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FARMING ABOUT BROADMEADOWS, VICTORIA AUSTRALIA IN 1873.

FARMING ABOUT BROADMEADOWS

This article was discovered during a Corcoran search in connection with my HOCTOR journal and seems to confirm my long-held suspicion that Peter Corcoran who bought North Pole Farm on the west corner of Keilor and North Pole (Milleara)roads had been a member of the Broadmeadows Corcoran family.

Discussion of this article (P.7, Leader, 19-7-1873) will commence when the HOCTOR journal is finished. Hopefully the name and location of each farm mentioned will be specified.

Edmond Dunn's 1100 acres consisted of Viewpoint (c/a's 1 and 2,section 4, parish of Tullamarine, 323 acres between today's Camp Hill Park at Tullamarine Junction and the Mickleham Rd/Lackenheath Drive corner, which he purchased in 1849 after farming on Jamiesons's Special Survey between Dromana and Mt Martha with his brother Henry) and Stewarton (section 5, parish of Tullamarine, 785 acres north of Viewpoint to Forman St, the southern boundary of Broadmeadows Township.) Both farms went east to the Moonee Ponds Creek. Gutsy Edmond took on the might of the Melbourne Hunt Club at about this time, inspiring the formation of a league to prevent crops, fences and animals being damaged by hunters.

John Kerr's 3600 acres were not one piece of land but certainly included Pasture Hill (383 acres) and Bayview Farm (a tad under 345 acres) which he bought on 1-12-1874. It did not include Glenroy Farm which John Cochrane had been leasing at the time. (See the subdivision plan, P. 78, BROADMEADOWS A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.)

Alexander Gibb's 550 acres comprised all but 90 acres of section 5 parish of Will Will Rook. Meadowbank was the northern half of the grant, 320 acres, so he'd bought or was leasing 230 acres of his relative,James Robertson's* Gowrie Park, south to today's Hilton St where it adjoined Box Forest (Hadfield.)
*Robertson (not a Keilor farmer as stated by Andrew Lemon) and the Gibbs were related because Robertson and James Gibb, Alexander's brother, had married Coupar girls.

add crown allotments for these farms and provide links for parish maps
Cameron's farm, not discussed in the article, was Ruthvensfield, most of today's Roxburgh Park.

FAIRVIEW was across Somerton Rd from Glenarthur.

BROOK HILL was between Fairview and today's Meadow Heights.

GLENARTHUR lies under the western half of Greenvale Reservoir. John Bond owned Glenarthur by the time of his death in 1902. His widow sold Glenarthur in about 1915.

THORNGROVE was granted to Big Clarke and became the property of James Hearn senior who'd married his sister. James Hearn was the last lessee of the Mount Martha run and bought the grants for much of the Mount Martha coastline, the pre-emptive right (Dalkeith)and land east to the Tubbarubba diggings.

add links for journals about people mentioned in this journal

THE HOCTORS, PIONEERS OF BROADMEADOWS, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA..

Broadmeadows was the name of a township, the site for which was reserved in 1838,and the township being proclaimed in 1850. Like most townships it straddled a stream, in this case, the Moonee Moonee Chain of Ponds (Moonee Ponds Creek)and thus was in the parishes of Tullamarine and Will Will Rook, south of the creek and Kenny St to Forman St. The township was the headquarters of the Broadmeadows municipality until 1928 when the town hall was built at East Broadmeadows near the station.

In 1857 Broadmeadows became a road district and celebrated its 125th anniversary of municipal government as a road board, shire and city on 27 November 1982.
(BROADMEADOWS: A FORGOTTEN HISTORY, Andrew Lemon, commissioned in 1980 to celebrate this anniversary.)

When I started researching the history of the area near Tullamarine in August 1988, I did not realise that I'd known a member of the pioneering Hoctor family since about 1972 when I played footy with Doutta Stars and Ed Hoctor was the club's president during my three years wearing the yellow star. Ed., later a City of Broadmeadows councillor and mayor, was responsible for the renaming of the portion of Black St SOUTH OF THE CREEK as Coopers Hill Drive. Ed introduced me to Jack Hoctor, who with Gordon Connor and Colin Williams possessed memories of the area from before W.W.1.

Jack was born in the old coach house on the Broad St corner with the assistance of midwife, Nurse Mitchell, who delivered many of the township's children and took absolute control, allowing no interference from the fathers. He was the town's lamplighter and delivered bread for Anderson's bakery (between the bridge and the Foresters' Hall. Jack provided much information about his family and the farm called Rocklaw whose position I could never really pinpoint and is thus the reason for this journal. He told me about the sale of the Dundoald estate in 1929 which was confirmed by George Lloyd's MICKLEHAM ROAD 1920- 1952 shortly afterwards and trove over two decades later. Boundy's store would sell goods on barter, such as for a supply of eggs. The footy team's goal and behind posts were kept at the Broady Pub but one of them fed the fire one cold night. When dances were held at the Foresters' hall, people were allowed to leave their vehicles and horses in Anderson's yard next door. The remount was used to spell draught horses from the army camp. Jack's older brother enlisted for W.W. 1 and Jack's mum would send young Jack on the 3 mile walk to the camp to deliver goodies that she had baked. Some of the Broady boys were pretty wild but policeman Jim Ahern kept them in line; it's doubtful though whether he discovered which lads were responsible for whitewashing a horse left overnight at George Kingshott's smithy.Butcher, Robert Cargill's young son was accidentally shot by young Graco and there was ill feeling towards the Graco family which moved to Keilor.(This story has been confirmed on trove and the Graco farm near Keilor found on the Doutta Galla parish map.) The above constitutes a fraction of the stories provided by Jack.
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TIMOTHY HOCTOR.
Mr Timothy Hoctor, who died on 28th ultimo at Broadmeadows, was an old and much respected resident of that district. He was a kindly citizen, aged 77 years, and leaves a widow and grown up family, with whom there is much sympathy. (P.3, Kilmore Free Press, 6-7-1916.)

Colin Williams' parents moved onto Broombank at Tullamarine and had a man called Timothy Hoctor working on their farm. As farmers worked from dawn to dusk, they suggested that he could sleep in their barn to avoid having to add a walk in the dark from and back to the township to his already long working day. He tried it once but heard gnawing in the night and said he wouldn't try it again because he was likely to wake up and find that he'd been eaten up entirely. (The Irish certainly had a way with words!) Whether he was the deceased above might be confirmed when Victorian BDM comes back online.

CORRESPONDENCE
RECRUITING.
(To the Editor.)
Sir - Kindly allot me space in your columns to contradict the rumour current in this district to the effect that
I induced O*.Kingshott to enlist. I would like to say here for the benefit of those who think they have an axe
to grind, that O. Kingshott enlisted of his own free will, and not through any inducement of mine. With all respect due to the man who has decided to fight for his country, I think it is time those others concerned, who make the balls in the dark, should come out in the light and fire them. It is hardly fair at this time that one of two knock kneed patriots, conscious of their short comings, should seek to side-step their own shufflings by holding their neighbour up to ridicule.--Yours, etc.
TIMOTHY P. HOCTOR. Broadmeadows, 14/3/16.
(The Essendon Gazette and Keilor, Bulla and Broadmeadows Reporter Thursday 16 March 1916 p 3)
* Owen Kingshott.

Thomas Dunne was Timothy Hoctor's brother in law. His farm at Greenvale was Belmont between Harpsdale and Crowe's Hill at about Melway 385 F6. Timothy Hoctor had two pieces of land on Dunhelen Lane east of Mickleham Rd, the larger piece being on the south side. It was no surprise that the two families became related because most pioneers married near-neighbours. THOMAS DUNNE'S OBITUARY

It would seem that Timothy had married Mary Dunne. Thomas Dunne was buried at Keilor, as was Timothy Hoctor.

HOCTOR.—On the 28th June, 1916, at his residence,Broadmeadows, Timothy, beloved husband of Mary, and beloved father of M. B., M. T., N., and J., aged 77 years. (No flowers.) R.I.P.

HOCTOR.—The Friends of the late Mr.TIMOTHY HOCTOR are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of interment, the Keilor* Cemetery. The funeral will leave his late residence, Broadmeadows*, THIS DAY (Friday, 30th June, 1916), at ?? (Both P.1, Argus, 30-6-1916.)

