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C.B.FISHER'S LANDHOLDINGS IN ASCOT VALE, MARIBYRNONG,WEST ESSENDON AND AVONDALE HEIGHTS, AUST.

While consulting Doutta Galla parish maps to find when John Aitken had been granted section 8,I found one map with a large area of land outlined that only Dorothy Minkhoff and I would understand. Dorothy wrote the history of Ave Maria College in West Essendon which has Clydebank, the mansion of Ramsay (the inventor of Kiwi shoe polish) on its grounds. In her book, Dorothy discussed C.B.Fisher's vast land acquisitions in the above modern suburbs.

Although it is probably 20 years since I read Dorothy's book,the mere sight of the map had her words tumbling out of the hidden recesses of my brain. A precise match! You will notice that Hurtle St (named after the older brother of, as MARIBYRNONG:ACTION IN TRANQUILITY puts it,the father of the Australian turf)runs the precise length of the Ascot Wale West land.

Thought I'd share our secret. The map, described below, has 29 in bold type in the top left corner and 94 in red ink in the top right corner.

Doutta Galla, County of Bourke [cartographic material].
Melbourne : Photo-lithographed at the Department of Lands and Survey ... by J. Noone, - Parish maps of Victoria. 1882 English Map; Single map 1 & Online

CAIRNS GENEALOGY, BONEO ETC, MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST. (and Tassie!)

P.11, THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO.
JAMES AND JANET CAIRNS.
James and Janet Cairns (nee Cunningham) lived in Stirlingshire, Scotland. Stirlingshire is south of the river Forth and east of Loch Lomond. Some local names appearing on papers held by members of the family who made the trip to Australia, are Clackmannon (sic), Blairbogie, Alva and Menstrey(sic?).

Three sons of James and Janet Cairns, Robert, David and Alexander and a daughter Elizabeth, all came to Victoria and eventually settled at Boneo.

When James wife Janet died in Scotland he remarried. His second wife was a woman of some wealth. Together they reared a second family who were step-brothers to Robert, David, Alexander and Elizabeth. Members of the second family also came out to Australia in the 1850's. In Scotland they owned the "Carron" Timber Mills and also ships of their own. They brought with them prefabricated houses, one of which was to be erected ready to accommodate Robert and Mary Cairns on their arrival in Melbourne.

ROBERT AND MARY CAIRNS.
...with their three sons, James 3,John 2, and Robert, an infant, sailed from Scotland, via Liverpool,on the sailing ship,"Europa", 1088 tons, under its Master, Hamilton Oliver, on the 17th June 1852. They arrived in Melbourne on 15th September of the same year.

....Robert's age is shown as 36 years and Mary's 35. No reason can be given for the advancement of the ages, but they do show a discrepancy with those recorded later on the death certificates. It is generally accepted by the descendants that the ages shown on the death certificates are more accurate.

.......On the arrival of the "Europa" at Port Phillip Heads, Robert Cairns found the ship bringing his step brothers, and their prefabricated houses, delayed just inside the Heads. After an exchange of greetings, the "Europa" proceeded on to Port Melbourne.

The delay to Robert's step brothers was only short term and they were soon reunited at Port Melbourne. Robert stayed on in Melbourne and assisted with the location and erection of the prefabricated houses in Prahran.

Robert's step brothers are said to have settled at Port Melbourne, establishing the Carron Timber Mill, which in later years became Sharp's Timber Co.


Elizabeth's death certificate shows that she was indeed the sister of Robert, David and Alexander Cairns. The curious thing is that she was born in 1814 and that Alexander was born in 1827. If Janet died during or soon after Alexander's birth, the first of the step brothers would have been born in 1828, making him only 24 or so on his arrival in Port Phillip Bay in 1852.

The reason for the delay inside the heads would have been a very thorough inspection by officials from the quarantine station which had been hastily transferred from Elwood in 1852 after the arrival of the fever ship (Ticondera?) Perhaps some passengers from the step-brothers' ship were infected and had to be taken ashore to the tents awaiting them on shore, no buildings having yet been erected.

As Elizabeth was born in 1814, the ages on the shipping list may have been the correct ones, not the ones given on death certificates. In 1852, Robert's age was given as 36 and Mary's as 35. In 1854, David's age was stated as 40 and his wife's as 36; Alex was said to be 35 and his wife 30.

The approximate birth year of each, as indicated by the shipping list, is given for each below, followed in brackets by the details supplied at the end of the book.
David Cairns c.1814(1821-1870.) Janet,nee Thompson c.1818 (1818-1880.)
Robert Cairns c.1816 (1820-1884.) Mary, nee Drysdale c.1817 (1828-1901.)
Alexander Cairns c.1819 (1827-1911.) Janet, nee Dalgleish c.1824 (1827-1898.)


Oliver and Sarah Wilson's ages were falsified on the passenger lists so they could qualify as bounty (assisted) passengers and Back Yard Bob's opponent in the shovel trouble at Rosebud, Robert Henry Adams, falsified the date of his father's marriage on his own wedding certificate so gentlewoman, Miss Hopcraft,would not discover that he was a b-st-rd. However the Cairns families were unassisted passengers and had no reason to lie.

To check the possibility of the shipping records being right,let's examine the age (based on the shipping records) of each wife at the birth of their last child:
David's Janet, (Rosebud Ted 1865), 47; Robert's Mary (Mary 1872), 55; Alexander's Janet(Walter 1870), 46.
To have a child at these ages would be most unusual today but these women would have been very healthy and would have had the birthing business down to a fine art after the previous 11, 10 and 9 (respectively) births.

Let's examine the ages of the husbands in the year of the birth of their first child. (Shipping list/Death Cert.)
David (James 1840)26/19; Robert (James 1848)32/28; Alex (James 1850)31/23.
David's details present the best case for preferring the shipping list ages.



