr Millyard was handed a letter written by Mr Williams who wished to speak to the council about the Blackwood reservoir.(Note, this has not been corrected on trove.)

Mr. Williams being called upon, said-I am acting for the public of Blackwood in this matter. The Chairman: Do I understand you rightly to say that you represent the public of Blackwood at this Council today ? Mr. Williams: Well, perhaps that is saying too much; but I am here to request, on behalf of the public interest of Blackwood, that this Council will interfere between Messrs. Walker and Armstrong obtaining a lease of the Blackwood Reservoir, or permission to cut a race therefrom. Mr. Walker has applied to the Board of Lands and Works for the lease of the race, and he also states that this Council has no power in the matter; whereas I am informed that the Council holds a lease of the reservoir, which is the exclusive property of this Council, I also wish permission to be allowed to peruse that lease. - Should Messrs. Walker and Armstrong attain their object, it will create a private interest detrimental to the public interest of Blackwood.

Councillor Mairs: It is important that this Council should take some steps in the matter, and it is also important that Messrs. Walker and Co. should not be put in possession of the property which they are now applying for. I will move-"That the Secretary write to the Minister of Mines, in reference to the application of Messrs. Walker and Armstrong, of Blackwood, for the right to cut a race in connection with the Blackwood Reservoir, and request that such right be not granted, as this Council is of opinion that the right to construct watercourses in connection with the above reservoir should be vested in this Council alone. And that, to create private interests in connection therewith, would be highly detrimental to the interests of this Council, and to the interests of the people of Blackwood." Councillor Graham would second the motion,
believing that it would serve the best interest of Blackwood. Carried.
(P.3,Bacchus Marsh Express, 25-5-1867.)

GREENDALE.
A letter from D.Ryan, which discussed Greendale originally being part of the Bacchus Marsh Road District and the possibility of having to join the Bacchus Marsh Shire, gives much detail about the formation of the Ballan Road District Board. Ryan (the letter is signed D.R.)stated in another letter that David Mairs nominated Blackwood's first rep. and as he was unlikely to forget the Mairs name, the typesetter was most likely responsible for Main. Only part of the letter is shown here and the paragraphing is mine.

In 1862 a few men met at Flack's hotel, Ballan, and petitioned to have Ballan constituted a Road District. The boundary towards Blackwood was fixed by the petitioners at the northern boundary of allotments near Long Gully, owned by Mr. Andrew. But when the boundaries were gazetted no one was more surprised than myself to find that the more important part of Blackwood was brought within the Ballan Shire. Mr. Steavenson did this work by a stroke of the pen.

The residents of Blackwood in those days were both numerous and prosperous. They, however, never stirred to come under the Act, and thereby committed a grievous blunder, as they might easily have formed a respectable municipality themselves, being then the most important centre in West Bourke. Instead, however,the inhabitants of the various townships of which Blackwood is composed were very jealous that any particular little township would be better served than the other three. It would be amusing reading to publish the details of the various improvement com mittees formed at Blackwood from time to time.

For a great number of years past- perhaps from the beginning, the inclusion of the agricultural portion with the mining portion as one Riding has been immensely unsatisfactory. Our interests tend Marsh wards. Some years ago, in accordance with the wish of my neighbours, Mr. Standfield and myself drafted a petition, the purport of which was the annexation of our territory to the town where we transact our business, viz., Bacchus Marsh. Before the necessary signatures were .attached some person gave out that "if you join the Marsh you will have to pay the ordinary rate, a water rate for Messrs. Pearce Bros., and another for the Water Trust." This story travelled quickly amongst my neighbours, and they would believe nothing else. Hence, from that day I became very indifferent as to the disposition of the Shire funds. Three years ago another friend drew a like memorial for the same purpose, and surely enough another story upset this proposal.

No one here grudges the Blackwood people to vote en bloc, as they did at the last election, but a good many criticised the act of 16 voters here who always vote against any neighbour; which, if added to - the other 20 ratepayers who refrained from voting gave this side a big pull back. - Mr. Hamilton is a native of this neigh bourhood-a live man, full of zeal and vigor, and a son of one of the very best men who ever resided here; still, the 16 true men of Greendale voted against him.

To show the cruel wrong Blackwood is inflicting on this part of the Riding I have to go back a long, long road to the first election of the Ballan Road Board District. Election day was a big event for Ballan, yet Blackwood showed the utmost indifference. About a dozen Blackwood people came over on a pilgrimage to Ballan. Among those I now remember were George Moore (a talented man, who died in his native city, Bristol); William Vigor (a favourite); and J. B. Garland, " Bozzy." All now with the majority.

