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CHRONOLOGY OF THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

This journal will take years to complete but here's a start.

BASS'S STRAITS.
This morning I needed to continue the grind of the CHRONOLOGY OF BURIALS AT DROMANA, by adding biography for Mary Ann Peatey's entry from PINE TREES AND BOX THORNS. But I wasn't up to starting while I sipped my first coffee of the day and I'd been thinking a chronology of the Mornington Peninsula would be a good project if I ever found the time. And I don't believe in rehashing what has already been written, by Leonard Wilding in 1907, countless articles in 1934 etc. Would you believe that the Yanks were sailing past the peninsula before the short-lived settlement at Sorrento was established or Port Phillip was even discovered? The 25-1-1802 entry resulted from a BASS'S STRAITS search on trove and I'll bet this information won't be found in any existing history.

25-1-1802.
The following is the Copy of a Letter from Capt. Eliphalet Smith, of the Brig Fanny, extracted from a New York Paper, dated at Sea, Jan. 25, 1802.

I am now on my passage from Port Jackson for Batavia, and am within a few days sail of that place; my route was thro' Bass's Straits which separate Vandieman's Land from New Holland. Mine is the first American ship that has ever made this passage and I flatter myself, from the observations I have made, that this passage (which has hitherto been considered impracticable by all seamen, owing principally to the Western winds prevalent in this lat.) will be rendered not only safe but expeditious, and of considerable advantage to the mercantile
world." (etc.)
(The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) Sunday 27 November 1803 p 2 Article)

15-2-1802.
THE DISCOVERY OF PORT PHILLIP.
The following interesting letter by Mr P. G. King, of Sydney, grandson of Governor King, relative to the discovery of Port Phillip, appears in the Argus of the 4th inst :—
( The very long letter contains incredible detail about early surveying of coast lines. Extract only. Lieutenant Grant, a friend of Captain Schanck who had designed the Lady Nelson with its sliding keel, had not noticed the entrance while bringing the vessel out or during his extensive survey. )

In January, 1801, Grant was followed through the straits by a small brig commanded by a Mr Black, who in passing
discovered and named King Island. After a short refit Grant proceeded to Western Port, accompanied by Ensign
Barreillier, and made an extensive examination and survey, returning to Sydney on 14th May. Here Grant left his
vessel, and went back to England, being succeeded in the command by his officer,Murray, now appointed as an acting lieutenant.

It was then that Murray was directed to carry out the instructions of Governor King, and he proceeded at once to Western Port, as the basis of his operations. On the 5th January, 1802, Murray sailed out of Western Port, and ran along the coast, passing Cape Schanck with a strong breeze "dead on shore," but he kept on for about 12 miles, when he saw an opening in the land that had the appearance of a harbour. For this he then bore up,knowing well the good qualities of his vessel, and that she would work out of the difficulty if he were disappointed
in finding an entrance into it.

With Mr Bowen at the masthead looking out, he stood on till within a mile and a half of the eastern rocky point, and boldly approached what must have shown itself as broken water, for Mr Bowen presently reported "Rocks ahead!" doubtless mistaking the now well-known " Rip" for shallow dangers. The line of breakers appeared to reach all the way, or nearly all the way, across the entrance, and Murray was obliged — though he could
perceive inside the troubled sea on the bar a fine sheet of smooth water of great extent — to haul to the wind, and though anxious to know more of this promising place, with the true instinct of a seaman in a gale on a lee shore, made good his offing, and with strong winds and in "tumultuous" and "confused sea" passed outwards beyond Cape Otway, till at length on the 11th he sought refuge and rest under King Island, anchoring in Elephant Bay.
Finding himself so far to windward, he examined Three Hummock Island, but the weather continuing bad, " worse than he had ever experienced since he sailed the seas," he regained a quiet anchorage in Western Port, waiting his opportunity to revisit the bar-bound harbour he had so reluctantly turned away from.

He now adopted the prudent course of making a preliminary examination of the entrance in a boat, and accordingly despatched Mr Bowen in the launch with 14 days' provisions ; but in a much less time Bowen returned with a favourable account of there being a good channel into the harbour.

On the morning of the 15th February,1802, the Lady Nelson at noon found herself off the bar, and Murray, with all sail set stood proudly on, the ship's way accelerated by a strong flood tide — the first flood tide which, in that narrow channel, had ever borne along with it a living freight. (P.2, Launceston Examiner, 9-10-1880.)

APRIL, 1802.
In April 1802, a French expedition ship Naturaliste under Jacques Hamelin explored the area, as part of the Baudin expedition to Australia. He named the island Ile des Français, since Anglicised as French Island.
(Wilipedia entry for French Island.)

With Port Phillip (originally dubbed Port King) having been discovered there was no way the French could be allowed to nose around there too, hence the Collins settlement at Sullivans Bay.

7 and 8-11-1803.
On Thursday arrived the Patterson, Capt.Ahern, from Providence, bound to China, and the Ocean, Capt. Mertho. from England, but last from Port Philip in Bass Straits, whither she conveyed a cargo of stores and provisions
for the Establishment of an intended Settlement under the Command of His Honor Lieut. Governor DAVID COLLINS, who had arrived in His Majesty's ship Calcutta, Capt. D. WOODRIFFE, having on board a Military Establishment, with 2 free Settlers, 209 Male Convicts, 15 Women and children: 8 Convicts died on the passage.

The Calcutta and Ocean sailed from England the 24th of last April, touched at TeneRIFFE,Rio Janeiro, and the Cape of Good Hope: The Ocean arrived at Port Phillip the 7th, and the Calcutta the 8th. ult. The Lieut. Governor having communicated to His EXCELLENCY the same unfavorable circumstances respecting Port Phillip not being
calculated for an extensive Settlement as was reported by the Surveyor General, Mr. Grimes,who with other assistance surveyed it in January last, but whose report had not reached England before the Calcutta sailed: Lieut. GovernorCollins has therefore suspended his proceedings until he receives directions from His Excellency
the Governor in Chief, which he has requested by Mr. Collins, a Passenger, under the sanction of Government, who very handsomely volunteered his services to bring the Lieut. Governor's Letters in an open six oar'd boat, which there is every reason to believe he would have accomplished with great credit to himself altho he encountered much bad weather and heavy gales in the Straits and on the Coast, but being so fortunate as to fall in with the Ocean off Point Upright, Capt. Mertho, who appears to have had no intention of touching here,very humanely took Mr. Collins and his people on board, and brought them to this Port.

