itellya on Family Tree Circles

sort: Date Alphabetical
view: full | list

Journals and Posts


ABORIGINAL VOCABULARY (HODDLE- LANGHORNE.)

The purpose of this journal is to encourage people to share their knowledge of aboriginal words that have entered the English language as place names or in other ways, such as Yakka.(See Itellya's Sources journal.) No doubt the actual meaning of many words was misinterpreted by those who recorded them. I have read that aborigines used words for places that were really an expression of what happened there, such as frogs growling, water rushing and that words were repeated for emphasis. I think it was surveyor Wedge who first noted the word "Yarra" and presumed that it was the aboriginal word for the freshwater river. I believe that he and his dusky friend were standing near the waterfall near Queen St and Yarra Yarra might have been describing the water's movement.

"Maribyrnong : Action in Tranquility" states that Maribyrnong is a corruption of the aboriginal phrase for I can hear a ringtail possum. A Footscray history said that Cut Cut Paw, the parish name, meant a clump of she-oaks. Symonds says in his "Bulla Bulla" that the parish name meant two hills.I wonder if there is any connection with the fairly common "bool" suffix as in Warrnambool. Another history (Lenore Frost?)stated that Wonga (Wurundjeri) meant bronze- winged pigeon and the Bunurung ( there are a dozen versions of the spelling) used the word for Arthurs Seat, where as Colin McLear says in "A Dreamtime of Dromana", the bronze-winged pigeon kept to scrubby areas, searching for seed in small grassy clearings.

A Victorian or Australian history (The Settlers?) said that Robert Hoddle accepted 100 aboriginal words as compensation from the missionary to the aborigines, George Langhorne, who had used that number of fence posts belonging to Hoddle. (See more about Langhorne in the J.T.SMITH AND HIS ELECTORS journal, in relation to Peter Young of "Nairn", whose details I'd better add before you read it!)
I have found the origin of over 200 street names on the Peninsula, but have met a brick wall regarding seemingly aboriginal names for streets south west and north east of the Boneo/Eastbourne Rd intersection at Rosebud.They do not even resemble the vocabulary on the Bunurung website and the Shire's aboriginal consultant says that the names have been plucked from all over Australia. Perhaps somebody has come across these words.(See google map.)
I hope that many people add their comments.

12 comment(s), latest 1 month, 1 week ago

ABOUT SOME OF J.P.FAWKNER'S LAND CO-OP. MEMBERS, VIC., AUST.

After my second last unsuccessful attempt to insert a tiny paragraph in the J.P.FAWKNER CO-OP. journal, before turning off the computer in frustration, it occurred to me that I was really just listing people's names and as I said in a journal about Bulla "Names in a list ain't much good."

Naturally the first two names that came to mind were those of David Beckinsale and Henry Langlands as I had experienced so much trouble entering the details of their purchases into the journal. They were just names to me but trove soon changed that.

David Beckinsale, a dairy farmer at Woodstock (north of Donnybrook Rd, across Plenty Rd from the Yan Yean Reservoir) was taken into custody when his wife, Elizabeth, was brutally murdered in 1863. David was more than 20 years older than Elizabeth and if the defence lawyer (for the Kiwi drifter that was convicted of the crime) had seen David's 1852 notice about Elizabeth, he might have been able to cast more suspicion on David.

NOTICE
My Wife, Elizabeth Beckinsale, having left her home without any provocation, I hereby give notice that I will not be accountable for any debts that she may hereafter contract .
DAVID BECKINSALE
February 10, 1852. (P.3,Argus, 13-2-1852.)

David was probably in the colony by 1850. There was a letter for him at the post office.(P.4, Argus,5-12-1850.)



In the article about the murder trial, Epping road would mean High St(now the Plenty Highway I think) and the Morang road would be Plenty Rd. These, with Pascoe Vale Rd (Old Sydney Rd)and Bulla-Broadmeadows Rd(both of which passed through Broadmeadows Township and up the Ardlie St hill) were alternate routes to Sydney before the direct route (Sydney Rd)was made.

James Barrett confessed shortly before he was executed, thus exonerating David from all blame.
(P.4, Empire, Sydney,2-12-1863.)

There are many accounts of the incident and trial, but this one seems to have more detail than most.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Wednesday 18 November 1863 p 5 Article
... MURDER. James Barrett was Informed against for the wilful murder of Elizabeth Beckinsale at ... stock-road, a man named David Beckinsale. At the comer of the Woodstock and Epping roads there was ... Beckinsale was a dairy farmer, and lived not far from these parties. On Sunday, the 18th of October, the ... 10221 words




Henry Langlandswould have been different from most co-op. members in that he would have been able to buy land without worrying about price. I had suspected that he was just a speculator but after reading his obituary,I now suspect he had contributed to the co-op as a favour to Fawkner, because they were a few members short.

THE LATE MR HENRY LANGLANDS.
Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918) Wednesday 24 June 1863 p 3 Article
... THE LATE MR HENRY LANGLANDS. Our obituary this morning contains a name which must familiar to most of our readers. During a of nearly sixteen years. Mr Henry Langlands led a life of quiet and ... resigned his seat for the city, and Mr Langlands was elected in his place without opposition. Mr ... 603 words
TROVE PLAYING UP. I'LL CORRECT AND PASTE HENRY'S OBITUARY LATER.
THE LATE MR HENRY LANGLANDS.
Our obituary this morning contains a name which must be familiar to most of our readers. During a period of nearly sixteen years. Mr Henry Langlands led a life of quiet and unobtrusive usefulness in this
city. Born in London during tho year 1794, he was,therefore, at the time of his decease, 69 years of age.
A linendraper by trade, at the ago of 21 he changed his residence from London to Glasgow, where he continued for upwards of thirty years. He left Glasgow for the colony in 1846, and prior to his departure was entertained by a large number of hisfriends, and presented with a handsome testimonial.
He landed in this colony on tho 1st January, 1847, and immediately became connected with his brother in tho Port Phillip Foundry. During his residence in Glasgow, Mr Langlands was identified with every public measure for ameliorating the condition of his fellow-men. He, took an active part in the Catholic Emancipation Reform Bill and anti-slavery movements. In this colony his course has been the same.
He took a leading part in the anti-transportation movement, and was one of tho twelve who contributed 100 each for carrying it out to a practical result. Since that period he has been more or less associated with every movement in the city of a religious or benevolent character. The Hospital,the Benevolent Asylum, the Immigrants' Aid Society, and kindred associations, have ever found in him a steady friend ; whilo he has rendered material support to societies of a religious character, such as the City and Seamen's Missions and the Bible Society. At the first election subsequent to the inauguration of the New Constitution, Mr O'Shanassy, finding that he was elected last on the list for Melbourne, and that he had also been returned for Kilmore, resigned his seat for the city, and Mr Langlands was elected in his place withoutopposition. Mr Langlands held very decided political views, and while a member of the Legislative Assembly, he supported bills for the amendment of the Land Act and the Abolition of State Aid to Religion. As an employer, Mr Langlands has
always obtained the confidence and affection of his workmen, who have on several occasions given him
a public banquet in attestation of their esteem forhim. During the whole history of his connection with them, he has taken a warm interest in their welfare, uninterrupted by a single misunderstanding on either side. Mr Langlands died at his residence, Jolimont-square on Sunday night, shortly after eleven. His illness (bronchitis) was of very brief duration, and so late as Monday evening last he attended a public missionary meeting, addressed by the Rev.Dr Turner and others, in the Congregational Church,Richmond. He leaves behind him three sons, who have already arrived at manhood, and one daughter,married, to deplore his loss. His brother (of thePort Phillip Foundry) died some years before him. Wherever virtue is esteemed and honored, the death
of men possessod of sterling integrity and principle must be regarded as a public calamity, and we are
afraid it will be some timo before the blank which Mr Langland's death has caused will be filled up.
Age, 23rd June.(P.3, Bendigo Advertiser, 24-6-1863.)

I DO NOT INTEND TO PROVIDE ALL THE INFORMATION THAT IS AVAILABLE ABOUT EACH CO-OP. MEMBER. LET'S SEEWHAT IS AVAILABLE ABOUT THE OTHER MEMBERS, FROM WEST TO EAST.
SECTION 10.
EDWARD POPE.
In 1849, Edward Pope was listed as an elector in Bourke Ward, his address given as "off Little Lonsdale St".He was on the committee of St James' Visiting Society in the same year. The St Peter's Visiting Society gave its aim as being to look after people in its parish who were in need so I imagine the one associated with St James' (Old Cathedral, which was relocated to West Melbourne later)had the same aim.

Edward was before the court in 1851 and the bench reluctantly punished him.THE BUILDING ACT AGAIN. -Edward
Pope of Little Lonsdale-street was charged under the building act with not giving proper notice of a'cn tions and additions \h In lum The bench thought this a hard case, but it was necessary to make an example, tlicrcfo o, defend mt was s ntencc 1 to pay the pen iltt of 20 und'.Osts The bench advised the defendant to me
mormorialise the Council, as the provision of the act was very severe, und the pcuclties uimecsssanlv heit \ notice cf appeal tv is git cn.(P.2,Argus, 11-1-1851.)You might notice that I haven't corrected all the text!

POPE.On the 4th inst., at 205 Bourke-street east,Edward Harry, the youngest son of Edward and Sarah Pope, aged 18 months. (P.1, Argus, 7-5-1887.)

The bereaved father (above) could have been the section 10 purchaser or his son. By this time there was also Edward R. Pope at Clunes and a decade or so later, Edward Pope, a coach builder, was in East Brunswick.

THOMAS FRASER.
APPOINTMENTS.
John Atkyns, Esq., to be Deputy Judge of Court of Mines, Ballaarat, during the illness of Mr. Rogers ; Thomas Turner, Thomas Connor,W. S. Urquhart, Thomas Orwin, and Thomas Fraser, to be the trustees of the ground set
apart at Taradale as a site for a general ceme-tery, under the provisions of the Act 17 Vic. No. 12;
(P.5, Argus, 2-6-1858.)

Such an audience literary, artistic, and otherwise distinguishedas gathered to support Mr. Russell, on Monday, is certainly not often collected. There were present Thackeray,Douglas Jerrold, John Leech, Planche, Mark Lemon, Carter Hall, Mrs. Hall, T. P.Cooke, Clarkson Stanfield, John Oxenford, Charles Dickens, Shirley Brooks, Peter Cunningham, Sir Charles Taylor, Charles Mackay,Robert Bell, B. Lumley, Colonel Tulloch,
Gruneisen, Ella, Colonel de Bathe, Charles Dance, Thomas Fraser, J. C. Deane, F. Fladgate, Hon. Mr. and Mrs, Wrottesley, cum mults aliis- Press. (P.5, Argus, 7-7-1857.)

John Donald Coghill; Joseph Henry Elliott, Thomas Fraser, William Bennett Hull, and Henry Wrixon, to be trustees of the land set apart at Elphinstone as a site for the use of the Church of England.
(P.6,Argus,11-8-1860.)

Campbell's Creek School, Rev.Andrew Robertson, Thomas Kinigan,Thomas Fraser, William Reed, and G. Bien-
venue; (P.5, Argus, 9-1-1864 re school committees.)

There are not many articles about Thomas Fraser. The purchaser of the Tullamarine Island block would not be the Thomas Fraser who absconded from the Sunbury Industrial School, and if he had been the Rev. Thomas Fraser, his title would surely have been used in the title document. Therefore I believe the pioneer in the Castlemaine area was the co-op.member.

THOMAS COLLINS.
The choice of the right Thomas Collins is not so clear-cut. Relative to articles from the 1850's, he could have been a sailor who was assaulted, a cab driver or a juror at an inquest about a death at the Benevolent Asylum at Portland. The following one is my prime suspect, given Fawkner's association with Collingwood.

Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Tuesday 1 March 1859 p 4 Family Notices
... son. On the 27th ult., at Gertrude-street, Collingwood, Mrs. Thomas Collins, of a daughter

ELIZABETH SWEETNAM.
The Sweetnams were prominent in the Camberwell area. I believe that Elizabeth would have been a widow at the time of her purchase. She may have been the mother of Samuel Sweetnam, who was living in Bourke Rd, Hawthorn when he was made a J.P., was involved in a tramway company which seemed to be in trouble by 1889, and was sued for divorce by his wife.

WILLIAM POLLOCK.
It is possible that William Pollock suffered a smelly death within a few years of buying his block.

Inquest.-An inquest was held at tho Parkside Hotel, North Melbourne, on Monday, on the body of a man named William Pollock, who was found on the same day drowned in the manure depot. The deceased was twenty-eight years of age, and was a printer in the employ of Mr. Sayers, Little Collins-street. The evidence tended to prove that he had fallen in by accident on the previous evening, and was perfectly sober at the time. The jury returned a verdict of "died from suffocation," adding a rider, suggesting the propriety of immediately fencing in the manure pits.(P.5,Argus, 9-5-1855.)

JOHN DWYER.
DIED.
On the 16th inst., at his residence, No. 135 Little Lonsdale-street east, Melbourne, Mr. John Dwyer, sixty years, native county Tipperary, Ireland, an old colonist, much respected by a numerous circle of friends.
(P.5, Argus,19-5-1856.)

ADDITIONAL FRANKLINFORD SURNAMES.

The following surnames occur in the end section of the original FRANKLINFORD journal after the section covered by FRANKLINFORD 1-4. They were listed in FRANKLINFORD 5 and FRANKLINFORD 6, which, for some unexplained reason, were "under review".

ADDITIONAL SURNAMES IN "1888 geography with the Melbourne Hunt."

ADDITIONAL SURNAMES.
CONNOR, MCNAB, WILLIAMS, HEAPS, LLOYD, BLACKWELL, REDDAN, NASH, LEWIS, PARR, WALDOCK, SMITH, SNOWBALL, SWAN, TAYLOR,BOYD, ROBINSON, BEALE, FULLARTON, MORRIS, FAWKNER,DUHY, CURRY, CROOKE, MILLAR, McINTYRE, DUTTON,MORAN, HENDERSON,COX, COLLIER, MORGAN,STEELE,JOHNSON, THOMAS,McNAMARA, LAVERTY, McCORMACK,BRANNIGAN, REDDAN,GRIST, COCK, LOFT, O'NIAL,RIDDELL,HAMILTON,HOWSE,McDOUGALL,BUTLER,GREEN,KILBURN, RORKE,BEAMAN,MOUNSEY,BLANCHE, CAMPBELL, DENHAM, MILBURN,HURREN,GILBERTSON, DOYLE,MURPHY,FOX,GERAGHTY, HENDRY, MANSFIELD,DONOVAN, SPIERS, ELLIS,LOCKHART,BREES,PETER, ROWE,HANDLEN,WILLIAMS,TENNIEL,SAGE,JUDD, GOODWIN,PURVIS,HOLLAND,SEELEY

AIRPORT WEST, VIC,. AUST.