I need not say how Blackwood had no show of electing anyone on that day ; yet, through the good offices of Messrs. Mairs, Fox, and others, we supported Moore, and had him elected the first representative for Blackwood; but entered into a solemn compact with Mr. Moore that none of the money raised on the agricultural portion should be expended in the forest till our roads were made in the agricultural portion. This proposition was ratified; and as a matter of positive certainty Mr. Moore obeyed it to the letter. So did Cr. Mill yard, who succeeded him, except if he saw the Council in good humour he'd ask for 5 or 10 " to cut a dangerous sideling," &c. He used to superintend the execution of this work himself, and the Council was the gainer, as he always had full value from the best men he employed.

Barry's Reef at this time was growing strong, and not being on the best of terms with the Golden Point people put forward a resident of their own as candidate at a Shire election. The result surprised everyone as the Barry's reef man went within two of being elected. Barry's Reef people were jubilant, as they knew their strength, which kept rapidly increasing till another surprise was sprung upon the ratepayers. This was an additional Riding, necessitating all the members coming out of office. For the new Council Barry's Reef nomi- nated three of its best men, who were easily elected, thereby taking all the representation. And taking our share of the "Municipal fund, or a great portion of it, to make a forest road which we do not require, and our own roads neglected, and disregarding the compact entered into.etc. (P.1, BME, 3-10-1896.)

DAVID MAIRS.
David Mairs seems to have had a soft spot for Blackwood. This might be because at the time of his marriage in 1857 his address was 35 Roslyn Rd, North Blackwood (according to a genealogical website!) I have had no luck finding any mention on trove of Roslyn Road in Blackwood, Greendale or Ballan. However my search turned up this beauty.
EUREKA!
BALLAN. On a recent visit to our much esteemed friend, Mr. Denis Ryan, J.P., I was favored by the brief but interesting intelligence that the East Riding of Ballan Shire in the first Road Board was represented by Messrs. David Mairs, Denis Ryan, and George Moore. (P.3, Bacchus Marsh Express, 10-4-1909.)

DENIS RYAN, HARRY ATHORN AND GEORGE JACKSON.
Ryan's story certainly differs in some respects from that given in ASPECTS OF EARLY BLACKWOOD.Only a part of Ryan's letter is reproduced here.

MOUNT BLACKWOOD. To the Editor. SIR,-George Jackson would, I think make a good living anywhere. I was present at his wedding at Leahy an Egan's, Bacchus Marsh. He, Tom Spice(r?) (Ballan), and Black Charlie, would surprise any mob of wild bullocks in the Pyrete scrub or anywhere else that they were commissioned to muster. Jackson picked up with Harry Athorn, East Ballan hotel, an expert horseman, Bill and Jim Keating (Keating's swamp, Mount Cotterell), Tom Gregory, Disher, and George Whale of Ballan, joined the party, who started in January, '55, on a pilgrimage through the Blackwood ranges, and fixed their tent on the site of Peter Jensen's property, at Golden Point, Blackwood. They worked on with great success, opened up Jackson's gully, and got heaps of gold. Jackson let me know, so one morning early in March John Leahy, John Edols, myself, and Sergeant Roberts, started for Blackwood Towards evening we came to the camp of our acquaintances, and it was a sight to see the immense quantity of gold in pickle bottles (a pickle bottle held about 12 lbs troy). After getting lost a few times we got back next evening late, jaded and careworn. As soon as I could discharge my obligations I made up my mind to try Blackwood.(P.3, Bacchus Marsh Express, 9-7-1898.)

By the way, George Jackson was living in poverty later and Harry Athorn,(in 1854, a publican at East Ballan who also owned two team of bullocks) later became a butcher and was declared insolvent.