*Part of the funeral notice was illegible and the digitisation wrongly stated his residence as Broadford and the cemetery as Fawkner. (mjdunstan had made some wrong guesses in his text corrections.)
Timothy was buried at Keilor, date of death given as 28-6-1916, but his year of birth is wrongly stated as 1888.
Timothy Hoctor
It was probably Timothy Patrick, their son, who was born in 1888.

HOCTOR.— On the 24th January, at private hospital, Essendon, Timothy Patrick (Murphy), the second beloved son of Mary and the late Timothy Hoctor, of Broadmeadows, loving brother of Maria, Bridge, Mick, Ted(deceased), Nell (Mrs. M. Lawless), Frank(deceased), and Jim. R.I.P. Nearer my God to Thee.(P.11, The Age, 1-2-1930.)

HOCTOR. On November 11, at her residence, Broadmeadows. Mary, relict of the late Timothy Hoctor, and dearly beloved mother of Maria, Michael (deceased), Bridget, Annie (deceased), Michael, Timothy (deceased), Edward (deceased), Ellen (Mrs. M.Lawless), Francis (deceased), and James, in her 95th year. Requiescat in pace.

HOCTOR. - On November 11, Mary, dearly loved mother-in-law of Laurie, loving gran of Jack, Ted, Frank, Jim, Bernie, Tim, Mary,Carmel, Kevin, and Laura, and great-grand-mother of John, Marjorie, Edward, David,Glenice, Terry, Margaret, Bernard, and Janice Hoctor, in her 95th year. Requiescat in pace.

HOCTOR.-Requiem Mass for the repose of the soul of the late Mrs. MARY HOCTOR will be celebrated at St. Anne's Church*, Broadmeadows, THIS DAY (Tuesday), at 10 a.m. The Funeral will leave the church at the conclusion of the Mass for the Keilor Cemetery. (All P. 2 Argus, 12-11-1946.)

Although Broadmeadows Township had had a catholic church for a long time, many of the town's Catholics were buried at Keilor or Bulla rather than the Will Will cemetery near the army camp. Andrew Lemon didn't even mention St Anne's and in my efforts to find when St Anne's started, I discovered that many township Catholics must have been married elsewhere.
CHURCH HAS ITS FIRST MARRIAGE FOR 65 YEARS


TO BE CONTINUED.

MICHAEL HOCTOR.
Michael had arrived in about 1857 and married Margaret Corcoran.
HOCTOR.—On the 20th August at his residence "Rocklaw," Broadmeadows Michael the dearly beloved husband of Margaret and beloved father of John, James, Peter, Michael, Mrs. Mahoney, Mrs. O'Sullivan Mrs. Beahan, and Liza, native of King's County, Ireland, aged 82 years, and colonist of 57 years. R.I.P.(P.1, Argus, 22-8-1914.)


A native of Brunswick, but one of Broadmeadows' residents, died at latter place at advanced age of her 89th year,on Thursday last, when Mrs Margaret Hoctor was called to her reward. The deceased lady was relict of the late Mr.Michael Hoctor, and reared a large and respectable family, with whom many friends and neighbors sympathise.(P.3, Kilmore Free Press, 6-7-1933.)

HOCTOR.—On the 29th June, 1933, at her residence Rocklaw, Broadmeadows East, Margaret,dearly beloved wife of the late Michael Hoctor, dearly beloved mother of Bridget-(Mrs. Mahoney),Mary Ann (Mrs. O'Sullivan), Eliza (Mrs. May), John, Maggie (Mrs. Beahan), James (Boinka), Peter, and Michael, loved sister of Daniel Corcoran,
aged 88 years and 3 months. Native of Brunswick. May her soul rest in peace. (P.1, Argus, 30-6-1933.)

YOUNG AITKEN COLLEGE AT GREENVALE, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA APPRECIATES THE HISTORY OF ITS SITE AND AREA, AS DOES GREENVALE PRIMARY.

AITKEN COLLEGE
Aitken College opened in Term 1 of 1999, and has remained steadfast in maintaining its historic and agricultural links.

The College name (Aitken) has links to John Aitken, who immigrated to Van Diemans Land from Scotland in about 1825. He sailed across the Tasman to the Port Phillip district in 1836, bringing his sheep across to graze on pasture land in the outer limits of the area north of Melbourne. Up until the purchase of the College property from the Gambles in late 1998, the property was still a working farm. The School names (Fairview, Cumberland, Dunhelen and Brookhill) refer to property names associated with the local area and were so named by the settlers and land owners of the time. Fairview was a farm property owned by J. Bond (and possibly bought from John Aitken). The Cumberland estate is located near Woodlands Park. The ruins of the original homestead and some remnants of the original garden are still on the site. The Dunhelen property was built at some time after 1850. The bluestone barn still exits on the site. The Glen Arthur property was owned by Joseph and Celia Trotman; and William, the son of Robert Shankland, a Scot who arrived in Australia in 1841 owned the property named Brookhill. The House names (Brodie, Cameron, Clarke and Millar) are derived from the family names of early pioneer settlers and prominent locals. The Brodies, Camerons, Millars and Clarkes have a long association with the area. The Brodie brothers bought land in the area around Mickleham to service their sheep around the 1840s. The Clarkes also bought land in the area and took over land owned by the Brodie brothers and John Aitken. The Millar family had a local involvement in the area from around the late 1860s. Donald Cameron purchased the land known as Ruthvenfield in 1848, to be later renamed by its new owner, Thomas Brunton, in the 1890s as Roxburgh Park. The historical links that we have maintained is a tribute to the vision of the pioneers who colonised this area.

COMMENTS.
I am yet to be convinced that Aitken's Hill was named after John Aitken. There is only one reference to anyone named AITKEN in connection with the area on trove, none in connection with Mickleham, Yuroke or Craigieburn. There is no mention of the area in John Aitken's biography. The City of Hume must examine Broadmeadows shire's rate records to establish if the hill was named after G.Aitken, Broadmeadows in 1895.
MELBOURNE MARKETS. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5. THE MILLS.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 6 June 1895 p 3 Detailed Lists, Results, Guides
... Ce sold -10 K Bullen, Glenro) ti, G Aitken, Broadmeadows. A. M'LEÍN and Co sold - Bullocks-If)
MARKETS. MELBOURNE MARKETS. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5. THE MILLS.
The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 8 June 1895 p 35 Detailed Lists, Results, Guides
... . Aitken, Broadmeadows. ^A. M 'LEAN and Co. sold :-Bullocks-19, XV. Moore, ..fSoloonook, to £0 10s ... , ltockbank; 2, XV. Marshall, Saltwater River. M'PiiAit, BROS, and Co. sold10, R. BuIIen, Glenroy; 6, G ...

Aitken College is on the northern half of crown allotment 9O of the parish of Yuroke, consisting of 361 acres, and known as Springfield. This was on the northwest corner of Mickleham and Somerton Rds and extended 1.62 km to the north, the middle of Melway 178 K3.To the east were "Glenarthur" and Robert Shankland's "Waltham" which are now the west and east halves of the Greenvale reservoir. East of Waltham was Cameron's STONY FIELDS, as revealed by the Broadmeadows rate book of 1863 but this descriptive and hardly glamorous name was soon changed to Ruthvenfield by the same family, and later to Roxburgh Park by Brunton.(Many E.D.F.L. commentators fail to realise that it rhymes with Edinburgh!)

William Shankland's Brook Hill was south of Waltham to just south of Kirkwell Court but Shankland Drive and the Shankland Wetlands are east across the transmission line in today's Meadow Heights. John Bond's Fairview was south of Glenarthur and west of Brook Hill with its south boundary just south of Mossgiel Avenue.JOHN BOND OWNED AND OCCUPIED GLENARTHUR WHEN HE DIED IN 1902. East of Fairview and fronting Mickleham Rd was c/a 2D, which like Springfield was divided into north and south halves of about 180 acres. The north half became Hughie Williamson's "Dunvegan". Hugh's son's memoirs form a large part of the Greenvale Primary School history which explains why a fairly recent school has such a low number.

