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CORRECTION RE WILLIAM JOHN FERRIER'S HOUSE AT ROSEBUD, VIC., AUST.

William John Ferrier called his house in the Rosebud Fishing Village "Seven" because it was on crown allotment 7 of the village, now 858 Pt. Nepean Rd, Rosebud. Rate research led me to conclude that the present house had been built by 1894 and was thus the house that the hero of the La Bella wreck at Warrnambool in 1905 had occupied.

However, my history column in ROSEBUD RIPPLE has led to me being contacted by the grandson of George Fountain whose mother and aunt wrote histories of Rosebud, which are every bit as valuable as Isabel Moresby's ROSEBUD FLOWER OF THE PENINSULA and will become a new journal when I finish transcribing them.

As will be revealed in Laura Fountain's memories in ROSEBUD (VIC., AUST.) HISTORY ISSUING FROM THE FOUNTAINS, the PRESENT house on crown allotment 7 Rosebud Fishing Village (858 Pt. Nepean Rd, Rosebud) was NOT occupied by William John Ferrier. George Fountain bought C/A 7 from him, probably in 1916 when the Ferriers moved to Queenscliff, and demolished the cottage occupied by Antonio Bosina from 1894 till he became blind, Mrs Lennie Edwards 1903- 1910 and the Ferriers till 1916. The present house was built by George Fountain and later sold to the Archers.

CORRECTION, LYNDHURST LIZZIE AND THE HALF WAY HOTEL, LYNDHURST.

In previous journals, I have wrongly assumed that the Halfway House in which Lyndhurst Lizzie died was the one established by James McMahon on the site of the present Riviera Hotel (Melway 97 D11.) From previous experience, correcting these journals does not remove such false assumptions in Google search summaries, so a new journal is needed to point out this error. I have had a niggling doubt about this assumption since I saw a report of a Melbourne Hunt event which mentioned the Halfway Hotel and properties crossed by the riders which seemed to be nowhere near Long Island, and with no mention of the Kananook Creek which would have had to be crossed to reach them. Strangely, the northern boundary of the parish of Frankston is Seaford Rd except on Long Island (between the creek and the beach) where it went north to include James McMahon's grant (probably the pre-emptive right of his Long Beach run.) Relying on memory after too many late nights caused another mistake, my statement that McMahon's Half Way House (or Carrum Hotel) was in the parish of Lyndhurst. It was on the northernmost grant in the parish of Frankston.

At the time of writing, I was only aware of one HALF WAY HOTEL in Lyndhurst (McMahon's hotel likely to be so described despite my mistake, being only a short stroll from the parish of Lyndhurst.) However the death notices of Richard Taylor and his only surviving daughter, Mrs Cairns, led me to the discovery that there was a multitude of HALF WAY HOTELS and that the one with which they were connected was near Cranbourne.

Death of Mr. Richard Taylor.
Almost a Nonogenarian.
Early on Saturday morning Mr Richard Taylor, widely known as the licensee of the Half-way House hotel at Lyndhurst, on the main road between Dandenong and Cranbourne, departed this life. Deceased had reached the ripe old age of 87 years, and until quite recently had been in possession of good health. Till the end he retained his mental faculties clearly.By his death the district has lost one of its most familiar identities, one who was closely connected with the growth of the place from the old coaching days, and who was a highly respected citizen.

Richard Taylor was born in 1825 at Stockwell, near Oldham, Lancashire, and was a typical Englishman. In his native town he learnt the trade of carpenter, and after working at it for some years. emigrated to Australia in 1854 in the good ship Marco Polo. At that time there was keen demand for artisans in Melbourne and Mr Taylor had no difficulty in getting employment at 25/ per day. Like most others of a sturdy nature he drifted along with the gold fever to the diggings. Twelve months' experience taught him that all is not gold that glitters, and he returned to Melbourne and followed his trade with Messrs Bruman and Brooks, a leading firm at the time.

Here he continued for about 15 years, and then he took up the land at Lyndhurst, comprising 156 acres, upon which he has since resided, and on which stands the familiar house of call. Mr Taylor found good brick clay on his property, and by his own energy he excavated a clay hole, and after getting some little assistance in moulding bricks, he built with his own hands the Half-way House, and built it well and faithfully too, the
work taking him two years. This was in the early seventies, and Mr Taylor obtained a publican's licence which he retained until the time of his death.

Mr Taylor was twice married, but the only surviving child is Mrs. Cairns. He was known as a very straightforward man, and one of great individual character. The funeral took place on Sunday, when many old friends followed the remains to their last resting place the Cranbourne cemetery.
(P.3, South Bourke and Mornington Standard, 12-9-1912.)

LYNDHURST
DESPITE her many years, that grand old lady, Mrs Cairns, of the Half Way House, still leads a very active life and takes a keen interest in the things about her. On Thursday, accompanied by her nephew, Mr Harry Cairns, son of Mr Fred Cairns*, and Mrs W. Tucker jnr., she made the round trip to Rosebud and back. Mrs Cairns’ father conducted the Half Way Hotel many years ago, and Mrs Cairns herself can remember when the bullock teams from Gippsland stopped there on their way towards Melbourne.
(P.11, The Dandenong Journal, 11-6-1941.)