AND NOW THE SOURCE USED IN ASPECTS OF EARLY BLACKWOOD.(The part about Blackwood's name is not included.)
James H.Walsh of Ballan was far too kind to G.B. whose "legend" included not one name.
BLACKWOOD DIGGINGS.
To THE EDITOR OF THE ARGUS
Sir,- G B' s interesting article on Blackwood on August 20th recalled a version of the first discovery of gold there, given to me by Harry Densley, a resident of the Ballan district from 1853 to his death in 1919. His version does not differ materially from that of GB but it is more circumstantial and it contains intimate details of the occurrence only to be expected from one who played a part in it. Densley was a native of Van Diemen's Land. He arrived in Victoria with his father in December, l851, his father having been attracted by the gold discoveries. His eldest brother Charles had come to Bacchus Marsh with Captain Bacchus in 1838, and another brother Thomas, came later, so after landing Harry and his father made for there on foot. Immediately after their arrival they started with a party for the Forest Creek diggings but having no success there they moved on to Bendigo, and later to Ballarat where Densley senior, died towards the end of 1852. Harry who was then between 14 and 15 years was brought to Bacchus Marsh, and after a time he obtained employment as a bullock driver from one Harry Athorn, a well known identity of that place at that time. In 1853 Athorn came to East Ballan, and built an hotel there, at the top of the hill to the east of the valley which he named the Travellers Rest. Densley and another bullock driver named Crockett came with him. In addition to the hotel business he had two bullock teams carting on the roads. His account of the discovery of gold at Blackwood given by Densley to me is as follows - "Harry Athorn and Harry Hider were the first to discover gold at Blackwood. They made the discovery in the latter part of I854. Six bullocks that had got away from earlier carters were generally known to be in there on the Laradoc (as the Lerderderg was colloquially, and perhaps correctly, styled by the early settlers), and previous attempts to get them had proved unsuccessful. Athorn and Hider went on three different Sundays to seek them and on the last occasion when in the vicinity of where they were supposed to be running they stopped about mid day to have lunch on the bank of the creek where Golden Point now is. The water was clear. While eating their lunch they saw water worn gold at the bottom of the stream. They collected as much of it as was visible. Overjoyed with their discovery they returned with the gold, and with two of the bullocks, blazing a track out to make sure of finding the place again.

As soon as they returned to East Ballan a party was made up to prospect the discovery composed of Athorn, Hider and three others named Jackson, Dungey and Bellinger, the arrangements being that all were to share equally in any gold discovered. Jackson, Dungey and Bellinger were to do the prospecting while Athorn and Hider found them in food and other requisites. The prospectors begun work in Jackson's Gully (named after one of them) and they camped on the far side of the creek about where the Golden Point bridge is. In some of the holes put down good gold was obtained and in others none but on trying along the course of the creek the party found that gold could be got anywhere in it. I took the first lot of provisions out to them on horseback being guided to them by the trees blazed by Athorn and Hider, and afterwards a man named Matt Cook and I took out a larger supply and some mining equipment. Cook having half a ton on a two horse dray and a like weight on a dray drawn by six bullocks. After leaving Athorn's we went down by Pyke's homestead and crossing Doctors Creek below it followed the eastern bank of that stream through what is now Mr Lidgett's paddock until we reached about where the present road is. We then turned in an easterly direction and kept on until we arrived at the site where Greendale now stands, where we camped for the night near where Mr George Henry Roberts's latest store afterwards stood close to a large pool in which a servant woman in the employ of the Dale's had drowned herself a short time previously. In consequence of this tragedy the pool had received the name of the Lady's Waterhole and I did not like camping near it . On mentioning my doubts to Cook he did not seem to be perturbed and remarked philosophically 'She will not hurt you'

The creek was not then washed out as it is now and it could be crossed easily any where. After starting next morning we kept along the left bank of the creek, over the big hill and on until what is now called the Junction was reached where we again camped for the night. Next night we made for where the prospectors were working at what is now called Golden Point above which Jackson and Dungey met us and cut a track for us through the heavy heath and undergrowth which enabled us to reach the tent at the foot of the hill close to the creek. Throughout the journey we followed the trees blazed by Athorn and Hider but as trees had to be cut and fallen timber removed to give the dray passage our progress was necessarily very slow. The news of the party's operations was soon bruited about, and a considerable rush set in in which a good many early Ballannites took part "
Yours &c.,
JAMES H. WALSH. Ballan, Sept. 12. (P.9, Argus,17-9-1927.)

3 comment(s), latest 9 months ago

BLACKWOOD, VIC., AUST., THE HISTORY BUFF AND BUSHWALKER'S PARADISE.

Oh to be in Blackwood town
One hundred years ago,
When axes, picks and shovels
Were a'swinging to and fro.


Blackwood is a town in Victoria, Australia. The town is located on the Lerderderg River, 89 kilometres north west of the state capital, Melbourne. Blackwood is in the Shire of Moorabool Local Government Area and had a population of 235 at the 2006 census.[1]

The town was founded in 1855 during the Victorian gold rush and at one stage had a population of around 13,000 prospectors. The Post Office opened on 22 September 1855 and was known as Mount Blackwood until 1921.[2]

Attractions include the State Park and Wombat State Forest, a mineral spring, miners' cottages from the 1860s and Mount Blackwood, an extinct volcano offering panoramic views of the surrounding area.