Springfield became Springfield North and Wally French's dairy farm ON THE SOUTH HALF. Desmond Gamble was a descendant of early squatter, John Brock who, like the Jacksons, Headlam, George Evans and many others,was dispossessed by Big Clarke's special survey circa 1850 and became a pioneer of the area near Latrobe University. When he bought Springvale North, he renamed it BROCKLANDS. In 1933, Edward and Jean Gamble were pupils of Greenvale State School 890 at the Section Rd corner.

Desmond Gamble, the second youngest in his family, was raised at Barfold near Kyneton and went to Dookie College where his brother, Willie from Berwick was principal and then managed a farm in Plenty Rd, South Morang. In 1915 at the age of 28, he married May Isobel Brock. Desmond died at the age of 57 and was buried at the Fawkner Cemetery. His sons, Bill and Ted carried on the milking of 100 cows to supply Cheffers and Collings' dairy at the corner of Scott and Buckley St, Essendon. They also supplied Butterworth's dairy at the corner of Winifred and Glass St in Essendon. Jean Gamble married Jack Simmie of Harpsdale after they'd shouted love* at each other during many sets at the Greenvale Tennis Club (*the score meaning the egg shaped 0 of course!) Nine years later Ted Gamble married Joy Simmie. Helen Gamble who supplied much of this biography in about 1990 married Ken Souter* at the outbreak of W.W.2 ON 2-9-1939. Ken was Principal of Parklands Primary School in Airport West when he retired. The Souters were farming John McKerchar's "Greenvale" which Robert Millar renamed as "The Elms" circa 1990.

All information about locations of farms and the Gambles comes from the G volume of my DICTIONARY HISTORY OF TULLAMARINE AND MILES AROUND.

*The Souters were involved in the history of Dunhelen immediately north of Brocklands, farming in partnership with George Hossack.See my journal, A CHRONOLOGY OF THE OCCUPANTS OF DUNHELEN NORTH OF GREENVALE RESERVOIR.

THE CUMBERLAND RUINS ARE AT MELWAY 5 C1.

See my journal GEORGE SINCLAIR BRODIE'S PROPERTIES BETWEEN SUNBURY AND MERRI CREEK. By the way, George might have been a mate of John Aitken and named Aitkens Hill in his honour.

GREENVALE PRIMARY SCHOOL HISTORY

JOHN C. COCHRANE, PIONEER FROM 31-3-1850, SCIENTIFIC FARMER NORTH OF MELBOURNE AND NEAR GEELONG, VIC., AUST.

POSTSCRIPT, 14-5-2018.A "COCHRANE, FAIRVIEW" search revealed that John C.Cochrane had died by the time of Matilda's wedding and that his second given name was COWAN. Also revealed was an engagement notice* and that JOHN COWAN COCHRANE HAD DIED BETWEEN 4-4-1903 AND 15-10-1904. Then, (Eureka!), his death notice was found.
COCHRANE.—On the 10th May, at his residence, "Fairview," Keilor-road, Essendon,John Cowan Cochrane, land valuer, formerly of "Aitkenside," Ceres, aged 77 years." Interred Melbourne: Cemetery 12th. May.
(P.1, Geelong Advertiser, 23-3-1903.)


BARBER—COCHRANE.—On October 4th,at "Barrabool House," Highton, by the Rev. James Jackson, of St. George's Pres-
byterian Church, Geelong, G. P. Barber, of Staywood Park, Warrnambool, to Matilda Jane, second daughter of the late John Cowan Cochrane, of "Fairview," Keilor Road. Essendon.(P.1, Geelong Advertiser, 15-10-1904.)

* Joseph Alexander, Aikenside, Ceres, son of Mr.John Cowan Cochrane, Fairview, Essendon, and May Isabel, third daughter of Mrs. J. Ritchie, Coulter Haugh, Geelong,Victoria, and the late Mr. John Ritchie,Blackwood Station, Penshurst. The marriage will take place on April 25, at the residence of the bride's mother.
(P.43, The Australasian,4-4-1903.)


POSTSCRIPT 2. A google search for John Cowan Cochrane revealed that he was Essendon's first teacher as noted in comments. That would explain why he was farming at Glenroy by 1853, whether he was at the Catholic school (forerunner of St Monica's) or the Pascoe Vale National School; it was the latter. The National School was at Melway 28 J2 at the end of Government Road in the angle where Five Mile Creek meets the Moonee Ponds Creek. From there it is only 190 chains (3.8 km)to Rhodes Pde, the southern boundary of "Glenroy Farm".

The Newsletter (Essendon Historical Society Inc Established 1970 Moonee Ponds Courthouse Museum)
Issue No 238 Nov—Dec 2016

"Bob Chalmers then introduced our Guest Speaker, Bob Mackay, who gave an illustrated talk on the Pascoe Vale
National School which opened in July 1850 and was the fore-runner of the Essendon State School No. 483 in
Raleigh Street.
Bob, who is researching the Pascoe Vale area, has been trying to compile a list of the students who attended the
school in its formative years and where they came from.
The first teachers were Irish couple, John Cowan Cochrane and his wife, Jane. Bob used Andrew Jones’ history of the Essendon Primary School, “Follow the Gleam” as a basis of information, and a letter, written by Cochrane in August 1850 to his friend, Tom Mackey in New Zealand, gave a good description of the school and how it operated.
The school closed in the early 1860s and was moved to the Raleigh Street site, opening in 1863 as the Essendon
Common School under the charge of Head Teacher,Robert Grandison Taylor. "
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Extract from my journal, A CHRONOLOGY OF OCCUPANTS OF DUNHELEN.

1859.
COCHRANE'S CLYDE.—
This pure and justly popular Clydesdale Stallion will stand during the season at his owner's farm, Dunhelen, by Broadmeadows; and travel the surrounding districts.etc. (Bell's Life in Victoria and Sporting Chronicle (Melbourne, Vic. : 1857 - 1868) Saturday 24 September 1859 p 4 )

1860.
SCIENTIFIC JOHN COCHRANE P.6, Argus, 8-11-1860.

1861.
COCHRANE.—On the 28th inst., at Dunhelen, from the effects of teething, Samuel, the beloved son of John C. and Jane Cochrane, aged thirteen months and twelve days. (P.4, Argus, 30-8-1861.)

THE Friends of Mr. J. C. COCHRANE are respectfully informed that the remains of his infant son Samuel will be removed from his residence, Dunhelen, this morning, at 10 a.m., and pass the Moonee Ponds* about 1 p.m., for interment in the Melbourne General Cemetery.(P.8, Argus, 30-8-1861.)

The occupant was also certainly J.C. (John) Cochrane who was farming on "Glenroy Farm" in 1874 when it and farms to the north in the late Donald Kennedy's Glenroy estate were sold. (P. 78, BROADMEADOWS A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.)

*As Moonee Ponds meant anywhere along the creek, "the Moonee Ponds" probably meant the timber bridge linking the two sections of Ardlie St in Broadmeadows Township (that part of today's Westmeadows south of Kenny St.)The shire of Broadmeadows went south only to Woodlands St, so the following allocation was probably for the historic extant bluestone Fawkner St bridge which replaced the timber bridge about eight years after Samuel Cochrane's funeral.
" to Broadmeadows, for a bridge at Moonee Ponds, £500" (P.14, Leader, 14-8-1869. THE ROADS AND BRIDGES VOTES.)

1862.
SALE OF MR.COCHRANE'S SHORTHORNS
The Farmer's Journal and Gardener's Chronicle (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1864) Saturday 29 March 1862 p 121

JOHN C. COCHRANE.
G.S.Brodie advised at about this time that John C.Cochrane was no longer his agent. It may be at about this time that John moved to Glenroy Farm; he was certainly there in 1870. In 1874 Glenroy Farm was sold by the Donald Kennedy executors and bought by William McCulloch. John had arrived from Ireland on 31-3-1850 and was on "Glenroy" by 1853*, as was Robert McDougall, famed Shorthorn breeder with whom John had arguments later about the breed.**
At the end of 1875, John advertised his services as an agent.(P.2, Leader, 18-12-1875.SHORTHORN CATTLE, column 2.) By October 1876, however he won prizes at the spring show at Geelong, his address given as Newtown (obviously near Geelong, not Collingwood.)