The following are the Names and Numbers of the Civil and Military Establishment of the intended Settlement now arrived in the Calcutta and Ocean at Port Phillip, viz.
His Honor DAVID COLLINS, Esq. Lieut. Gov.
Rev. Rich. Hopwood, Chaplain
Benj. Barbauld, Dep. Judge Advocate
Wm. l'Anson, Surg.
Matt. Bowden, 1st. Assist. Surg.
Wm. Hopley, 2d do.
Leonard Fosbrook, Dep. Commissary
G. P. Harris. Dep. Surveyor
A. W. U. Humphreys, Mineralogist
T. Clark, Superintendent
W. Paterson, ditto
J. Ingles and W. Parish, Overseers.
PRESENT MILITARY ESTABLISHMENT DETACHMENT FROM THE ROYAL MARINES.
Lieut. Col. DAVID COLLINS, Captain Commandant, W. Sladder, and ----- Johnson, 1st Lieuts. ----- Lord, 2d Lieut.
58 Rank and File, including Non-commissioned Officers.

From the uncertainty of Capt. Mertho's putting in here, and the risque attending Mr.Collins's efforts to reach this Port in the open boat, Lieut. Gov. Collins and Capt. Woodriffe declined sending the Government dispatches,
or any private letter by this conveyance.

His Majesty's Armed Tender Lady Nelson which was loaded for Norfolk Island, was immediately cleared, and on the GOVERNOR'S return from Parramatta on Friday made the the Signal for Sailing, and is expected to leave this on Monday morning with the Ocean for Port Phillip, to enable Lieut. Gov. Collins to comply with His Excellency's Instructions. (P.1, The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, 27-11-1803.)

CLEAR PHOTOS OF MR.A.McDOUGALL AND MR.H.DELAHEY, JUDGES AT AN R.A.S.V. EVENT IN 1920 AT MELBOURNE SHOWGROUNDS.

TWO WELL-KNOWN JUDGES.
The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 2 October 1920 p 29 Article Illustrated
McDOUGALL, DELAHEY

It is likely that these two men were relatives. Alexander McDougall, son of renowned Shorthorn Cattle breeder, Robert McDougall, was an expert horseman, having been the inaugural Master of the Oaklands Hunt from 1888 until he moved to Camperdown in 1900. Moving to W.A.in 1907 he became a stipendiary steward, soon after becoming chairman of stipendiary stewards, retaining the position until he retired in 1928. He died in W.A. in 1937.

There is no proof that the judge was the same A.McDougall and it seems strange that a West Australian would be a well known judge in Melbourne or even be in Melbourne but I believe that Alexander and Jane (nee Forrester) may have visited Melbourne every show week to touch base with relatives and old friends.Alexander's father had been the Secretary of the Moonee Ponds Farmers' Society in 1847 when it changed its name to the Port Phillip Farmers' Society so when this body became the Royal Agricultural Society, Alexander would have been no stranger to its members.

Harry Huntington Peck made a rare mistake in MEMOIRS OF A STOCKMAN when he stated that Henry Delahey had married a daughter of Robert McDougall. Henry Delahey Snr. had married Mary Dodd and his co-grantee of section 10 Doutta Galla, George Dodd, had a son named Robert, a prominent journalist on agriculture, who married Robert McDougall's daughter, Maggie. As the two judges appear to be about the same age, I believe that H.Delahey in the photo was Henry Delahey Jnr.

CLIFFORDS RD LINKED PASCOE VALE AND SYDNEY ROADS BY 1850? (VIC., AUST.)

WON'T SUBMIT. TRIED TO ADD AS COMMENTS ON EARLY SYDNEY RDS JOURNAL AND HERE, A TOTAL OF ABOUT 10 TRIES. SO FRUSTRATING! WILL TRY LATER.

By deleting William Smith's 1850 advertisement for the ORIGINAL Old Queen Inn at PASCOEVALE,which mentions the link to the new line of road near Somerton Inn,and some of my commentary, I was able to post the arguments for Cliffords Rd being the link in comments under my journal about EARLY ROADS TO SYDNEY. The whole, and a similar discussion about the early route to Geelong (fords, punts, bridges)has been posted on facebook,entitled EARLY ROADS OUT OF MELBOURNE.

I prefer to post my research on family tree circles, so it is more accessible to family historians, but instead of wasting days trying to submit, I might have to use the facebook option more often (when such frustration sets in.) Private message me if you would like to see my facebook posts, which are all about history.

COBURG, MELBOURNE, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

Richard Broome's BETWEEN TWO CREEKS is an excellent history of the City of Coburg. I no longer have my notes but remaining memories of his information will guide my trove searches. I will not include family notices but pioneers will be mentioned in articles about events. This history was found when I was researching the new Young Queen Inn in Coburg, which I think Richard said was built by George Somerville (it was about 23 years ago that I read the book.) When Richard wrote his book, there was no TROVE, and he obviously didn't see this article. (P.S. When I was correcting the digitisation, I typed the headline and the author's name and discovered 6 or so installments which you can find by doing the same. B.Cooke was an auctioneer.)

Early History of Coburg
BY B. COOKE.
The trees which to-day form quite an avenue along the Sydney road from Bell street to the northern wall(i.e. of the jail), were planted about 1857 by the prisoners under supervision of a warder (who was paid by the Road Board), and taken from 'Thorp's (Thorpe's?)paddock, Newlands, by my father. who at the time was clearing part of the estate. In 1859 Colonel Champ was commissioned by the Government to start the volunteer movement, which was called the Pentridge Rifles. This he faithfully carried out, and with the aid of the warders and others connected with the (Penal)Department made the movement a great success.

The colonel was a man of fine soldierly appearance, who among his officers and men was greatly loved and respected. He stood for Parliament, being returned by a large majority for East Bourke. On the declaration of the poll the people took his horses from the carriage and pulled him all the way along the road from Pentridge to Brunswick.

Leaving the stone walls of Pentridge, going north, you cross a small lane that leads to the creek, and connected Newlands with our village. There was a rough stone ford, fairly passable when the creek was in normal state, but in winter was difficult and at times dangerous to use as a crossing. On the north of this lane was Morgan's* farm to the creek. One of the most picturesque places in the district is found here. In it you have the miniature landscape, with the ever-flowing brook, while the outlook to the east is a charmingly beautiful view right away to the Dividing Ranges. To-day strangers visiting the district stop and stare, delighted with the scene.

*Several Morgans appear in the area's history. Morgans and Knights who were related to each other, and through this to (John?) English who bought Belle Vue from Fawkner's widow in 1879, leased Belle Vue and (Fred?) Morgan's (The Pines?)was probably part of it. A Morgan owned Camp Hill at Tullamarine between the Gilligans and Scott (who called it Gowanbrae) and R.K.Morgan relocated his factory from Pascoe Vale Rd, Glenroy to Gowanbrae near the creek where Hannah Pascoe Drive** (named by me) now stands. His old factory,near the iron-sided bridge he built, was used for the genesis of the Broadmeadows Basketball Association in the 1980's.
**Named after the mother of John Fawkner who adopted Pascoe as a given name as a tribute to his mother following her death before he co-founded Melbourne. (The life and Times of John Pascoe Fawkner, (J.P.?)Billot.)