*FORGAN (Cairns). – On September 19,at Melbourne, Leslie, loving foster-son of the late Elizabeth and Alexander Cairns, and loved brother of Frederick Cairns, Maggie,Josephine, and Elsie Forgan, late of Lyndhurst, aged 35 years. (P.2, Argus, 21-9-1944.) Leslie must have been a newborn when adopted by Alexander Henry Cairns and Lyndhurst Lizzie because it's a fair bet that he was named after a child they'd lost at Wonthaggi, Christopher but referred to as LESLIE.
CAIRNS.— In sad but loving memory of our dear son, Christopher George Leslie Cairns (dear Little Leslie), who left us to dwell with the Master, Sunday, 21st June, 1896, at half-past 12, aged 6 years and 8 months.POEM,
Inserted by his loving, sorrowing parents, A.H. and E. Cairns, Wonthaggi Post Office,South Gippsland, late of Boneo, Dromana.(P.15, Weekly Times, 26-6-1897.)

OBITUARY
AFTER a short illness lasting only three days Mrs Eliza Cairns, aged 96 years, one of Lyndhurst’s oldest and most highly respected residents, passed away peacefully at her home, “Lyndfield,” the picturesque old Half
Way House, on Saturday afternoon last. Deceased, who had led an active life right up to the time of her death, was a very keen gardener, and the spacious grounds of her home were always a picture.

She was born in England and came to Australia with her parents when she was very young. For some years she lived at Beechworth, and when older was employed at Dromana, where she met and married Mr Alexander Cairns**, of Boneo. Before coming to live at the Half Way House, which her father (Mr Taylor) conducted as a hotel, she lived at Powlett River* in South Gippsland.

The late Mrs Cairns had lived it Lyndhurst for nearly 30 years, and deepest sympathy is extended to her sorrowing relatives in the loss they have sustained. The funeral took place on Monday afternoon, when the remains were buried in the Church of Christ portion of the Dandenong Cemetery. Mr Marshall conducted the service at the home and at the graveside. J.Garnar & Sons had charge of the funeral arrangements. The many beautiful floral tributes received reflected the high esteem in which the late Mrs Cairns was held.
(P.3, The Dandenong Journal, 25-6-1941.)

(* i.e. Wonthaggi.
**Alexander Henry Cairns, 8th child of David Cairns and Janet, nee Thompson, born in 1856, probably at Boneo.
CAIRNS. -On the 19th January, at his residence,Cranbourne road Lyndhurst (late of Wonthaggi), Alexander Henry, the dearly loved husband of Elizabeth Cairns, aged 65 years.P.1, Argus, 20-1-1920.He was buried at Dandenong Cemetery.)

Pinpointing the location of THIS Halfway House has not been helped by the following.
vhd.heritagecouncil.vic.gov.au/places/113052/download-report
Victorian Heritage Database Report. Halfway House. B1622 Halfway House Lyndhurst. Location. Cnr Cranbourne Road and Gippsland Highway LYNDHURST.

This report seems to have been prepared in 1963, three years before the old hotel was supposedly demolished. The location given is a pathetic effort from a heritage consultant if a Casey Cardinia website is correct. The location seems to be taken from a very old newspaper report when the South Gippland Highway seems to have been the original route to Gippsland. It was supposed to have been ABOUT four miles from Dandenong. The following gives another clue to the hotel's location, equally unhelpful.

BURGLARY AT TAYLOR'S WAY HOUSE HOTEL,
The Half-way house Hotel situate at the junction of the Cranbourne and Lyndhurst roads, and midway between
Dandenong and Cranbourne, was visited by two enterprising burglars early on the morning of Saturday last.(etc.)
(P.3, South Bourke and Mornington Journal, 21-8-1895.)

Casey Cardinia - links to our past: February 2008
caseycardinialinkstoourpast.blogspot.com/2008_02_01_archive.html
Feb 4, 2008 - Richard Taylor arrived in Lyndhurst in 1869 and opened his hotel, Taylor's Half Way House (pictured below), in 1871. It was demolished in ...(1966)

The following blog is about High Street, Cranbourne, based on an aerial photograph and photos of places in High St taken in the 1960's, one of which is the HALF WAY HOUSE.

Casey Cardinia - links to our past: High Street Cranbourne in the 1960s.
caseycardinialinkstoourpast.blogspot.com/2011/.../high-street-cranbourne-in-1960s.ht...
Jan 19, 2011 - This is taken just a bit further up the street than the previous photograph. The car is thought to be a 1961 EK Holden. The Half Way House.