John's new area had probably been beautified by Scots with purple flowers in the garden beds, which like rabbits had got out of control and John and another farmer were charged under the Thistle Act. In October, his address was more specifically given as Highton House when he clarified the pedigree of a shorthorn bull he had sold for 1000 guineas.John continued the farming reports he'd written about his former abodes and in 1883 his address was Barwon House.

By 1884, he was at Aitkenside, Ceres, via Geelong. BARRABOOL-HILLS and was still there in 1889 when he was sued by a bank. While retaining Aitkenside, he seems to have returned to his old haunts, at Oaklands Junction during the 1890's and by 1899 was on "Fairview"*** on the south side of Keilor Rd straddling Spring Gully. John had died at Fairview by 1915 and his widow was living at Nantes street, Newtown, Geelong when their youngest son, John R. was engaged. John C.Cochrane of Victorian Railways who married a daughter of James Swan was possibly John's nephew as it's unlikely that he'd given two sons the same given name.
* P.10, THE STOPOVER THAT STAYED, Grant Aldous.)
** P. 7, Argus,16-11-1858 and P.25, The Australasian, 25-9-1880.
*** P.41, The Australasian, 24-6-1899,2nd lst column near bottom.
Powers, Rutherford, and Co. report having sold by auction, at the Newmarket yards, on Tuesday last, 417 pure Border Leicester sheep, on behalf of John C. Cochrane, of Fairview, North Essendon. These comprised the surplus sheep from the vendor's well-known stud.

BARBER.-On the 18th March, at Barrabool street, Highton, Geelong, Matilda J., second daughter of the late J. C. and Jane Cochrane,dearly beloved sister of J. A., J. R., and M.E. Cochrane.(P.17, Argus, 21-3-1936.)

NOW, WHY DID MATILDA'S GIVEN NAME RING A COW BELL? OH, YES.
MATILDA'S 2ND BARON. TO THE EDITOR.
Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1859 - 1926) Tuesday 23 October 1877 p 3 Article
... MATILDA'S 2ND BARON. TO THE EDITOR. I am, etc., JOHN C. COCHRANE. Highton House, October 22nd, 1877 ..

MORE TO COME WHEN VICTORIAN BDM COMES BACK ONLINE (if I remember.) BIRTH RECORDS OF THEIR CHILDREN (ABOVE EXCEPT FOR SAMUEL AND PERHAPS OTHERS) WILL HOPEFULLY REVEAL JANE'S MAIDEN NAME AND THEIR ABODES AT THOSE TIMES AND JOHN C. AND JANE'S DEATH RECORDS WILL MAKE UP FOR THE LACK OF FAMILY NOTICES EXCEPT FOR SAMUEL'S.(The engagement notice for John R.Cochrane and Enid Turner in 1915 was the only one of six family notice results for "John C.Cochrane", the other 5 being the marriage notice for the Victorian Railways bloke of Melbourne. Samuel's death and funeral notices in 1861 were not found in the search so it's lucky that the magic word DUNHELEN found them. Matilda Barber's death notice was found in a "JANE COCHRANE" search.)

2 comment(s), latest 6 days, 8 hours ago

GEORGE SINCLAIR BRODIE'S PROPERTIES BETWEEN SUNBURY AND THE MERRI CREEK, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

By the end of 1865, G.S.Brodie had determined to return home,and placed his remaining land in the hands of stock and station agents. Since about 1990, I have been trying to discover where Brodie properties such as Helensville and Katesville were. I also recall seeing somewhere that the Brodie properties stretched from Bulla to the Merri Creek. Various parish maps and local histories did little to confirm this claim but solving these mysteries remained in the back of my mind ever since.

A breakthrough came when I was researching my occupants of Dunhelen chronology journal. I aim to specify the locations of the above-mentioned farms, the Dunhelen Estate and the Newgrove Estate in the Parish of Mickleham.

There will be problems correlating Melway maps with the Mickleham parish map; uncertainty whether such as McLauchlan and Williamson were grantees or purchased their land from Brodie in the parish of Yuroke and making sense of differing acreages given in advertisements and on parish maps.

An example of these differences is that Guthrie's Paddock was described as 185 acres in an advertisement but c/a 22 (4), parish of Bulla, granted to A.& J. Guthrie on 5-10-1854, which fronted Emu Creek as stated, consisted of 135 acres 3 roods and 10 perches. An assumption will have to be made that 22(4) was indeed Guthrie's Paddock, the discrepancy caused by a misreading of the acreage by the stock and station agent or a Lands Department map copyist. The Dunhelen Estate is described as 5563 acres immediately below, just below that, the 5563 acres is stated to include two other properties and then there's this:
"Dunhelen, of 5563 Acres, being Sections 11,12, 13, l6, 17. l8, 22, 23, and 26 etc., in the parish of Yuroke."


To make matters even more confusing there's no section 26 in the parish of Yuroke and to make sense of a two mile frontage to the Merri Creek, it had to be section 24. This gives a total Dunhelen acreage of 6944 acres, 981 acres more than the 5563 acres stated above and my theory is that, by 1866, G.S.Brodie had already sold section 22 and 23B (a total of roughly 989 acres) to Archibald McLachlan.

Plotting the locations of the various properties will take place later when I've finished the Dunhelen occupants journal but at least I've copied the somewhat contradictory clues*.
(* For example:
"Helensville. containing 653 acres. Katesville, containing 586 acres Guthrie's paddock, containing 185 acres. Situate On the Emu Creek, a permanent stream close to Sunbury."
"Secondly-Katesville, of 583 acres. Sec. 20, parish Bulla "
Crown allotment 20A and 20B, granted to G.S. and R. Brodie consisted of EXACTLY 586 acres so it can be taken as Gospel that Katesville was 20AB, parish of Bulla.

Isaac Batey mentioned in an article, read yesterday, that Richard Brodie* had moved up to Mr Reid's place. This indicates that HELENSVILLE might have consisted of c/a 24(1), 306 acres granted to Richard Brodie and 24(2),347 acres granted to H.Cooper (probably connected with the Constitution Hotel.) Part of a closed road (c/a 2A of 22) was purchased by D.W.Reid on 5-5-1983. It was 3850 links (770 metres) before the Dunsford Track (Lancefield turn off)and the road continued north, forming the western boundary of section 24, before crossing Emu Creek at the Melway 383 D,E 7 border to link with Gellies Rd at 383 E 5, bottom right. My recall of Bulla rate records suggests that the Reids had purchased 24(2)by about 1912 when Isaac Batey's memoirs were published. Therefore I conclude that Helensville was section 24. The Quarry at 383 G9 was the north east corner of KATESTVILLE so Dameeli homestead at 383 F8 is on HELENSVILLE.

RICHARD DIED AT HELENVILLE IN 1872.
Mr. Candler held an inquest at Sunbury on the 19th inst., on the body of Richard Brodie, a landowner living at Helensville, on the Emu Creek. He was fifty-eight years of age and was of unsound mind. (Much detail.)
(P.2, The Age, 23-1-1872.)


THE EVIDENCE. (COPIED FROM THE DUNHELEN JOURNAL.)
1866.
Freehold Estate. — We also report having sold Mr G. S. Brodie's Dunhelen estate consisting of 5,563 acres, to Mr John Edols, for the sum of £27,815. (P.2, Mount Alexander Mail, 5-10-1866.)


P.3, Argus, 9-1-1866 specifies the 5 563 acres as being the Dunhelen, Newgrove and Katesville Estates, all belonging to George Sinclair Brodie.

I.W.Symonds mentioned Helensville and Katesville in "Bulla Bulla but did not specify where they were. The following advertisement (P.23, Leader, 16-10-1866) may help to do so. Isaac Batey mentioned the Katesville paddock and the five mile estate but shed no more light on their locations. With the aid of the Bulla parish map and the following information, I hope to specify the locations of the properties IN ANOTHER JOURNAL.

THURSDAY, 18th NOVEMBER.
FREEHOLD ESTATES,
Near Melbourne.
RICHARD GIBSON and Co. have received Instructions from Mr. Geo. Martin, as executor of the late George Sinclair Brodie, to sell by auction in Melbourne, on Thursday, the 18th November next, the remainder of his Victorian properties,
viz.,
Helensville. containing 653 acres.
Katesville, containing 586 acres
Guthrie's paddock, containing 185 acres.
Situate On the Emu Creek, a permanent stream close to Sunbury.
These blocks will be offered separately with the option.
They are all fenced, permanentlv watered by the Emu Creek, to which they have extensive frontages. A considerable portion is rich agricultural land. There is a commodious, comfortable cottage on Helensville
with all necessary outhouses.
Also, the property known as THE FIVE MILE PADDOCK Containing 1255 ACRES. This Is situated within 5 miles of Sunbury, Is all substantially fenced and is permanently watered by springs and waterholes.