On the south-eastern portion of this farm the Council have decided to construct an embankment across the creek, forming a sheet of water that may be used for boating and other pleasures. Nature has given them this splendid opportunity to make this site one of the most attractive beauty spots around the City of Melbourne. I am pleased to know the Council and public have taken up the matter so earnestly, and I hope in the near future to see the work completed.

Then north of Morgan's farm stood the Young Queen, a well-built hotel, owned and managed by Mr. Baker, at the time quite a noted place of resort. The gardens were well laid out and beautifully kept and also had a large collection of birds and animals. Mr Baker being a splendid host and jovial landlord, the place was much frequented by pleasure seekers who drove out from the City to spend their holidays there. At one time the Brunswick coach stopped there, but later ran on to the Wheat Sheaf Hotel*, conducted by Mr Harry Marsh, where they changed horses. It is now the site of the Deanery, part of the old building being retained in the new.

Crossing Edgar's creek over a log bridge and ford, was Mr Treloar's farm, his house being built close
to the road of bluestone is still standing. Then Richards Bros., carriers, also Spry Brothers, one of whom was
shot at and wounded by one of the Gilbert gang of bushrangers, who bailed him up on the Sydney road near
Pretty Sally's Hill. Spry gave his horses the whip and -the team got into a gallop. The bushrangers fired at and wounded him, but the horses kept going and he got safely away with his money. In those days teamsters on
their return trips often had large sums of money in their possession, banking being a convenience quite out of the question and occasioning great risks.

Then the camping ground and general store of Mr. Bartlett, a wooden building still standing. It was no
uncommon thing to see six or eight teams there in company, it being desirable for safety and mutual help along the road to the diggings. Then there were paddocks to the boundary of Campbellfield.
(P.4, Brunswick and Coburg Leader, 31-7-1914.)

* From Andrew Lemon's BROADMEADOWS A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.
(* =Lemon; #= itellya, re text in brackets.)


P.30.* "Anywhere from the Wheatsheaf Hotel (site of today's First and Last at Fawkner) north for three or four miles tended to be called Campbellfield..."
P.43. Lemon mentions that Campbellfield had three hotels in the mid 1860's including the Wheatsheaf and the Plough Inn.
P.49. #"Even grander (than the races near Broadmeadows Township i.e. Westmeadows)were the Pentridge and Campbellfield Steeplechases held in July 1861,promoted in part by Harry Marsh,owner of the Wheat Sheaf Hotel, and staged on adjoining properties."
P.85.*"The Coburg Reserve Estate Co.---could promise two railway stations close by: the North Coburg (today's Merlynston)on Wheatsheaf Lane (Boundary Road) and ----."

N.B. Boundary Rd was the boundary between the parishes of Will Will Rook (north) and Jika Jika (south). Today, between two creeks from west to east,it is Victoria St,Glenroy; a line just north of Barina Rd and Rhodes Pde; Pascoe St; Boundary Rd; and a line just south of Queens Pde to Merri Creek.

The Wheat Sheaf was just within Pentridge Shire but a quick trove search revealedthat it wasdescribedasbeing at Pentridge AND at Campbellfield.


While doing a trove search for YOUNG QUEEN INN, PENTRIDGE,to find when the direct route (today's Sydney
Road )had been built, I found some more memories of early Coburg. As the print in the article was terribly hard to read and the digitisation would have looked like a foreign language- but is actually almost perfect- I can only think that somebody is writing a history of the City of Moreland. Therefore I will not paste the article here but I will list the names in it.

GREATER MELBOURNE. COBURG. FARTHEST NORTH.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 23 March 1910 p 6 Article

Surnames in the article- PRICE, HAIN (AUTHOR), O'HEA, FAWKNER, SPRINGHALL, DUNCAN, SANDFORD,WARWICK, BARDIN, MURRAY, LILBURNE, MAILER, O'SHANNASSY, PATTERSON, CUTTS.

Richard Broome wrote quite some detail about the Mailers (and their home if my memory is correct), (William?) Murray, Price,the Young Queen and Father O'Hea,Price, and Fawkner, but I don't remember mentions of the other names, especially O'Shannassy.

Mr Hain mentions Fawkner's two lots of land. They were in part of Jika Jika shire, between two creeks,as the name of Broome's book suggests. You can see this land for yourself by googling JIKA JIKA,COUNTY OF BOURKE.

Crown allotment 151,of 709 acres, was bounded on the north by Victoria St- Rhodes Pde (boundary with Will Will Rook parish and the Cameron's Glenroy run,which they named), Northumberland Rd., Gaffney St and the Moonee Ponds Creek. It is shown divided into several farms: Fawkner's Belle Vue Park of 253 acres(later owned by Glenroy flour miller Hutchinson, who renamed it Oak Park because of the English trees Fawkner had planted.)The part sold in 1842 to Henry George Ashurst (after whom part of Pascoe Vale Rd-north or south of Glass St, can't remember which- was once named), which became in 1856 John Kernan's "Merai Farm" of 147 acres and 11 perches,and smaller farms near/ north of Devon Rd. A map on P.78 of Andrew Lemon's BROADMEADOWS A FORGOTTEN HISTORY shows the owners in 1874 of the three properties fronting Rhodes Pde: Mr Bowring* (96a 2r 38p), Mr Murray (77 0 28)and Mr Peachy** (sic, lot 3-probably 26 acres.) The 15 acres would include Sefton St houses but I know nothing of owners.

* This was almost certainly a relative of Ed.Bowring of Red Hill near Dromana who cycled from Essendon to his new home there on the village settlement in record time. Bowring Rd -off McIlroys Rd,Red Hill- was near a later Bowring farm.
** Hadfield is another J.P,Fawkner grant.In the parish of Will Will Rook, east of the golf course,it was called Box Forest, but was known circa 1940 as Peachey-Kelly Town***,those two families consolidating many of Fawkner's Land Co-op.blocks. Stephen Peachey moved to a 6 acre farm at Tullamarine to run a dairy after swine fever broke out in the area (which never took on the school name coined by the district inspector: Westbreen.) Its present name honours Cr Rupert Hadfield of Broadmeadows Shire. Derby St, Tullamarine became known as Peachey's Lane.(Broadmeadows rates, Winnie Lewis, Olive Nash, Harry Heaps.)
*** Jim McKenzie's oral history in my KILTS AND COW DUNG FLATS.


Fawkner's crown allotment 140 of 569 acres was east of "La Rose" and bounded by Rose St, Bell St, Merri Creek and Reynard Rd. It is bisected by Munro and Harding Streets. The Hardings were prominent Coburg pioneers and I think their home was discussed by Richard Broome.

As the surname list has probably reached capacity,here endeth the lesson.


Question marks were used above when I wasn't 100% sure. Let's check.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 30 April 1927 p 34 Article
.... WILLS AND ESTATES Frederick John Morgan, of The Pines Pascoevale.