The east-west road at the top of the aerial photo is Camms Rd running west to Evans Rd, which then terminated at the same corner. Whether Cranbourne Road was Hall Rd or the Frankston-Cranbourne Rd, both lead to the South Gippsland Highway at Melway 133 J6. As the 1960's HALF WAY HOUSE was in High St, Richard Taylor's 156 acres must have been at the north west corner of Sladen St and High St-if the 1960's HALF WAY HOUSE was the original hotel, or at least, on the same site. All I have to do now is find the right parish map to confirm that there was a 156 acre grant at this location.

I have discarded what I had previously written about the parish of Eumemmering because it didn't make sense but left the following about another Taylor family.

I discovered Taylors Rd running between Abbotts Rd and Ballarto Rd undoubtedly named after Thomas Taylor who married a Ross girl from Keilor, and may have been related to Richard Taylor.

In view of her native place, Catherine may have been responsible for the location name of Skye, later changed to Lyndhurst South because of the stigma caused by a murder committed there and once again as Skye, postcode 3977.

Mrs. C. Taylor, of Cranbourne
CRANBOURNE, Sunday.-Mrs. Catherine Taylor, who attained her 100th birthday on May 25 this year, and who was
the oldest resident of Cranbourne, having lived in the district for 83 years, died at the home of Mrs. T. Bullock, Duff street, Cranbourne, this morning, after a brief illness.Mrs. Taylor, who was born in the Isle
of Skye, Scotland, in 1835, arrived in Victoria with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Ross, when she was aged 15 years. The family lived for a time in the Keilor district, and afterward at Skye,now South Lyndhurst. Mrs. Taylor enjoyed good health up to a few days before her death.

She had vivid recollections of the early days, when Cranbourne was the marketing centre of South Gippsland, and blacks were as numerous as white people. For many years she and her husband used to walk eight miles every Sunday morning to the Cranbourne Presbyterian Church, during the ministry of the Rev. Alexander Duff, who was the first ordained clergyman in the district.

Mrs. Taylor's 100th birthday was celebrated at the home of Mrs. Bullock, where Mrs. Taylor lived after the death of a son,Mr. Richard Taylor, two years ago. On the occasion of her birthday greetings were received from His Excellency the Governor (Lord Huntingfield) and Parliamentary representatives.

Mrs. Taylor's husband, Mr. Thomas Taylor, died 17 years ago at the age of 81 years. Of her family of six children, two are living, Mr.George Taylor of Brisbane and Mr.Malcolm Taylor, of Melbourne. She has 23 grandchildren and 50 great-grandchildren living. The funeral will be at the Cranbourne Cemetery to-morrow afternoon.(P.3, Argus, 14-10-1935.)

LOCATION OF RICHARD TAYLOR'S HALF WAY HOUSE HOTEL.
Glasscocks Rd was the boundary between the parishes of Eumemmering to the north and Lyndhurst to the south as indicated by the curve in Frankston-Dandenong Rd and Perry Rd (Melway 128 B 2-3) which was a government road linking with the existing portion at Melway 94 H9.

As the result of this discovery, I abandoned the Eumemmering map, and discovered that the Lyndhurst map didn't suit either. High St. was the name of the part of the South Gippsland Highway running through the TOWNSHIP OF CRANBOURNE. The highway was probably called the Lyndhurst road in early days and the Cranbourne road, no matter whether it came from Wells Rd at Melway 99 J2 (via Lathams and Halls Rd) or from Frankston, met High St at 133 J6.

Discarding* claims that the hotel was ABOUT four miles from Dandenong and halfway between Dandenong and Cranbourne, I decided to check for a 156 acres property on the township map. (*It is 8 miles along the South Gippsland Highway from the Princes Highway to Sladen Street so both descriptions would place the hotel at Melway 129D1 where no junction of the Lyndhurst and Cranbourne roads would ever have been. Many city adventurers complained that country folk had no idea of estimating distances!)

Township of Cranbourne, Parish of Cranbourne, County of Mornington ...
digital.slv.vic.gov.au/dtl_publish/simpleimages/6/1003177.html

The most likely location was west of High St as land on the east side of High St was divided into the usual half acre township blocks and south of Sladen St a total of about 39 acres, mainly granted to E.J.Tucker into whose family Lyndhurst Lizzie's companion on the long trip to Rosebud married. West of the GIPPLAND HIGHWAY (as it is labelled, confirming my belief that today's South Gippsland was the original route to Gippsland), 120 acres were reserved for the racecourse and cemetery with most of the rest not alienated till much later.

The north west corner of High and Sladen Street and High St, bounded by Fairbairn and Clarendon Sts contained suburban lots ranging from 7 to 33 acres but averaging about 18 acres each with a total area of 182 acres 2 roods and 34 perches. This was about 26 acres more than the 156 acres that David Taylor bought, perhaps not all in 1869. All 10 crown allotments had been sold by the crown in 1857. It is likely that many of the grantees had become insolvent over the next decade or so; Victoria's first manufacturer of bellows,Joseph Porta, and Ralph Ruddell of Tuerong had both suffered this fate in the early 1860's as well as many others I have noted. I presume that A.Duff was related to Cranbourne's first Presbyterian minister mentioned by Thomas Taylor's widow and sold his grants to David Taylor when the family moved away.