Blackwood is so-much better described in that one verse than in wikipedia. As I jogged a hundred metres at a time up the Old Blackwood Coach Road, my mind was on a coach driver applying the brake with all his strength so the coach would not overtake his weary team and cruelly kill the horses. As I threaded my way up the ridges between the ruts, I could well imagine axles being broken and passengers, already bruised from the jolting, seeking shade or helping while repairs were carried out.

Blackwood is no Bendigo, Castlemaine or Maldon, time capsules filled with beautiful architecture. But it has the beauty of discovery about it and for those who like to combine fitness with the thrill of discovery,the Blackwood area is just the ticket. Blackwood has a tiny population now but amazingly has a newsletter of such quality that it can truly be called a magazine, and many organisations that require hard working volunteers to serve on many of them, so that the terrific community spirit can be maintained.

The type of hard work described in the first verse of the late Grace Rayner's Blackwood (A haven in the hills) was typified by Ray Meade, who served on the Cemetery trust and progress association as well as being president of the cricket club, social club and crown reserves committee. This history is dedicated to the late Ray Meade.

MARGOT HITCHCOCK. Margot is in the process of writing a history of Blackwood and its pioneers. As my aim is to supplement existing histories, not repeat it,, I will summarise the articles she has written for the Blackwood News so you know what information is available, but not include it in my work. Margot is willing to help people
with genealogical detail about any of their family who have been Blackwood pioneers. Margot would also appreciate any anecdotes, photos etc that you can supply. She can be contacted by email on <margothitchcock@bigpond.com> or by mail at P.O. Box43, Blackwood Post Office, Blackwood, 3548.

Margot has replied to my email and provided some valuable information.

Tyrrell should be spelt Terrill. The pioneer after whom the backtrack and the street (joining old Golden Point Rd to Golden Point Rd at the pub corner) were named was Byres, not Byers as I had written.

The school site at Golden Point is listed on old maps of Blackwood and a photo of the school is in my Aspects book. Blackwood North was not the main food growing area as food and sheep farms were also in Green Hills, Blackwood and a Chinese Market was where the Sport Ground is.

Mt Blackwood was named after Captain Blackwood of the 'Fly'.

There is information about the aborigines of the area in her books.They are:
1. 'Aspects of Early Blackwood - The Goldfields, The Landmarks, The Pioneers' by Alan J. Buckingham and Margot F. Hitchcock. (89 pages including photos and index - with information on early gold mining days and the pioneers - $ 14 or $16 including postage.)

2. ' Some History of Simmons Reef, Blackwood', compiled by Margot Hitchcock for the Blackwood & District Historical Society.(55 pages and 51 photos plus index with information on the early Quartz mining in Simmons Reef - $13 or $15 including postage.)

�The Story of Blackwood� � a small booklet of 8 pages with brief information on Blackwood � �The Beginnings, Gold, The Diggings, The Township, Quartz Mining, The Surrounding Districts � Barrys Reef, Simmons Reef, Golden Point, The Cemetery, Blackwood Today, and a map of 'Where to Go, - What to see.� Produced by the Blackwood & District Historical Society. Cost $4 from the Society or $5 posted.

Available from the Blackwood & District Historical Society Museum at the Old Police Stables Blackwood, open 1st Saturday of every month 10-30am - 12.30pm. Or can be purchased from the 'Garden of St. Erth', Blackwood Post Office, Blackwood Hotel, Mineral Springs, Caravan Park -or
For orders - contact Margot Hitchcock, email - margothitchcock@bigpond.com

If I don't summarise an article, it's because I don't have that newsletter.Variations in spelling are as found in articles. Descendants of pioneers who may never have lived in Blackwood are included in the surname list for genealogical purposes.

April-May, 2011.Graves in the Blackwood Cemetery. John Wightman started the first steam sawmill at Barry's Reef, Blackwood in 1866. Details of his wife, children and their spouses.(Kennedy, Dunlop, Thompson, Wolters.)

June-July, 2011.Silas Gay, mine manager, Blackwood. Excellent biographical and genealogical detail. It is interesting that the evidence of Albert Sweet was included in the police report regarding the accidental death of Silas in 1898.