In result after result, a NEWGROVE ESTATE was found to be in Gippsland, with the occasional mention of one at Healesville, but my determination was eventually rewarded.

TENDERS WANTED, for the ERECTION of 26 chains of dry stone WALL, and 14 chains of post and rail Fence, on the Newgrove Estate, Parish of Mickleham. Particulars on application to Mr Deagan, on the ground, or to J Mitchell, Royal park. (Tenders were to be sent to Joseph Mitchell- the superintendent of the MODEL FARM.)
(PAGE 3, THE ARGUS, 17 MARCH, 1868.)

EUREKA!
MR. STUBBS Is favoured with instructions to SUBMIT to PUBLIC COMPETITION, and sell by Auction, at his rooms,- 61 Collins-street, Melbourne, on Tuesday, the 9th day January, 1886," sale to commence at twelve o'clock precisely,
All those highly productive and very valuable estates known as
First-Dunhelen, of 5563 Acres, being Sections 11,12, 13, l6, 17. l8, 22, 23, and 26 etc., in the parish of Yuroke.
Secondly-Katesville, of 583 acres. Sec. 20, parish Bulla
Thirdly-Newgrove, of 632 acres, Sec. 17, parish Mickleham.
(P.2, Argus, 29-12-1865.)

LOCATIONS.
"NEWGROVE."
"Thirdly-Newgrove, of 632 acres, Sec. 17, parish Mickleham."
Luckily, I do not have to rely on key map 8 in my 1999 Melway. My 2008 edition has all the detail I need on map 365. The course of Deep Creek is almost identical to that shown on the Mickleham parish map. Kinnear Rd is shown on both, confirming that the northern boundary of section 17 was, as I'd suspected from the key map, DONNYBROOK ROAD. Section 17, NEWGROVE, granted to John Johnston in 1852, indeed consisted of 632 acres 3 roods 11 perches.

Its western boundary was 10930 links (2183 metres) east of Mickleham Rd with a 7960 link (1620 metre) Donnybrook Rd frontage extending east to the parish boundary with Kalkallo. The western boundary was 7960 links long and the eastern boundary 7950 links. The southern boundary was the transmission line forming the northern boundary of the Mount Ridley Grasslands. The Donnybrook Rd frontage was between the left border of 366 F4 and the right border of 366 J5. The west and east boundaries can be transposed by lines joining these two points to the n/w and n/e corners of the Mount Ridley Grasslands.
PS. One millimetre on Melway maps 3-679 is equivalent to one chain (100 links) which enabled me to plot the n/w and n/e corners of NEWGROVE. How easy was that!

1 comment(s), latest 4 days, 11 hours ago

A CHRONOLOGY OF OCCUPANTS OF "DUNHELEN" (1240 Mickleham Rd.) NORTH OF GREENVALE RESERVOIR, VICTORIA , AUSTRALIA.

It seemed that the Dunhelen estate originally consisted of sections 11, 12 and 13 of the PARISH OF YUROKE.
IN CASE THE LINK DOESN'T WORK, TYPE YUROKE, COUNTY OF BOURKE IN YOUR SEARCH BAR.

POSTSCRIPT-BUT by the end of 1865, Dunhelen consisted "of 5563 Acres, being Sections 11,12, 13, l6, 17. l8, 22, 23, and 26(sic, probably 24)* etc., in the parish of Yuroke","with a two mile frontage to Merri Creek."

WARNING!!!!! DO NOT ASSUME THAT NAMES ON A PARISH MAP ARE THOSE OF THE GRANTEES UNLESS THE DATE OF ISSUE OF THE GRANTS ARE SHOWN. These dates are shown in:
Yuroke, County of Bourke [cartographic material] / drawn and ...
digital.slv.vic.gov.au/dtl_publish/simpleimages/10/2425493.html

The second map (with dates) shows the same names as the first, which did name the grantees. The sections in bold type* had been purchased from the grantees some time before 1865.


This was gradually sold off with the homestead and barn now on 1240 Mickleham Road on the east side of the road, just north of the bend, as I recall from my visit circa 1990. In the days when light was provided by candles and lanterns, both capable of causing a fire, which eventually caused much damage during the Websters' occupancy, the design of the barn was very clever. A two level roof with vertical windows all along both sides between the lower and upper sections, provided as much sunlight inside as outside without excessive temperature. This may be what is described as a lantern in the citation for the heritage-listed barn. Another clever design allowed easy refilling of feed troughs.

Dunhelen was just one of two mansions built not much more than a mile apart on Brodie grants, the other one being HARPSDALE at Melway 384 E5. A feature of Harpsdale that Jack Simmie showed me is the tiled mosaic Brodie crest on the floor just inside the front door. The citation* for Harpsdale gives reasonable information about the Brodie family but does not mention Helen after whom Dunhelen was named, as was another Brodie property named Helensville**.

* The link doesn't seem to be working. Google GEORGE SINCLAIR BRODIE'S CHILDREN and it's the first result.
** BRODIE.—On the 18th inst., at Helensville, Bulla Bulla, Richard Brodie, Esq., aged 58 years.
(P.2, The Age, 19-7-1872.)

THE CHRONOLOGY.
1859.
COCHRANE'S CLYDE.—
This pure and justly popular Clydesdale Stallion will stand during the season at his owner's farm, Dunhelen, by Broadmeadows; and travel the surrounding districts.etc. (Bell's Life in Victoria and Sporting Chronicle (Melbourne, Vic. : 1857 - 1868) Saturday 24 September 1859 p 4 )

1860.
SCIENTIFIC JOHN COCHRANE P.6, Argus, 8-11-1860.

1861.
COCHRANE.—On the 28th inst., at Dunhelen, from the effects of teething, Samuel, the beloved son of John C. and Jane Cochrane, aged thirteen months and twelve days. (P.4, Argus, 30-8-1861.)

THE Friends of Mr. J. C. COCHRANE are respectfully informed that the remains of his infant son Samuel will be removed from his residence, Dunhelen, this morning, at 10 a.m., and pass the Moonee Ponds* about 1 p.m., for interment in the Melbourne General Cemetery.(P.8, Argus, 30-8-1861.)

The occupant was also certainly J.C. (John) Cochrane who was farming on "Glenroy Farm" in 1874 when it and farms to the north in the late Donald Kennedy's Glenroy estate were sold. (P. 78, BROADMEADOWS A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.)

*As Moonee Ponds meant anywhere along the creek, "the Moonee Ponds" probably meant the timber bridge linking the two sections of Ardlie St in Broadmeadows Township (that part of today's Westmeadows south of Kenny St.)The shire of Broadmeadows went south only to Woodlands St, so the following allocation was probably for the historic extant bluestone Fawkner St bridge which replaced the timber bridge not long after Samuel Cochrane's funeral.
" to Broadmeadows, for a bridge at Moonee Ponds, £500" (P.14, Leader, 14-8-1869. THE ROADS AND BRIDGES VOTES.)