It is likely that David Taylor's 156 acres consisted of crown allotments 2-9. Crown allotments 10 and 1 of 18 acres 3 roods 16 perches and 7 a. 2 r. 11 p. (26 a. 1 r. 27 p. altogether) both fronted Clarendon St and when deducted from the total area of 182 acres 2 roods and 34 perches, leave 156 acres 0 roods and 23 perches. Deduction of no other grants or combinations thereof, produces the 156 acres associated with the hotel.

Crown allotments 1 and 10 both extended south for 650 links (6.5 chains or 130 metres) from Clarendon St, so if my assumption of the composition of David Taylor's land is correct, its northern boundary was the midline of Dearing Avenue and Cochrane St.

Therefore it is likely that the HALFWAY HOUSE (store?) shown on the Casey Cardinia blog was on or near the site of the hotel and may have been the hotel itself before its demolition in 1966. As mentioned earlier, a photo of the hotel is also shown on the blog. I would like to look at it again to see if the bricks moulded by David "with a little assistance" are visible and if there are any similarities with the HAL WAY HOUSE in the 1960's photo. But I'm too weary and have other research commitments of great importance so I'll leave these tasks to others. I'm reasonably sure that I've confirmed the location of Lyndhurst Lizzie's last residence and her father's 156 acres but remember that I've discarded some clues to their location so I could be wrong. At least my conclusion MAKES SENSE.

CORRECTION: CHARLES BLAKEY (NOT BLAKELY) LANDOWNER AT WANNAEUE, BROADFORD AND YUROKE, VIC., AUST.

The first reference I saw to this pioneer was in a document detailing a loan of 128 pounds and 9 shillings in August 1878 from Captain Henry Everest Adams of Rosebud to William Edwards of Dromana. The latter had mortgaged his land at Rosebud and a sketch of title mentioned Charles BLAKELEY and lot 86 of crown allotment 18 section A, parish of Wannaeue. Confusingly the solicitor had described this 2 acre block as crown allotment 86, section 18 Wannaeue as if it was a township block rather than a private subdivision. I wondered at the time if Charles was related to William Henry Blakeley, Australia's first sawmaker.

Later I saw a Charles Blakey shown as a grantee of crown allotments 1, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, all but about 40 acres granted to John Cameron of Stony Fields (Roxburgh Park) on the north west side of Cliffords Rd, which ran from the end of Pascoe Vale Rd to Sydney Rd until it was cut off by the north eastern railway; the northern boundary of these blocks is today shown by transmission lines. Charles was also the grantee of crown allotment 6 which is fairly well indicated by the bottom half of Melway 180 D7.

It was soon after that my internet problems started and I could not access the Yuroke parish map or the Lake v Jones case regarding lot 86 of 18 Wannaeue or the 1874 advertisement of 18 Wannaeue and land at Broadford by Charles' executor. My memory came up with a combination of Blakeley and Blakey when I was discussing 18 Wannaeue.

With my internet problems overcome and pangs of guilt for possibly misleading readers, I used an idle moment to find the right spelling of the surname.

By the way, crown allotment 18 Wannaeue consisted of 152 acres and is bounded by today's Pt.Nepean Rd, Adams Avenue, Eastbourne Rd and Jetty Rd. With lot 86 on the FJ's corner excised, it only consisted of 150 acres when Blooming Bob White or his father bought it, apparently calling it or the homestead Menstrys Hill. The advertisement in 1874 forgot to mention the prior sale of lot 86. The Lakes thought they were buying the whole 152 acres circa 1888 and tried to get Jack Jones kicked off his corner block. The farm was later owned by Thomas Bamford and the Pottons (who called it St.Albans and are recalled by a street name) before being involved in the two suicides of De Garis in the late 1920's.

DEATHS.
BLAKEY.—On the 7th inst., at the Alfred Hospital,Charles Blakey, aged 61 years.(P.4, Argus, 8-7-1873.)

Advertising
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 26 February 1874 p 2 Advertising
... Wannocuo, County of Mornington And 04a Or 3Sp, Parish of Broadford By Order of tho Executors of CHARLES ... ) BROADFORD Wannaeue, t, / Couuty of Morrdngton '" SALE by PUBLIC AUCTION Of 152a. 2r >flp , ?" ' Parish of .


MONDAY, DECEMBER 7.
SOMERTON.
13 Miles from Melbourne, On tho Sydney-road.
Sole by Public Auction of Allotment 6, Section 6, Parish of Yuroke,A Short Distance Nearer Town than the Somerton Hotel.
By Order of the Executors Under the Will of the late Charles Blakey.
For Positive and Unreserved Sale.
ALFRED BLISS has been favoured with instructions from Messrs John Munday and John Kyle to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, at the mart, on Monday, December 7, at twelve o'clock,
That block of agricultural land, containing 34a. Or. 30p , and forming the full Crown Allotment 6 of
Section 6, parish of Yuroko.
This land is unfenced, it is first-class grazing and agricultural land, is Surroundcd by farming properties,
and was purchased from the Crown by the late Mr.Charles Blakey. Title, Crown grant.(P.3, Argus, 5-12-1874.)