December 2011-January 2012. Holes in the rock wall at the sports ground resulting from a competition displaying a skill used in mining; drilling holes in which dynamite was inserted.Results from the 1902 sports. The race behind the spring on the Shaw's Lake side of the Lerdie was constructed by Vincenzo Cocciardi.
(Cocciardi, Strangman, Coleman,Healy, Daymon,Terrill, Kathleen Maxwell.)
Also, World War2 Memories from Jack Rayner and Alan Wellsley Griffin and SOME EARLY MEMORIES OF BLACKWOOD by Don Owen.(Richards, Walker, Simmonds, Bricker,Dr Wisewould, Dwan, Sweet, Tyrrell, Callaghan.)
The historical society seem to have the police stables as its Museum. I'll have to check that out next time I'm up!

June- July, 2012. LAST BIG NUGGET FOUND IN BLACKWOOD.Much genealogical information about Tom Matthews, his spouse and children. (Tom Matthews, William Walters (wrong)/Waters (correct), Brennan/Brannan, Beasley, Considine, Eccleston, Wells.) Also a trip down memory lane by Kathy Blair. (Matthews,Cann, Tyrell, Gribble, Sweet, Shaw, Broad, Denman, Webster, Morgan, Amery, Hill, Walker, Seymour.) Tom Matthews used to play accordian at the dances. Kath used to go to school at Golden Point. I wonder where the school site is!

August-September, 2012.FLOOD AND LOSS OF LIFE AT BLACKWOOD. Two of John and Jane Williams' children had died from Scarlatina and two others were affected, one recovering and the other taken to Melbourne by Jane for treatment. While she was away another son drowned, during a heavy flood in mid 1861, while returning from the post office at Golden Point.(Williams, Harry.)
Also a poem UP HOME (NORTH BLACKWOOD) by Minnie Turner (nee Bawden) circa 1920's, (Elliott, Service, Brown, Bawden, Goudie, Cassidy, Thomas) and DOES BLACKWOOD HAVE A NORTH? by Jimmy Olsen (Dunn,Berg, Rodgers, Lillis, Meredith, Millyard, Donnely, Guppy, Bawden, Wright, O'Connel, Meier, Stewart, Ambler.) In 1865, Charles and William Dunn were the first settlers at Blackwood North, which became the foodbowl of the diggings.

Just two points on behalf of family historians, if you write poems about your family or the people of an area: (a)write notes, giving surnames, maiden names etc for such as Aunt Annie, Uncle Tom; (b)names in a list provide very little information so if you can't work some detail into the actual poem, try to add a note about each surname. For example one family might have had a huge number of children, another might have been a dairy farmer while most others grew spuds etc. For example:
BLACKWOODIANS.
Jack Rayner sat on council;1
War dangers did he face.2
He's living still up in Lourdes Hill3
With fond memories of Grace.4

1.Jack was a Ballan Shire councillor from -- to --.
2.Jack served in world war 2. See details in the December 2011-January 2012 edition of Blackwood News.
3. Grace Power bought the log cabin in Clarendon St, which overlooks Jackson's Gully, in 1938, according to her poem THE LOG CABIN (at the age of 17 according to Jack.)Given the name of the Rayner residence,it is no surprise to see the name, Power,mentioned in her THE CHURCH UPON THE HILL (St Malachy's Catholic Church.)
4.Jack married Grace Power at----on---- etc.

See how much information can be extracted from just one verse but a family historian isn't going to guess what it is and must be told the background. To avoid littering the poem with numbers, I prefer to write a page of notes corresponding to the verse numbers. e.g.

verse 1. Jack was a Ballan Shire councillor from -- to --.
Jack served in world war 2. See details in the December 2011-January 2012 edition of Blackwood News.
Grace Powell bought the log cabin in Clarendon St, which overlooks Jackson's Gully, in 1938, according to her poem THE LOG CABIN (at the age of 17 according to Jack.)Given the name of the Raynor residence,it is no surprise to see the name, Power,mentioned in her THE CHURCH UPON THE HILL (St Malachy's Catholic Church.)
Jack married Grace Power at----on---- etc.


IN THE BEGINNING.
I know nothing of the first inhabitants of the Blackwood area but I hope to remedy this. Despite expecting to find that the first white inhabitants were a lawless lot,quite the opposite was generally the case. I have not had time to ascertain whether the Pyke brothers' run included the Blackwood area,but if they attended Patrick Phelan's meeting at Blackwood, I doubt they would have voted for him.

A cursory glance at the voters' roll for the Mt Blackwood Division of the West Bourke electorate (Page 6, Argus, 22-5-1856)has revealed where the various diggers and storekeepers etc. were resident and the person after whom Vigor St was named. The Mr Langhorne who chaired Patrick Phelan's meeting, was probably Edward Langhorne, a householder at Red Hill, that is, near the present hotel and store. I will leave it for readers to look at the roll; Margot may include it in her book.