ROBERT CAIRNS (1820-1884) was married in Menstrey, Scotland to MARY DRYSDALE (1828-1901.) Robert was buried at the cemetery on Alexander's grant at Boneo and Mary was buried at Rye. Mary's parents, who came out with them, settled on the other side of the bay and gave Drysdale its name. Mary Campbell, who came out with them in 1852, with Robert as her guardian and probably helping Mary with the children, later became a relative via the Edmonds family, her daughter and Walter's daughter both marrying into this family. Robert most likely bought his grant at Boneo at auction because this was before the days of selection as far as I know; selection was enabled by the Land Acts of the 1860's. Robert had intended farming but got into lime burning which proved so lucrative that he was able to help his brothers,David and Alexander to come out in 1854.

(Something I had intended to put into the GEORGE AND OLLIE JOHNSTONE journal. Robert obviously came with some money. Alex Johnstone stated that the limestone houses erected by Cairns family members were indicative of money. However the fact is that pioneers used the material that was most readily available, and limestone was common from Rosebud/Boneo to the Heads. Slab huts were more likely to be built in forest areas, and much of the Arthurs Seat timber disappeared for piers,sleepers, firewood etc so some limestone houses may have been built further east for want of timber. Slab buildings were not a sign of lower financial status, the McCrae Homestead being a good example.)

Robert, David and Alexander shared Little Scotland on the north east corner of Boneo and Browns Rd until in 1870, Alexander moved to his grant on the north west corner.Colin McLear recalled a visit to Little Scotland made by George McLear, accompanying his mother's business partner, hawker, Charles Graves (who sold Marysfield to her in 1860 to become a Shoreham storekeeper with over 300 acres in the parish of Flinders.) One of the flock of snowy-haired children complained,"Ae Cannae crruck a whee whup yet!" (P.98, A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.)


Robert did later select some land in the parish of Fingal, 198 acres on the east side of Boneo Rd, in July 1871 and on it built Maroolaba in 1873.Give location details from p.map later!!!

Robert and Mary's children were:
1. JAMES ,1848-1914, married Emily Hynes, buried Macclesfield; he and brothers contracted to Victorian Railways at Camperdown and then near Murchison. Erected a theatre in Queenstown, Tas. C.1895. Issue:Robert, Alan,Donald, Charles, Herbert and Alice.
2. JOHN, 1850-1914, married Mary Russell, buried Rye. Issue:Robert and Charles.
3. ROBERT, 1852-1920, buried Rye.
4. MARGARET, 1854-1920, buried Rye. Married William Patterson in 1880 after Christina (Davids 6th) had died. Issue: William Jnr. who married Rosebud Ted's daughter Ruby.
5. DAVID, 1856-7, buried Boneo.
6. ALEX, 1859-1930, married Suzanne Lawson, buried Tasmania. Issue: Jean.
7. CHARLES, 1862-1889, buried Boneo.
8. DAVID, 1863-1930, buried Rye.
9. JANET, 1865-1934, married Robert Wilson, buried Rye. Issue:Mary, Frank, Madge.
10. HENRY, 1867-1948, married Mary Agnes Cain (daughter of Michael), buried Rye. HILL HARRY. Inherited Maroolaba. Issue:Charles, Raymond (made one more century!), Harry.
12. MARY, 1872-1914, buried Rye.

ALEXANDER CAIRNS (1827-1911) was married in Scotland to JANET DALGLEISH (1827-1898.) Both were buried at Rye. Janet's maiden name is recalled by Dalgleish St (Melway 170A2) on crown allotment 13, section A, Wannaeue, purchased in the early 1900's by her sons David and William.)
Alexander and Janet's children were:
1. JAMES , born 1850.
2. JOHN, 1852-1951, married Emma Baldry, buried Rye.Issue: Douglas*, Mabel, Reuban (A.I.F.), Beatrice.
3. ALEX, 1854-1912, buried Rye.
4. ROBERT, 1856-1910, buried Rye.
5. JANET, 1859-1909,married William Brent, buried Flinders. Issue:Richard (A.I.F.), Alexander.
6. DAVID, 1861-1935, buried Rye. ELEANORA DAVEY.
7. WILLIAM, 1864-1938, buried Rye.
8. ELIZABETH, 1865-1948, buried Rye.
9. HELEN, 1869-1946, buried Rye.
10. WALTER, 1870-1956, married Flo Laughton, buried Rye.
See the GEORGE AND OLLIE JOHNSTONE journal.

DAVID CAIRNS (1821-1870) was married in Scotland to JANET THOMPSON (1819-1880.) Both were buried at Rye.

David and Janet's children were:
1. JAMES, 1840-1929, married Johanna Russell, buried Rye. Rabbit Inspector for the shire. His farm was called Alva Hill. Issue: Arthur, Belle, Lily, Violet, Percy.
2. DAVID, 1842-1923, married Elizabeth Russell, buried Flinders. BLACKS CAMP DAVEY. See the GEORGE AND OLLIE JOHNSTONE journal re the 1897 accident and the guest house at Flinders. Issue: David, Edward, James, Archie, Mary*, Jennie, William, Jane Brown, Edith, Christopher Ernest, Bertie, Alice. (* See Cairns V Haddow, P.2, Mornington Standard, 3-10-1901.)
3. JANE BROWN, 1844-1897, buried Dromana. Inherited Little Scotland in 1880; this probably be part of Little Scotland. See rate records in future journal CAIRNS LAND IN WANNAEUE AND FINGAL.
4. JOHN, born 1846, married Ada Morgan. Issue: Joseph, Janet, Harry, Charles, James.
5. ROBERT, 1848-1937, married Annie Symonds, buried Dromana. BACK ROAD BOB. See SHOVEL TROUBLE AT ROSEBUD in the future CAIRNS LAND journal. Issue: James, David, George, Godfrey (A.I.F.)
6. CHRISTINA, 1850-1877, William Pattersons first wife, buried Dromana. Issue: James, Janet, Sarah and Christina (Win.)
7. JANET, 1853-1913, married John McLear (b. N.S.W.11-7-1846) on 4-5-1874, buried Dromana. Issue: Janet (Jessie?), Martha 1876, William 1880, George (George Albert 1882), John 1884, (Mary, Jane; actually Mary Jane born in 1886), Jean 1889, Lily 1891, Christopher Henry1893, James 1896.
8. ALEX, born 1856, married Lyndhurst Lizzie.
9. MARY, born 1859, married John Boyd. Issue: Jean, Edith.
10. HENRY, born 1861, married Margaret Haddow, buried Dromana. CARRIER HARRY. Lived at junction of Boneo Rd and the now closed Cape Schanck Rd. Issue: Maude.
11. CHRISTOPHER,1863-1947,married Margaret Russell, buried Rye. Issue: Ethel, Oscar.
CAIRNS.-0n May 23, at Castlemaine,Christopher, beloved husband of the the late Margaret Cairns, loving father of Ethel(Mrs Crichton, deceased) and Oscar, aged 86 years. -At rest. (P.9, Argus, 25-5-1949.)
According to THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO, Christopher died in 1947.