I presume that the title for 18 Wannaeue had been transferred from Charles Blakey to (his son?)Richard and this extract from Lake v Jones illustrates why I was confused about the spelling of the surname.

Mr Justice A'beckett said that the facts were uncontradicted. They were that in the year 1871 the defendant who is a fisherman bought a small piece of land for the sum of 4 pounds from the then registered proprietor Richard Blakeley.
LAW REPORT. SUPREME COURT. EQUITY COURT. FRIDAY, SEPT. 13. (Before His Honour Mr. Justice A'Beckett.) LAKE V. JONES.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 18 September 1889 p 11 Article

2 comment(s), latest 1 year, 5 months ago

CORRECTION: JOHN KERNAN OF MERAI FARM, PASCOE VALE, VIC., AUST. WHO DIED IN 1877, NOT 1879.

If you google, John Kernan, itellya, you will find many results which include the false claim that John Kernan of Merai Farm died in 1879. This claim was caused by the error detailed below. Genealogists face enough problems without being led astray so this correction is necessary. Unfortunately, as in the case of Sumner of Moorooduc and Brunswick,the year is not corrected in the summaries if it corrected in the actual journal.

Andrew Lemon was wrong on P.76 of BROADMEADOWS: A FORGOTTEN HISTORY when he stated that John Kernan, who had occupied Merai from 1856, died in 1879. He died in 1877 at the age of 48. Perhaps he was also wrong about the widow of John being Mary? (P.14, Illustrated Australian News, 24-7-1877.)

The Moreland City Council has been informed of this and another Andrew Lemon error quoted in their heritage study.

CORRECTION: THE FIRST RYE HOTEL WAS IN DROMANA??? WILLIAM COTTIER GAVE RYE ITS NAME?? (VIC., AUST.)

Charles Hollinshed had presented about a truckload of papers to the Victorian Historical Society and was selected by the Shire of Flinders to write its history:LIME LAND LEISURE. I had been researching Mornington Peninsula History for about a month or so when I read his book, rather made notes from it, and although I found a few boo boos, such as Ned Williams' biography appearing in the WHITE entry,I was quite prepared to accept everything in the book as Gospel. Boy, I was excited when I found out that the first Rye Hotel was in Dromana some time before 1859! The alarm bells tingled when Charles called William Cottier JAMES Cottier. The Kangerong parish map, which I had obtained from the Rye Historical Society,made it quite clear that William Cottier was the grantee of the land that became Walter Gibson's "Glenholm". It is doubtful that William Cottier's supposed hotel was on the foreshore (actually the Survey) opposite the Dromana Bush Nursing Hospital;it would more likely have been the squared-log core of the Glenholm homestead (bottom of 160 D5,under the freeway.) William had received the grants in 1857.

QUOTED FROM PAGES 112-113 OF LIME LAND LEISURE.
James (sic) Cottier (pronounced "Cutter")and his wife came to Dromana in 1850.They may have begun as tenants on the Survey but built on the foreshore where Dromana Hospital is now. James (sic) took up timber getting and presumably stayed in that trade because he is said to have had bullocks hauling piles from the back country when the Dromana pier was being built in the 1870's. However he or perhaps Mrs Cottier soon began to take in boarders.

SOME TIME BEFORE 1859 A LICENCE ISSUED AND THE COTTIER HOUSE BECAME THE RYE HOTEL. (Charles then mentioned Cottier's grants which became Walter Gibson's "Glenholme", sic, Glenholm.)

IN 1866,IN PARTNERSHIP WITH A MR. CAMPBELL, HE PUT UP A BUILDING SPECIFICALLY TO BE AN HOTEL,AND ON TRANSFER OF THE LICENCE,THIS BECAME THE RYE HOTEL. Eventually the new hotel deteriorated and Campbell, probably still in partnership with Cottier (unlikely,see below), built the White Cliffs Inn,presumably on a site next to Cliff House (which was) on the(east)corner of Napier St. THE COTTIERS WERE AMONG THE FIRST SETTLERS AT RYE AND IT IS SAID THAT THEY WERE THE FIRST TO USE THAT NAME INSTEAD OF TOOTGAROOK.

Pencilled in one of the four copies of LIME LAND LEISURE in the local history room at Rosebud library are the following comments written by somebody who was obviously a frustrated Cottier family historian.

Who is the William Cottier who married Margaret Owen and had two children born at Tootgarook, Emily in 1872 and Mary Jane in 1869. A William Cottier paid rates on 564 acres at Fingal in 1865. William leased land in Rye from W.A.Blair in 1874,1 acre 3 roomed house.

The following is copied from my HERITAGE WALK, DROMANA journal.