A description of several Runs near Blackwood can be found on pages 1 and 4 of The Argus of 3-10-1848. With boundaries described in some instances as ploughed lines,or as adjoining a run leased by a named person, it is difficult to determine which of several runs encompassed the Blackwood area. One item discovered from a description of one of the possibilities, Run 152, is that the native name for Mt Blackwood was Moonia.

Mt Blackwood was obviously named by 3-10-1848 but I have found nothing to indicate after whom it was named. I believe it was named after Vice-Admiral Henry Blackwood (Nelson's third in command who had no surviving children to succeed him as Baronet according to one source but not the one about Francis Price Blackwood), the Hon.Henry S.Blackwood or Francis Price Blackwood. The Blackwood River in Western Australia was definitely named after the Vice Admiral.

Blackwood, Francis Price (1809�1854)by Ann Mozley
Francis Price Blackwood (1809-1854), naval officer, was born on 25 May 1809, the second son of Vice-Admiral Sir Henry Blackwood and his third wife Harriet, n�e Gore. He entered the navy at 12 and obtained his first commission in August 1828. In 1833 on the East India Station he was appointed to command the Hyacinth, in which he first visited Australia and contributed hydrographic data on the north-eastern coast. He was promoted captain in 1838.

In 1841 Blackwood was appointed to command the corvette Fly in the first hydrographic survey commissioned by the Admiralty for exploring and charting the north-east Australian coast. The Fly, fitted with costly instruments, and carrying two scientists, Joseph Jukes, geologist, and John MacGillivray, zoologist, sailed from Falmouth in April 1842 with the cutter Bramble, under the charge of Lieutenant Charles Yule. After a stop in Hobart Town from August to October, the two ships called at Sydney and began the survey in December 1842.

In the next three years the Fly charted from Sandy Cape to Whitsunday Island, including Swain Reefs and Capricorn Islands and the broad passages between, and marked the outer line of the Barrier Reef from 16� 40' S. to 9� 20' S. Early in 1844 a beacon was successfully erected on Raine Island to mark the best passage through the reef. Meanwhile the Bramble completed a survey of Endeavour Strait. Late in 1844 the Fly visited Surabaya and returned in April 1845 to chart a track for shipping from Bramble Cay to Endeavour Strait (Great North-East Channel) through Torres Strait. The expedition then surveyed 100 miles (161 km) of the south-east coast of New Guinea, charting the dangerous off-shore shoals and the mouths of several rivers. The discovery of the Fly River commemorates their work. After a call at Singapore, the Fly returned to Sydney by way of the Swan River, and in December 1845 sailed for England. Next year Blackwood entered Jesus College, Cambridge, and on 12 October 1848 he married Jemima Sarah Strode. He died on 22 March 1854.

The records compiled under Blackwood were important not only for hydrography but also for the detailed sailing directions, many of which still appear on modern charts. In addition to the astronomical observations for the hydrographic survey, magnetic observations on sea and shore were made. The expedition was one of the earliest to visit Papua and bring back detailed reports of the natives.

The Hon. Henry S. Blackwood is appointed one of the Queen's Messengers for foreign service. (P.4, The Argus, 25-9-1849.)

And something closer to home for the next Blackwoodians' trivia night:
Maurice Baldwin BLACKWOOD - (born 1882 Britain died 1941 Australia).
Captain of the Stonecrop, a British E-boat sunk in the First World War,
became an admiral in the Royal Australian Navy in the Second World War.
A great grandson of Sir Henry Blackwood.
(Dennis Bell Burnaby, B.C. on rootsweb. The Blackwoods were also prominent in the U.S.A.)

THE ROADS AND THE ORIGINAL TOWNSHIPS.
4 corrections, most recently by culroym - Show corrections
MOUNT BLACKWOOD DIGGINGS.(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)24th September, 1855.
"What is Mount Blackwood like?" This question is frequently asked of a visitor from these diggings when in town. As it is likely to prove a very interesting place in many ways to the community at large, in the gra- dual development of the prodigious wealth known to exist there, it may be not uninteresting to your distant readers to give a brief description of the district in question.