12. EDWARD, 1865-1943, married Elizabeth Bucher, buried Dromana. ROSEBUD TED. Issue: Ruby (who married William Patterson Jnr.), Roy, Leslie, Ivy.

THE IN-LAWS.
HYNES, LAWSON, RUSSELL, PATTERSON, WILSON, CAIN, BALDRY, BRENT, LAUGHTON, MORGAN, SYMONDS, MCLEAR, BOYD, HADDOW, BUCHER,
The family connections with the Hynes, Lawson and Morgan families probably took place outside the Peninsula; please make a comment if you have knowledge to the contrary. The Brent/Laughton/Walter Cairns connection is discussed in my GEORGE AND OLLIE JOHNSTONE journal. The reasons for the other connections, in terms of farm locations, employment etc. will be discussed in my future journal, CAIRNS LAND IN WANNAEUE AND FINGAL, MORNINGTON PENINSULA.
Colin McLear gives much genealogical detail in A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA. John McLear (1846-1918) who married David and Janets 7th child, Janet, was one of three professional fishermen at Dromana, his house being next to the Dromana Hotel. (See my journal PIONEERING NEIGHBOURS NEAR CARRIGG ST, DROMANA.) From Colins information, I have inserted the year of birth of each of John and Janets children. (Above.) Alex, son of David, probably took up a selection on the Carrum Swamp in the parish of Lyndhurst (north of Seaford Road) which would explain why the family called his wife Lyndhurst Lizzie.

WELL, THAT WAS QUICK! Lizzie was Eliza!
CLAIMS AGAINST SOLICITOR Judgments for 1,991 ADJOURNMENT SOUGHT
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 6 October 1936 p 11 Article
... Eliza Cairns, aged 70 years, of Lyndhurst, widow, who claimed 1,601. In an iilllduvlt Mrs. Cairns sold ... Frederick Cairns, of Lyndhurst, farmer, adopted son of the lirst applicant. Ile claimed 300 money had und ... 443 words
Oops! I was a bit hasty there. I think Eliza was the widow of George Cairns, a pioneer of the parish of Lyndhurst, and one of the half brothers of Robert, David and Alexander.

I reckon this is our Alexander.Elizabeth would be Lyndhurst Lizzie and David's 8th child, born in 1856, would have been about 65 years old in 1920.

Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 20 January 1920 p 1 Family Notices
... CAIRNS. -On the 19th January, at his residence, Cranbourne road Lyndhurst (late of Wonthaggi), Alexander Henry, the dearly loved husband of Elizabeth Cairns, aged 65 years.

FORGAN (Cairns). - On September 19. at Melbourne, Leslie, loving f0ster-son of the late Elizabeth and Alexander Cairns, and loved brother- of Frederick Cairns. Maggie, Josephine, and Elsie Forgan, late of Lynd- hurst, aged 35 years.

It now seems that Eliza was Elizabeth and the widow of Alexander unless George had one son named Frederick as well.

On 21-9-1881, G.Cairns was granted crown allotment 121 in the parish of Lyndhurst, consisting of 199 acres and 24 perches. (The map may be viewed online by googling "Lyndhurst, County of Mornington".)With so many roads closed, it is difficult to determine its position but it seems to be at Melway 94 A12 with its north east corner at the bend in Springs Drain in 94 A 11, that drain forming its north west boundary and McMahens Rd and Riverbend Rd on the south and west.

3 comment(s), latest 1 year, 2 months ago

CAMPBELLS CREEK, BETWEEN CASTLEMAINE AND FRANKLINFORD, VIC., AUST.

On Saturday I had a lovely meal at the Five Flags Hotel in Campbells Creek after my ma-in-law's ashes had been buried at the cemetery. As I drove through Campbells Creek every school day in 1965-6, I have fond memories apart from the time I copped a broken half window in my old FX going up the hill to the Maine.

There wouldn't have been a FRANKLINFORD REPORTER without the assistance of Ron Champion, H.T. at the C.C. school who kindly let me run off copies on his duplicator. On hot days,I didn't care that the water in the swimming pool had been pumped out of the creek by the fire brigade.

The owner of the Five Flags Hotel was very busy but kindly spared a few moments for a chat.The hotel was established in 1854 with the bar near the car park being the original section.

There are some great photos of the "Creek's" heritage items, details of Ray Bradfield's history etc. available on trove. I also found a picture of the Five Flags Hotel.The reason I started this journal is that the history in wikipedia was as pathetic re Campbells Creek as for most other places. Fancy saying that Campbells Creek was named after a creek! Dur! How did the creek get its name?

Excerpt from my INVERNESS HOTEL AND FRANKLINFORD journal.

STATIONS - Bough Yards

The establishment of the Aboriginal Station not only displaced the Jumcra* run, but took a good portion of Mollison's Bough Yards run. Now effectively separated from the Coliban run by Holecombe and the Protectorate Mollison possibly found Bough Yards an imposition.

In 1840 Alex Kennedy (1801 - 1877) had arrived in the Guildford area. He was related to William Campbell. William Campbell and Donald Cameron had arrived on the "Wm Metcalfe" from Invernesshire in late 1838.

Kennedy and his wife Margaret, and five children arrived aboard the "S Boyne" in January 1839. The Kennedys made their way to Clunes where Donald Cameron had set up his run. Kennedy had selected a run near Newstead whist on route to Clunes. By the time he returned, Norman Simson had established the Charlotte Plains run on the site.