COTTIER 1857.
According to Colin's map, William Cottier's house on the Survey was near today's Balmoral Avenue. William signed the 1861 petition in support of Robert Quinan's school becoming Dromana's Common School (P.133 in Colin's book.) William Cottier (pronounced Cutter)received the grants for crown allotments 9 and 10 section 1, Kangerong and built the initial part of what became Walter Gibson's Glenholm homestead. C/a 9 is now the Dromana Industrial Estate and c/a 10 is the Monaco Estate including all Lombardy St house blocks.

What did surprise me is the following grant in the parish of Fingal, south of the Boniyong (Boneo) pre-emptive right.
Lot 32. One hundred and twenty two acres three roods five perches, 22/- per acre.William Cottier.
(P.5, Argus, 19-2-1858.)

In another journal I have warned family historians about taking lot numbers to be crown allotment numbers. William Cottier's Fingal grant was crown allotment 13 of 122 acres 3 roods and twenty five perches.It was a triangular block fronting the west side of Truemans Rd south of the St Andrews Golf Club's Gunnamatta Course, indicated by Melway 252 B10 and C 10-11.

When I added Kangerong as a search term, to avoid millions of shipping intelligence articles in the 1850's (Captain William Cottier), I discovered that William had bought his grants between Collins Rd and (inclusively) Lombardy St in early 1857. Lot 5 is c/a 9 and lot 6 is c/a 10 (both section 1 Kangerong.)

Parish of Kangerong, County of Mornington. Upset price £1 per acre.
Lot 5,151a. Sr. 8p, William Cottier, £1 per acre.
Lot 6,116a. 2r., William Cottier, £1 5s. do. (P.6,Argus,26-3-1857.)

LIME LAND LEISURE has much detail about Cottier and John Campbell (who also signed the 1861 petition in support of Robert Quinan.) Charles Hollinshed relied on the memory of elderly descendants and called Dromana's pioneer James Cottier. However he must have seen documents or articles to support his claim that Cottier established the RYE hotel at Dromana and that the licence was later transferred to Tootgarook where he and John Campbell (who built Rye's first pier in 1860) built the RYE HOTEL east of Napier St. (The present Rye Hotel is on the site of Patrick Sullivan's Gracefield Hotel, built about 15 years later, whose name came from the Dromana property that his father in law,William Grace, had sold in about 1871 before moving to Rye.)

Rye was known as Tootgarook, but as in the case of Rosebud, where people said that they were going to THE ROSEBUD,thirsty limeburners probably said ,"I'm going to THE RYE" and in each case THE was eventually deleted. Thus William Cottier is credited with giving Rye its name. So what's this?

FOUND, A quantity of SPARS. Owner can have a claim by applying to Mr. Cottier, Tootgarook Hotel, Tootgarook.
(P.1, Argus, 8-6-1869.)

JOTICE of APPLICATION for a PUBLICAN'S
LICENCE.-To the Bench of Magistrates. at
Mornington.-I, WILLIAM COTTIER, farmer, now
residing !nt Ryo, in tho colony of Victoria, do hereby
give netico that it is my intention to APPLY to the
justices, sitting at the Court of Petty Sessions to bo
holden at Mornington, In tho said colony, on tho 20th
day of Juno noxt.'for n CERTIFICATE authorising
the issuing of a PUBLICAN'S LICENCE for a house
situated at Rye aforesaid. The houso Is built of wood,
consisting of two slttlngrooms and six bedrooms ex-
clusivo of thoso required for tbo use of tho family ;
occupied and owned,by mo. It is not licensed. To
bo know n as tbo Tootgarook Hotel. i
Tho 14th'day of Juno, A.D. 1807. ,
- I ' (Signed) . WILLIAM COTTIER. (P.8 Argus, 21-6-1867.)

NOTICE.-The PARTNERSHIP hitherto subsisting
between WILLIAM COTTIER and JOHN CAMP
BELL, trading as " Wm. Cottier and Campbell," at
Tootgarook, has this day been DISSOLVED by
mutual consent.
All liabilities will be paid and all moneys received
by William Cottier.
JOHN CAMPBELL.
WM. COTTIER. ,
Melbourne 18th April, 1870. (P.3, Argus, 14-4-1870.)

William Cottier, of Rye, near Point Nepean,
limeburner. Causes of insolvency-Long de-
pression of trade and losses in business.
Liabilities, £480 12s. 6d. ; assets, £30 ; de-
ficiency, £150 12s. 6d, Mr. Goodman, official
assignee. (P.5, Argus, 26-10-1870.)

A special examination was held in the
estate of William Cottier, of Rye, labourer,
late publican. The insolvent was brought in
custody from gaol, where he was imprisoned
on a charge of stealing meat, and was ex-
amined by Mr. F. Stephen in reference to his
transactions as a publican at Rye, and also
respecting, a lime-burning business that he
had been engaged in. (P.7, Argus,23-12-1870.)