I just received another query. I might as well share the information. Unfortunately, I must write this journal off the top of my head, with a little help from trove, as I no longer have all the sources that I would have been quoting a decade ago, such as rates transcriptions, the Doutta Galla parish map, Keilor Souvenirs (1950, 1961 and 1963) etc.

Hi xxxxx,

Hope you are well. Just wondering if you know when Matthews Avenue and its associated suburb was built.

The Matthews Avenue referred to is the eastern boundary of Airport West. The western boundary of this suburb is the Albion-Jacana railway line,built in 1928,which separates Airport West from Keilor Park. The suburb was the birthplace of a company called Associated Radio. On a block fronting both Victory and Marshall Streets, the company had a big transmission tower. The company was later bought out by the Australian Broadcasting Commission which called its station 3AR; I trust you've worked out where the two letters in the station's name came from. The transmission tower was eventually replaced by one at St Albans.(Much detail in one of the three Keilor Souvenirs mentioned.)

A BROADCASTING ACTION.
WRIT FOR DAMAGES ISSUED Melbourne, September 11.
Acting on behalf of Alfred Louis Brown, of Rundle-street, Adelaide, Messrs. Madden, Butler, Elder. and Graham, to-day issued a Supreme Court writ, directed against the Associated Radio Company of Australia, of Elizabeth-street; Walter Conder, of Exhibition-street: the Victorian Broadcasting Company, of Queen-street; and J. C. Williamson, Limited, of Exhibition-street. From the Associated Radio Company, the plaintiff claims damages for a breach of several agreements, under which the plaintiff alleges that he was to have the option of purchasing the broadcasting undertakings of the defendant, including an A class broadcasting station license, and all land and buildings and appliances situated and installed on the Victory Estate at Essendon; also all other appliances used for broadcasting, for 10,000. etc. (P.19,The Advertiser, Adelaide, 12-9-1928.)

(The A.B.C. seems to have acquired 3LO from the Australian Broadcasting Co. shortly after June 1932 and 3AR from Associated Radio during 1933.Associated Radio was being sued by creditors in 1935.

ANSWER TO THE QUESTION.
The Morgan family of Niddrie - National Library of Australia
catalogue.nla.gov.au/Record/1751713
Available in the National Library of Australia collection. Author: Morgan, Richard, 1917-; Format: Book; 157 p. : geneal. tables, maps, ports. ; 21 cm.

This book should be available from the Brimbank or Moonee Valley library system and contains a subdivision plan of the property. Matthews Ave was one of the streets shown but was only a short street, not a through street from Keilor Rd to the northern boundary. Treadwell Rd (part of which in the aerodrome is called Nomad Rd) extended to Bulla Rd creating the Triangular estate of small farms*, Mrs Ford's lolly shop etc. This probably accounts for the bottleneck described in the following article. In about 1943, the Tullamarine Progress Association discovered that Bulla Rd was to be closed because of Airport expansion. Matthews Ave might have been extended because of the closure of Treadwell Rd at this time as well.
(*The late Jim Hume, long-time President of the Broadmeadows Historical Society, lived on one of these farms.)

Tramway Extension.
Reference to a proposed extension of the Essendon tramway service to the aerodrome led to the shire engineer (Mr. Pullar) remarking that no official announcement had been made. He understood the extension might be along either Bulla road, Treadwell road or Matthews avenue, but that he had no definite information. Cr. Parsons considered Treadwell road to be better than Bulla road. Wherever trams went, the district extended and developed. The council should fight for Treadwell road. As long as the aerodrome was served the military did not care which route was followed. The Bulla road extension was not warranted. If Bulla road were adopted, the line should not go past the aerodrome for reasons of safety. With the existing parking trouble it would only create a death trap. The line might go up through the centre of the plantations, but not through the bottle-neck past the aerodrome. The council should use its influence to prevent that. There were enough bottle-necks in the metropolitan area already. Cr. Davis said he understood the trouble was caused by inability to get sufficient buses. Cr. Parsons: I was told the tram would be running up Bulla Road in five weeks. It was decided to write to Cr. W. Parks .(Essendon Council), local representative on the Tramways Board, asking, him to take action to prevent a line being put through the Bulla road bottle neck at the aerodrome. ((P.3,Sunshine Advocate, 7-8-1942, KEILOR COUNCIL.)

Re the following article-
If I remember correctly, Martin St was on "Niddrie", as most of the "valuable building blocks" would have been. One of the houses that would have to be removed would have been the homestead built by Sam Mansfield on his grants on section 16 Doutta Galla (near the present south-west corner of Essendon Airport (Melway 16 C9 roughly.)

KEILOR SHIRE COUNCIL. A deputation of Parliamentary and Municipal representatives of Keilor and Broadmeadows shires waited upon the Minister for Air and Civil Aviation (Hon. A: S. Drakeford), last Friday. Dec. 4. They presented a petition from 330 people directly concerned, and the plea of the ratepayers generally of the two shires, that the proposed expansion of the Essendon Aerodrome and its activities, which would be a disturbing element, be not proceeded with. The Keilor Shire contends that the proposition will be very detrimental to the shire, as many good building blocks will be used and a number of the ratepayers' houses will have to be removed. (P.4, Sunshine Advocate, 11-12-1942.)

It can safely be assumed that Matthews Ave had been made to a reasonable standard to the northern boundary of "Niddrie" by the time the tramway opened.

SOLDIERS IN NORTH WANT ACTION
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Friday 14 May 1943 p 12 Article
... Essendon station and the aerodrome. The first tram on week days will leave Eliza- beth st at 6.13am and ... Chinese Legation in Australia. ESSENDON DROME TRAM BEGINS SUNDAY The tramway extension to Essendon aerodrome will operate from Sunday, Mr H.-JI. Bell, chairman Tramways Board, said yesterday. Trams will ... 313 words

The reason for the name of Airport West was the proliferation of industry associated with the aerodrome such as N.I.C. (National Instrument Company) which fronted Matthews Ave.




It might surprise many people that Airport West had its own hotel in the 19th Century. It was called the Travellers' Rest Hotel and sat on a nine acre block (today bounded by Matthews Ave, Dromana Ave, Louis St and a line just south of Rood St) owned by J.B.Howse. (Titles Office Volume 29 folio 783.)The Oaklands Hunt often assembled at the Travellers' Rest, four times in 1899.

The hotel was described as being in Tullamarine (as were James Sharp's "Hillside" and Maurice Crotty's "Broomfield" on the south side of Sharps Rd) because the land between the aforementioned farms and Niddrie, Spring Park and Springfield (fronting Keilor Rd and extending to the line of Spence-Fraser St) had no locality name. The Thomas family took over Hillside in about 1943 and renamed it Carinya Park,the property becoming the home of the Tullamarine Pony Club. Joe Thomas's wife, Edie, was living at 160 Matthews Ave, East Keilor in 1954, probably while Joe was extending the old Hillside homestead. I haven't time to check now but the condolences she had received were probably related to the death of their young son Barrie, after whom Barrie Rd on part of Carinya Park was named.

THOMAS - Mrs E THOMAS and Family 160 Matthews avenue Keilor East and Relatives wish to THANK friends for beautiful floral tributes letters telegrams cards and personal expressions of sympathy in their recent sad be- reavement. (P.19, Argus, 4-9-1954.)



FIRE AT TULLAMARINE.
AN HOTEL DESTROYED
A fire broke out at 23 minutes past 3 a.m. on Sunday at the Travellers' Rest Hotel Bulla road, Tullamarine of which Mr E.J. Wilson is the licensee, The building was a wood and iron structure, one- storey, and contained nine rooms. A firm hold was established by the flames, and the efforts of four hose carts and 14 men with hand pumps failed to save it from total destruction. There was no insurance on the building, which was the property of Mr J Howse. The contents, destroyed were insured for 100.(P.6, Argus, 4-12-1899.)



Somewhere I have written details of Airport West being officially so-named decades after the name came into common useage. Hopefully I'll find these details. One of the aforementioned souvenirs had a big article about Airport West.You could access these souvenirs through the Keilor Historical Society.

Luckily I had quoted part of the Airport West article in my other QUINLAN journal and I have pasted it below.

So it can be seen that this quote from the article AIRPORT WEST WAS OAT FARMS in PROCLAMATION OF THE CITY OF KEILOR 29-4-1961 was based on fact:
The 260 acre farm of Dr. Morgans father (i.e. NIDDRIE) and the farm of a neighbour, Maurice Quinlan, occupied much of what is today Airport West and the airport. (Niddrie was actually 249 acres but thats another matter.)

The part of Airport West south of Fraser St houses was originally three crown grants; heading west from Treadwell Rd, they were Niddrie, Spring Park and Springfield.

NIDDRIE.
Niddrie was crown allotment 17B of the parish of Doutta Galla, consisting of 249 acres, situated entirely on the northside of Keilor Rd between Treadwell Rd and the midline of Grange Rd and Bowes Avenue. Although this name, bestowed by Harry Stevenson, crept south to describe the present "locality" of Niddrie (Nicholson and J.P.Main's grants), both Niddrie primary and high schools used the name. My 1999 Melway shrewdly described the location of Elstone Ave as being in both Airport West and Niddrie but Cameron St as being in Airport West only.

Between 1843 and 1851, the Scottish settler, Thomas Napier (18021881) purchased the Keilor Road land covering Niddrie and Airport West. In 1869, Napier sold this 249-acre (1.01 km2) land to Henry Stevenson (18101893). By 1871, Stevenson had built a house he named Niddrie, after his birthplace of Niddrie, a suburb of Edinburgh, Scotland. After his death in 1893 the property was transferred to his wife Elizabeth who sold it to Patrick Morgan eight years later.

A Keilor East Post Office opened on 1 July 1947 and was renamed Niddrie around 1956. The Niddrie North office opened in 1960, though it was known as Airport West from 1974 until 1982.[4] (Niddrie wikipedia.)

Who ever wrote this entry in wikipedia can be excused for thinking that Thomas Napier's grant straddled Keilor Rd and included the area now known as Niddrie.

SPRING PARK.
Spring Park was crown allotment 17A of the parish of Doutta Galla,consisting of 193 and 3/4 acres, adjoining the western boundary of Niddrie and extending west to the line of Olive Grove, Hansen Reserve being in its north west corner.It was granted to spirit merchants, Owen Connor and Patrick Phelan but they became insolvent. Angela Evans and colleagues told (in KEILOR PIONEERS: DEAD MEN DO TELL TALES) how Phelan's daughter had married Connor's son and Springfield (see below)evaded the creditors' clutches. Owen Connor had returned to Ireland but sent a letter written with an Irish accent! William and Sarah Connor shared with James Harrick the farming of the Keilor Park area for many decades.

CONNOR. On the 27th August, at her residence,5 Williams-road, Moonee Ponds, Sarah, relict of the late William Connor, of Keilor, aged 58 years. (P.1, Argus, 28-8-1903.)

DILLONCONNOR.On the 24th April, at St. Monica's R.C. Church, Essendon, by the Rev. Father Nolan, James, only son of James Dillon, 84 Napier-street, Essendon, to Ellen (Nelly), eldest daughter of Sarah and the late William Connor, "The Franklyn," Keilor.
So that's where William and Sarah Connor lived! The Franlyn was actually the Sir John Franklin Hotel, built by Henry Eldridge on the east corner of Keilor Rd and Collinson St, Keilor Park.

Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Monday 14 December 1857 p 8 Family Notices
... The Funeral to move from his residence, Sir John Franklin Hotel, Keilor-road, this day, Monday, at twelve o'clock noon. JOHN DALEY, Undertaker, corner La Trobe and Spring Streets, Melbourne. ... Funeral Notices. --- THE Friends of Mr. HENRY ELDRIDGE are re- spectfully invited to follow ... 62 words



The last to farm Spring Park as an entire farm was William Johnson. The Johnson family also owned Glendewar and leased Cumberland before moving back to Glendewar(probably when Alexander McCracken's beautiful Cumberland homestead was burnt down;its ruins can be seen at Melway 178 C12.)

JOHNSON. On the 28th September 1913 at "Glendewar," Tullamarine,James Alexander,the dearly loved third son of Mrs. W. and the late William Johnson,late of "Spring Park," Essendon aged 39 years.(P.1, Argus,30-9-1913.)

The McNamara brothers had farmed Spring Farm and other parts of Airport West for many years so it is fitting that Spring Park is bisected by McNamara Ave.
Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Thursday 23 July 1903 p 1 Family Notices
... farmer, who died at Spring-park, Essendon, 23rd July, 1901. "May her soul rest in peace." -(Inserted ... Mary E. McNamara, who died at Sping-park, Essendon, on July 23. R.I.P. (In- serted by her ... B. Ballantine, F. M. Robertson and G. B. Cabena.) McNAMARA.--In ... 636 words

Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956) Thursday 29 October 1903 p 1 Family Notices
... missed (Inserted by her lov- ing husband, John T. Lee.) McNAMARA.--In sad and loving remembrance of our affectionate father, Patrick McNamara, who died at "Spring-Park," Kesendon, October 29, 1896.

An advertisement of the subdivision of the Spring Park Estate into 44 small farms appeared on page 1s of the Independent (Footscray) on 20-3-1915. The so-called plan shows Spring Park enormously out of scale, with Morgan's "Niddrie" seeming to have a twentieth of the road frontage shown for the Spring Park Estate. Edwin Roberts was the developer; hence Roberts Rd.