1862.
SALE OF MR.COCHRANE'S SHORTHORNS
The Farmer's Journal and Gardener's Chronicle (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1864) Saturday 29 March 1862 p 121

JOHN C. COCHRANE.
G.S.Brodie advised at about this time that John C.Cochrane was no longer his agent. It may be at about this time that John moved to Glenroy Farm; he was certainly there in 1870. In 1874 Glenroy Farm was sold by the Donald Kennedy executors and bought by William McCulloch. John had arrived from Ireland on 31-3-1850 and was on "Glenroy" by 1853*, as was Robert McDougall, famed Shorthorn breeder with whom John had arguments later about the breed.**
At the end of 1875, John advertised his services as an agent.(P.2, Leader, 18-12-1875.SHORTHORN CATTLE, column 2.) By October 1876, however he won prizes at the spring show at Geelon, his address given as Newtown (obviously near Geelong, not Collingwood.) John's new area had probably been beautified by Scots with purple flowers in the garden beds, which like rabbits had got out of control and John and another farmer were charged under the Thistle act.In October, his address was more specifically given as Highton House when he clarified the pedigree of a shorthorn bull he had sold for 1000 guineas.John continued the farming reports he'd written about his former abodes and in 1883 his address was Barwon House. By 1884, he was at Aitkenside, Ceres, via Geelong. BARRABOOL-HILLS and was still there in 1889 when he was sued by a bank. While retaining Aitkenside, he seems to have returned to his old haunts, at Oaklands Junction during the 1890's and by 1899 was on "Fairview"*** on the south side of Keilor Rd straddling Spring Gully. John had died at Fairview by 1915 and his widow was living at Nantes street, Newtown, Geelong when their youngest son, John R. was engaged. John C.Cochrane of Victorian Railways who married a daughter of James Swan was possibly John's nephew as it's unlikely that he'd given two sons the same given name.
* P.10, THE STOPOVER THAT STAYED, Grant Aldous.)
** P. 7, Argus,16-11-1858 and P.25, The Australasian, 25-9-1880.
*** P.41, The Australasian, 24-6-1899,2nd lst column near bottom.
Powers, Rutherford, and Co. report having sold by auction, at the Newmarket yards, on Tuesday last, 417 pure Border Leicester sheep, on behalf of John C. Cochrane, of Fairview, North Essendon. These comprised the surplus sheep from the vendor's well-known stud.


1863.
FOR SALE, 25 three-quarter bred COTSWOLD RAMS, one year old, from half-bred ewes, by imported prize ram. Apply P. Thomson, Dunhelen,by Craigieburn.(P.8, Argus, 19-8-1863.)

1865.
See under 1866 at end of italics. The crown allotment numbers are given for George Sinclair Brodie's properties.

1866.
SCAB NOTICE— My land called and known as Dunhelen, situate at Yuroke, is AFFECTED with this DISEASE, and I have to notify that I made this discovery on the 13th day of April, 1866. GEO. S. BRODIE, 19th April, 1860.
(P.4, The Herald, 7-5-1866.)


Freehold Estate. — We also report having sold Mr G. S. Brodie's Dunhelen estate consisting of 5,563 acres, to Mr John Edols, for the sum of £27,815. (P.2, Mount Alexander Mail, 5-10-1866.)

This acreage, about 4.5 square miles, may have included Brodie grants between Sunbury Rd (past Bulla Village) and Emu Creek, or Harpsdale in the parish of Bulla, or sections 24-6 OR SECTION 6-8 STRADDLING KONAGADERRA RD SOUTH OF THE CREEK CROSSING AND THE CLOSED END OF MT. RIDLEY RD in the parish of Mickleham because the Yuroke grants comprised just over three square miles.

P.3, Argus, 9-1-1866 specifies the 5 563 acres as being the Dunhelen, Newgrove and Katesville Estates, all belonging to George Sinclair Brodie.

I.W.Symonds mentioned Helensville and Katesville in "Bulla Bulla but did not specify where they were. The following advertisement (P.23, Leader, 16-10-1866) may help to do so. Isaac Batey mentioned the Katesville paddock and the five mile estate but shed no more light on their locations. With the aid of the Bulla parish map and the following information, I hope to specify the locations of the properties IN ANOTHER JOURNAL.
THURSDAY, 18th NOVEMBER.
FREEHOLD ESTATES,
Near Melbourne.
RICHARD GIBSON and Co. have received Instructions from Mr. Geo. Martin, as executor of the late George Sinclair Brodie, to sell by auction In Melbourne, on Thursday, the 18th November next, the remainder of his Victorian properties,
viz.,
Helensville. containing 653 acres.
Katesville, containing 586 acres
Guthrie's paddock, containing 185 acres.
Situate On the Emu Creek, a permanent stream close to Sunbury.
These blocks will be offered separately with the option.
They are all fenced, permanentlv watered by the Emu Creek, to which they have extensive frontages. A considerable portion Is rich agricultural land. There is a commodious, comfortable cottage on Helensville
with all necessary outhouses.
Also, the property known as THE FIVE MILE PADDOCK Containing 1255 ACRES. This Is situated within 5 miles of Sunbury, Is all substantially fenced and is permanently watered by springs and waterholes.

In result after result a NEWGROVE ESTATEwas found to be near Traralgon, with the occasional mention of one at Healesville, but my determination was eventually rewarded.

TENDERS WANTED, for the ERECTION of 26 chains of dry stone WALL, and 14 chains of post and rail Fence, on the Newgrove Estate, Parish of Mickleham. Particulars on application to Mr Deagan, on the ground, or to J Mitchell, Royal park. (Tenders were to be sent to Joseph Mitchell- the superintendent of the MODEL FARM.)
(PAGE 3, THE ARGUS, 17 MARCH, 1868.)

EUREKA!
MR. STUBBS Is favoured with instructions to SUBMIT to PUBLIC COMPETITION, and sell by Auction, at his rooms,- 61 Collins-street, Melbourne, on Tuesday, the 9th day January, 1886," sale to commence at twelve o'clock precisely,
All those highly productive and very valuable estates known as
First-Dunhelen, of 5563 Acres, being Sections 11,12, 13, l6, 17. l8, 22, 23, and 26 etc., in the parish of Yuroke.
Secondly-Katesville, of 583 acres. Sec. 20, parish Bulla
Thirdly-Newgrove, of 632 acres, Sec. 17, parish Mickleham.
(P.2, Argus, 29-12-1865.)


1867.
EDOLS—ATKINSON.—On the 27th inst., at South Yarra, by the Rev. George Mackie, George Edols, of Dunhelen, Broadmeadows, to Maria Bennet, daughter of the late Thomas Atkinson, of Glasgow.(P.4, Argus, 29-6-1867.)

1868.
Stock reports mention George Edols.

1872.
EDOLS.— On the 17th September, at Ingleston near Ballan, Margaret Brown, wife of John Edols, of Dunhelen.
(P.2, The Age, 19-9-1872.)

1873.
P. Thompson who'd been on Dunhelen in 1863 had been a shire council about a decade later so he obviously stayed in the area. For John Edols to become a Mickleham riding councillor, the riding probably included at least a part of the parish of Yuroke.
BROADMEADOWS.- For the extraordinary vacancy of the Mickleham riding caused by the resignation of Mr.P. Thompson, Mr.W.Williams was the only candidate nominated and is consequently duly elected and for the ordinary annual vacancy of the same riding Mr. John Edols of Dunhelen being the only candidate was declared duly
elected.(P.5, Argus, 7-8-1873.)