OOPS, it wasn't J.P.-The life and times of John Pascoe Fawkner / C.P. Billot
Billot, C. P. (Cecil Philip)[Book : 1985 ]

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 1 February 1873 p 4 Family Notices
MURRAY.-On the 31st ult., at Balloan, Coburg, William Sutherland Fraser Murray (of the firm of Greig and Murray), in his fiftieth year. ... 218 words

It was Joseph English who bought Belle Vue in 1879,not John,who bought John Murray Peck's Lebanon at Strathmore and then had to claim title to Sir John Franklin's 12 acres that Peck had occupied for years.I couldn't find a notice about the purchase but this is interesting.

Students of the early history of Melbourne will be interested to know that the original house erected by the late Mr. John Pascoe Fawkner at Pascoevale, together with the modern mansion and 152 acres of Oak Park Estate nearest to the city, have been purchased by Dr. John Murphy, of Collins street;. The old house, which is built of wood, is in fairly good order, and will be preserved by Dr. Murphy. In the living-room, in which there are six doors, is an imported grate, probably one of the first brought to Victoria.
(ITEMS OF INTEREST. The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 12 November 1920 p 4 Article.)

When I spoke to the owner in the early 1990's, he thought the English manor might have incorporated the original house. I wonder what the heritage study says. Fawkner's stables remain, converted into a house,next door.

The large estate of Belle Vue Park was sold following Fawkner's death. In 1880, the part of the Estate containing the homestead and stables was acquired by Joseph English who constructed a new two storey residence that replaced (or possibly modified) Fawkner's homestead. The estate has since been subdivided and the house still exists at 7 Oak Park Court.

Despite extensive research, it has not been possible to prove who built the stables at 9 Oak Park Court (Fawkner, English or someone else). However, it is possibly the only surviving remnant of Fawkner's original Belle Vue complex. It was converted to a residence in the post war period.

2 comment(s), latest 4 years, 1 month ago

COMMANDER M.G.H.W.ROSS, MARINE SURVEYOR, DROMANA PIONEER,VIC., AUST.

The details of M.G.H.W.Ross's grants in present-day Dromana,their advertisement for sale in 1881, and John Saunders Ross (who is presumed to have been related) are given in my journal JAMES ROBERTSON BOAG. I assume that there was a marital connection between the Boag and Ross families who were neighbours on crown allotments 11 and 12 respectively of section 1 Kangerong(whose exact locations are described in the BOAG journal.)

The commander's 60 acre grant in Kangerong and his grants in Dromana Township are labelled with his initial and surname, not his title but the rate collector helpfully referred to him as Captain Ross in 1865. I had tried unsuccessfully to search ROSS, DROMANA and ROSS, KANGERONG on trove, the reason for my failure being that the digitised rendition of his surname was Roas. I found the advertisement of his grants for sale quite by chance while searching LORD, KANGERONG and discovered that the captain (army, navy, limecraft?)was actually a commander in the royal navy!

Deserting Trove, I searched on google and found his initials, which had been indecipherable on the Kangerong map but clearly M.G.H.W. on the Dromana Township map, to be exactly as on the township map.This led to the discovery of a chart showing the location of the submarine cable in Bass Strait, 1859,soundings by Commander M.G.H.W. ROSS, marine surveyor. Unfortunately the page would not open.However I soon found another chart by the commander that I could view. It is entitled SOUTH COAST ENTRANCE TO PORT PHILLIP. (I have since successfully opened the cable chart page. There is a fair deal of information about the commander in his days as a lieutenant.)

It is likely that Commander Ross came on the marine survey ship on which Edward Williams, an early pioneer on the peninsula arrived. It is also possible that Sidney Smith Crispo, who was a member of the coastal survey until about 1875, and was a great friend of Edward Williams,dying at Eastbourne in the care of Edward and his wife Mary (nee Campbell), came on the same survey ship.

Edward Williams had a legendary status as a harvester with the scythe, performing almost super-human feats for such residents near Dromana as the McLears, as told by Colin McLear in A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA. Sidney Smith Crispo obtained grants at Manners-Sutton/Canterbury/Blairgowrie and Rosebud West, calling the latter Eastbourne, a name carried on by Edward Williams. I wonder if Edward or Sidney influenced the commander's investment in Dromana?

Is it possible that the commander's family has the same naval tradition as Sidney Smith Crispo? If so,one of his family might have been a famous explorer (James Clark Ross) or commander of the Pacific fleet (Charles Ross.)

It is likely that the Ross family was mainly associated with Williamstown.

1 comment(s), latest 5 years ago

COMPANION TO "A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA" : LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS, ADDITIONAL GENEALOGY etc. (VIC., AUST.)

I don't know how many times I had to search through Colin McLear's great book about the pioneers and events in Dromana's history to find certain illustrations such as the map showing early tenants on the Survey. I was sure there was a photo of Beauvoir in the book and flicked through the whole book, only to find there wasn't. That's probably why Beauvoir is not in the present DROMANA HERITAGE WALK pamphlet. I thought a list of illustrations in the book was necessary so I stopped working on my journal about a Dromana heritage trail to accomplish this.Those who have already purchased the book will find this list to be of value. Genealogists always give a distinguishing detail such as year of birth so that people with the same name are not confused but Colin failed to do this regarding the photo of William Gibson and his wife on page 83. This led to genealogical research which revealed the maiden name of Walter Gibson Snr's wife, the correct spelling of Glenholm and details about descendants that weren't available to Colin.

These details appear in NOTES. One map has been found to be wrong so far,the one on page 39. The Dromana Hotel is shown on crown allotment 4, Section 1, Kangerong,between Pier St and the east end of Gibson St and crown allotments 5 and 6 are shown as being occupied by Holden, John McLear and Peter Pidota. The Dromana Hotel and all the people mentioned were all on crown allotment 5. This and any further errors discovered will be discussed under CORRECTIONS.

A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA: LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
(plus notes & corrections.)