Fortunately, William Campbell had purchased the lease for Bough Yards which was adjacent to his run, Strathloddon. Campbell gave Kennedy the remains of the Bough Yards run and the Kennedys established a homestead on the Loddon River. The homestead was named Bowyards.

The Strathloddon run homestead was near Yapeen. The township of Campbell's creek was named after William Campbell.


SOME SNIPPETS. (From The Argus unless otherwise stated.)
Richard Hills, a storekeeper of Campbells Creek, had become insolvent. (P.6, 18-1-1859.)

On the 25th ult., at Campbell's Creek, Mount Alexander, by the Rev. J. Chene, Isabella Will, eldest daughter of William F. Preshaw, Esq., surgeon, to Mr.John Graham, of Belfast, Ireland.(P.4,3-6-1853.) Dr Preshaw was one of Castlemaine's most prominent citizens.

MARRIED.
On the 15th inst., by special license, at the residence of Mrs. McLaughlin, Campbell's Creek, by the Rev. James Low, Mr. Robert Moorhead, store-keeper, to Anne, only surviving daughter of the late James McLaughlln, Esq., Kingston, Ireland.(P.4, 20-11-1854.)

DIED. On the 23rd ult., after a short illness, of rheumatic gout, Mr. Thos. Wightman, of the John o'Groat Hotel,Campbell's Creek, Castlemaine, aged 43 years. (P.4,5-3-1857.)

DIED. On the 26th ult., at his residence, Campbell's Creek, Castlemaine, Mr. William Frederick Wheeler, youngest son of the late Daniel Wheeler, Esq., of Chelmsford,Essex, England, aged twenty-six years.
(P.4, 4-14-1857.)

N.B. AS I HAVEN'T BEEN STUDYING THE AREA'S HISTORY FOR 25 YEARS,I AM PLAYING IT SAFE BY INCLUDING ITEMS ABOUT CAMPBELLS CREEK,CASTLEMAINE, BECAUSE I WOULD NOT KNOW WHETHER THE PIONEERS WERE IN CASTLEMAINE OR THE TOWNSHIP. I'M TREATING CAMPBELLS CREEK AS I WOULD ROSEBUD, DROMANA, WHERE THE LATTER IS GIVEN AS A CLUE TO THE LOCATION OF THE FORMER. WHEELER'S LOCATION WAS PROBABLY ON WHEELERS HILL IN CASTLEMAINE BUT I THOUGHT THE ABOVE MIGHT BE OF INTEREST.

-------
Baron Von Mueller the famed botanist who,if I remember correctly, designed the Castlemaine Botanical Gardens, organised the planting of trees at the Campbell Creek Reserve.
(CAMPBELL'S CREEK.
Mount. Alexander Mail (Vic. : 1914 - 1917) Tuesday 2 February 1915 p 2 Article.)
EDITS WON'T SUBMIT.

March 2014.
WELSH-ANNEAR.-On the 31st January, 1919, at
"Redbank," Rusden street, Elsternwick, John
Alexander Welsh (late A.I.F.), eldest son of
Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Welsh, Elwood, to Henrietta,
daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Annear,
"Five Flags," Campbell's Creek.
(P.11,Argus,8-3-1919.)

7 comment(s), latest 11 months ago

CAPTAIN JOHN MARTIN ARDLIE AND HIS CAMELS

Captain Ardlie is the subject of a newsletter article on the PORT PHILLIP PIONEERS GROUP'S website.The article discusses his attempts to introduce camels to Australia. He was the grantee of land (section 4 allotment 2) in the parish of Tullamarine. This land was to become part of E.E.Dunn's Viewpoint. At the time Ardlie was living there his neighbours would have been Peter McCracken on "Stewarton" (the northern 777 acres of Gladstone Park) and Eyre Evans Kenny on "Camp Hill" ( now Gowanbrae.)Streets in Broadmeadows Township (now Westmeadows) were named after Ardlie and Kenny.

The article points out that his address was given as Camelswold in 1847. There is reason to believe that this was the 225 acres at Tullamarine granted to J.M.Ardlie on 31-7-1843. His grant's location is roughly indicated by Melway 5 K12 to 6D12. Ardlie's financial difficulties are discussed in the article and also below.

The following comes from page 36 of Ray Gibb's "Early Landowners:Parish of Tullamarine".
Ardlie mortgaged his 225 acres at Tullamarine on 14-6-1844 for 291 pounds 14 shillings and sixpence and on 14-10-1847 for 300 pounds. He then conveyed it to Daniel Newman on 3-10-1848 for 560 pounds. On the next day, he bought the 65 3/4 acre allotment B of section 22, Doutta Galla from the grantee for 160 pounds. By 1-11-1848, he'd had to deposit the deeds to this new land as security for 157 pounds 10 shillings he owed C.H.Dight for flour. Then on 5-3-1949, Ardlie sold this land to Joseph Hall for 200 pounds and moved away, soon becoming a pioneer of Warrnambool. Page 600 of the Government Gazette of 23-6-1852 shows that J.M.Ardlie was a Clerk of Petty Sessions; he presented the decision of the Justices sitting at Kilmore.
22B Doutta Galla is bounded by Melrose Drive, Caravelle Cres., Vickers Ave and Tasman Ave in Strathmore Heights. (P.117, Early Landowners: Parish of Doutta Galla" by Ray Gibb.)

Ardlie's son's biography can be seen in Alexander Sutherland's "Victoria and Its Metropolis: Past and Present".
MY APOLOGIES FOR THE ATTACHMENT NAME; I TRIED TO CHANGE IT TO J.M.ARDLIE BUT YOU KNOW WHAT A COMPUTER DILL I AM!


CARRIERS, MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.

CARRIERS.
Arthurs Seat jutted into the bay; a problem this did pose
Until in 1866, Ned Williams cut into Anthony's Nose.
It was sail,wait till the tide was out while you had a rest, or
Climb up to the Cape Schanck road if you wanted to go west.