Certificate Meetings.
Certificates of discharge from their debts were granted to the following insolvents :
....... ; John Blair, of Melbourne, surgeon*; ....... William Cottier, of Rye, limeburner ; F. W. Wilks, of Collingwood, commission agent. (P.6, Argus, 10-6-1871.)
*Blair,like Cottier,recovered and bought Villa Maria, naming it Blairgowrie, which eventually became the new name of Sorrento East.

CONCLUSION.
Until documentation of a licence being issued for William Cottier's house near Dromana under the name, Rye Hotel, is found, this claim must be treated as the type of myth that finds its way into family folklore, such as Rosebud's Captain Adams being the illegitimate son of Lord Vivian and receiving a grant of 750 acres. As William's application of 1867 shows, he intended to call the hotel the Tootgarook Hotel;he did not mention transferring a previous licence.

However,the fact that a "Tootgarook Hotel" had been operating earlier*(on part of the Tootgarook pre-emptive right, near the future Leonard St) might have required a different name to be used.
*Peter Purvis**, Tootgarook, Tootgarook Hotel.Granted.(P.5, Argus, 22-4-1857.) **Peter Purves d. 1860.

Since not one of the 170 results for "Tootgarook Hotel" in the 1860's mentioned a hotel of that name until William Cottier's application in 1867,the need for another name seems unlikely. It also means that Patrick Wee Wee and the four quarrymen who drowned on the way to the quarantine station in late 1869 had met in William Cottier's TOOTGAROOK HOTEL, which, by the way was probably built on John Campbell's grants, crown allotments 6 and 7 of section 1, extending from The Esplanade to Nelson St. They had a 40 metre frontage to both streets between points 60 metres east of Napier St and 100 metres west of Lyons St.

Was William Cottier ahead of his time in naming the area Rye? He used the name twice in his 1867 application. There was no mention of either Tootgarook or Rye Townships in The Argus in the 1860's,the only indication that a township was even in the pipeline being the following advertisement:

extension on mail road between Cheltenham and Tootgarook (in consequence of removal of post office, Tootgarook to another site), at contract rate per mile, from 1st of July to 31st of December, 1860, £8 6s. 6d,Henry Dunn ;
(The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 17 October 1860 p 7 Article)

In 1868 the school at Rye was still called the Tootgarook school when John Watt (whose house now stands next to the Sorrento Museum) was appointed to the committee.
Tootgarook, No. 623 -Robert H. Kelly, John Watt ;(P.7, Argus, 24-6-1868.)

RYE. County of Mornington, parish of Nepean, in the village of Rye, on Port Phillip Bay.Upset price, £8 per acre. Allotments 4, 6,7,8, Section 2 ; 7,10, Section 3. 2 roods each. (P.3, Argus, 21-4-1869.)

Now realising why I'd found no mention of either Tootgarook or Rye Townships,I entered VILLAGE OF RYE and the Cottier claim of giving Rye its name was shot down in flames.

COUNTRY LOT. NEPEAN. Situate on the southern shore of Port Phillip Bay, west of the village reserve of Rye, about seven miles east of the Sanatorium.Upset price, £1 per acre. Allotment 12. 163 acres.
)P.7, Argus,17-8-1865.)
(Crown allotment 12,parish of Nepean was on the north east corner of Melbourne and Canterbury Rds and became part of Owen Cain's Tyrone.)

ANY CRITICAL THINKER WOULD IMMEDIATELY RESPOND, "BUT IF CAMPBELL WAS SUPPOSEDLY (IF I REMEMBER CORRECTLY) BUILDING THE FIRST RYE PIER IN 1860,COTTIER MAY HAVE BEEN IN THAT AREA BEFORE 1865 TOO, SO THERE IS NO PROOF THAT HE DID NOT GIVE RYE ITS NAME."

It could be presumed that the people who signed the petition of 9-3-1861,scanned onto page 132 of Colin McLear's A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, had children enrolled at Robert Quinan's school at Dromana. It was signed by both William Cottier and John Campbell. This would indicate that both families were still living at Dromana in 1861. It is possible that Master Mariner, John Gibson (whose son,John, born in 1859 on the Survey later became a Kiwi) had a vessel and took Campbell to Rye each day, or the pier was built later than 1860. (John Gibson also signed the petition!)

Did the village of Rye have that name while John Campbell and William Cottier were still living at Dromana? Yes, in early 1860!

Nepean, situate from 8 to 10 miles south-easterly from Point Nepean adjoining the village reserve of
Rye, and west of Mr. Purves's pre-emptive section :etc.
(Column 4 about a third of the way down in the second MELBOURNE sale after GISBORNE, P.7,Argus,23-4-1860.)


Jennifer Nixon's FAMILY, CONNECTIONS, SORRENTO AND PORTSEA probably has much information about the Cottiers but let's see if trove can add anything.

COTTIER.

COTTIER.-In loving memory of our dear sister,Lily, who passed away on the 25th August, 1924,at Frankston; and our dear mother, who passed away on the 23rd August, 1913, at Sorrento; and our dear brother, Walter, who passed away on the 17th September, 1916, at Sorrento.(P.13,Argus,25-8-1928.)