Page and description.
1. Anthony's Nose,1920's.
3. Dromana from Arthur's Seat c.1920.
4. Dromana from Mt. Martha c.1920.
5. Forest scene.
6, Fern gully.
10. Fern in forest.
13. McCrae homestead.
27. Early tenants on the Survey.
29. Matthew Flinders cairn.
32. Waterfall.
34. The Burrell family.
35. Jonah Griffith 1912.
37. The McLear bullock team.
38. Dromana Hotel and McLear bullock team.
39. Section 1 Kangerong (needs correction.)
41. Timber and firewood on Dromana pier.
42. Fishing nets on Dromana pier.
43. Dromana pier (arm at end,rail and luggage,waiting for the steamer.)
45. Godfrey Burdett Wilson.
46. Wilson's butcher shop (probably next to Beauvoir.)
47. Wilson's butcher shop in McCulloch St before 1934.
48. Beachwear of the early 1900's.
49. Guest houses (Aringa, Kangerong,Belmont.)
51. Berthing steamer and waiting day trippers at Dromana;
Dyson's bus fleet; Whittaker's bus.
53. Shaw's bus that did the Arthur's Seat run (in front of Kangerong?)
54. First Dromana post office on the corner of Foote St near the Scurfield / ArthursSeat Hotel.
58. Henry George Chapman.
59. Chapman's forge in Pier St.
61. Nelson Rudduck's "Jetty Store".
63. Nelson Rudduck and Jack Rudduck.
64. Nelson Rudduck and Jane Sophia (nee Chapman.)
67. Page from George McLear's account book re Gay Lad's "service".
71. Albert Griffith,blacksmith, and Mary and John Griffith.
73. Arkwell's packing shed, Red Hill.
76. Former Lighthouse as tower atop Arthur's Seat.
78. William Moat.
82. Walter Gibson's "Glenholm(e)".
83.A young William Gibson and his wife (see note ) in later years.
85. Mr and Mrs Bill Dyson. (See P.84 under CORRECTIONS.)
86. JamesMcKeown, Catherine McKeown.
87. Gracefield in 1964. Eva McKeown.
88. Archibald Vine Shaw.
93. Mary Ann McLear.
94. McLear family tree.
95. Mary Ann McLear 1801-1884, Mary Ann 1893-1970 and Emmeline, Mary Ann McLear 1849-1923.
97. George McLear.
100. Maryfield.
102. Sons of Mary Ann McLear:Bill,George, John, Thomas.
103. Fishermen-Fred Vine; Harry Copp; John McLear, Harry Copp, Jim Singleton and Jonah (Doan)Griffith.
104. James McLear and his bride Alice (nee Prossor.)
108. Henry McLear and bullock team passing Kangerong guest house,apparently in Kangerong Avenue.
110. George McLear's wife, Emmeline Louise (nee Newstead.
112. Maryfield driveway.
113. Dromana's tree church.
115. St Mark's, Dromana.
117. Inscription in prayer book presented to the Union Church by Rev.T.Quinton.
120. Frank Moat.
121. Dr Weld.
122.Old Joe the yardman.
123. The first Presbyterian Church.
125. TheDromana Methodist Church.
128. The first Catholic Church built on land donated by Laurence Murphy.
131. Dromana State School No.184 in very early days.
132. Petition of 9-3-1861 supporting choice of Robert Quinan's school to become Dromana's Common School.
133. Dromana School's attached residence (visible at left of p.131 photo.)
134. The bus which carried students from as far afield as Portsea to Frankston High School.
135. Past pupils from the Rudduck,Aust, Aust, Gunn,Chapman, Evans and Singleton families in 1946. (The old school behind them was burnt down four years later and Connie Cornish (nee Evans), who wrote this at a later reunion in (1887?)stated that a granite wall in the school ground was built with the salvaged McCrae granite. If it is still there,the wall should be heritage-listed.)
136. Piawola, built by Nelson Rudduck using bricks secured from a pit on his Karadoc property.
137. Heronswood.
138. Machinery at granite quarry (opened on 17 acres of George McLear's grant) in 1920.
140. Ralph and Ben Wilson in front of butcher shop that is shown on page 46.
143. Aftermath of Christmas 1939 bush fires.
144. 1939 devastation shown on aerial photo. (The block shown seems to be that bounded by Seacombe St and Kangerong Avenue, based on the tennis court photo on 170 and the kink in Carrigg St in the photo on page 172. The destroyed building at the right was possibly the Kangerong Guest House. BUT...)although there was no mention of the guest house in 1940,advertisements were found in 1941. The aerial photo shows that the positions of the two buildings are very similar to those shown in a Rose Series photo of 1939 that is advertised for sale. However two photos of Kangerong taken in 1954 and 1937 are identical, namely:
Kangerong House Dromana FE Brown 1954;
and Kangerong Dromana M M Shaw 1937.

As the Kangerong Guest House obviously wasn't burnt down, we must assume that the lack of advertising in 1940 was because there were no vacancies and that the tennis court was on the west end of the present football oval. That being so, the destroyed buildings at the right of the photo would have to be at the south west corner of Pier and Gibson Streets.
146. Dromana Fire brigade:?, Malcolm McLear, Alby brasser, Tom Cauacoud, Wally Guy, Frank Singleton, John Ross, Kevin Clydesdale, Norm Osborne.

147. Will (Pop) Littlejohn.
150. Local Volunteer Defence Force.
152. Mrs Christie and Mr J.P.Wallace; Victory Celebrations near Jetty Store.
155. Slaughteryard and shed near the corner of Shergolds Lane and Nepean Highway.
157. Julia Clydesdale; James Clydesdale.
160. NedWilliams, Bill Sears' son-in-law, Bill Sears, George McLear; Messrs N.Rudduck 81, W.J.McIlroy 86 and
Ault 86; Mr and Mrs William Evans on their wedding day.
161. Tom Singleton, John's son,at Dromana racecourse.
164. Dromana F.C. Premiership Team. George Osborne,D.McLardy,Jack Skillen,Peter Gleeson, Eddie Farrell, Henry McLear, Reg. Birch, Mick Nolan, Lou Todd, Sam McLear, Jack Clydesdale, Bill Dyson, Tom Singleton, Jack Rudduck, Bill Evans, R.Gray, Jack Young, F.Harmer, Bob Clydesdale, Bert Aust, Norm Osborne (mascot), G.Wilson,Wally Guy, Bert Griffith, Bill Patterson.
166. 1946 Dromana F.C. team. Bob Friend, Norm Osborne, Ticky Hazeldine, Wally Guy, Burton Allen, Scotty Gourlay, Alan Hosking, Bluey Earles, Bob Moorehead, Vern Humphrey, Doug Goad, Ru Griffith, Jack Brown, Ian Christie, Bert Aust, Spencer Brown, Sandie Christie.
169. DromanaC.C. Premiers 1926-7 season.Stan Evans, H.Head, R.Birch (inset), M.Nolan,Bill Evans Snr., Bob Gray, Alf Farrell, Dr Beattie, R.Stephens, George Osborne,T.Rutherford, E.Inglefinger, Bill Evans,Ru Griffith.
170. The foreshore tennis courts.
171. Dromana Tennis Club. Les and Mavis Wallis, Mr McWhirter, Colin McLear, Mary Bristow, Ken Greer, ?, Maurie Shaw, Gwen Wallis, Charles Kemp, Neil Forge, Norm Osborne, Mrs Dwerryhouse.
172. Dromana 1927 with Foreshore and Panoramic Estates and Aerial Landing Ground (the 45 acres that H.W.Wilson bought from Carrington)labelled.
173. The township from the pier.
176. View from the pier 1927 showing Spencer Jackson's office and with "Panoramic Estate" superimposed.
179. Shaw's bus at the Garden of the Moon on Arthurs Seat.
182. The new ArthursSeat roadon Opening Day , December 14,1929.
183. One of the diving platforms.
186. Dromana Grand Ball 1928; Groovy Spencer Jackson.
188. View of the bay from the Panoramic Estate with Dyson's orchard in foreground.
191. Girls from the Black Lance factory above the jetty Store.
194. "Nip" McLear behind the counter at Rudduck's grocery store.
195. George Wong delivering vegetables from his cart.
196. Looking east (from Pier St?) with Dromana Hotel at rear and the Tea Rooms of Fred Warren's long-time widow (nee Janet Patterson) halfway between.
197. Sketch floor plan of "Maryfield".