The sale of the Spring Park Estate caused problems for Patrick Morgan of Niddrie, who wanted to continue farming.
Mr. P. Morgan, who owns 250 acres adjoining the property recently cut up and sold by Mr. Roberts, was also in attendance to object to the assessment of his land. The land was valued by the State at 19 per acre, and he contended that the assessment was unfair and should not have been accepted as a basis for making the shire valuation. Cr. Delahey: In order to exist as a shire we were compelled to increase valuation. Mr. Morgan said the increase in his case was from 240 to 380, and the valuation was prospective. He bought the land at 14 per acre, and that was as much as it was worth to-day. The land did not return more now than when it was bought. It was simply valuing a farm as if it were cut up in building allotments. , Cr. Parr: The land adjoining has been submitted to auction and brought high prices. The question arises whether Mr. Morgan is using the land to the best advantage. Mr. Morgan contended that he was using the land to the best advantage. Cr. McFarlane: It has been publicly stated that you have refused 40 per acre for the land. Mr. Morgan: I have never received such an offer. I bought it 15 years ago at 14 per acre. It is simply farming and grazing land. Cr. Parr: The same might be said of land in Buckley Park. If Essendon annexed this territory, I wonder what the valuation would be. Mr. Morgan said that probably many of those who bought the land adjoining his property would never go through with their payments. The auctioneers told them to buy by the acre and sell by the foot. The Land was boomed, and values were inflated by its proximity to the Essendon boundary. Cr. White: And Essendon claims that our values are too low. Mr. Morgan: I do not think I could get 25 an acre cash for my land. In my opinion even the old valuation was too high. The matter was referred to committee...etc.
(P.1, Essendon Gazette and Keilor, Bulla, and Broadmeadows Reporter, 18-1-1917.)

SPRINGFIELD.
Springfield was crown allotment 18b of the parish of Doutta Galla,consisting of 151 acres and adjoining Spring Park on the west, extending west to the corner of Keilor Rd and Roberts Rd. Thus it was part of Edwin Robert's Spring Park Estate.

NORTH OF FRASER ST.
EXTRACT FROM MY "EARLY LANDOWNERS:PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA" (NOT A JOURNAL.)
SECTION 22.

The boundaries of section 22 are indicated by: Thomas St/Barrie Rd, Sharps Rd, Nomad Rd. and the Fraser/ King St. midline. Information regarding its occupants comes mainly from Keilor Shires rate records except for lots B and D, which were in Broadmeadows Shire.

ALLOTMENT F of 147 acres between Fraser St. And Parer Rd., was granted to early squatters, A.Wright and J.& T.Crighton in 1848 and in 1868 it was being farmed by John Commons. Its eastern boundary was the same as for allotment E.

ALLOTMENT E consisted of 128 acres and extended north to Moore Rd. In 1868 it is likely that Sam.Mansfield had lot E as well as his 56 acres in section 16 and 87 acres in 22c as another property of 130 acres is listed. At the turn of the century, Robert G.Stevenson was leasing lot F, part of St Johns between Bulla Rd and Treadwell Rd (Wirraway and Nomad Rds.), lot E (which was mistakenly called lot G) and a few small blocks between Bulla Rd. And a now-closed road*. This gave him a total of 329 acres.

(* This road left Bulla Rd. at Webb St. to run to the corner of English St. and Nomad Rd., the n.w. Corner of section 16. The 1860 survey map shows this road finishing at the north boundary of 17B. It may have been the original road to the Springs or the old Macedon Rd,which title deeds show to have cut, respectively, though section 15 and section 21.)

Rupert Percy Steele was leasing Niddrie and a memo reveals that Steele had taken over lot F and Maurice Quinlan lot E plus the s.w. Corner of St. Johns.

ALLOTMENT C, between Moore St. And Dromana Ave., granted to J.P.Fawkner, was occupied in 1868 by: Sam. Mansfield 87 acres, J.B.Howse 17 acres and Catherine Howse 9 acres and licenced house. This was the Travellers' Rest (whose location is already described in this journal.) The occupancy of 22C, which contains much of Westfield Shoppingtown, had not changed much in 1900. Sam Mansfield still had 68 acres, J.B.Howse, who now owned John Hall's "South Wait" across Bulla Rd, had 40 acres and Edmund Tucker had the 9 acres on which the Travellers' Rest had stood.

Crown allotment 22A, between Sharps Rd (now Caterpillar Drive) and Dromana Ave,mostly across the railway line from Airport West, was mainly farmed as part of Hillside/ Carinya Park. Joe Thomas sold the majority of the 87 acre block to Caterpillar prior to 1956. The Tullamarine Progress Association was concerned that the Caterpillar factory would mess up the area but Percy Hurren of Dalkeith reassured his fellow members, and he was right.

Extract from my journal MAURICE QUINLAN AND OAKLANDS RD, BULLA.
NORTH ESSENDON comprises about 26 ACRES, situated on the main Bulla road, about 1 1/4 miles from the Keilor road electric tram terminus. This property is beautifully fenced, and bordered with live hedges and groups of flourishing handsome gums. Also, about 160 acres separated by a road. It is proposed to subdivide and submit this latter block into 10 allotments, in areas of from about 9 acres to 28 acres each, thus affording persons in quest of farmlets or accommodation paddocks near the city the opportunity of participating in the distribution.
(P.3,Argus, 26-4-1919.)- RE SALE OF QUINLAN'S FREEHOLDS.

STOCK GRAZED IN RESIDENTIAL AREA At the meeting of the Keilor shire council last Saturday a letter was re- ceived from a number of ratepayers owning land in the Victory Estate, North Essendon, complaining of sheep being grazed continually in portions of the Victory Estate and stating that the practice was unhealthy and offensive. The council decided to ask for the names of the offenders with a view to taking legal action.
(P.6, Sunshine Advocate, 9-10-1936.)

SHEEP AND CATTLE. Sheep grazing on vacant land at North Essendon was referred to in a communication received from F. B. Roberts, who said 1000 acres were concerned, carrying some thousands of sheep. Differences arose between drovers, some of whom left dead sheep lying about. Drovers could not carry on with out supervision. He had bought a property to handle sheep between his place at Mickleham and the Melbourne market, and had tried to keep things shipshape in the district, to avert a crisis.(P.3, Sunshine Advocate, 12-6-1942.)
As this concerned Keilor Council, North Essendon meant on the west side of Bulla Rd, north of the Essendon boundary(which was north of Keilor Rd), so the land being grazed was probably the part of Essendon Aerodrome south west of Bulla Rd (part of which is now Wirraway Rd), and Airport West.

The un-named road separating the 160 acres from the 26 acre triangle described as North Essendon was Treadwell Rd. Both of these properties were described in detail in my earlier QUINLAN journal.

North Essendon land 220 acre
A block of 74 acres of vacant land at North Essen- don, west of the aerodrome, and about half a mile west of the tramline, was sold at auction yesterday for 220 an acre, or 10,280.(P.7,Argus, 20-11-1954.)

ALBERT COLEMAN'S BROTHER, HASTINGS' DEADSHOT JACK (THE GREAT JOHN COLEMAN) AND HARRY CASPAR.

Doug Ackerly's "Coleman" has recently been published. My aim here is to provide information that is not available in wikipedia or Doug's book.

Both played for Tyabb but in another game
Young Jack's stratospheric leaps and tons won far more fame.
When he first trained with Hastings, their offer he'd refuse
(To give him stops for better grip): "Not in my good shoes!"*

Did he squat in Hasting's goal square as he did at Windy Hill,
Nonchalantly chewing gum thrown by adoring fans, until
Rising with the speed of light from his haunches
He led into one of his spectacular launches?**

In one of Hasting's matches he was sorely pressed,
Kicking only eight; only A.Coleman was among the best.
Hastings won two premierships, won them back to back,
And Argus readers read of the feats of the "Standard's" Deadshot Jack.

(Trove, Tyabb Cricket Club website and Wikipedia. *George Slocombe,the Hastings coach.
** Fraser had felt his pulse quicken as a 10-year-old at Windy Hill when Essendon's on-ballers would win the football, Coleman would crouch in the goal square ready to explode like a sprinter from the blocks, and all in the Reynolds Stand would stamp their feet on the floorboards in anticipation. "It was just so exciting." I had written the poem before I saw Ken Fraser's account. It proves I wasn't dreaming!

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/afl/afl-news/john-coleman-book-has-everything-except-the-answer-to-goalkickings-mystery-20140528-zrr54.html#ixzz3B2NQea9E)

John Coleman did not forget Hastings when he hit the big time. Albert was invited to play with Richmond but that must have been when he suffered his injury.

PAGE 16.-THE STANDARD, Thursday, October 27, 1949.
Hastings Acclaims John Coleman. District's Great Tribute to Champion Forward.
Last Friday was a "Red Letter Night" for Hastings when a very big percentage of the town and district population attended at the Hastings Hall to officially welcome home the former local champion goalkicker, John Coleman, at a ball arranged in honor of his triumphant first season with Essendon League team, where he kicked the record of 100 goals, and stamped his claims as the greatest Victorian goalkicker of all time.

Prominent amongst the visitors were Messrs....W. French (senior Vice-President and Life Member of Essendon League Club, and an Essendon Club official for 42 years), who was accompanied by Billy Hutchinson, first rover;
George Hassell, champion wingster; and Bob Syme, first ruckman of the Essendon League team. Popular Mr. and Mrs. A. E.Coleman, the proud parents of the champion, were accompanied at the function by their other son,
Albert, who was also a fine footballer till he suffered a knee injury. Mr. Coleman, Senr., was a good footballer with teams in the Wangaratta-Albury district many years ago.

A surprising feature of the night-and the only regrettable one was the almost complete absence of representatives of most M.P.F.L. clubs, other than Hastings, and also the non-attendance of any members of the Shire Council, although the Shire President and two Councillors live in Hastings, and Centre Riding
Councillors reside close by in the Somerville-Tyabb area. However, the hall was packed to capacity by a crowd that found great delight in all the proceedings, and danced till 1 o'clock to splendid music by Neil Whitford's
Rhythm Trio (Sorrento). Warrant-Officer McKenzie (F.N.D.)proved himself the most efficient M.C. seen at Peninsula functions for a very long time. The function was exceptionally well organised, due mainly to the work
of Mr. Mayne, Hastings Club treasurer.

The hall was appropriately decorated with seven large premiership pennants won by Hastings Club, three of these being for the three last seasons, and due in large measure to Coleman's ability in front of goals. About
200 miniature club' pennants, large balloons, and a floral-decked, stage completed a fine picture of public appreciation.

Torchlight -Procession.. .
The opening of the "Welcome Home Ball" was preceded by a torchlight procession from the Hastings Hospital, headed by the Mornington Town Band, and followed, by the Hastings Fire Brigade members, in full uniform,
...A Great Reception.
John Coleman received a great ovation as he entered the hall, all present standing to sing ''For He's a Jolly Good Fellow," and giving three mighty cheers. Mr. Mayne expressed regret that Mr. Wallace Sharland, who
was to have made the presentation to John Coleman, was unable to attend on account of illness.
Mr.Mayne thanked all donors towards the present for Coleman, and the Mornington Town Band for giving its services free. He also thanked the Ladies' Committee for the' grand job they had carried out in connection with the supper arrangements.

Mr. Percy Wilson (captain of the Hastings Football Club), who made the presentation to John Coleman, of a bag of golf clubs valued at 40, said that night's entertainment had been organised by the Hastings Football Club
and admirers of John Coleman in honor of the wonderful record he had put up this year, and during the past two seasons. Hastings had never had a more popular player said Mr. Wilson, and John still came along to all club
functions as a Hastings player, just as he did when he took the field with the local team
. He then presented John with the golf equipment, expressed the hope that he would be as good a golfer* as he had been a footballer, and wished him every success in the world. The Band again played "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow," and the hall rang with cheers.

(*As a golfer John made some good cricket scores. See P.22,Argus,4-8-1955.)

John Coleman, in responding thanked all concerned for a very fine gift. He would remember and appreciate this evening for many years to come. He thanked Mr. Mayne for the way he had organised the function, and also
the Hastings Club generally. It gave him great pleasure to see so many Peninsula faces in the gathering.

Mr. W. French (Senior Vice President, Essendon League) expressed, great pleasure at being present. He said he would like to mention at the outset that Essendon had not "taken John Coleman off Hastings," for Coleman
had played first with the Essendon District Juniors, which team was holding its presentation night in the Masonic Hall, Essendon, that same night. He (Mr. French) had been told long ago by an official of that team, that "there is a kid here, who will be the greatest forward of all time.'" He (Mr. French) was sure John was
going to be the greatest forward of all time, and he was the "King of Essendon" as far as public popularity goes in that city. Essendon's gain had been Hastings' loss, but it would have been a pity to have kept a great player like John in Hastings. If it had not been for his great team spirit, in co-operating with his team
mates, John could easily have got 130 or 140 goals for his first League season, instead of 100,said Mr. French. He assured them that Essendon would look after John, and he hoped Hastings would produce another player of
his calibre for future play with the 'Dons'.

A Popular Song
During the evening pleasing songs were rendered over the 'mike'" by the talented Hastings vocalist, Mr. Dave Ward. One that "brought the house down" was the following parody (tune"Four Leaf Clover" chorus) written in the hall by the Standard representative:- "

There's not a goalman like our John Coleman,
That we've ever seen, before.
Each kick is dead-shot, and goals
come like rain,
Tired, are the scorers who can't
stand the strain;
No need explaining, one w're entertaining.
Is somebody we adore;
There's not a goalman like our
John Coleman,
That we've ever seen before.

Another Coleman Trains At Richmond
By PERCY TAYLOR
ALBERT COLEMAN, whose full forward brother is doing so well at Essendon, trained at Richmond last night, but has promised to train with his brother on Tuesday. Richmond was much impressed by Coleman, "who is a 6ft l 1/2in. half-back, with heaps of football in him. There is a feeling that he will prefer to play with his brother, but Richmond hopes to see him again.(P.16,Argus, 25-3-1949.)

Albert was obviously too busy as an orchardist to train very much but he did play in Essendon's practice match soon after.* Before I forget, I must mention two of last night's incidental findings. Albert was a former schoolmate of Harry Beitzel and Harry Caspar. The former was a successful field umpire and broadcaster and Caspar, who transferred from Northcote to Carlton was the man who cost John Coleman four matches and Essendon a premiership. The school which Albert and these two attended together has not yet been found. Was it University High School? Jack Simpson from Doutta Stars became a labour politician who held the State seat of Niddrie for many years.

*COLEMAN PLEASES IN ESSENDON MATCH
By PERCY TAYLOR " "
JOHN COLEMAN, much discussed Hastings full forward, played at Essendon for the first time on Saturday, and proved to be just as good a footballer as expected. A large crowd came specially to see Coleman, and they were
well rewarded. He is fast, leads out well, marks safely, and is a most accurate kick, scoring seven goals from seven kicks.Although he is 6ft 2in in height, he does not carry much weight*,which might be a drawback in
League company.