1874.
John Edols wrote this will in 1874.
The Will of the Late John Edols.
Mr. John Edols, of Dunhelen, near
Broadmeadows, by his will dated Novem-
ber 21 1874, appointed William Taylor,
of Keilor, John Ord Inglis of Ballan,
and Charles Francis, of Elsternwick, his
executors. He bequeathed £2000 to such
charity or charities or in such proportions
as the trustees deem most expedient. He
left 1441 acres of land at Ballan to the
use of his sister, Elizabeth Ogilvie, and
her assign for life, with remainder to the
executors in trust, to sell if they think fit,
and invest the proceeds for the benefit of
the daughters of the said Elizabeth Ogilvie.
All the rest of the real and personal estate
is left to the executors upon trust, to sell
the same within a year of testator's death,
and out of the proceeds pay £3000 to
Elizabeth Ogilvie; £400 to a brother,
Richard Edols, and shall invest the re-
mainder, paying the annual income of
£10,000 part of the general fund to
another brother, George Edols, for life,
and after his death to his widow abso-
lutely. £2000 each shall be held by the
trustees for Elizabeth Constance Ogilvie,
Mary Eleanor Ogilvie and Helen Ogilvie,
the daughter's of his sister, Elizabeth
Ogilvie. £1000 each, also with the above
part of the general fund, shall be held by
the trustees for Thomas, James and Harry,
the sons of the same sister, and the annual
income of £3000 is to be paid to his
sister, Mary Phillips, during life, and after
that to her children Lillie, Amy, Charles,
John, equally. £2000 to be held in trust for
his nieces, Jane Edols Phillips and Thirza
Martha Phillips; £1000 each is to be held
in trust for the before-mentioned Lillie,
Amy, Charles and Alfred John Phillips
£1000 each is to be held in trust for
Richard Edols, junior, John, Frank
Robert and James Edols, the sons of
Richard Edols; £1500 shall be held in
trust for Violet Edols, the daughter of
the same Richard Edols. The trustees
shall pay the annual income of £3000 to
his sister, Martha Cullen, during her life
and to go to her children afterwards.
£1000 each shall be held in trust for
John, Robert, Richard and George
Cullen, the sons of the said Martha
Cullen. £1500 shall be held in trust
for Fanny, Louise, Florence and Grace
Cullen, her daughters. £500 is to be
held in trust for Richard, John and
Ernest Edols, the sons of his late brother,
Robert Edols ; and £1500 for their sister
Flora ; £1500 each is to be held in trust
for Emily, Alice, Florence and Constance,
the daughters of another brother, Thomas
Edols ; £1000 for Harry England Francis,
the son of James Goodall Francis. The
trustees stand possessed of the residue of
the general fund in trust for Elizabeth
Ogilvie, the youngest, Mary Eleanor
Ogilvie, Helen Ogilvie, Jane, Thirza
Martha, Lilly and Amy Phillips, Violet
Edols, Fanny, Louise, Florence and Grace
Cullen, Flora, Emily, Alice, Florence,
and Constance Edols equally. By a
codicil dated November 23, 1874, he left
his furniture and effects at Dunhelen to
Maria Bennett Edols, the wife of his
brother, George. Real, £48,405; personal
Fix this text£152,377. Total £200,782. (P.3, Camperdown Chronicle, 16-4-1889.)

1879.
At the invitation of the Edols brothers, The Findon Harriers hunted on Dunhelen.
(P.13, The Australasian, 21-6-1879.)

Cr. George Edols, of Dunhelen, was unanimously elected president (OF THE SHIRE OF BROADMEADOWS) for the ensuing
year.(P.5, The Age, 30-8-1879.)

1881.
See 1874 re Edols/Ogilvie connection.
WILSON—OGILVIE.—On the 2nd inst., at Dunhelen,Broadmeadows, by the Rev. W. G. Fraser, Andrew Denham, youngest son of Dr. Wilson, Kew, to Mary Grant, second daughter of the late Thomas Ogilvie,Geelong.
(P.1,Argus, 13-7-1881.)

1884.
Messrs. J. and G. E. Dawes, Dunhelen,mentioned in a livestock report. (P.4, The Age, 25-6-1884.)

1885. (Alerted by the CHIG article at the end of the journal.)
Messrs. Powers, Rutherford, and Co. report having sold yesterday (in conjunction with Messrs. Campbell, Pratt, and Co., and Richard Gibson and Co.), on behalf of Mr.J. S. Hosie, portion of his Dunhelen Estate,on the Broadmeadows road, comprising the Dip*, Home, and Middle Paddocks, in all about 2,225 acres, to Mr. F B. Hann, of Yarraman-park*, at £19 per acre. (P.23, The Australasian, 26-9-1885.)

* As the western portion was sold months later, the dip paddock would probably be the portion of today's Greenvale Reservoir in Melway B2-3 and C-D 3 which extends beyond the northern boundary of "Glenarthur" (c/a 8N of the parish of Yuroke and the western half of the reservoir)into the Brodie grant c/a 13U.
** 2000 acres within half a mile of the Dandenong railway station (P.12, Weekly Times, 20-2-1886.)

Hosie later subdivided the western part of the Dunhelen Estate, Dunhelen Lane obviously being the subdivisional road.HOSIE'S SUBDIVISION

N.B.THOSE HEREAFTER NAMED AS BEING ON "DUNHELEN" SHOULD NOT AUTOMATICALLY BE ASSUMED TO BE OCCUPYING THE HOMESTEAD. A member of the Hoctor family bought a subdivision block and was described as farmer, Dunhelen in rate records.


1886.
BROCKLEBANK—HANN.—On the 14th inst., at St.Mary's Church, Broadmeadows, Victoria, by the Rev. R. H. Rodda, W. H. Brocklebank, of Brisbane, to Grace, third daughter of F. B. Hann, Esq.,Dunhelen, Broadmeadows. No cards.
(P.1, Argus, 16-10-1886.)

A DOUBLE HANN WEDDING.
MILLER—HANN.—On the 3rd inst., at St. Mary's Church, Bulla Bulla, by the Rev. T. H. Armstrong, M.A., assisted by the Rev. E. A. Crawford, B.A., Herbert J., third son of Frederick Miller, Esq., of Croydon, Sydney, to Alice, seventh daughter of F. B. Hann, Esq., of Dunhelen, Broadmeadows. No cards.

M'CORMICK—HANN.—On the 3rd inst., at St. Mary's Church, Bulla Bulla, by the Rev. T. H. Armstrong, M.A., assisted by the Rev. E. A. Crawford, B.A., John M'Cormick, Commercial Bank of Australia, Nhill, eldest son of W. H. M'Cormick, Esq., Geelong, to Laura Ruth, eighth daughter of F. B. Hann, Esq., Dunhelen, Broadmeadows. No cards.
(P.1, Argus, 6-11-1886.)

Broadmeadows' rate record of 1899-1900 shows that James C. Pigdon was leasing a house and 1000 acres from the Ham executors. Ferdinand Bond Brown Shortland Hann, had bought the Dunhelen estate of 2500 acres in 1885.

St Mary's church was in the Shire and land parish of Bulla Bulla on the south west corner of "Woodlands", a block in Melway 177 J9 just south of the property's entry from Oaklands Rd. It was moved to Bulla Village in the early 1970's by Tullamarine's W.V. "Major" Murphy because vibrations from aircraft were threatening to destroy it. (Australian Christian Church Histories :: Bulla VIC - St Mary's Anglican
www.churchhistories.net.au/church-catalog/bulla-vic-st-marys-anglican/)

1887.
Subdivision of 1330 acres with Craigieburn station near the centre of the property.(P.17, Argus, 19-11-1887.)
To let, the north and western paddocks, 2300 acres of good grass land , part of Dunhelen estate, Brodmeadows, J.S.Hosie, 36 Bourke St. (P.3, The Age, 22-12-1887.)

1888.
That beautifully situated estate, known as Gnotuk Park, one mile west from the town, will be offered for sale on Friday next, at Mr. J. Thornton's sale room, by Messrs. M'Leod aud Booth, who are acting under instruction from Mr. R.D.Scott. We have previously noted the fact that Mr. Scott has taken up his residence at Dunhelen, near Melbourne. etc.(P.2, Camperdown Chronicle, 14-3-1888.)

1891.
NEW INSOLVENTS.
Robert Dunbar Scott, of Dunhelen, grazier. Approximate schedule. Causes of insolvency—Losses in transactions in stock, and through drought and depreciation in the value of stock and wool, and in land transactions, and adverse judgments in two actions.
Liabilities, £5,358 10s. 11d.; assets, £3,449 18s. 2d.; deficiency, £1,908 12s. 9d. Mr.Cohen, assignee.
(P.7, Argus, 13-6-1891.)

NASH.—On the 12th inst., at Stoney-park, Brunswick, the wife of Albert Nash, Dunhelen, Broadmeadows—a son.
(P.1, Argus, 17-10-1891.)

1892.
FREEHOLD PROPERTIES LEASED.
Abbot and Wilson report having leased------; 1000 acres at Craigieburn, part of Dunhelen Estate, for the Free-
hold Banking Co. to Messrs Mason and Canning;---etc. (P.3, Gippsland Times, 13-7-1892.)
Canning was William Canning after whom Hume City Council named a reserve in Campbellfield (or his son) and Mason, after whom a street near the reserve was named, was his son-in-law as I pointed out in my submission in support of the Canning descendant's request.
Campbellfield's William Canning Reserve honours pioneer | Leader
www.heraldsun.com.au/.../william-canning-reserve.../c6d132c0d5756e5bbd2ff22fe6ab6...
Nov 1, 2017 - Land between Fordson Rd and Sycamore Crescent in Campbellfield has been officially called William Canning Reserve. Suzanne Canning, a ...