In the first place, it is certainly a very mountainous one consisting entirely of a continued series of precipitous ranges, generally running, as near as may be, north and south, covered by a dense forest of trees and numerous perennial plants and shrubberies. Golden Point, where the Government Camp is located, and where a township is in process of being surveyed in allotments, is situated on a large sloping bank, close upon the main creek. On either side it is hemmed in, east and west, by very steep ranges. Further up the main creek, about a mile or so, is the celebrated Red Hill, where a considerable quantity of gold has been obtained. Both at the Red Hill and Golden Point, from the want or utter absence of any thing in the shape of sanitary regula- tions or preconcerted arrangements for that important object,an intolerable stench salutes the nostrils of the passers by , and from the same unfortunate cause, one may easily predicate that when summer comes on death and the doctor will be actively engaged among the inhabitants of those two abominably filthy spots At the Red Hill, the main creek is divided into the important tributaries, one coming down from the Yan- kee's, or Acre's Quartz Mining Reef, and the other from Simmons's Reef, numerous other smaller tributaries running into them, along the high ridges overlooking the Yankee Creek tributary.(P.6, Argus, 25-9-1855.)

THE OLD BLACKWOOD COACH ROAD.(Shown as King St on a Bushwalkers' association map.)
The Old Blackwood Coach Road went straight to Golden Point, which makes sense because that's where gold was first found on 14-11-1854. It emerges onto Clarendon St between Albert and Victoria Sts,closer to the latter. The original continuation was the North Blackwood Road. Heading south the road climbs very steeply and for this reason huge ruts,almost on the scale of the Grand Canyon, develop in rainy weather so it must have been worrying for coach drivers and very uncomfortable for passengers. The only good thing about the ruts, when I was running to heaven up this road, was that having to look intently for a safe footfall, so I wouldn't break a leg, distracted my mind from the climb ahead that went on and on and on. This road (also known as King St) meets the Morning Star track, a continuation of Golden Point Rd.

THE NORTH BLACKWOOD ROAD.
In DOES BLACKWOOD HAVE A NORTH? (P.5, Blackwood News August-September 2012), Jimmy Olsen states that this was the main route in and out of town in the 1800's,the Fern Hill-Blackwood Rd.
SETTLEMENT AT NORTH BLACKWOOD.TRENTHAM, WEDNESDAY.
It is proposed to place 200 families on some very rich land near Laver's Mill, close to Fern Hill, North Blackwood. Each family is to have two acres of land for a building site and garden and then there will be in addition to this 1,000 acres on the fringe of the state forest to be worked by the men in occupation of the two acres. They will work on the company system, dividing the profits made out of it on equal terms.

(P.6, Argus, 19-10-1893.)

While searching for "Fern Hill",I discovered an article (P.6, Bacchus Marsh Express,6-10-1906) which mentions the Fern Hill Railway Station and Charles Dunn, who with brother William,pioneered Blackwood North.

Mr. Charles Dunn, jun.,it should be mentioned, is a most public spirited man, and, with his father, pioneered this region over 40 years ago, living for two years in a hollow tree (big enough to turn a dray in) while subduing the wilderness. He thinks nothing of walking all day in these acclivities and declivities, and on Sunday last walked to Blackwood and back to send a message by Cr. Walters to Ballan to the Ed. to invite the party to luncheon on the Tuesday.

THE OLD TRENTHAM ROAD.
If you head down Martin St from the pub and ignore the curve to the left (the Trentham road until the bypass was built),continuing straight down to the river past Whalebone St, you're on the old Trentham Road. It intersects with Yankee Road after a fairly steep climb. I've run up this hill once and down once with much discomfort resulting each time. (See FUN? RUNS AND STROLLS.)

GOLDEN POINT ROAD.
This road, starting at the pub corner, curved slightly to the north before heading due south into Jacksons Gully to a leftie hairpin and a climb back to the direct route (with Hettie the Hen on your right!) This section has been replaced but can be clearly seen, with a plaque on the slight curve to the north. It states that gold was first found at Jacksons Gully by two teamsters on 14-11-1854. Golden Point Rd runs east to the river, turning right at the big rock to climb steadily past the log cabin, zig zag around a gully and pass the Byers Back Track before levelling out.At thispoint,it becomes the Morning Star Track which heads west and south west to meet the Greendale-Trentham Rd, intersecting with Thompsons Rd on the way.

OLD GOLDEN POINT RD.
As mentioned previously, the Old Blackwood Coach Road is very steep and is easily eroded.When the present centre of Blackwood (Red Hill) also became an important mining venue, it made sense to make a new and slightly less steep road directly to that area. I believe that old Golden Point Road skirted the upper reaches of Jacksons Gully to connect with Clarendon St, Golden Point.(Jack Rayner thinks my theory makes sense.) Old Golden Point Rd east of Campbell's Cutting is a dead end but has two houses of interest. Norm Campbell, a steward on Merchant ships, loved Blackwood and built Cambrae from whatever material he could scrounge in 1939.
The next house was owned for ages by the Simmons family. Across the road is a gum tree which was planted by Mr Simmons but was accidentally pruned with a mower, resulting in today's fascinating three gigantic, conjoined trunks.