Simpson, 6ft 4in, came from the Doutta Stars, and played so well in the junior match that he was taken out and included in the senior game. He could easily go further. Others to shape well were Mccallum (seconds), Calder
(Wonthaggi), who worried Leehane; McGilvray (Gunbower), Luck (Shepparton), Williams(Moonee Valley),Illingsworth
(district full-forward), and Donovan (seconds). A. Coleman (brother of Jack) has ability, but he is "short of a gallop." (P.17, Argus, 28-3-1949.)

Another incidental find last night was that John Coleman had broken Hastings' record for goals in a season set by John McMillan. To say that John Coleman did not carry much weight was actually an understatement as shown by a photo of McMillan and John Coleman both of whose families had lived in the south west of Victoria. I wonder if Doug had this photo in his book. See photo in the following accompanying the text which is supplied below in italics:
Dunrobin Football Team (1921) - Glenelg & Wannon Settlers
www.swvic.org/casterton/dunrobin_football(1921).htm

John Angus "Jack" McMILLAN, son of John and Florence McMILLAN (nee McGUINESS).

Mr McMillan was a member of the Footscray Seconds first premiership side in 1936. He came to the club from Hastings in that year and played four senior games before breaking his wrist. A full forward, he held the goal kicking record at Hastings for 13 years before it was broken by John Coleman in 1947 with 136 goals. Mr McMillans record was 119 goals established in 1934. Born in Casterton, Mr McMillan was from a family of nine children.

A primary school teacher, Mr McMillan had been actively associated with sports administration. He was coach of the Victorian Schoolboys football team in 1955 and 1962 and was manager of the side in 1968. He was also on the Council and the committee of the Kooyong Lawn Tennis Association. Mr McMillan was a member of the City of Hawthorn Lodge No 363, and had been Secretary of the Gould League of Bird Lovers for the 11 years prior to his death in 1969.

Thanks to Libby McMillan for the above images.




RUNS IN COLEMAN FAMILY
Alan (sic) Coleman, brother of Essendon League football champion, John, kicked another six goals for Hastings on Saturday to make his total for three games 22. In this period his team has scored 32 so Coleman's feat is equal to, if not better than, some performed by his now better-known brother, John, who were both former
residents of Port Fairy. Coleman's father, a former manager of the Port Fairy butter factory, residing at Tyabb, when asked to compare Alby with John, replied, "Alby hasn't had the chance John has had, on account of
trouble. I would not say that he is better than John, but without injury he would be just as good. When asked if Alby would go to the 'big game,' Coleman, senr., said, He doesn't intend to carry on with football. He is looking after an orchard and has his hands full. (P.2,Portland Guardian,26-6-1950.)

John Coleman was such a sensation that every time somebody kicked a bag he was touted as the new John Coleman. Most of them,such as the Spotswood lad that was invited to train with Williamstown, are unknown to me. However this article is of interest to me for two reasons. Firstly, John and Alby's father,Albert Ernest Coleman, had been a noted player in the Albury area and secondly Ken Smale had been the coach of East Shepparton in 1970 when I was on the V.F.L. list and umpired one of their games.

BULLDOGS CHASE NEW "JOHN COLEMAN"
Warracknabeal, Monday
Wimmera League's "John Coleman," Ken Smale, was interviewed today by Mr.Roy Russell, secretary of Footscray Football Club. Mr Russell made a special trip to Warracknabeal to do so. Smale, who is only 19,would have been Wimmera League's leading goal-kicker last season but for National Service training. He kicked 10 goals for
Warracknabeal against Murtoa on Saturday. Smale is similar in build to Essendon star John Coleman. He is 6ft. tall and a brilliant high mark. (P.9, Argus, 12-5-1953.)
Ken kicked 98 goals in 60 games with Collingwood and was belatedly made a life member of the club. See:
Pies honour Smale fo life | The Wimmera Mail-Times
www.mailtimes.com.au/story/965788/pies-honour-smale-fo-life/
Nov 4, 2008 - WARRACKNABEAL football living legend Ken Smale has been awarded a belated life membership to Collingwood Football Club. Smale, 78 ...

Doug Wade grew up in the Wimmera with Ken Smale as one of his heroes.
My all time hero was John Coleman but guys like Ted (Jarrard)and Kenny Smale who was from Warracknabeal werent far behind him. Kenny played in three Grand Finals, including the famous 58 side.
(KEN PIESSE FAVOURITE SON'S FROM THE WIMMERA
www.footyalmanac.com.au/ken-piesse-favourite-sons-from-the-wimmera/)


A PORT FAIRY PERSPECTIVE.
THE role Port Fairy played in the life and times of an Australian sporting legend has seen the town take up a prominent place in a new e-book.

Former Essendon champion the late John Coleman is the subject of the e-book, Coleman: The Untold Story of an AFL Legend, which has been written by former Heywood man and author Doug Ackerly.

The e-book is a prelude to a full biography about Coleman that Ackerly will release next April.

The release of the e-book coincided with the unveiling of the Avenue of Legends at the MCG yesterday of which Coleman was a part.

In the e-book, Port Fairy is the central location on the chapter which focuses on Coleman's early life.

The chapter explains how Coleman's parents moved to Port Fairy in 1922 when his father was appointed as the manager of the Port Fairy Cheese, Butter and Ice Factory in Gipps Street.

The young couple wasted no time in starting a family, with daughters Lawna and Thurla and oldest son Albert.

John Douglas Coleman was then born on November 23, 1928, with the story behind his second name an interesting one.

It appears his mother was struggling to find a second name when Sunday school teacher Ruth Engish suggested Douglas, which was the name of the guest house she ran in Gipps Street opposite the Colemans home.

Football was always a part of John Coleman's life as he and his brother would play football matches with the Pevitt boys, Frank and Don, along what was a then small back road covered in grass called Regent Street.

The book says the Pevitt boys remember John Coleman as a talented footballer but with an extremely competitive nature.

John Coleman may never have played official competition with the Port Fairy Seagulls, but these early games of street football give Port Fairy some right to the claim the town was the first step in his decorated football career.

The Colemans stayed in Port Fairy until January 1939 before moving to Melbourne.
(Legends link to Port Fairy | Moyne Gazette
www.moynegazette.com.au/story/1784599/legends-link-to-port-fairy/)

ONE GAME WONDER.
A great fan of Daryl Pittman's THE LOCAL FOOTY SHOW ON C.31 (digital channel 44), I remember seeing this story on the show some time ago. No doubt local residents named Coleman attended the game.

Was John Coleman the greatest forward ever to ever play ...
www.footyalmanac.com.au/was-john-coleman-the-greatest-forward-ever..

John Coleman

In early December 2012 I stumbled on a small article that appeared in the Argus on 8th October 1951 titled Win Ends Country Dispute. The article covered various country matches and finished with:

Freighters, runners up in the Federal District League, were defeated by North Albury in a match in aid of the local team at Albury on Saturday. Essendon full forward John Coleman kicked five goals for Freighters. Other Essendon players took part in the game. Final scores North Albury 17.25 Freighters 17.9.

I couldnt believe what I had found. The great John Coleman played for a Heatherton side! This was just a week after Essendon lost the 1951 Grand Final to Geelong. Coleman didnt play as he was reported in the final home and away game of the season and sensationally suspended for 4 weeks. It seemingly cost the Bombers the flag as they went down by just 11 points.

It just didnt make sense that the great John Coleman could have played with a local outfit and why did it only receive a few lines at the end of another article, especially given his fame and the recent events of that year?

I began trawling the internet and books on John Coleman without success. My next port of call was searching the newspaper archives at the State Library Victoria (SLV).

In a hard copy edition of the Border Mail 6th October 1951, I won the research equivalent of 1st Division in lotto. I found an advertisement and an article for the game and not only was John Coleman listed to play but also Bill Hutchison and Alan Dale (Essendon), Alan Ruthven (Fitzroy), Charlie Sutton (Footscray), Kevin Curran (Hawthorn) and Ted Jarrod (North Melbourne). What a side! I quickly turned to the Monday edition to see the photographs of these legends wearing our club colours. It was disappointing to discover that there were no photographs, just a two paragraph report of the game.

Big Crowd Sees Coleman At Albury

North Albury combine defeated Freighters (Melbourne Federal League) by 17 points at Albury sportsground on Saturday. Gate takings were 144.

Champion Melbourne goal kicker John Coleman got five goals for the visitors, and repeatedly drew the applause of the crowd for breath-taking leaps.

Final scores were North Albury 17.26 (128), Freighters 17.9 (111).

Best Players Freighters : Hutchison (Ess), Reeves (Nth M), Coleman, Sheppard, Tilley and Reid.

I grabbed the Moorabbin News and located the Freighters Club notes by H.C.J. in the edition issued the week after the game.

Freighters Club (By H.C.J.)

The Federal District League received a great boost when Freighters played Nth Albury football team during our visit to Albury last week-end. Our club was very fortunate in securing four league players, namely John Coleman, Bill Hutchison, Alan Dale and John Reeves. These players gave the game a great kick, and were a great attraction to the crowd that witnessed the game.

The marketeers of the game were obviously making sure a good crowd rolled through the gate with the extra star players notes in the Border Mail article and the advertisement. Still, the Freighters team contained three Essendon premiership players and John Reeves who played in North Melbournes losing 1950 grand final team which would have made for a more than handy side. Unfortunately, we returned Alan Dale back to Essendon slightly damaged, he received a nasty knock and suffered two broken ribs during the game.

So who was the greatest forward to ever play for Heatherton?


As mentioned before Doug Wade regarded John Coleman as the greatest player he had seen. Another with the same opinion was a player who rivalled his hero as a spectacular high flying aerialist. I loved this Fitzroy player who filled a void when John Coleman's career was cut short. As a young Bomber supporter, I could share in the excitement of Tony Ongerello's screamers, safe in the knowledge that they would be unlikely to result in a goal to hurt the Bombers (unlike Ray Poulter's huge torps from centre half forward for Richmond.)Leigh Matthews is generally regarded as the greatest-ever footballer,but not in the opinion of Tony,the last man to kick goals using place kicks. Some of Tony's screamers are shown on the following website,from which Tony's opinion is reproduced in italics.


OWAAT One Week at a Time Tony Ongarello: A ...
www.oneweekatatime.com.au/tony-ongarello-a-highflying-gentleman/

On Coleman, Tony is adamant. He is the greatest player to have played the game. He could do it all: he was quick, skilful, could jump and mark, was tough, but fair. He was without peer. I played in the game before his last. He kicked 14 goals on us and was untouchable. He would repeatedly jump and take the most sublime marks. Easily the greatest player I have seen.
Later, when discussing the Brisbane Lions coaching predicament and board troubles, Leigh Matthews was mentioned.
He would be Colemans competitor wouldnt he? I said.
In what way? he responded.
As the best.
Not as far as Im concerned. Matthews is one of the games greatest players, but to my mind Coleman stands alone.
The game following his 14 goals against Fitzroy, Coleman would kick 5 against North Melbourne before dislocating his knee. He would never play again.
It is easy to see why Tony Ongarello was such a fan of John Coleman, they played similarly. There are differences of course, and the main one is clearly that Coleman was an elite kick. In his 131 games, Tony is credited with kicking 247 goals, but the records dont show how many behinds he kicked. According to those who saw him, there were many.


COLEMAN NOT PICKED IN VICTORIAN TEAM TO PLAY WESTERN AUSTRALIA IN 1952!
Imagine my surprise to find that John Coleman had not been named in the team. There was a very good reason and it had nothing to do with his form.

John will be the draw
By HUGH BUGGY
Star League forward John Coleman was not omitted from the Victorian State side because of loss of form. He was left in the Essendon team to play in Brisbane on June 14 as the game's greatest drawcard. This opinion was
expressed by several League club officials last night. They said the whole object of the match between Essendon and Geelong in Brisbane was to promote the Australian game in the northern State.

To play a game there without John Coleman, they added, would be like playing a Test match without Lindwall and Miller. These officials agreed that Jock Spencer, North Melbourne forward, was now quite as competent as Coleman, but Spencer was not yet the big-name player that Coleman is. Coleman in five games this year has kicked 24 goals for Essendon. Spencer, in six games, has scored 23.

Ace kicker
They said the prowess of Coleman as a goal-kicker was well known to all followers of football in Brisbane.
His record as the first League forward to kick 100 goals or more in his first two seasons was as familiar
to them as it was to Victorian fans. Officials said that as the "away" round was solely a propaganda effort, Brisbane would be keen to see Coleman in action. (P.8,Argus,4-6-1952.)

N.B. John kicked 13 goals!
Essendon crushes Geelong at Brisbane COLEMAN GETS THIRTEEN IN GREAT WIN Brisbane, Monday
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 17 June 1952 p 8 Article.

JOHN MARRIES HIS "FINANCE".
Yes,that's what Monica Fernando of Merlynston was called when their engagement was announced in 1954! The crush outside the church when they married was described in graphic detail in the following article which has poor quality photos of the crowd and the newlyweds. (P.1,Argus,4-3-1955.)

OH THE PAIN!
I went to Kensington Central School where two of my mates were Reg. and Max Fairchild who barracked for South Melbourne. Reg.was a good-enough footballer to have attracted the attention of North Melbourne while at the Central School (form 1 and 2)and Max will be well-remembered as Beau in the Beaurepaire Tyre advertisements. They'd told me they were going to the match at the Lakeside Oval and when the Bombers lost despite John Coleman kicking eleven goals straight (not mentioned in the following report) they were the last people I wanted to see because I knew I'd get a ribbing. Sure enough they were waiting to gloat when we entered the subway at the station.

COLEMAN 11, BUT-
Speedy South earns 10-point win
By PERCY TAYLOR
SOUTH MELBOURNE'S tigerish finish gave it a sound 10-points victory over Essendon in a game of high standard on Saturday. South's pace, plus the varying fortunes of the sides, thrilled the 30,000 spectators.John Coleman, who kicked 10 goals for Essendon on the opening day, gave another exhilarating display to kick 11 brilliant goals. But despite his dominance, Essendon failed elsewhere. Its defence, in particular, became slack, and crumpled beneath the persistent and pacy play of the southerners. On Saturday's form South could do well this season. South was the dominant side for three quarters, due to high-flying and fast ruckmen, fast and clever rovers, and a forceful and high marking lot of half forwards. Essendon held control in two of the three centre line positions all day, but its forwards, with the exception of Coleman, did not take full advantage of it. etc.
(P.10,Argus,4-5-1953.)