Peter Pidoto had a craft to fish
But he'd carry anything you'd wish;
Like wood from up near Dromana's peak,
Loading near the mouth of Sheepwash Creek.

Walter Gibson had the mail contract to the Schanck,
Jimmy Williams' and Harry Cairns' cargo stank
But their passengers told them, "Thanks,
Better than the pony owned by Shanks!"

Jimmy sold to Keith McGregor who ran a Ford T van
To Melbourne, which they wanted to ban.
That's when Spencer Jackson came to the fore.
Keith later sold to Billy Adams,his brother-in-law.

The Purves' horses at Tootgarook were well above par
And were driven by Patterson lads to Kirk's Bazaar.
Blacks Camp Davey* drove a cart for Benjie Shaw, draper,
Who later ran Kangerong in the guest house caper.

Bullocks hauled loads for firewood,sleeper and pier
With drags to slow descents by such as George McLear,
While to the west she oak was carted more
To fire the kilns, and bagged lime carted to the shore.

Near Owen Cain's Tyrone, limecraft would come in at high tide
And be propped up with timbers all along each side
So when the water receded, after quite a time,
Carts could come on the hard-packed sand and they could load the lime.

Sorrento's cargo was people back-beach amphitheatre bound;
The summer demand for chaff pleased many farmers around.
The cabbies'horses pulled up the main street hill, manure a-droppin';
Later the steamers were met by the tram brought in by Mr Coppin.

Farmers came from far and wide to keep the tourists fed,
Fruit from such as McIlroy and Vegies from Alf Head;
Mornington too,for another Red Hillite, was worth the ride,
At Sargood's place young Simpson met his bride.

* CAIRNS.

CATHOLICS IN MELBOURNE'S NORTH WEST AND ST. AUGUSTINE'S, KEILOR. (VIC., AUST.)

If information is required about Catholic pioneers near Bulla, the place to look is Kathleen Fanning's website about the Fanning family. A "Fanning,Bulla" search brought several results including:

Irish Settlement at Bulla Victoria Australia | Fanning Family ...
www.fanningfamilyhistory.com/irish-settlement-bulla-victoria

It is likely that many of the Irish pioneers had first tried their luck at the diggings. The Daniel family of "Narbonne" near Daniels Rd (Melway 177 K6)hosted many new chums before they set off for the diggings. Mrs Daniel
was a widow and shrewdly explained to her guests that they'd need to build up their muscles by practising the art of digging. "Narbonne " was highly cultivated!

In researching Bulla pioneers,I came across this website, which gives fantastic information about Irish pioneers from Footscray to the Sunbury and Broadmeadows areas (even Portland)BUT HAS A DANGEROUS FLAW.

KEILOR BAPTISMS - Freepages - Ancestry.com
freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/.../Keilor/KEILBAPT.htm

Many of the Irish diggers, after the alluvial gold had been found, did not have the resources to sink shafts, so they would have trekked towards Melbourne with empty bellies looking for employment. This time,in 1858-9, they were in luck. The Mt Alexander (Castlemaine)and Murray River railway was in construction and the workforce was largely comprised of their countrymen. So they would have found work pushing the line through the parish of Holden (Diggers Rest), Keilor Road Station (Sydenham) and on to Sunbury.

St Augustine's Keilor was started a few years before this time by local Catholics. Connor and Phelan were spirit merchants who received the grant for Spring Park,just east of the A.J.Davis Reserve on Keilor Rd and Connor was also granted much of "Keilor Binn Farm" which was part of the Doutta Galla portion of Keilor Township. Connor bought the rest of this farm but lost it to Hugh Glass by 1868. Keilor publican,Matthew Goudie,later came into possession and when his daughter married John Dodd who became owner,she insisted that it be called "Brimbank".

George Dodd, another trustee of the St Augustine's site, was originally a quarryman so he was well qualified to oversee construction. The related Dodds and Delaheys occupied land between North Pole (Milleara)Road and the river, including the part of today's Brimbank Park south of the E-W high tension power line.

When construction of the railway began, the number of worshippers increased dramatically! This fact has been overlooked in the following article but was emphasised in one of the Keilor centenary souvenirs.

About St Augustine's St Augustine's 150th Anniversary
staugustines150th.com/about-st-augustines/

The history of St Augustine's Catholic Church in Keilor is as old as Keilor itself even older!
St Augustine's Church Keilor 1863-2013.JPG (photo.)
Both Keilor and St Augustine's celebrate their 150th anniversary in 2013; but for the genesis of St Augustine's Church we need to go back even further.

A large proportion of the population in the area now known as Keilor were Irish Catholics, and as they settled down to a life far from their homeland and loved ones, they sought spiritual as well as physical comfort. Thus it was that the first Parish Priest, Father Matthew Downing, came to Keilor in July 1854 to set up the Keilor Mission. Matthew Downing was born in County Kerry in 1810, was ordained in 1837, and spent time in Italy and Ireland before coming to Hobart in January 1849 to serve as a penal chaplain. Much of his time there was spent at the convict prison in Port Arthur. By August 1852 he had moved to Victoria and in November 1852 the goldfields of Ballarat, where he remained until July 1854, when he came to Keilor.

The new Keilor Mission initially took in Flemington, Moonee Ponds, Essendon, Broadmeadows, Keilor, Sunbury, Mickleham and Darraweit Guim, and was then joined by Bulla Bulla in February 1855.

In those days Father Downing celebrated Mass in a number of venues, but it was his vision to build a Church at Keilor in honour of St Augustine, the patron saint of his order. In January 1855, five trustees of the Keilor Church Reserve were approved Father Downing, Bishop James Goold (first bishop of Melbourne), Patrick Phelan, Owen Connor and George Dodd (who became a key person in the development not only of the Church but of the Keilor area in general).

Building work commenced in 1857, with Mr Dodd appointed Foreman of Works.

The bluestone for the Church was quarried locally, but construction was slow, in part due to financial recession in the times, but also due to the lack of labour (as many men were attracted to the goldfields at Ballarat, Bendigo and Castlemaine).

It would take six long years before St Augustine's was finally completed.