Possibly related to William.
COTTIER.-On the 3rd inst., at Queenscliff, James Cottier*, aged thirty-one years. Gipps Land and
New Zealand papers please copy.(P.4, Argus,9-2-1867.)
*His son, James Edwin, was still at Queenscliff when he married in 1885.

COTTIER. -On the 11th Mar, at the Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Alan William, dearly loved grandson of Edwin John (deceased) and Josie Dark, Ophir, Sorrento, and William Cottier, Frankston* and the late Elizabeth Cottier, aged 9 years and 11 months. (P.1, Argus, 12-5-1925.) The boy's parents, John and Elizabeth, who placed the previous notice in the same issue,lived in Richmond.

*Possibly son of William in previous notice.
COTTIER, James.—On March 10,at his residence, Lewis street,Frankston, loving husband of Isabella (Queenie).
COTTIER. —The Funeral of the late Mr. JAMES COTTIER, of Lewis street, Frankston, will leave Cain street, Sorrento, THIS DAY (Thursday), after a service commencing at 2.45 p.m., for the Sorrento Cemetery.
(P.12, Argus,11-3-1954.)

Grandfather of Alan William.
COTTIER -On the 7th September at Charlescote, 23 Hope street Spotswood, William, the dearly beloved husband of the late Elizabeth Cottier and loving father of Jack and Ethel (Mrs W.R.Anderson), aged 77 years -Mother and
father reunited. (P.1, Argus, 8-9-1932.)

The late Elizabeth Cottier (nee Dark) above(Lily.)
COTTIER. –On the 20th[?] August, at Fndley? street,Frankston, Elizabeth Hester (Lily), dearly loved wife of William Cottier, loving mother of Jack and Ethel (Mrs. Anderson), loved sister of Ted(deceased), Walter (deceased), Charlie, Minnie (Mrs. White), Annie (Mrs. Skelton), Frances (Mrs.Johnstone), Effie (deceased), and Harry, aged 65 years.(P,.1,Argus, 26-8-1924.)

Edwin John Dark's grandson.
COTTIER.—On August 25, at Sydney, Edwin John dearly beloved son of Elizabeth and John, brother of Allan (deceased), Florence (Mrs.Gillson) and Charles aged 28 years. -Loved by all. (P.22, Argus, 1-9-1951.)

5 comment(s), latest 2 years, 3 months ago

CORRECTION: WILL WILL ROOK CEMETERY (MELWAY 7 B9), VIC., AUST. (BOOK LAUNCH, BURIAL LISTINGS IN COMMENTS.)

I can't blame Andrew Lemon's BROADMEADOWS A FORGOTTEN HISTORY for my boo boo. Andrew gave me no grounds for assuming that there were no denominational sections at the Will Will Rook Cemetery. He may have given me that impression with his emphasis on the prominence of Scots in the area, such as John Kingshott's appointment to the Broadmeadows (Westmeadows)school committee so it wouldn't consist entirely of Presbyterians. Somewhere,probably in Sue O'Callaghan's BROADMEADOWS HISTORY KIT (which I read in 1988 in the Gladstone Park High School library),it was mentioned what a turn-around it was for the Will Will Rook Cemetery when Kerrsland became the St Joseph's Foundling Home,the resting place of Presbyterians becoming the final abode of infant Catholics (or words to that effect.)

However the main reason for my assumption was the burial of many Broadmeadows Catholics at Bulla and Keilor cemeteries,such as butcher, Bob Cargill's son at Bulla after he was accidentally shot by young Graco.

The following comes from Beryl Patullo, whom I have never met though we have been history colleagues for over a quarter of a century. She is one of the dedicated FRIENDS OF WILL WILL ROOK CEMETERY, along with another colleague of similar vintage, Elaine Brogan, secretary of the Essendon Historical Society for many years.

Hi XXX, been reading your article on Mickleham. Your comment regarding no designation in the cemetery.
Originally it was 10 acres: 2 acres Presbry, 2 acres C of E, 2 Acres RC, 1acre Wesleyan, 1 Independent & 2 acres other denominations..... It was cut back later to 4 acres in total. which was because there was no one buried on the side closest to the creek the area which is now the parkland. from the existing Headstones in the cemetery to the creek. . We are able to pick where the designated areas are because of the headstones or known graves exist.There are some Darmody children buried in the cemetery, but the parents are in Keilor.
regards Beryl.


Thanks for that Beryl!

18 comment(s), latest 2 years ago

COULD THIS BE JOE PETERS,THE BLACK FIDDLER ? (ROSEBUD,VIC., AUST.)

TALK ON CHANGE. "I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you." ?SHAKSPEARE. "Quamquam ridentem dicere verum, Quid vetat?"?HORACE.
The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 5 January 1884 p 17 Article

And the talk is of Dusky Joe, who owns the pleasure boat from Rosebud, and who plays seven musical instruments.