JOHN'S LAST SCREAMER.
And is this his last great mark?
This could be the last of Coleman's fabulous marks-it was taken in Saturday's game-that stamped him as a champion. (P.1,Argus,7-6-1954. A GREAT PHOTO which shows clearly that John did not need opponents' backs to gain elevation.)

UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL.
It has been said that John Coleman was a "middling" high jumper and Ron Clarke said he would have been more successful as a triple jumper because he could take off on either foot. He was the Open champion of Uni High in both.

TWO RECORDS AT UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS
J. Nuttall won the 880 yards in record time of 2min 7 3-10sec at the University High School sports at Royal Park yesterday. G. Harry broke the long jump record in under 16.
Results:
BOYS' EVENTS: Open: 830 Yds: J. Nuttall. 2.7 3-10. Hurdles: J Coleman. 100 Yds:K. Kube. 220 Yds: H. Dowd.
High Jump.J. Coleman. Hop, Step, Jump. J. Coleman. etc. (P.14, Argus, 17-10-1946.)

Uni High could beat most opponents in footy but the most satisfying victory was always over Melbourne High and these were more common in the 1950's when Uni High's side was stacked with players such as Ron Carruthers, Barry McAuliffe,John Booth, Viv. Peterson, Bobby Clark, the Keddie twins,Terry Rodgers (who beat John's goalkicking record), Graeme Leydin, Graeme Beissel, Ron Evans (imported from Caulfield Grammar), etc., etc., etc.

Good Win For U H S At Carlton
UNIVERSITY HIGH. 14 gls 11 bhds (95) MELBOURNE HIGH . 9 gls 3 bhds (57)
For the first time in six years University High School defeated Melbourne High School in a football match at Carlton yesterday. A return match will be played on August 7.Best: University High: Coleman (5), Plumridge (4), Boyd (2). Melbourne High: Balson, Dunn, Witherow.(P.13, Argus, 25-7-1946.

John Coleman, captain University High School, trained at Essendon last night. He is a district boy, aged
only 17, 6ft lin, and 12 1/2 st. He should be a player next season.(P.9, Argus, 21-8-1946.)

I speculated earlier that John Coleman, Harry Beitzel and Harry Caspar had all attended University High School.
This has been confirmed by Harry Beitzel himself in a pop-up (click on the carictature of Harry Beitzel) on the following website, found in a Harry Caspar search. Harry Caspar's career at Carlton had a break in 1954,the reason being that he was playing forSorrento and was married in New Zealand in that year. Harry was working at Portsea in early 1953 and the Sorrento Football Club tried to sign him but the Carlton Football Club refused permission, obviously later relenting. Harry was one of many footballers to move to the beautiful Mornington Peninsula. Not surprising because he seems to have been living at Sorrento before he started playing for Northcote, according to another Carlton webpage (given in italics later.) Another pop-up on this website reports his death at Rosebud.

CASPAR, Harry : Blueseum - Online Carlton Football Club ...
www.blueseum.org/tiki-browse_gallery.php?galleryId=193...0...

HARRY CASPAR.(Google "Harry Caspar, Mahoney".)
From Post Office Directories of Melbourne Thaddeus Mahoney was a storekeeper and hardware dealer of 30 Queensberry Street, Carlton from 1862 until 1866. After this date the family appears at several addresses through Carlton, and Prahran until around 1884. There were ten surviving children all growing up, and only two were married before the father died.

Thaddeus was aged just 59 years when he died at Neil Street, Melbourne, on the 6th of February 1879 of general exhaustion and disease of the liver.[21] Jane O'Mahony died just five years later of Dropsy and Chronic Inflammation of the Liver on the corner of Newry Street and St Georges Road in Fitzroy on the 23rd March 1884, aged 50 years.[22]

Both were buried together in the Roman Catholic Section of R/C I 391 in Melbourne General Cemetery. Their youngest was also buried there as Eliza had died in 1880.[23]

Jane had left a family of nine living children and most married just before or just after her death. The pair of Thaddeus and Jane have left a large family of descendants who have married into many of the other families of Carlton and North Melbourne.


Some of the descendants of Thaddeus and Jane were footballers, and played for Carlton. One great grandchild of the couple was Harry CASPAR, who was involved in a punch up with the great full forward John COLEMAN. That John Coleman / Harry Caspar fight in the goal square cost Essendon the Grand Final when both were suspended for four weeks. Without Coleman, Essendon lost the 1951 Grand Final to Geelong by 11 points. The Essendon supporters have not forgotten it, and never forgiven it.

8.
Harry George CASPAR b. 4 Nov 1926 North Carlton, Vic. m. 6 Mar 1954 New Zealand. d. 1 Jul 1988 Rosebud, Vic.
June Lesley EGINTON b. 1930

Descendants of Harry and June were born at Mornington from 1957 and later at Rosebud as late as 1996. They are listed on this website.However, despite the Caspar name being mentioned in connection with the South Mornington Football Club, Harry was probably living near Sorrento,perhaps at Blairgowrie. These births and Harry's death were probably at the Mornington and Rosebud hospitals. Harry is buried in good company at the Sorrento cemetery.

IN GOOD COMPANY
John McCarthy is buried on a small rise in the middle of the Sorrento Cemetery.

Tucked away in scrubland on the edge of the Mornington Peninsula coastline, the graveyard is filled with notable figures.

Barry Hooker Harrison, who tagged Ron Barassi out of the 1958 Grand Final, is just a few metres from McCarthys grave.

A bit further along youll find Harry Caspar, the Carlton full back Essendon fans blame for John Colemans suspension at the end of the 1951 season which cost them the premiership.

Theres also Percy Cerutty, the athletics trainer who coached Herb Elliott to the 1500m gold medal at the 1960 Rome Olympics, and Prime Minister Harold Holts wife Dame Zara Bate.
( Remembering John McCarthy | Herald Sun
www.heraldsun.com.au/news/...john.../story-e6frf7jo-1226613235980

F - Australian Cemeteries
www.australiancemeteries.com/vic/mornington_pen/sorrentoafdata.htm
CASPAR, Harry George, 1/7/1988, 61, June, buried with son Phillip J Casper (sic).
Phillip, Harry and June's son, was only 11 years old.


The following webpage explains why John Coleman lost it when he was punched. He had a boil on the back of the neck and that was the target his former Uni High schoolmate aimed at! Harry Caspar supposedly was originally from Sorrento so this could mean that he stayed with relatives each weekend during his career with Northcote. Amazingly,one of his sons played with Essendon Reserves.
Harry Caspar : Blueseum - Online Carlton Football Club ...
blueseum.org/tiki-index.php?page=Harry+Caspar
Jun 5, 2013 - Originally from Sorrento, Caspar later joined VFA front-runners Northcote ... the 1954 season playing for Sorrento on the Mornington Peninsula.
N.B.Northcote was hardly a front-runner when it cleared Harry to Carlton; the club had finished 10th!


It has been said that John Coleman never lived at Hastings but it seems that he spent time there with his parents after his knee was injured. These consecutive pars show that John and Harry Caspar were both on the peninsula at the time. Harry had been relegated to Carlton's reserves possibly because of a loss of form or his inability to get to training from Sorrento; this is why Carlton had a change of heart about clearing him to Sorrento.

Information from Hastings indicates that John Coleman is progressing slowly. His damaged knee is still in
irons. "We will be surprised if he plays again this year," said Mr. Howard Okey last night. "Perhaps he will be
fit to play for us in the finals."

CARLTON
Follower Harry Caspar was cleared to Sorrento by Carlton committee last night. He had previously expressed a desire to go to Footscray, but changed his mind, preferring to play where he is employed. (P.15,Argus, 29-6-1954.)

FROM New Zealand comes news of the recent marriage of Harry Caspar, former Carlton ruckman, to June, elder
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Eginton, Mayor and Mayoress of Motueka, Nelson. After a car tour of the South Island, they will return to live at Sorrento, Victoria, where Harry will resume football training.
(P.17, Argus, 29-4-1955.)
Harry had been one of Sorrento's best in its first semi final win in 1954 but returned to Carlton in 1955 because he needed only one more game to qualify for the provident fund.

HARRY'S BLUE WITH THE BLUES.
Was Harry's relegation to the reserves due to poor form or a blue with the Blues?

After serving his suspension through the first four games of 1952, Caspar was brought straight back into Carltons senior team. He celebrated his 50th match in round 18 (a 36 point win over St Kilda at the Junction Oval) and played in the first and only senior final of his career when the Blues lost a heart-stopping Semi Final by l point to Fitzroy in front of 18,000 fans at the MCG. In a dramatic post-match incident later that evening, Carltons promising full-forward Keith Warburton collapsed and was rushed to hospital, where only repeated blood transfusions over the next 24 hours saved his life. One of Keiths kidneys had been ruptured in a heavy collision during the game, but he somehow stayed on the field until the final siren.

That dramatic final marked the high point of Harry Caspars career at Carlton, because soon afterwards, his career went into decline. Injury delayed the start of his 1953 season, and he had added only four senior games by round 9 when he apparently became embroiled in a dispute with his captain, Ken Hands, or his coach Percy Bentley. As a consequence, Caspar spent the second half of the year with the seconds. In September, he was influential in driving his team right through to the Reserves Grand Final, and the Blues comfortably beat Essendon in the curtain-raiser to the Collingwood-Geelong Grand Final at the MCG.

Despite that success, Harrys problems continued into 1954. On the first day of the new season, Carlton Reserves unfurled their Premiership flag at Princes Park prior to the match against South Melbourne. Early in the game, Caspar and the Swans captain-coach Don Condon tangled, and Condon was reported. Then at half time, Harry became involved in a heated discussion with Carlton officials, and shocked everyone by demanding an immediate clearance and leaving the ground.

Caspar spent the 1954 season playing for Sorrento on the Mornington Peninsula.

Carlton stood firm however, and Caspar eventually returned to the fold and to senior football - in 1955. Wearing guernsey number 6 (after playing all of his career to that point in number 24) he was one of Carltons best in a big loss to Essendon in round 9, before his career imploded in less than ideal circumstances the following week. In the midst of another big defeat this time by Footscray - Caspar was reported for striking the Bulldogs Dave Bryden. And to make matters worse, he suffered a badly-bruised back during the last quarter. On the following Tuesday night, Harry was suspended for four weeks, and that brought the curtain down his career. He retired on the spot, and didnt play again at any level.

In 1956, Caspar headed off to play for East Ballarat that had just appointed his former team-mate John Brown as coach for the 1956 season.


In the years after his last match for the Blues, Harry returned to live at Sorrento, where he and his wife produced five sons. All of the Caspar boys represented Sorrento at some time in their sporting careers, and two went on to play at VFL Reserves level; Michael with South Melbourne in 1980, and David remarkably, with Essendon in 1984.

Harry Caspar passed away on the 1st July, 1988, aged 61.
(Harry Caspar : Blueseum - Online Carlton Football Club ...
blueseum.org/tiki-index.php?page=Harry+Caspar)

BALLARAT'S fast, open, smooth game, functioning around their winning centre and a more coordinated attack, should give them victory in the first semi-final against East Ballarat at Eastern Oval tomorrow.Geelong West and Maryborough will contest the second semi-final. Ballarat was the early premiership favorite, but injuries so depleted the line-up in the latter stages of the minor round that they were forced to struggle to hold a place in the final four. Ballarat won the last two premierships. East's hopes received a setback last Saturday when the team failed badly against Maryborough and lost second place.

East's strength lies in the ruck-rover combination of Caspar, Dodd,and Pascoe. Former Carlton ruckman
Harry Caspar "makes the game" for Dodd and Pascoe,the best pair of little men in the league.
(P.19, Argus,7-9-1956.)


The Mahoney family history gives little early genealogy for the Caspar family. Is it possible that Harry's move to the East Ballarat Club was influenced by family connections as well as the club's coach being a former Carlton player? Did the first Caspar come out to try the Ballarat diggings? Was Frank Caspar,our William Tell, the saw-miller (after whom the Swiss-like landscape between Bacchus Marsh and Gisborne was called CASPAR COUNTRY) his son? Is it possible that Harry's mother and father became acquainted through Frank Caspar and Cornelius Mahoney who is mentioned in the same article? "Goodman's creek was opened in May of that year by Mr. Cornelius Mahoney, J.P., who is still living in Bacchus Marsh, in his 84th year. We often want him to give us his recollections of early days, but have not succeeded very well. He has the first balance sheet of the old Road Board(of which he was a member) and we should like to have that framed in the Shire hall."
(IN CASPAR'S COUNTRY.
The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 - 1918) Saturday 4 March 1905 p 3 Article)

Unfortunately there is not enough Caspar genealogical information to link Harry's father with the families of Frank Caspar or William Louis Caspar who died in Ballarat in 1950.
CASPAR_On August 3, at Ballarat, William Louis Caspar, beloved husband of Alice, and loving father of Lillian (Jean, Mrs. Kemp). Frederick. Nellie (Mrs. McGregor), Robert, and Myrtle. (P.16, Argus, 4-8-1950.)

Harry Caspar's ancestor, Thaddeus Mahoney, from Killarney, was transported for picking pockets in 1833 at the age of 13. Cornelius Mahoney was also from Killarney and came out with his parents in 1837. Thaddeus had been transported to Sydney and after serving his sentence,moved to Melbourne in about 1944. Here's Cornelius Mahoney's obituary.

DEATH OF MR CORNELIUS MAHONEY, JP
One of the widest known personalities, and the oldest resident, of the district, in Mr Cornelius Mahoney, J.P., died at his residence, Bacchus Marsh, on Tuesday night, in his 94th year. Although of such advanced age, Mr. Mahoney had only been laid up during the last few months. Mr.,Mahoney was born at Killarney, County Kerry, Ireland, 31st March, 1821, and landed at Hobart, Tasmania with his parents,from the immigrant ship "Bussorah
Merchant," of London, Louis William Moncrief, Master, on 11th December, 1837. In 1838, after a stay in Tasmania, the family, consisting of his father, mother, himself (then 16 years old), and a younger brother,
came to Melbourne arriving on 22nd May; where his father and himself went into the building trade, and
carried it on successfully until 1844 when they went to Bacchus Marsh, and purchased the present homestead.
of 200 acres, lots 10 and 11, between the rivers Lerderderg and Werribee, and where his father died 9th January, 1887, aged 92 years.