By then Father Downing had transferred to Williamstown, to be succeeded by Father Patrick Madden and then Father James Moore. Father Moore was in residence when the Church was finally completed and on Sunday, 15 November 1863 St Augustine's Church was opened and blessed by Bishop Goold.

WHAT IS THE FLAW IN THE ST.AUGUSTINE'S BAPTISMAL REGISTER?
It was not until I looked at the Crotty entries that I realised why the Register didn't make sense. The columns are headed:
SURNAME; CHILD; D.O.B.; FATHER; MOTHER; CHRISTENING DATE; RESIDED

The Crotty entries read:
CROTTY JAMES MAURICE 11.08.1864 MAURICE McCORMICK, MARY 19.09.1864 KEILOR

CROTTY MARY 15.08.1866 MAURICE McCORMACK, MARY 16.09.1866 KEILOR

CROTTY MICHAEL PATRICK 17.11.1861 MAURICE McCORMACK, MARY 06.12.1861 KEILOR

The flaw is that the father is given the maiden name of the mother. This probably applies to all entries.
The last Crotty entry should read:
CROTTY, Michael Patrick; 17-11-1861; Maurice; Mary (nee McCormack); 6-12-1861; Keilor.


Maurice Crotty worked on the Brannigans' "St John's Hill" at Melway 384 J5 when he came to Australia. The McCormacks had fled Tasmania because they were wanted for smuggling in Catholic priests. They leased a 44 acre farm between the east end of Annandale Rd and an eastern extension of Sharps Rd (the DouttaGalla /Tullamarine parish boundary.) One of the McCormack boys was involved in the hanging of an aborigine at Keilor bridge and fled to Corryong to escape reprisal. His sister, Mary, who had married Maurice Crotty and moved onto The Springs,just across Fosters Rd(now Keilor Park Drive)in 1860 knew of a revenge plan so she made haste to Corryong and, bravely placing her body between her brother and the aborigines,persuaded them to spare his life.
(SOURCES: VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS, Joe Crotty and his nephew, Glenn (Cotchen?), Mary Crotty's diary.)
See my FOSTER, SHARP, CROTTY journal for further details.

Although the Brannigans and Maurice Crotty probably attended Mass as "Narbonne",it is likely that this did not occur every week and that Maurice Crotty and Mary McCormack had first met at St Augustines.

JUST REMEMBER
the surname of the father is the same as that of the child and the surname following the father's given name is actually the mother's maiden name.

1 comment(s), latest 1 week, 6 days ago

CHAMPION FOOTBALLER KILLED. ROSEBUD, VIC., AUST.

The Dryden family pioneered the area near Hanging Rock before Tom Wills thought of the game that became known as Aussie Rules. When surveys had been completed, leases on squatting runs were cancelled, and as with most pioneering families, the next generation sought opportunities elsewhere.

Bill Dryden had been a champion footballer with the Kyneton Football Club. Unfortunately Rosalind Peatey did not explain how Bill came to meet Mary Peatey. Mary, born in 1890 in Gippsland, was the eldest daughter of Jack and Mary Peatey, who returned to Rosebud in 1894 and established their produce business on "Beachside" on the east side of Peatey's Creek.

When Bill was killed, the elder of his boys, Jim and Bill, was six years old so it can be assumed that they had married by 1926,
three years before the Rosebud Football Club played its first season.

Whatever job Bill had worked at probably disappeared soon after the 1930's depression started and he was probably offered a job at the Seaford sandpits if he played for Seaford. Another inducement may have been that his brother, E. (Edward?) Dryden,was living in the backblocks of Seaford and also starring for the team.

Just before the tragedy, he'd been offered a job at Tom Maw's sand pit at Rosebud. Bill stepped onto a wheel to get off the tray of the truck just as it started reversing and was crushed by the truck.

ROSEBUD v. RED HILL. Red Hill turned out in full force last Saturday when their team visited Rosebud and were rewarded by a win. Both sides were very anxious to win this match, particularly Rosebud, who had their previous beating by Red Hill to repay. However, after quite the best game that has been played in Rosebud this season, Red Hill won by two points - a very unfortunate state of affairs for Rosebud. A large crowd of Rosebud supporters watched the match and the excitement was intense.
Dryden, Anderson and Wong Bros. showed up well for Rosebud; H.Liversidge was handicapped by his fingers being still tied and not yet right.The final scores were Red Hill 9.5; Rosebud 7.14. Frankston and Somerville Standard (Vic. : 1921 - 1939) Saturday 27 July 1929 p 7 Article

SEAFORD OBITUARY . Regret was expressed on the Peninsula, last Saturday when it was learned that Mr. W. Dryden had met his death by accident at Rosebud. The deceased was a well-known footballer around the district, having played with the Rosebud team a year or two ago, and last year captained the Seaford club. He had just recently left Seaford to accept employment at Rosebud. He leaves a widow and two young children. Deepest sympathy is extended to his parents, widow and children. SEAFORD OBITUARY
Frankston and Somerville Standard (Vic. : 1921 - 1939) Saturday 25 November 1933 p 4 Article.

CHRONOLOGY IN VERSE (1800's): ARTHURS SEAT, VIC., AUST.

I've avoided using Red Hill in the title because those words seem to attract the "Oh Noes" gremlins. That's exactly what I mean by Arthurs Seat but the alternative also lets me include the Brady family of Wannaeue and Alexander Shand, as well as the same storm affecting Red Hill and Dromana.

I've been presenting a lot of information that is available on trove. If it was about the Mansfield family, Neil would have found the articles himself,but he would not have found "Ritchie's Foe" anywhere. The poems that I propose will present facts gleaned from trove and countless other sources and provide something a little different in your family history. If I use italics it is because the source had it wrong ( eg. Don instead of Dohn.)



1882.
Margaret Davies, a name on the Kangerong parish map,
Has a story that is mainly gap.
On 20-8-1877 she was granted crown allotments 13 A and B
But nothing more about her I see.

A widow or spinster, on whom did she depend,
John Davies, Pine Grove, Balnarring; Davies Bros at North Woodend?
Her land was east of Andrews Lane to the east Kindilan boundary.
Was it Margaret who lost it to the mortgagee?