CORRECTIONS.
P.39.THE PAGE 39 MAP IS WRONG,AS STATED IN THE FOREWORD.
Crown allotment 5 ,section 1, Kangerong has been calculated as being between the east ends of Gibson St and Sea Quinn Close. It consisted of 36 acres and 25 perches(36.16 acres.) On the thousand link (200 metre) frontage by 1864 were Holden's store*, next to which was Peter PIDOTO'S hut for his workers, such as Robert Rowley, and the two year old Dromana Hotel,described as a 12 room brick house and garden with a staggering nett annual value of 100 pounds. (P.37 A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA,RATES.) In 1874 John McLear married Janet Cairns of Boneo and made his home by Nepean Highway between the Dromana Hotel and the corner of Carrigg St. He was a fisherman and his home was as close to work as he could get without having a hut of the foreshore like Fred Vine did. John's son,John (Nip) lived out his life at this house which was demolished for extensions to the Dromana Hotel. (Melbourne Brindle's map re Fred Vine, P.103-4 of Colin's book.)
(*For much bigraphical detail about Frances Holden, who died aged almost 102, see my journal: PIONEERING NEIGHBOURS NEAR CARRIGG ST, DROMANA.

So we have a store, Pidoto's 4 roomed hut, John McLear's home and the pub on the frontage by 1879, with the second and the third possibly one and the same.In that year Peter Pidota(sic) was assessed on 17 acres, Dromana. Amazingly the Dromana Hotel doesn't seem to to have been assessed,unless my transcription was sloppy.

When I embarked on a project about Dromana's two hotels, which resulted in Ray Stella's place mats, I had great difficulty because every type of construction, a palace or a hovel,was called a building. Eventually I cracked the code; building and 17 acres meant the Dromana Hotel and building and five town lots meant the Scurfield/ Arthurs Seat Hotel with the respective nett annual values also being an indicator.

Cr Terry kicked up a stink in about 1910 because the shire was almost broke,mainly because of inadequate description of properties, but not getting any support from his colleagues, he resigned in protest. Two examples in the 1910 assessment were:1. George S.Edwards, Dromana Hotel (and 17 acres???) and 2. John McLear, fisherman, 1 lot and buildings, Dromana. Both were on c/a 5, section 1, Kangerong! Mrs Pidoto of Clifton Hill, was listed as the person to be rated on "17 acres, Kangerong" but the following comments were made- W.E.Thompson,occupier. G.S.Edwards,owner.

The Liardets were pioneers of Sandridge (Port Melbourne). On page 42, referring to Georgiana McCrae, Colin wrote,"She talks of Liardet who established the first hotel at Sandridge. He told Georgiana that he would like to hire portion of Jamieson's Survey and have a boat and seine net,presumably to use along the shores of Safety Beach.By 1889-90,Richard Watkin was described as a gentleman. Arthur C.C.Liardet, hotel keeper, was assessed on 17 acres and buildings. Arthur had probably seen this advertisement.
HOTEL-DROMANA HOTEL, Dromana, better known as Watkins, brick, slate roofs, highly furnished, containing 12 rooms, very large dining and billiard rooms, coachhouse, stables, outbuildings, about 16 acres land. Let or sell. Immediate possession. Apply Stevenson and Elliot.(P.12, Argus,24-8-1888.)

(Stevenson and Elliot were Melbourne coachbuilders who owned Robert Caldwell's old Dromana Hill and renamed it Fairy Vineyard.)

You will remember that crown allotment 5, section 1 Kangerong consisted of just over 36 acres. (If you didn't I've told you again anyway!) The building (hotel)occupied one of Liardet's 17 acres,leaving about 16 acres of land behind it. Frances Pidoto's land was assessed later (when she was living in N.S.W.) on 17 acres, PART C/A 5,SECT.1, KANGERONG and the remaining two acres are accounted for by John McLear's house and the site of Holden's Store.

Soon after buying the hotel, Lou Carrigg bought the Pidoto land and was assessed on the hotel and 34 acres (on which horse racing-and footy-were conducted until about (no horse racing or racecourses in index so there's something else that needs to be improved.) A check of trove found no mention of racing behind the hotel after 1922. This was because (as stated by Colin somewhere in his book) the government had told the club it could not continue to hold races there and on the present Dromana Secondary College site. Lou Carrigg had been a prime mover in that club and the footy club which played behind the pub until seemingly the 1926 season.

In 1927 all or most of the 34 acres had become Spencer Jackson's foreshore estate.(See P. 172 aerial photo.) The blacksmith mentioned on the plaque at the south east corner of Pier and Charles Sts virtually donated the present footy ground. Who's going to be first to write the blacksmith's name in comments? Reminds me to mention the pub racecourse/footy ground and the plaque in the heritage trail.

P.76.Elsewhere I have referred to Colin's statement that the wooden light house (at today's McCrae)was replaced by the present iron structure in 1874; the replacement was constructed in 1874 but it was not installed until about seven years later so the original lighthouse would have had to operate until installation was completed. This was found by chance during an investigation re relocation of Dromana's post office.

DROMANA.
It is in contemplation to erect a new tower on the site previously occupied by the old trigonometrical tower on Arthur's Seat, and the question has been mooted whether this elevated position (1040 feet above the level of
the sea) might not be utilized as a signal station for both Port Phillip and Western Port Bay.
(South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic. : 1872 - 1920) Wednesday 8 May 1878 p 3 Article)


P.82.The children of Walter Gibson and Margaret (nee Purdie) are listed on page 82. Their fourth son is missing unless he was known as Tom (which he wasn't.)
GIBSON-HUTCHINSON.-On the 27th December, 1899, at "Waddella," Lilydale, Walter James, fourth son of Walter Gibson, "Glenholm," Dromana, to Sarah, second daughter of the late John Hutchinson, Lilydale. (P. 55, The Australasian, 27-1-1900.)

P.84.Charlie Dyson was working for George McLear at Dromana by 1864. One of his sons, George,planted orchards, on what became Spencer Jackson's Panoramic Estate of 1927,and started Dyson Bus lines. Another son, Jack,had the following children,according to Colin: Mary or Martha,John (Bunny), "Babe" (Mrs Thornell of Somerville), and Bill (Squeaker.) Bill Dyson and wife are pictured on P.85 and I wanted to give the wife a name. Jack's death notice lists his children. There was a Mary and a Martha (Babe, Mrs Thornell.)

DYSON.-On August 16, at Alfred Hospital, John Charles, of Dromana, loved husband of Margaret Mary, and father of Mary(deceased). John, Martha (Mrs. Thornell,Somerville), and William, aged 81 years.
(P.2, Argus,16-8-1943.)