THE WALKING TRACKS.
FUN RUNS AND STROLLS.
Before you cross the bridge at the mineral springs there are two short walks you can take. If you go left for only about a hundred metres,the track comes to a waterhole and a big rock from which children love to launch themselves into the water. This provides a good opportunity to teach water safety, such as how water holes can be very deep in places, and rocks, submerged logs etc can be hidden under the surface so exploring by wading should come before jumping, while noting current strength and planning exiting points should be taught.

If you follow the river to your right, you will find some interesting information about the gold mining era.

If you cross the bridge and turn left up some steps, the track will take you to Shaw's Lake where there are information boards in regard to history and walks. Primary school children can manage the climb with a few rest stops and it's a good jog for the athletically minded being not too steep and not too root and reef affected once you get up the hill a bit.

You can also drive up the North Blackwood road to Shaw's Lake Rd and try some of the circuit walks near the lake. Jogging up to the lake on the North Blackwood Rd is less difficult than the Old Blackwood Coach Rd (King St) but the climb does go on and on.

If you go straight down Golden Point Rd past the North Blackwood turn off till you reach the river, you will see a huge rock across the river. We always called the rock "The Sphinx" because it had the lion shape, even including the haunches, the absence of a human face not detracting too much from the comparison. It can be climbed fairly easily and safely by children of eight or so, presenting a splendid photo opportunity and making them feel like heroes. Jumping into the waterholes is a no no, being far too dangerous, but a short swim is possible, even in dry weather.

Golden Point Rd turns right and commences a long climb near the sphinx. Blackwood is a great place for stirring the imagination, not just historically as in Grace Rayner's THE DESERTED SHACK. No matter how tired the children were after walking to the sphinx, they just had to walk part of the way up the hill. For there was the Three Little Pigs' house;a log cabin sitting right beside the road. They didn't have to be inside it to provoke a bit of Drama.

The bridges at the springs and at the start of the North Blackwood road could not be crossed by the children without dad spending at least ten minutes being a troll!

My favourite runs were from the springs to Shaw's Lake returning down the North Blackwood Rd, the Byre's Back Track to O'Brien's Crossing, the Golden Pt Rd/Morning Star Track/Greendale-Trentham Rd and old Golden Point Rd circuit,and the previous circuit shortened by going cautiously down the Old Blackwood Coach Road.

One glorious hot moonlit night, I fancied a naturally illuminated run up Old Trentham Rd from Martin St to Yankee Rd, but when I turned after the bridge I ran straight into a puddle, and learning my lesson quickly, slopped back home. One day, feeling extra heroic, I tried the North Blackwood, Yankee Rd, Old Trentham Rd circuit and again came to grief on the last-named track. Reefs were a worry in places on the way to Five Ways,on most of Yankee Rd and for a while as I turned left for the last leg. Soon the road smoothed and, hearing some thumps, I took the opportunity to spot the roos. You guessed it; I tripped on a reef and did my very best Superman impression,removing most of the skin from my forearms and knees. And it was a long way to the Lerdederg, even if it was downhill!

Late one overcast afternoon I was about to reach a crest as I climbed Golden Point Rd from the sphinx when I saw an Alsatian's head appear. Oh no,a feral dog! But it was a kangaroo which received as big a shock as I had
and took off like a dragster. Another day on the Byre's Back Track, I heard a single thump behind me as I commenced a zig zag around a gully. It was a koala which had jumped to finish its descent of a big gum.Magic! I eased my way slowly towards the lovely creature which stared curiously at me.I crossed its too-close line and up the tree it went with a speed that would put Spiderman to shame. Magic!


THE EVENTS.
Easter is a busy time at Blackwood with the woodchop, parade and concert being major events. Dances were once higlights when I was much younger.

Recalling the first verse of Grace Rayner's poem,which starts this journal, where she wished she could be in Blackwood "one hundred years ago", if you have the same desire, you can combine it with the chance to become an Australian Champion. The Australian Gold Panning Championships will be held at the Blackwood Cricket Ground on 24 March 2013. Results do not depend on luck. For details, contact Marcus (0418 474 427) or Geoff (0408 396 644). Powered sites are available at the mineral springs caravan park for only $25 per night but it would be wise to book early on 03 5368 6539.

JOHN EDOLS.
See comment 2.

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