If you look up this advertisement,from which the poem was sourced, you will be surprised to see page 2 labelled with the name of a N.S.W. newspaper, but if you look at the actual page, you will find that it is the Argus.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 8
Sale of 129a 5r 31p of LAND, Parish of KANGERONG, County of Mornington By Order of the Mortgagees J.BELLIN has received instructions to SELL by AUCTION, at his rooms 8 Collins street east, on Thursday, August 5, at two
o' clock,Two Government sections of land, Nos. 13A and 13B, parish of Kangerong, containing 129a 3r 31 p , and having frontages to two Government roads, partly fenced, and well timbered. This land is about seven miles from Dromana, and adjoins Mr Arkwell's farm.
Mr James B. Wheeler, the Red Hill post-office, will direct Intending purchasers to the land. Inquiries for Davies's farm.
(P.2, Argus, 31-7-1882.)


1895.
The Red Hill Band of Hope was all agog
At Nelson's show about the evils of grog.
The two London waifs on Rudduck's magic lantern
For temperance had the audience panting.

1896.
Downward, Arkwell,and H.P.Davey were on the go
To organise the Red Hill Horticultural Show
With T.and J. Cleine and T.Parkinson.
Later they combined with Dromana and Mornington.

N.B. T.Parkinson lived at "Forest Lodge" after H.P.Davey,probably leasing from Clark of N.S.W.who had bought it. Forest Lodge was at Melway 161 E-G 11-12, fronting Red Hill Rd.

4 comment(s), latest 1 year, 1 month ago

CHRONOLOGY IN VERSE (1900-1919): ARTHURS SEAT, VIC., AUST.

1900.
Forty members of the Red Hill rifle club were mighty sore
After working long with axe and saw
To clear a range on Joe McIlroy's land;
Muscles so tired and blisters on hand.
------------------------------------------

When Heredford-born John Arkwell arrived in 1854, Hannah was only nineteen;
Hannah (nee Lewis) had pushed the future King's pram for the Queen.
Emily, Alice and Walter B. were born while John ran a plant nursery
On the site where Abbotford nuns later said their Rosary. (1)

John bought his Red Hill grants between Arkwells and Andrews Lane
In 1862, and while clearing for an orchard never did complain.
He was the pioneer in the growing of Red Hill's famed strawberries;
Flower-growing also becoming an Arkwell expertise.(2)

Ern, Herb, Clara and Percy were born at Red Hill (1)
And with their older siblings worked with a will.
Their 20 acre orchard was well-kept, probably the best,(2)
And the growing of blooms would allow little rest.


By 1900 John had finished his duty,
And left Red Hill of mountainous beauty.
And Hannah,his longtime mate,
Administered John's estate.

South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic. : 1872 - 1920) Wednesday 28 February 1900 Edition: WEEKLY. p 2 Article
Letters of administration have been granted in the estates of John Arkwell, late of Red Hill, Dromana, gardener, to Hannah Arkwell. widow, of same place;
(1) The Red Hill by Sheila Skidmore. (2)Around Red Hill(P.2, Mornington Standard, 30-8-1902.)


1902.
Robbing honey from the bees was fun for lads to do
But this saw Bobby Wilson's head tragically split in two.
Brother Jim and Alf Hanson were chopping the branch that held the hive
When Bobby fell as the axe came down; lucky to stay alive!

1904.
At Eatons and White Hill, people were destroying roads;
The reason this was happening wasn't heavy loads.
W.A.Holmes' complaint was about towing timber like a sled
To slow descent, as in 1908 by respected Alfred Head.

When hardship struck a Red Hill family
Their neighbours reacted speedily.
E.D.Davis thanked teacher,W.R.Simpson, for his path
Of organising a concert on their behalf.

1908.
Timber provided income for Red Hill farmers as they cleared their land
And was milled at Main Ridge, near Roberts Rd, by Alexander Shand.
What better place beams to seek
For the brand new bridge at Balcombe's Creek.

To illustrate my sources, I have included my notes for the following poem. Storey of "Seven Oaks" (Crown allotment 79A, parish of Balnarring)was probably related to the Dromana family which lost the terrier. Hazeldine of Dromana was the teacher at Rosebud for some time. The references to Hazeldine living in H.B.Simon's house, which he moved to the Catholic Church site in Foote St, and being a rate collector come from P.153-4 of A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.

1908 JAS MATTHEWS (B 1863 M SARAH YOUNG 1882-GIVING DESTINY A HAND) BUILDING (BRINDLE'S SUNNYSIDE -MELBOURNE BRINDLE'S MAP AND MEMOIRS) SCAFFOLD COLLAPSED ANKLE CRUTCHES
STOREY THE OAKS ERECTING BUILDING AXE SLIPPED ALMOST SEVERED LEG 2 MILE TRAIL OF BLOOD
SOMERVILLE'S MR MURRAY DESCENDING RED HILL (DID A MULGA BILL-Banjo Paterson) BROKEN NOSE STITCHES
PETS POISONED GODFREY WILSON TWO CATS HAZELDINE AND STOREY TERRIERS
(MORNINGTON AND DROMANA STANDARD,1908-1911,25-7-1908,P.3 under DROMANA.)

In high esteem Dromana's doctor was held;
Matthews, Storey and Murray were grateful to Dr Weld
When accidents happened like you wouldn't ken
And he managed to put Humpty together again.

Carpenter James Matthews, who in '82 made George Young's Sarah his bride,
Was building Brindle's new house at Sunnyside
When the scaffold collapsed and put him in gravity's clutches.
His ankle was fixed and he's now on crutches.

Storey of "The Oaks", south of Craig Avon Lane
Was the one who suffered the greatest pain.
While splitting timber for a building, he badly cut his leg.
He left a two mile trail of blood , assistance for to beg.

While cycling down Red Hill
Somerville's Mr Murray did a Mulga Bill.
Dr Weld stitched him up and fixed his nose;
Murray went back to his "good old horse" I suppose.