N.B. A NOTE placed here for convenience, not a correction. While I have suggested that Spencer Jackson's 1927 history BEAUTIFUL DROMANA was of an advertorial nature, promoting his Foreshore and Panoramic Estates, a death notice under that submitted by the family of Jack's brother, George (mentioned earlier), shows that the DROMANA DYNAMO did not serve as progress association president,get a road to the summit (funded in part by the huge 1928 ball-see ILLUSTRATIONS p.186), pay for historic plaques and write his history just to make more money.

DYSON. –On July 27, at Dromana, George
Robert Dyson, a truly noble character,
much-esteemed friend of Spencer Jackson.
(P.2, Argus,28-7-1944.)

N.B.(Also a note.)Colin said on page 84 that George's brother, Jack,spent his time working in the bush. It seems that his house in Palmerston Avenue, east of Pier St (Panoramic Estate) was called St Benedict's and his work in the bush took him to the vicinity of Roberts Rd, Main Ridge. Perhaps he worked in Alexander Shand's old Steam Saw Mill near Main Creek on the Roberts' farm.(Sale notice in my RED HILL POST 1940 journal.)

DYSON (nee Roberts). –On the 13th September,at St. Benedicts, Dromana, to Mr. and Mrs.J. B*. Dyson, Dromana — a daughter.(P.1, Argus, 15-10-1924.)
*If this initial is correct, it would probably be Jack's son John (Bunny) and the assumption of how he met his wife would still stand, as he probably worked with his father after leaving school at 12 and was discovering that the other sex didn't really have girl germs.

Bunny and Squeaky Dyson, sons of Jack, both served in W.W.1., as did a son of Martha Ellen Dyson who married James Clydesale (P.84.)

Honouring ANZACS
dromana-vic.honouringanzacs.net.au/search-anzacs.php?...Dromana...


ANZACS born in Dromana, VIC
John Alexander Davey Create Anzac Certificate
Service Number: 138
Place of Birth: Dromana, VIC, Australia
Place of Enlistment: Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Next of Kin: Davey, Mary Anne (mother)

BUNNY.
John Burns Dyson Create Anzac Certificate
Service Number: 326
Place of Birth: Dromana, VIC, Australia
Place of Enlistment: Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Next of Kin: Dyson, John (father)

SQUEAKY.
William Robert Dyson Create Anzac Certificate
Service Number: 1668
Place of Birth: Dromana, VIC, Australia
Place of Enlistment: Dromana, VIC, Australia
Next of Kin: Dyson, John (father)

FOR FURTHER DETAILS, SEE:
DYSON, William Robert - Details
https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=87241
Address, Same as next of kim. Marital status, Single. Age at embarkation, 18. Next of kin, Father, John Dyson, Dromana, Victoria. Enlistment date, 21 April 1915.

DYSON, John Burns - Details
https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=87218
Next of kin, Father, John Dyson, Spring Hill, Dromana, Victoria. Enlistment date, 6 May 1916. Rank on enlistment, Private. Unit name, Machine Gun Company 15, ...

CLYDESDALE, William Dyson - Details
https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=56146
Weight, 145 lbs. Next of kin, Brother, M Clydesdale, Dromana. Previous military service, Nil. Enlistment date, 25 February 1915. Date of enlistment from Nominal ...


**************************************************************************

NOTES.
P.83.William Alexander Gibson, third son of Walter and Margaret (nee Purdie) does not seem to have married, being only mentioned as an uncle in his 1949 death notice. Therefore William Gibson, pictured on page 83, was not Big Will and was most likely a son of Adam Gibson and Mary Ann (nee McLear), William Thomas Gibson (listed as one of Big Will's nephews.) If this assumption is correct, his wife, also pictured on page 83, was Minnie.
(P.2, Argus,

GIBSON William Thomas Died 11/07/1965 Wife Minnie 11/07/1965


Wife Minnie
G - N - Australian Cemeteries
www.australiancemeteries.com/vic/mornington
.../dromanagn_data.htm

Colin knew nothing about Walter and Margaret's second son. No wonder,because John probably lived far away from Dromana.

GIBSON-CLYNE.—On the 23rd inst, at the residence of
the bride's parents, Fairy Bower, Lake Rowan, by
the Rev. C. Thomson, John, second son of Walter
Gibson, Glenholm, Dromana, to Ellie, eldest
daughter of George Clyne, Fairy Bower, Lake Rowan.
(P. 1, Argus, 31-5-1882.)

It is of interest that Big Will was christened in Moorooduc. This would have meant Mornington. Dromana had no church of any type in 1868, the Union church being constructed about a decade later.

William Alexander Gibson
Australia, Births and Baptisms
Name: William Alexander Gibson
Gender: Male
Christening Date: 24 Aug 1868
Christening Place: Moorooduc, Victoria, Australia
Birth Date: 09 May 1868
Name Note: Dromana, Victoria, Australia
Father's Name: Walter Gibson
Mother's Name: Margaret Gibson


P.88.SHAW. Additional information.

The Shaw-McKeown Reserve was given that name in recent years but shamefully the history board explaining the name was defaced in record time. (view report - Mornington Peninsula Shire
www.mornpen.vic.gov.au/files/656900ff-949d.../110905ca_rep_26.pdf
May 9, 2011 - Proposed Naming of Reserve at 26 Atunga Terrace, Dromana – ... Dromana the 'Shaw McKeown Reserve' after two of Dromana's pioneering )

Mr. Archibald Vine Shaw, of Kangerong, Dromana, died on Tuesday, aged 63 years. Mr Shaw was one of the leading citizens of Dromana, and was a councillor of the Shire of Flinders for more than 20 years, during which he was president on two occasions. Mr. Shaw held office in almost every semi-public institution in Dromana for many years, and conducted the guest house Kangerong for nearly 46 years. (P.6,Argus,27-10-1932.)


P.178.The 1930's depression affected Dromana too. Colin stated that Passiflora was on the Harrison property, (which probably included Thomas Appleyard and George Peatey's grants by that time, giving a total of 397 acres 1rood and 32 perches fronting the west side of Harrisons Rd. The following indicates that the Passiflora employees mentioned by Colin were again looking for a job before the end of 1938.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5
AT THREE O CLOCK ON THE PROPERTY
under Instruction from Mr H Chapman 313 Little Collins Street Melbourne Chartered Accountant (Aust.) as the Receiver for the Debenture Holders of Passiflora Plantations Pty Ltd
RECEIVER'S REALISING AUCTION
Passiflora Plantations, Dromana-Red Hill.
395 ACRES (About 179 Acres in Passionfruit),
First to be Offered As A Whole But If Not Sold to be Offered In Subdivision, Comprising ? ACREAGE BLOCKS OF 16 ACRES TO 140 ACRES EACH
Extensive Outbuildings. Pine Plantations Netting fences &c.
Terms 25 Per Cent Deposit, Balance 3 Years at 5 Per Cent
Plans and full Details from Manager on Property or Auctioneer
COGHILL AND SON,79 Swanston Street Melbourne and Canterbury, Cent. 2793 W.2059.
(P.19,Argus, 17-9-1938.)