Mr Mahoney was a member of the old Road Board, a Justice of the Peace, and was for several years Chairman and Correspondent of the School Board of Advice in the district. He was for 16 years a member of the Bacchus Marsh Troop of Prince of Wales Light Horse, during which time he rose to the rank of Captain.

Mr. Mahoney was always imbued with the spirit of adventure, and in 1849 he left his home for the Californian goldfields, and spent 2 years there, but not meeting with much success he returned to Bacchus Marsh, and has remained there ever since. Mr. Mahoney was the first to discover gold on the Goodman's Creek, at Cockatoo Gully, in 1854. He had many bushranging tales to relate.

Mr. Mahoney was married in Melbourne in 1849 to Miss Mary Hogan, a native of Tipperary, who came to the colony with her parents in 1841, by the immigrant ship "Agricola." Mrs. Mahoney survives her husband, and although 84 years of age, is wonderfully keen of intellect. There is also a grown-up family of sons and daughters; and a number of grandchildren. One of the latter (Mr. Clem. McFarlane) it is interesting to note at the present time,
is an Officer in the Australian Navy, being a Torpedo Instructor on board the cruiser Melbourne.The funeral took place on Thursday, and was largely attended. (P.3,The Bacchus Marsh Express, 22-8-1914.)

Thaddeus Mahoney married Jane Stafford. Fred Stafford was therefore related in some way to Harry Caspar. Like Harry,he played for Northcote before moving to Carlton (where he kicked the winning goal in the 1947 premiership win). There he would have played with Harry, as he probably also did in 1954.(*He did!)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Fred Stafford
Fred Stafford.jpg
Personal information
Date of birth 3 August 1926
Date of death 10 July 2009 (aged 82)
Original team Northcote (VFA)
Debut Round 1, 1947, Carlton v. Melbourne
Height/Weight 173 cm, 74 kg
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
1947-1952 Carlton 102 (68)
1 Playing statistics correct to end of 1952 season.
Career highlights
Carlton Premiers 1947
Fred Stafford (3 August 1926 10 July 2009[1]) is a former Australian rules footballer in the Victorian Football League (VFL).

He kicked the winning goal in the dying seconds of the 1947 VFL Grand Final.[2]

*Finishing second on the list in the Peninsula League, Mornington (coached by ex-local half-back Gordon Williams) failed by three goals against Seaford (led by Conley, ex Carlton) last Saturday. Mornington meets Sorrento tomorrow in the final. Caspar and Stafford (Carlton), Ollie (St. Kilda) and Ron Wilson
(Coburg) play with Sorrento. Alby Morrison (Footscray) played earlier in the season with Sorrento, although probably in his middle forties. (P.1, Williamstown Chronicle,17-9-1954.)

Sorrento won the premiership in 1954.
Between 1948 and 1954, Morrison served as captain-coach of Sorrento, finally retiring, aged forty-five, after the club's victorious 1954 grand final. Meanwhile, at the MCG on the very same afternoon, Footscray broke through for its first ever VFL pennant by downing Melbourne. - See more at: http://australianfootball.com/players/player/Alby%2BMorrison/4800#sthash.d2kh7rJF.dpuf

I wonder if my post on the Sorrento F.C. timeline will shed some light on the Caspar family,several members of which are life members of the club.
A BIT OF SORRENTO F.C. HISTORY. Why do you think Harry Caspar and Fred Stafford both played at Northcote, Carlton and Sorrento? The answer relates to Thaddeus Mahoney who was transported at the age of 13 in 1833. And what's that got to do with Albert Coleman whose brother kicked 23 goals against Sorrento? Is the photo of Alby Morrison and some of his Sorrento players that appeared in the newspaper article (1954?) hanging in the clubrooms?

2 comment(s), latest 4 weeks, 1 day ago

ALBRESS/ BENNETT/ MCINTYRE CONNECTIONS, THE NORTH QUEENSLAND ALBRESS STORY, BOXING AND THE TIGERS.

EXTRACT FROM AN EMAIL SENT TO jotreloar, AN ALBRESS DESCENDANT.

In regard to your query, the most important thing, and the reason genealogical sites don't have death details for Maria Albress, is that she was Mrs McIntyre when she died!

Here's the file that I supplied to Jason Albress.

ANTONIO ALBRESS.

My local history research on the Mornington Peninsula began in August, 2010 because I discovered that there was little information about Rosebud available for loan. My desire to write about pioneers who had not been acknowledged led to this entry in my Peninsula Dictionary History about a month later.


ALBRES(S). See pages 25, 26 ,51, 142 of Rye Primary School 1667.

Antonios name was written on the Wannaeue parish map (with the res ending) to indicate that he was the grantee of lot 37B (40 acres) on 16-5-1884 and lot 37 A1 of 50.75 acres on 12-8-81. This land is indicated by Melway 168 K 9 -10.
I believe that Albres was the original spelling of his surname, and, like the Greek fishermen at what became Rosebud, he anglicized his name. Obviously he retained (Portugese?) pronunciation of his name and introduced himself to the limeburning community at the present Weeroona St/ Browns Rd. corner with the re ending as in centre. Thus it is likely that Antonios name would have been written as Albas by any member of the Blair, Page, Sullivan or White families and not just the one whose anecdote was on page 142 of Rye Primary School 1667.
His son (I presume) John Albress was born on 5-2-1895. When he was in Grade 3 (1905 has been wrongly written on the document; it should be 1903), there was a chance that John and his classmates would have to walk to the Rosebud school. The headmaster was asked to provide details of how far pupils had to travel to each school. According to him, John would have to travel 7 miles. Now, as we know, the peninsula is much wider as you go east and Browns Rd gets further from the bay. Eager to protect his position, the teacher visualized Johns route as being all the way down Browns Rd to Jetty Rd. and then north to the School, exactly 7 miles. (Shorter routes are 4.6 and 5.1 miles!)
The eastern boundary of Antonios 90.75 acres is indicated by an extension of Springs Lane across Browns Rd and its road frontage is 360 metres. (18 chains.)
As the photo in Rye Primary School 1667 shows, John (or Julo?) was one of the Rye lads that served in WW1. Antonio Albress died at the age of 68 and was buried in the Rye Cemetery on 2-8-1909. In 1910 Jessie Johnson was occupying the Albress farm and by 1920 it had become part of the 475 acres on which Andrew Leonard Ball of Rye was assessed.
I hope that Antonio Albress will now be given proper recognition as a pioneer of Rye and not get the treatment he did in LIME LAND LEISURE i.e. Dont know him but perhaps he was Tony Salvas.


The following is an extract from my Dromana, Rosebud and Miles Around on Trove.
THE PORTUGESE.
A large number of Portugese came to the peninsula in early days, perhaps at the suggestion of J.B.Were who acted as the Consul for many countries including Portugal (page 83 Lime Land Leisure). Many worked at lime burning for Kettle near The Heads. De Galvin (Portugese Joe) and De Peana (John Grant) were two given nick names by the Scottish captain who brought them out (page 130.) Antonio Albres and Nicholas De Mas settled on Truemans Rd at Melway 168K10 to 169 A 10 and Ascensio De Freitas bought Alfords 83 acre grant (Melway 169 E11) before 1910. Albres pronounced his name, anglicized to Albress, in such a way that it was presumed by oldtimers to be Albas; Hollinshed thought that he was Tony Salvas but they were two different men. See detail about the Albress family in LOOK FOR ONE THING AND FIND ANOTHER.
Two of the Portugese were descendants of former slaves taken to the Cape Verde Islands by the Portugese. They were Emanuel De Santos, who farmed and lit the pier light at Rye, and Joe Peters (Joe the black fiddler) whose descendants may have later run the store at the corner of Ninth Avenue. Bosina, Latros, Peters and Silva were all Portugese or Im a monkeys uncle!
John Lima Moraes, a farmer on the area west of Troon Rd (golf course) by 1910, may have been a descendant of a Portugese immigrant.

ALBRESS GENEALOGY.
Extensive information has been provided by Andrew Thompson and Emma Burkitt on the rootsweb and mundia websites and Cecilias christening at Moorooduc (on 14-9-1884) is recorded on the International Genealogical Index website. I will not repeat it all here, but some detail is necessary so that what I do write makes sense.
ANTONIO ALBRESS was a native of Boa Vista, one of the Cape Verde Islands off the westernmost point of the African mainland. I have given much information about this island on the rootsweb site and also hinted about a French origin for the Albress/Albres surname. A Thompson ancestor was also from the Cape Verde Islands. Many of the islanders are classified as Creole (mixture of African and European ancestry). No doubt this description applied to Antonio (see the article about footy and the Anzac tradition re William Albress of Richmond), Emanuel de Santos (Rye) and Joe Peters, the black fiddler of Rosebud.

(boards.ancestry.com)
Antonio married Maria Bennett, the daughter of Thomas Alexander and Eliza Bennett. The names of two of their children, Thomas Alexander and Cecilia, came from the Bennett family. There are two Bennett entries in the International Genealogical Index (Nos. 3860 and 3863) which probably refer to two of Marias brothers, Thomas and Thomas Alexander, who were both christened at Moorooduc. The parents names are given in two different ways, Thomas and Eliza for the first and T.A.Bennett and Elizabeth for the second. The first was born on 23-9-1860 and christened on 3-11-1861 and the second was born on 30-6-1862 and christened on 15-8-1875. This would seem to indicate that the first Thomas had died soon after a hasty baptism; Thomas Alexanders christening was far from hasty!

Cecilia Albress and these two boys were christened at Moorooduc. This could mean that the Bennett and Albress families were residing in that parish (bounded by Port Phillip Bay, Eramosa Rd, Jones Rd, Tyabb Rd, Derril Rd and Ellerina (Bruce) Rd.) There was a William Bennett who owned Crown Allotment 74 at the south west corner of Bungower and Stumpy Gully Rds, and I seem to remember a T.Bennett having land, perhaps in Balnarring parish. It is more likely that they travelled to Schnapper Point (Mornington) to attend church.

The Cains of Tyrone arranged for occasional masses for the Catholics of Rye with a priest coming across the bay, and a priest from Mornington used to come occasionally to Dromana (until 1869 and the incident at Scurfields hotel!) Antonio and the Bennetts may have attended church at Dromana and a bishop may have visited Mornington to conduct baptisms and confirmations. That would be why Antonio was well-known at Dromana!

The children of Antonio and Maria Albress were posted on mundia by Emma some time ago but two names were missing. These were Cecilia, who married William Medley in 1906, and Maria who married Percival Alexander James (1889-1948.) Those listed were:
Rachel 1878-1920; Thomas Alexander 1880-1917; Pantaleon 1882-1940; Saramphina 1889-1915; Julo 1891-1970; Louis 1892-1982; John 1895-1969; William 1897-? It is likely that Cecilia was born in about 1884 and Maria in about 1887; Maria would have been a bit older than Percy James. Incidentally, a James family had land (C.A. 19A, Wannaeue) right next to the Ditterich Reserve at Main Ridge where Jason Albress continues (with bat and ball) the family tradition of excellence in sport.

The following details have been provided about Thomas Alexander Bennett by descendants of Louis Thompson and Cecilia (Bennett), namely iscant and thommo99.
Thomas Alexander Bennett, born circa 1828 to Charles Bennett (mason/builder) and Margaret (Summons/ Simmons, apparently decoded as Summers), married Elizabeth McMurray in 1855. (Elizabeths family hailed from Belfast, Ireland.) These details come from the marriage certificate of Tom and Eliza(beth). It seems that Toms wife preferred to be called Eliza- see poetic tributes to Harriet Skelton later- and this would explain the different parents names for poor Thomas Bennett and Thomas Alexander Bennett (of the very late baptism.)

Cecilia Bennett married Louis Thompson and thommo99 listed their descendants. Peter Thompson, father of Louis, was born on Fogo Island in the Cape Verde Islands circa 1818-1822. Both Louis and Cecilia died around 1900 and their children were taken in by Rachel (Bennett) and William Thompson.

LOCAL HISTORIES.
In ROOTSWEB and FAMILY TREE CIRCLES, details from Lime Land Leisure, parish maps and rate records have been posted under ALBRESS for the families of Antonio Albress and Tom Bennett. The following two books have no index but I have made my own for each.

RYE PRIMARY SCHOOL No. 1667 by Patricia Appleford.
P. 25. Antonio signs an 1895 petition opposing Rye being made a half-time school with Rosebud. The Government was almost broke because of the 1890s depression and half-time schools were common. One school would operate in the morning and the other in the afternoon, with the teachers lunchtime spent travelling from one to the other.

P. 26. In 1905 there was a move to close the Rye school altogether and make the children walk to Rosebud S.S. The teacher (who was about to lose his job) was required to supply details of his pupils and how far they lived from each school. Who could blame him for bending the truth in regard to William Albress? If William had gone the longest possible way (via Browns Rd and Jetty Rd), he would have travelled 7 miles to reach the Rosebud school. He was 1 miles from the Rye school if he carried an axe to cut an as the crow flies direct path through Blairs dense ti-tree and rabbit infested grants that became the Jennings familys Kariah a decade later. William Albress, born on 15-10-1897, was in grade 1 and lived 1 miles from the Rye School.
(This could be a mis-reading of my scribbled notes; Football sites give it as the 13th.)
P.51. The W.W.1 Roll of Honour, State School Rye, lists the following ex pupils:
E.Myers, J.Albress, G.Carlton, J.Connop, O.Cain, W.Darley, D.Edmonds, N.Edmonds, S.George, J.Hayes, W.Hill, R.Myers, J.McMeikan, R.Perrin.

P.142. James Sullivan employs Antonio Albas to run the kiln south of Weeroona St.
Patricias book mentions Muriel Bennet starting school in 1936 (P.54) and repeats information about young Eliza Bennetts grave in the Rye cemetery and the Bennett property in its present north west corner (P. 124.)

FAMILY, CONNECTIONS, SORRENTO AND PORTSEA by Jennifer Nixon.
P.10. Details of Harriet Skeltons death and burial and two poetic tributes from her loving friends, Thomas and Eliza Bennett.
P. 11. The ten children of Harriet and Edward Skelton are listed. The third, Henry William, married Hannah Bennett.
P. 26-8. H.W.Skelton was born at Point Nepean on 6-5-1843. He married Hannah Bennett in 1869.Soon after the birth of their third child in 1876, they moved to Waratah Bay (Walkerville) where the Hughes boys also relocated.
P.71. Repeats known details.