Someone is laying baits and poisoning pets.
I wonder what satisfaction this person gets!
Godfrey Wilson lost two cats and a death so gory
Was experienced by terriers owned by Hazeldine and Storey.
Wilson was probably at Beauvoir, 8 McCulloch, still complete,
And rate collector Hazeldine's dog lived at Simon's old house, moved to Foote St.
---------------------------------------------------------------
1908.
Eddie Bowring cycled in three hours from his father's home in Essendon (1)
To the Prossors Lane block in Red Hill where he'd settled in 1901.
By August '02 he'd planted vegetables, cleared many trees
And had two acres each of orchard and strawberries;
Tom Harvey of "Fernside", his future father-in-law
Was erecting a house whose rooms numbered four. (2)

When Eddie married Emily on 11 March 1903,
There was no hint of future tragedy,
But the heat wave in January,1908
Consigned two residents to their fate.

Esther Moat, relict of William, died at Sutton Grove
(probably the farm past which Red Hill people drove);
Aged 83, a colonist of over 50 years,
But another death also produced Red Hill tears.

Two days earlier Eddie and Emily lost their "infant daughter";
Sometimes a severe heatwave's toll cannot be stopped with water.
The Bowring and Harvey homes so grieved by the grim reaper's capers
That they seem to have failed to put a death notice in the papers.

(P.13, Argus; P.3, Mornington Standard; 1-2-1908.)

(1) Pasted from my journal,DICTIONARY HISTORY OF RED HILL, VIC., AUST. (PIONEERS, FARM LOCATIONS AND NAMES, ANECDOTES.)
Eddie Bowring was no slouch as a cyclist. He had ridden his bike to Melbourne, probably to visit his parents in Essendon, and decided to "open her up" on the way back to Red Hill. He made it in just over three hours!
(Mornington Standard 26-4-1902 page 2.)

(2) AROUND RED HILL. SOME PROPERTIES DESCRIBED
Mornington Standard (Vic. : 1889 - 1908) Saturday 30 August 1902 Edition: MORNING. p 2 Article





1909.
Getting fruit to market was a problem for the orchardists.
Boat service was poor and Stenniken's offer was rejected by realists;
Fruitgrowers owning a ship they did not seek,
But soon the Meeinderry came three times a week.


J.W.Brady had lit a fire to prepare his meal
And while outside with another task to deal
A spark ignited his old house,which was burnt to the ground;
For Harry Prossor's shed and haystack fire, no cause was found.

A violent storm ripped pears and apples from the trees
While, below the Mount, fishing boats were swamped by heavy seas:
John McLear's, Dohn Griffith's and Harry Copp's "Spray";
Luckily none went Davey Jones's way.

1910.
A Flinders meeting saw agreement for the areas to combine
In "open route" agitation for a railway line.
Discussion turned to "loading" (extra rates to support the cost),
But disputes about routes soon saw co-operation lost.
-----------------------

Sheila Skidmore wrote of W.A.Holmes' saw mill
At a specified site actually in Red Hill.
This made me wonder "When?"
The answer must be 1910.

Just south of Arthurs Seat road, 'tween The Settlement and Blakely,
Jackson sank a bore for Holmes,few thinking a good result was likely.
Such a good supply at an elevated spot had never been suspected.
"Mr Holmes proposes to have a mill erected."

(P.3, Mornington and Dromana Standard,12-2-1910.)

CHRONOLOGY IN VERSE (1920 on): ARTHURS SEAT, VIC., AUST.

1930's.
This bloke was a champion, and that's no joke,
At footy and cricket; his name, Fred Volk.
Red Hill thrashed Hastings and Fred kicked eleven;
Then Tyabb-Hastings had revenge. Fred kicked 5 out of 7.

Captain at both summer and winter game,
Fred led the '37 cricketers to ultimate fame;
Forgoing celebrations and a well -earned rest,
He took the field at footy and was one of the best.

1939.
In 1919 the Lessings bought 70 acres and Alf Hanson's Alpine Chalet
At Red Hill where Mont Rouge and 105 Tucks Rd are today.
The family of 13 had the area's second International truck
Which reached the Vic. Market in four hours with a bit of luck.

The family came from Carrum Downs and one son, Eric, became a neighbour
Of the Andersons near Heatherton's Five Ways, but Ewald did farm labour;
Ivy Thompson, 19, loved Ewald Albert Lessing, almost twice her age,
And they planned to marry but her parents flew into a rage.

They met secretly but Ivy's parents twigged and gave her an ultimatum,
"You'll go into a convent if you don't end this association!"
Ivy told him they could not marry as there was for them no hope
But Lessing hatched a plan that they could still elope.

A few days later while he hunted rabbits they chanced again to meet
And he made one last attempt her parents' obstruction to defeat.
"Marry me," he pleaded as he held her by the arm.
She brushed him off, the gun discharged. Romeo had done his Juliet harm!

A second shot came a moment later; he tried to do himself in.
He fired his gun with the muzzle placed underneath his chin.
He lived, and was found not guilty, but with his hopes evaporated
And Ivy's hand, in which she was shot, had to be amputated.

(Hec Hanson's MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN and countless court reports.)

1951.
DEATHS.
ARKWELL.--"On August 4, Clara Arkwell of Red Hill aged 81 years
-Last of a family of pioneers."
(P.15, Argus, 6-8-1951.)
As indicated by the quotation marks, the death notice was already a poem.

2004.
Red Hill - Victoria - Australia - Travel - smh.com.au
www.smh.com.au/news/Victoria/Red-Hill/2005/.../1108500207261.html‎
Feb 8, 2004 - The first white settlers at what is now Red Hill were James Wideman and John Arkwell who arrived in 1862.


Only 50 yards from the old Red Hill school site
In his blacksmith shop, with muscles tight,
A fine gentleman with foot-long whiskers white
Whose daughter, Jean, sold Northern Sky apples with a taste just right.(1)

His shoulders were probably broad, Fairfax Media,
Rather than being narrow and weedier.
But the pioneer there when Red Hill began
Was a Wiseman, not a Wideman!

(1) Memoirs of a Larrikin by Hec Hanson.