2 comment(s), latest 3 years ago

CONNECTIONS BETWEEN THE ROSEBUD AND GEELONG AREAS, VIC., AUST.

ROSEBUD AND GEELONG.
A connection between the two areas goes back to the first (brief) settlement of Victoria by the British Government near Sorrento in 1803. David Collins was in charge and used lack of fresh water as an excuse to relocate to Hobart where he would be less under the thumb of the Governor in Sydney.

One convict who was not relocated was William Buckley who had escaped and walked through Rosebud and around the Bay. The aborigines near Geelong thought he was a ghost, as their belief was that dead aborigines were white, and took him in as one of their own.

The next white men that Buckley saw, 32 years later, were lookouts posted at Indented Head near Portarlington by John Batman, including Jemmy Gumm (after whom Gumm's Corner at Keilor was named.) Some of the aborigines were plotting to murder them and Buckley's warning (in a language almost forgotten) saved their lives.

The next two connections involve the Cairns and Jennings families, original purchasers of Hindhope Estate lots.

In 1852, Boneo pioneer, Robert Cairns came out with his wife Mary (nee Drysdale) and her family. No prizes for guessing where the Drysdales settled. Some of Robert's relatives appear (from trove) to have also been involved on the west side of the bay. Two of Robert's relatives gained their nicknames because of their involvement at Rosebud, Back Road Bob of Fernvilla near Bayview Rd and Rosebud Ted.

George Jennings (Dod) was born at Drysdale in 1857 and playedfooty for Geelong in the 1870's. He married Hannah Wiffen in 1879 and they had seven children. Affected by the 1890's depression he lost his land as so many did and the family became nomads, farming at Flinders (where his son married Catherine Tuck), Cranbourne and Camperdown, before settling at Kariah in 1914. This 212 acre farm fronted Dundas St, Browns Rd and Weeroona St. After onion growing failed, the family changed to dairying, later expanding into Rosebud. The wooden statue on the east corner of Rosebud Pde (outside the former dairy) gives some extra detail mentioning the later dairy site at Jennings Court (Melway169 K7.)

Other connections between the two sides of the bay involve the wooden boat building Laccos, William Ferrier (hero of the La Bella tragedy at Warrnambool in 1905), both subjects of my journals, the east side fishermen dispatching their catches to Melbourne by rail from Queenscliff and several pioneer fishermen at Flinders coming from Queenscliff.

Joe Peters the black fiddler, a native of the Cape Verde Islands off the westernmost point of Africa also moved across the bay from Rosebud. Many natives of this Portugese territory were involved in lime burning on both sides of the bay.

CONNOR, PHELAN, KEILOR,VIC., AUST.

Owen Connor and Patrick Phelan were partners in a firm of spirit merchants and pioneers of Keilor. I have mentioned them in previous journals. Patrick Phelan was a member of parliament who became insolvent and lost his grant, Spring Park, which was west of "Niddrie", and is today bisected by MacNamara Avenue to the north boundary of Fraser St houses and included most of the sites of the Niddrie Primary and Secondary Schools with Mirams Court indicating its western boundary.

Much of Patrick Phelan's story can be found on the Victorian Parliament website ("Remember?") but Angela Evans' KEILOR PIONEERS: DEAD MEN DO TELL TALES gives much information about Spring Park and Springfield including Owen Connor's letter written with a hilarious Irish accent. Springfield was west of Spring Park to the Roberts Rd corner, both properties being later subdivided by Henry Roberts. Angela mentioned the Connor/Phelan marital connection,which is made clear in the following extract from a court case.Owen Connor had lost Keilor Binn Farm, the Doutta Galla portion of the Township of Keilor south of Keilor Rd, (which later became John Dodd's farm,through his marriage to publican Goudie's daughter-who insisted that it be called Brimbank) to Hugh Glass and had returned to Ireland. (The book has a photo of Owen's home there.) I'm not sure whether William Connor was Owen's brother or son. William Connor and his wife Sarah later farmed the Keilor Park area for many decades.

I apologise for being vague (e.g.about the publican whose name I think was Matthew etc.) but I though a brief journal was necessary to make this additional information available; I had found it by chance and might never locate it again, but I cannot afford to lose focus on my Bulla and Broady journals,hence this piece entirely from memory.

Patrick Phelan's gripe was that Eaton had ejected the family from its home and sold crops for less than the true value.

PAGE 1s, ARGUS, 15-3-1872, LAW REPORT (EXTRACT ONLY.)
PHELAN V. EATON.
An application for the appointment of a
receiver.
Mr. Bunny for the plaintiffs ; and Mr.
Stephen and Mr. T. A'Beckett for the de-
fendant.
From the plaintiffs' bill it appeared that in
1865 Mr. W. Connor settled the Springfield
farm, Doutta Galla, near Broadmeadows*, upon
his sister Ellen, the wife of a farmer named
Patrick Phelan, and appointed the defendant
a clerk in the employ of the Government,
trustee of the land. Under the deed
the rents and profits arising from the
farm werE settled upon Mrs. Phelan,
with a resulting interest to her children, the
present plaintiffs. In 1870 she died, and an
arrangement was made by which her husband
continued in possession of the farm as ma-
nager of it for the two children beneficially
interested.


* Now,that is vague! Near Keilor would be a better description Dumbo!

CORRECTION RE WILLIAM JOHN FERRIER'S HOUSE AT ROSEBUD, VIC., AUST.

William John Ferrier called his house in the Rosebud Fishing Village "Seven" because it was on crown allotment 7 of the village, now 858 Pt. Nepean Rd, Rosebud. Rate research led me to conclude that the present house had been built by 1894 and was thus the house that the hero of the La Bella wreck at Warrnambool in 1905 had occupied.

However, my history column in ROSEBUD RIPPLE has led to me being contacted by the grandson of George Fountain whose mother and aunt wrote histories of Rosebud, which are every bit as valuable as Isabel Moresby's ROSEBUD FLOWER OF THE PENINSULA and will become a new journal when I finish transcribing them.

As will be revealed in Laura Fountain's memories in ROSEBUD (VIC., AUST.) HISTORY ISSUING FROM THE FOUNTAINS, the PRESENT house on crown allotment 7 Rosebud Fishing Village (858 Pt. Nepean Rd, Rosebud) was NOT occupied by William John Ferrier. George Fountain bought C/A 7 from him, probably in 1916 when the Ferriers moved to Queenscliff, and demolished the cottage occupied by Antonio Bosina from 1894 till he became blind, Mrs Lennie Edwards 1903- 1910 and the Ferriers till 1916. The present house was built by George Fountain and later sold to the Archers.