TROVE. This website was recommended to me by a family historian while I was transcribing rates. It is a digitized collection of hundreds of newspapers prepared by the National Library of Australia and indeed a treasure-trove of information.

MORNINGTON AND DROMANA STANDARD (MDS) 14-8-1909, PAGE 2.
The late Mr A.Albress, whose death was mentioned in last weeks issue, was one of the oldest residents on the Heads. For many years he has been a well-known figure in Portsea, Sorrento and Dromana, where his cheery smile and a genial disposition endeared him to many. He was one of the pioneers of the district, his extended residence of over 40 years earning for him the distinction of one of the Daddies of the Heads, the future of which he regarded as of great promise. He was a native of Bona Vista, one of the Portugese islands in the Cape Verde group, and was in his 68th year. He leaves a wife, four daughters and six sons to mourn his loss.

MDS 7-8-1909, P.2. SORRENTO. Mr Albress of Rye died after undergoing an operation in Melbourne. He was interred in the Rye Cemetery. Mundia.com gives his place of death as Fitzroy. This would probably mean that he died in St Vincents Hospital in Victoria Parade, which the Sisters of Mercy opened in converted terrace houses in November 1893.

THE ARGUS 1-6-1910 page 2, column 5.
Auction tomorrow. In the estate of Antonio Albress, deceased. Charles Forrester& Co. in conjunction with Mr James Rowley of Rye, have received instructions to sell by auction:
All those pieces of land being allotments 37A1 and 37B of section A in the parish of Wannaeue containing 90 acres 2 roods and 30 perches. There is an eight roomed dwelling on allotment 37A1 and about 20 acres are cleared, the balance of the land being covered with light scrub. The property has a frontage of 18 chains to main road and is about 2 miles from Rye.
(See what I meant about needing an axe to reduce this distance to 1 miles?)
THE ARGUS, 21-4-1910, P.4. Those with claims against the estate of Antonio Albress, late of Rye, send particulars.

So, thats why I couldnt find details of the death of Antonios widow!
Maria Albress did not die!
THE ARGUS, 24-5-1930, p.15.
The probate of the will of Maria McIntyre, married woman, deceased, late of 11 Rogers St, Richmond, will in 14 days be granted to Louis and William Albress, labourers, both of 11 Rogers St, Richmond, sons of the deceased.
No reference to a McIntyre- Albress wedding could be found in trove but Frederick Vernon McIntyre of Richmond, a young man who got into trouble in 1939 might have been Marias second husbands son.

SPORTS, STYLE, SPIRIT, SINGERS AND STRIFE.
(Google anzac, Richmond, albress.)
Excerpt from Australian football and disputes over the Anzac legend, a talk given in Richmond.
I spent my adolescence a few streets south of here, within earshot of the roar of the MCG crowd. One of my domestic jobs was to carry the slops of an elderly man, a retired waterside worker of West Indian descent, down to the backyard privy behind the mulberry tree. I can still remember the press of his chocolate-skinned hand as he gave me a two shilling coin as a thank-you. When he died I was bequeathed his upstairs bedroom. His name was Billy Albress. He played eight senior games in the last two years of the war, 1917 and 1918. Only Richmond and three other clubs, Carlton, Collingwood and Firzroy, played on during the war.
Billy Albress was a typical Richmond player. He was born locally, but of distinctly non-white background, and sport was his only means of earning some social mobility. He remained a waterside worker his entire life, and died in his late sixties. He was a Richmond six footer (to borrow a phrase from Victoria Park), standing just five foot eleven inches, wiry and athletic. His brother and sister lived locally also, and he was part of a tight kinship group, children of Nellie and Pantelon, described in the genealogical records as a labourer. No Albress served in the Australian military in the Great War. (Talk by Prof. Robert Pascoe on 24-4-2009.)

The mistake about being West Indian is understandable. Id never heard of the Cape Verde Islands until I read about some of our Portugese peninsula pioneers. It is possible that Bill was born in Richmond. Perhaps Tom and Elizabeth Bennett were living there and Maria was staying with her parents towards the end of her pregnancy. (Perhaps the birth was at the four year old St Vincents.) Ray and Charlie Cairns of Maroolaba near Pattersons Rd in Fingal were born at Grandma Nevilles in South Melbourne and spent their first ten days there. This ensured that medical help was readily available if it was needed. There is no doubt that Billy Albress was the last child of Antonio and Maria Albress. In a post, I wrote that his brothers played for Richmond City but these Albress stars (circa 1939) would have been Antonios grandsons. I also made a mistake about Bill playing for Port Melbourne.

(Google albress, richmond, click on AFL Tables.) This confirms that Billy was Antonios son. He was 180cm tall and weighed 83 kg.

MORNINGTON STANDARD 9-4-1904 P.5.
Albress won the Sheffield over 130 yards, collecting the 10 pounds first prize, at the Sorrento Sports. Dromana ran their Sheffield over 150 yards, perhaps a little beyond the preferred distance and P. Albress could only manage a second in the second heat. (25-5-1905 p.5.)

MDS, 18-9-1909 p.3. Sorrento v Dromana. The latter was a bit short of players; Myers and T.Albress were useful substitutes for Dromana. Myers probably lived next to the Rye school.
THE ARGUS, 23-9-1935, P.15. Richmond City won the first semi final of the first grade of the Victorian Junior League, defeating South Kensington and Albress kicked 2 goals.
28-7-1937, p.5. L. and T. Albress were among Richmond Citys best players.
10-3-1939, p.20. L.Albress, living in Richmond, is to play in Richmonds practice match.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Any time the lady folk had for leisure was probably spent dreaming up and manufacturing their outfit for the next dance or ball- and how to display their culinary skills in the plate they would take. Any dreaming the men did would have involved the mouth -watering supper that was their highlight of the dances and balls. Newspapers gave accounts of the dresses worn but perhaps the correspondents were too fearful of a hip and shoulder to inspect the food too closely!
MS, 29-7-1897, P.3. Rye Jubilee Ball with a description of the outfits worn by Miss Rachel Albress and others. (Also see the 11-7-1903 concert re dresses.)
MS. 3-1-1901, p.3. Seraphina Albress won a handwriting competition for girls at the Kangerong (Dromana) Show.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
As concerts had packed programs, it was rare for any performers to be accorded an encore. One such performer to be received enthusiastically was the Peninsulas Don Quixote, Sidney Smith Crispo of Manners Sutton (Canterbury/ Blairgowrie) and Eastbourne. For a young Albress girl, receiving an encore must have been a huge thrill. Cecilia, Saramphina and Rachel all enjoyed singing.
See Mornington Standard: 30-5-1895, p.2; 20-12-1900, p.3 (the encore); 11-7-1903, p.4.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
It would be a rare pioneering family that did not have a member charged with an offence such as insulting behavior and of course strife can refer to accidents.
M.S.9-12-1905, p.2. P.Albress and J.J.Kennedy were charged with insulting behavior and fined.
Argus, 22-3-1923, p.7. Louis Albress, a wharf labourer of Gipps St, Richmond, was charged with stealing a wallet that a woman had dropped. When asked if it was his, he, and a woman that was with him, were said to have replied that it was. However, the man involved was not Louis at all and the case was dismissed.
Argus, 13-3-1933, p.19. John Albress, of Gipps St, Richmond, was fined for not disclosing his wifes earnings when he obtained sustenance.
An incident involving William is discussed in a separate section about our travelling sportsman.
Argus, 9-10-1939, p.5. Raymond Albress, 8, saw his mate slip into the Yarra near Richmond and drown.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
THE EXAMINER ( Launceston). 13-1-1938, p.5. The Tamar. Mr W. Albress of Richmond was reviving his spirits by holidaying with Mr V. Frost at Birralee. I wonder if one of Antonios daughters had married Mr V.Frost. The Examiner (page 2 of the.22-4-1913 issue) listed Albress as one of the horses in a race for hacks; the name of the horses owner was not given but its a strange name for a horse isnt it?
THE ARGUS. 6-11-1950, p.5. Antonio Albress, 21, of Richmond and five other youths from Melbourne walked to Rupertswood for the 20th Eucharistic Festival.


The Queensland branch.
It is uncertain when this branch was established but the move was probably prompted by the opportunity to find work during the depression of the 1930s. Newspaper articles do not provide certainty about who led the move but I believe it was Pantaleon who died in 1940. What causes the confusion is that when Beryl Jean Albress married Donald Arthur Gulliver in 1948 she was called the daughter of the late Mr A.S.Albress but when she made her debut in 1946, she was called the daughter of the late Mr. P. Albress.

The first mention of the family in Queensland was on page 2 of the Brisbane Courier on 21-1-1937. A.Albress had gained a 3rd class engine drivers certificate at Mareeba.
On page 2 of its 30-11-1945 issue, the Townsville Daily Bulletin reported that Private A.S.Albress of Ayr, previously listed as a prisoner of war, had died. (See details after trove information.)
The Cairns Post of 5-9-1946 reported on page 6 that Miss Beryl Albress, the second daughter of Mrs and the late Mr P. Albress of Mossman was one of the debutantes, describing her dress in detail. One would presume that this was Beryl Jean Albress who married Donald Arthur Gulliver in the Mossman Methodist Church but who was described on page 6 of the Cairns Post of 18-2-1948 as being the daughter of Mrs and the late Mr A.S.Albress. Her maid of honour was the brides sister, Mrs K. Craven. By the greatest stroke of good luck, the unhighlighted article above this one concerned a marriage that had taken place in the same church on Monday, 26 January. Keith Craven had married Maree Grace Gilligan Albress, the eldest daughter of Mrs and the late Mr A.S.Albress.
Before I deal with the name of Maree and Beryls father (A.S. or P?), I must mention that Marees third given name offers interesting possibilities. It is possible that the girls mother had been a Gilligan and I know of two ways that the Gilligan and Albress families may have become acquainted. Many peninsula lads tried their hand at the diggings and Antonio might have done so too, passing through Keilor on the way, just as I believe John Sullivan from Rye did. Due to the huge number of Irish workers building the Mt Alexander and Murray River Railway in 1858, St Augustines at Keilor was commenced at an early date. Irish pioneers near Bulla such as the Crotty, Reddan, Brannigan and Gilligan families would make the long journey to St Augustines very regularly and Antonio may have met the Gilligans after mass.
Thomas and Catherine Gilligan settled on 60 acres at the south west corner of Bungower and Jones Rd near Somerville and the widowed Catherine obtained the grant for crown allotment 61A, Moorooduc in 1882. As speculated earlier, Antonio may have attended mass at Mornington on a fairly regular basis since Dromana did not have its own Catholic Church till Lawrence Murphy got things going in the early 1900s. The Sullivans in Tyabb parish, the Gilligans and the Albress family might have become acquainted at the Mornington Church.
As both Pantaleon and A.S.Albress had died, it is hard to decide which report was accurate. A.S. was born in 1904 (according to a source) so assuming Maree was about 20, A.S. would have only been about 20 when she was born, highly unlikely.
The Cairns Post of 13-2-1948, page 5 article about rents being raised by the court, shows that Mrs P.M.Albress was renting a shop in Mill St, Mossman. Although it was usual for widows to use their own initials rather than their husbands, I presume that she was Pantaleons widow. Pantaleon was born in 1884 so if he was Maree and Beryls father he would have been about 44 when the girls were born, hardly too old.
Using a bit of guess work for the girls birth years, and assuming that Pantaleon was the father, that would make his children A.S.(1904, when Pantaleon was 22), Maree (1926?) and Beryl (1928?) so there should have been quite a few children born between A.S. and Maree.
Page 3 of the Cairns Post of 21-8-1947 reports a boxing tournament at Mossman as a fundraiser. In one bout M. Ah Wong was beaten on points by J.Albress. As their weights were, respectively 7 stone 6 pounds and 7 stone 5 pounds, they were either midgets or boys of about 13. J (possibly John) could have been a son of A.S.Albress. The Albress lad playing minor junior Rugby League for Southern Suburbs against Babinda was probably the young boxer.(C.P. 5-5-1950, p.3.)

A.S.ALBRESS.
Arthur Stanley Albress was born in Melbourne in 1904. (pipl)
The Australian War Memorial gives the following details.
A.S.Albress. Service No: QX24479. Rank: Private.
Unit: Australian Army Ordnance Corps. Theatre: Malaysia.
Casualty: P.O.W. Location of camp: Borneo.
The A.I.F. Project adds:
Cemetery: Labuan Memorial, Malaya. Details: 19/06/45.*
Son of Moira Albress, husband of Pearl Mavis Albress of Home Hill, Queensland.
*Mundia gives Arthurs year of death as 1944.

PLACES. Mossman (originally Mosman but changed to avoid confusion with the Sydney suburb) just up the coast from Port Douglas and quite close to the Daintree where the Gullivers were from. Mareeba (meeting of the waters) is at the confluence of the Barron River and two other streams on the Atherton tableland a bit south of due west from Cairns. Ayr is south east of Townsville about half way to Bowen and Home Hill is 12 km further on.

THE TRAVELLING SPORTSMAN.
Billy Albress played eight games for Richmond in the V.F.L. during the 1917 and 1918 seasons. At that time and for many decades afterwards, there was little money in it and most players worked all Saturday morning, requiring a rapid trip to the ground especially when playing away.
Jock McHale was a boss at the Carlton and United Brewery and there was one celebrated occasion when he made a worker, who was due to play against Collingwood, remain at work later than usual on the Saturday morning. There were no two- hour warm ups in those days. It may have been because of tiredness that Billy never cemented a spot in the team.

By December, 1918, Billy, by occupation a combination of tanner and shearer was up near Yea.
There was an entertainment at Glenburn followed by a dance. Two men caused a disturbance at the door and for some reason, although he was not involved, Billy kicked over a kerosene tin in which water was boiling for the supper cuppa. Billy had sung at the concert and had been asked to sing between dances but must have felt guilty and had travelled home in such a way that the police would .not spot him. Although evidence showed that his behavior had not been as bad as the charges suggested, Billy was still fined. (Yea Chronicle 12-121918, p.3.)

Billy was back in town by 1920 and was one of Port Melbournes best players when they beat Essendon As 11-11 to 6-14. (Earlier known as Essendon Town, the V.F.A. team which played at Windy Hill enjoyed great success circa 1911 when Dave McNamara played for them but were in decline by about 1920 when the Jolimont Railway Yards construction started, forcing Essendons V.F.L. team off the East Melbourne ground and the Essendon Council gave the Same Olds the use of Windy Hill at about the same time that planes (not bombers yet) started landing at the northern end of what is now Essendon Aerodrome. (Argus, 24-5-1920, p.11.)

By Easter of 1921, Billy seems to have been working in the Western District, perhaps as a shearer again. It was time to test his athletic ability against the best in the country. At the Stawell Gift, he entered the Stewards Purse, a race over the distance of 220 yards. He did well too, winning the seventh heat and the second semi final. (The Register, Adelaide, 30-3-1921, p.8.)
Some Horsham Times articles have not been digitized yet but it seems that Billy might have been appointed as Minyips coach and was in good form (17-6-1921, p.5.) He may have remained in the district and was set to compete again at the Stawell Easter Gift. For the Sprint Handicap, over 75 yards he had a mark of 6 yards with the back-marker on 2 yards and the front markers on 12 yards. (The Register, 6-4-1922, p.11.)
By the winter of 1923, Bill must have been working near the Murray River, as he was playing for Ebden Rovers and forming an effective combination with the coach, Condon.
(Wodonga and Toowong Sentinel, 13-7-1923; 20-7-1923, p.3.) It is possible that Bill only played the two games for the club as he was not named in the team in early August. Perhaps when Bill was working in an area, the coach, knowing of his reputation, would invite him to play for whatever period he would be around.
Was Bill working in a shearing gang? He competed at the Sale Athletic Carnival seven months later. He won the Longford Purse, a handicap race over 440 yards. Running off a mark of 22 yards and giving his competitors generous starts, he won his heat easily in 52 seconds. Despite strong opposition he won the final and collected the 30 pound purse.
By the winter of 1924, Bill was again playing for Minyip. He showed his fitness by rucking right throughout games but once again, it looks as if he has only played a couple of games.
(Horsham Times, 1-7-1924, p.3; 19-8-1924, p.5.)

THE NORTH QUEENSLAND STORY (FROM ANOTHER EMAIL.)
Dear XXX thank you for your reply it is much appreciated I looked up the mentioned site and found the information very interesting. I am one of the Queensland mob of which there aren t too many . We ve known that we have descended from Antonio and that he came from the Cape Verde Islands for some years but to get some information about their personal lives is amazing. As you were kind enough to email me I would like to add some information to clear up some things that were unknown. We come from Antonios daughter Maria who gave birth to an illegitimate son named Arthur Stanley Albress. As there was no father named on the birth certificate he was given Marias last name. He married Pearl Mavis Rushby and had three children at a young age Beryl Jean, Marie Grace and my father John Stanley Albress, he was the one mentioned having a boxing match in 1947. he would have been about 17 and was a small wiry man when he was young so the weights would have been correct. So as far as we know there are no other Albresses in north Queensland apart from us descendants of Arthur Stanley so I guess it was him that migrated north for whatever reason.Arthur Stanley was killed in 1945 in the sandakan marches at borneo during the second world war. His son John, my father, is 81 years old and the only remaining child of Arthur and is interested in finding out this information so thank you once again.

A TOAST TO THE ALBRESS FAMILY, PIONEERS OF RYE.

Heres to Antonio, the lad from Boa Vista Isle
Who gave the whole peninsula his genial smile;
He earned the title Daddy of the Heads,
And kept adding rooms to fit in all the beds.

Heres to Maria who milked and cooked and sewed
While hubbys dark skin glowed at the kiln just up the road.
Heres to the Albress boys, at sport much to the fore;
Heres to the Albress girls whose voices we adore.

Pioneers we were: Sullivan, Cain, Rowley and Wells,
Skelton, Clark, Watts; none of us were swells.
How sad we were to see you go,
Our good old mate, Antonio. 12-11-2011.

THE ATTACHMENT IS PART OF THE WANNAEUE PARISH MAP ON WHICH I HAVE PAINTED TWO WOBBLY ARROWS TO SHOW ANTONIO'S GRANTS. ALICEA CAMPBELL IS A GREAT GREAT GRAND DAUGHTER OF ANTONIO ALBRESS.


5 comment(s), latest 2 years, 2 months ago

ALEXANDER COUPAR GIBB OF MEADOW BANK, CAMPBELLFIELD (VIC., AUST.) AND HIS WIFE.

There is plenty of information about the relationship between the Gibbs of Meadowbank and Robertsons of Gowrie Park. Alexander Coupar Gibb's uncle,James Gibb, a blacksmith, and James Robertson had both married Coupar girls.
There is plenty of information on trove about Alexander Coupar Gibb's siblings. Several websites mention that Alexander Coupar Gibb married Margaret Ferguson Inglis but do not give even a year for the marriage or any information about her parents.

Another black hole concerns James Gibb. All that has been written about him is that he married the sister of James Robertson's wife,set up a coach building/ blacksmith business with James Robertson in Sydney Rd in 1841 and that they jointly leased from the Crown crown allotment 5, Will Will Rook at about that time, and that as James Gibb was not interested in farming, the 640 acre block was purchased by his brother,Alexander Gibb, a builder,who is believed to have built both the Meadowbank and Gowrie houses. (Interestingly this claim is not confirmed by the RED CROSS article which follows.)

CAMPBELLFIELD RED CROSS FETE By- FALAISE.
Meadow Bank, the old picturesque bluestone residence of Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Gibb,of Campbellfield, was the scene of a Red Cross fete on Saturday, April 20. Some few months ago Mrs. Gibb inaugurated a Red Cross branch in this part of the countryone of the earliest settlements in Victoriaand as funds are now required for the purchase of material to work upon, she, as president of the branch, arranged to hold this fete with a view to raising the money and bringing together the residents of this scattered farming district.Meadow Bank was built over 60 years ago for Mr. Gibbs's father, and the grounds surrounding the house are ideally laid out for the purpose of a fete.........Among those who had charge of the stalls,&c., were Mesdames R. Jones, Percy Oliver,and John Coldwell (produce). Miss Shepherd (flowers), Mrs.F.Olsen (sweets andice cream), Mesdames E.A.Porter,A.Austin, and F. Sheahan (work), Miss Oliver(cakes), Miss Kitty Ingles, Miss Dodds, and Mr. Wilshire (spinning tables), and Mr.Pearson (motor rides). (P.32, The Australasian, 27-4-1918.)


As I was having trouble submitting information from my DHOTAMA about the Gibbs and Robertsons in my DON'T YOU DARE MELBOURNE HUNT journal, I did a hunt of my own-for James Gibb, the disappearing blacksmith. In the process, I discovered the siblings of Margaret Ferguson Inglis who married Alexander Coupar Gibb. I also found why I had been unable to find Alexander Coupar Gibb's marriage notice; his name was given as Alex.H.Gibb!

The following has been pasted from a comment under the DON'T YOU DARE MELBOURNE HUNT journal. I thought a separate journal was warranted for previously unpublished information. The J.Ingles (sic)who was leasing most of Meadowbank in 1920 was the only son of Daniel Inglis and his widow, Mrs A.C.Gibb; John INGLIS died suddenly at Port Adelaide in 1923. I'll let you work out the maiden name of Mrs Daniel Inglis/ Mrs A.C.Gibb! It would be fascinating to work out why M.F.Inglis and A.C.Gibb were married in the E.S.&A. Bank house!

James Gibb and James Robertson selected 640 acres at Campbellfield and set up in business as coachbuilders and blacksmiths in Sydney Rd, living in a tent.
In 1920-1 Alexander Coupar Gibb was assessed on the Meadowbank house and 30 acres while J. Ingles (actually Inglis) was leasing 264 acres of the property from him. They were related (apparently twice!)

I discovered the Gibb/Inglis connection while I was trying to find what had happened to James Gibb, the blacksmith who selected section 5 Will Will Rook with James Robertson and had married the sister of Robertsons wife (nee Coupar.) I suspect that James Gibb moved to Ballarat where there would have been much demand for blacksmiths and later died in Richmond.

I suspect that Margaret Ferguson Inglis, whom Alexander Coupar Gibb married, was the widow of Daniel Inglis Jnr, who died in Queensland. It is almost certain that Margarets maiden name was Dods. Several websites state that both Alex. C. and Margaret died at Woodstock. Perhaps that was their last place of residence.

INGLIS.-On the 24th ult., at Hughenden, Queensland, Daniel Inglis, son of the late Daniel Inglis, Williamstown. P.1, Argus, 19-1-1893.)

DODS.-On the 10th July, at the residence of her cousin, Miss D. Dods 208 Sydney-road, Brunswick, Catherine Agnes (Cissie), youngest daughter of the late Alexander and Catherine Dods, of'Droushiel," Woodstock; loved sister of Mrs. A. C.Gibb, Mrs. C. S. Mummery and Jean B. Dods.
Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Saturday 27 July 1918 p 55 Family Notices.


(This website has photos of the Meadowbank homestead (2009) and Gibb graves in the Will Will Rook Cemetery.
Gibb
members.optusnet.com.au/jhl/moodie/coupar-a4-7.html)


GIBB - INGLIS -On the 16th March, at the E.S. and A. Bank House, Malvern, by the Rev. W. G. Maconochie, M.A., Alex. H.Gibb, Meadow Bank, Campbellfield, to Margaret Ferguson Inglis, William street, Hawthorn. At home at the E.S. and A. Bank House, Malvern (Armadale station), Friday, April 30th. ( P.13, Argus, 24-4-1909.)

The above obviously has a misprint,the groom being Alex.C.Gibb. If so Alex. was about 49 years old.

INGLIS-On the 24th April, 1923, at Port Adelaide (suddenly), John, only son of Mrs. A. C. Gibb, Meadow Bank, Campbellfield, and the late Daniel Inglis, of Williamstown and Shepparton. (P.1, Argus, 26-4-1923.)

PRAAGST--INGLIS. -On the 5th September, 1923, at Scots Church Melbourne, by the Moderator General (the Right Rev.J.Mathew), Howard Francis, only son of Mrs Lionel Praagst of St. Kilda and the late Dr Lionel Praagst of Brighton to Kitty only daughter of Mrs Alex Gibb, of Campbellfield, and the late Dan Inglis of Shepparton. (P.17, Argus, 20-10-1923.)

GIBB. On September 11, at private hospital, Malvern, Alexander Coupar Gibb, late of Meadow Bank, Campbellfield, aged 88 years.
GIBB. On September 11, at private hospital, Malvern, Alexander Coupar Gibb, loved stepfather of Kitty Prangst. (P.2, Argus, 13-9-1948.)

Alexander Coupar Gibb
Born in Cambellfield, Victoria, Australia on 1860 to Alexander Gibb and Elizabeth Coupar. Alexander Coupar married Margaret Ferguson Inglis. He passed away on 1948.

2 comment(s), latest 4 months, 3 weeks ago

Antonio Albress was a pioneer of the Mornington Peninsula in Victoria. (See also ALBRESS,BENNETT, McINTYRE etc journal.)

Antonio Albress was a pioneer of the Mornington Peninsula in Victoria, Australia.He was a grantee of 90 acres, whose eastern boundary was over Browns Rd from Springs Lane (which is the western boundary of the Moonah Links Golf Course.) His grant is now part of the locality of Fingal but was not in the parish of Fingal, being crown allotments 37 A1 and 37B of the parish of Wannaeue. (The Wannaeue map is available online.)His name was recorded on the map as Albres, which was probably the original spelling.
(Les Albres is a region in France, which suggests that one of Antonio's ancestors may have been French. As there is no mention of the Cape Verde Islands being under French control, perhaps this Frenchman from Les Albres had been on a ship sunk by Sir Francis Drake who did a bit of hunting in those parts.)

The two grants between Antonio's grant and the 2011 site of the Truemans Rd tip were 37B1 (Nicholas De Mas, probably another Cape Verde Islander) and 38A (Edward Russell.) I will not repeat Albress information posted on Rootsweb by thommo99 and Emily Burkitt and the details about probate.On rootsweb, you will also find details from newspapers accessed on trove. One of these (Mornington and Dromana Standard, 14-8-1909, p.2) states that Antonio came from the Cape Verde Island of Bona Vista. This was the English version of the Portugese Boa Vista (and was used for places in Canada and Brazil.) English presence on the island is indicated by an 1819 book of sailing directions that called the main town "English Road". It was probably this presence and the fact that J.B.Were, who had land near Cape Schanck, acted as the Consul for Portugal that resulted in Cape Verde Islanders such as Emanuel de Santos of Rye and Joe Peters of Rosebud coming to the Peninsula.

Boa Vista has the native name of Bubista, and the nickname, Ihla das Dunas (Island of the Dunes.) It is the third largest of the Cape Verde Islands, is 455 km west of the the Africa mainland's westernmost point, is fairly flat with its highest point being at only 387 metres and has the smallest population of all the inhabited islands. Being fertile at the time Antonio (or his parents) left, the island was fertile and supported much agriculture but now it is called Cape Verde's desert island.Antonio's given name was probably very common on the island, given that one of the three "mountains" and Ponta (point)Antonio on its north coast bear the Saint's name.


19 comment(s), latest 2 months, 3 weeks ago

ANZAC DAY 2013, ROSEBUD AND TULLAMARINE, VIC., AUST.

LEST WE FORGET.

At dawn outside the Rosebud R.S.L.
I thought of the boys who went through hell.
For King and country they crossed the water.
The grieving parents, siblings, son and daughter.

I recorded every Broady, Tulla, Keilor and Bulla name
But I no longer have them; what a shame!
Major Murphy moved the monuments at the first places two
To the old windmill site and Dalkeith Avenue.

The Lane boys of "Gowrie Park" (where planes rise and dip),
Alf Cock who died on a torpedoed ship,
Send offs where the old Beech Tree had been
During W.W.1 for the lads from Tullamarine.

Jack Hoctor, born in the coach house,who lit the lamp,
Tramped up the hill from Broady Town to the camp
To give Bro mother's cooking and her wishes best;
The lads were released to help the harvest.

Rosebud's Honour Board hangs in the school primary.
Fred Hobley's brother won a medal for extreme bravery.
Leongatha and Rosebud honoured the Hobley boys
Who suffered the mud, gas, pain and ear-splitting noise.