1893.
A.Nash, Dunhelen, mentioned in a livestock report.(P.10, Argus, 21-6-1993.)

1894.
A.Nash, and nobody else, was mentioned in many market reports re Dunhelen.


1895. A. Nash was mentioned in Market reports until August, then James Pigdon by December.

I hope Henry Stevenson of "Niddrie" (Much of today's Airport West) took more care with breeding his Bates strain shorthorns than with his attention to the spelling of his client's names.He'd sold "the Dunhelen Estate, situate at Broadmeadows, containing 2,200 acres, on behalf of Mr. T. B. Hand (F.B.Hann), to Mr. J. C. Pigdon.
(P.35, The Australasian, 19-10-1895.)

1896.When a certificate of discharge from insolvency was granted, the address given for the recipient was that when he became insolvent. One such was not on Dunhelen and hadn't been since A. Nash replaced him in 1891.

1899.
TRANSACTIONS IN PROPERTY.
Mr. George Howat reports having offered at auction, at Scott's Hotel, on 1st June, the Dunhelen Estate, comprising 2264 acres, a well improved freehold within 18 miles of Melbourne: but as the bidding did not reach the limit fixed by the trustees, the estate was passed in. (P.12, Leader, 17-6-1899.)

1900.
PIGDON.—On the 28th December,(1899!) at Dunhelen,Broadmeadows, the wife of J. C. Pigdon—a daughter.
(P.27, Weekly Times, 20-1-1900.)
See JAMES PIGDON HAD A SENSE OF HUMOUR

1901.
PIGDON. -On the 20th June, at "Dunhelen," Broadmeadows the wife of J. C. Pigdon-a daughter.(P.1, Argus, 8-7-1901.)

Here's one for Bezza Patullo.
PIGDON V. PATULLO, 13-7-1901


1903.
James Pigdon was still on the homestead block.

The Crinnion family had a hay and grain store on the north corner of Middle St and Mt Alexander Rd Ascot Vale which they bought from (William?)Eastwood after whom the street between Newmarket and Kensington stations was named. They'd bought the Brannigans' St John's Hill across Konagaderra Rd from Harpsdale and with more relevance to Dunhelen, John Crowe's "Mount Yuroke", later called Crowe's Hill*, on the north west corner of Mickleham Rd and Craigieburn Rd.
(*George Lloyd wasn't the only one who thought the hill was named after a bird.
North Melbourne Advertiser (Vic. : 1873 - 1894) Saturday 14 July 1888 p 2 Family Notices
... DEATH. On the 26th June, at Crow's Hill, Broadmeadows, Richard Crinnion, dearly be-loved son of ... Thomas Crinnion, and brother of Messrs. M. and P. Crinnion, chaffcutters, Flemington, aged 25 years. )

Mr George Howat reports having sold by private contract, on account of the executor of the late F. B. Hann, part of the Dunhelen Estate Broadmeadows, comprising some 677 acres to Messrs. Crinnion Brothers, of Broadmeadows at a satisfactory price. (P.4, Argus,5-5-1903.)
Despite my efforts, I cannot indicate where the 677 acre block was but it may have been south of Crowe's Hill, which the Crinnions owned till 1915.

1904-6.James Pigdon still on Dunhelen but sells 600 ewes without reserve in May 1906.

1907. James Pigdon had bought Dunhelen from F.B.Hann in 1895, the midst of a depression which forced many farmers off their farms because the many unemployed could not afford to buy their produce. Many families survived on "underground mutton". James was leaving because his LEASE HAD EXPIRED. He must have mortgaged the farm and leased it from the lender.

CLEARING SALE at "DUNHELEN,"
BROADMEADOWS.
A. E. GIBSON atid W. H. WILSON (Auctioneers
in conjunction), under instructions from Mr. J. C.
Pigdon, will sell —
16 dairy cows, in full profit; 10 springing heifers
20 calves, 4 draught horses, 12 highly bred
light horses 3 to 5 years old; Massey Culti
vator and binder, Musgrove drill, S. and D.F.
ploughs, bay and tip drays, mower, hay rake
2 sets harrows, hop cylinders (tanks), oat
crusher, feed bins i(boxes). express waggon,
Avery's scales, dray, plough and buggy har
ness, riding saddles aud stable requisites,
scythes, crow bars, blacksmith's shop and
tools, crosscuts, augers, grindstone, sundry
tools and implements, metal and wooden pul
leys, chains, separator, churn and butter
worker, ovens, copper boilers, wringer, poultry,
surplus furniture and numerous sundries.
The whole for absolute sale, owing to Mr. Pigdon's
lease of "Dunhelen" having expired.
(P.2, The Age, 30-1-1907.)

1908-9.
James Feehan was on Dunhelen. He was possibly descended from the Feehan whose farm became W.S.Cox's Moonee Valley Racecourse circa 1883.

1910.
J. Crinnion advertises 272 acres of the Dunhelen Estate at Craigieburn.This was obviously part of an earlier subdivision of a very large crown allotment such as c/a 16 of 1250 acres.

1911.
Mr.James Feehan invited us all in to refreshments, and right royally he treated us. It was with regret that we learned that Dunhelen had changed hands, and that Mr.J.J. Feehan would shortly be leaving. Our only wish is that the new occupier is a sporting man, as ever since the Oaklands Hunt Club has been in existence the occupier has been a keen hunting man. (P.24, The Australasian, 22-7-1911.).


Almost every mention of Dunhelen for years had been in connection with hunting and the Dunhelen Handicap. The Oaklands Hunt had been established in 1888. Races at Moonee Valley were named after many of the farms on Oaklands and Mickleham Rds. As I recall the Feehan family was involved with both clubs. I'd better check.

FROM MY MANUSCRIPT "EARLY LANDOWNERS:PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA" RE MOONEE VALLEY RACECOURSE.
"18-12-1855. Richard Feehan bought all of allotments 5 and 6 (OF SECTION 5 DOUTTA GALLA) east of an un-named road (which, being 525 links from the north west corner of allotment 5, was certainly Walker St).
This deal had been agreed upon while Feehan rode to Keilor with Mooney who had received the grant for section 30 Maribyrnong (Calder Raceway site) on 9-5-1854.
1883.Kensington Park (Allotments 17-19 section 2) having been sold to John Straker on 7-11-1882, W.S.Cox leased Feehan’s Farm for seven years with an option to purchase.
2-10-1895. W.S.Cox dies at 64.
25-1-1912. W.S.Cox Jun., eldest son of Moonee Valley’s founder, dies.
22-11-1913. The Moonee Valley Estate is placed on sale. Mary McPherson became W.S.Cox’s wife and she had connections with the Coats family, Cox’s daughter married a Kenna, Mrs Walker was the mother of Mary Cox, Alexandra Hoskins was born a Cox.

1917.The racecourse had been owned by proprietors (the Cox family). The Moonee Valley Racing Club is now formed at a meeting at Hosie’s Hotel* in the city, whose owner, J.B.McArthur of Arundel and a descendant of Richard Feehan are elected Vice Presidents. Alister Clark of Glenara, a world famous rose breeder is elected Chairman and retains that position until his death in 1949. One renowned jockey valued the roses more than the dough when he won the Alister Clark Stakes."

*See J.B.Hosie above, 1885, 1887.

OAKLANDS HUNT, FEEHAN Google search.
Nearly as old as Findon is Oaklands Hunt Club, which is starting its 60th year in the field, and which also pro-
vides its certain evidence of lifelong love of the sport. The Master, G.- A. (Alf) Watkins, has been hunting for
39 years, and will be out with the hounds today; the original secretary, H. H. Daniels, gave up the job only
seven years ago, and still an active member is the 83-year-old president, J. F. Feehan, who was one of those who helped with the founding of the club.(P.1, Argus,14-5-1949.)

D.F.Cameron-Kennedy's THE OAKLANDS HUNT, published in 1988 to mark the club's centenary, has much more information about the Feehans and the club's connection with the race course.


"on account of Mr. J. S. Feehan, his property known as Dunhelen, containing 1650 acres 2 roods 25 perches of rich agricultural and dairying land, with large and substantial bluestone residence erected thereon, situated 5 miles from Broadmeadows and 16 miles from Melbourne; the purchaser being Mr. George Hossack of Coburg West. This property has been purchased for purposes of subdivision, and the richness of the soil," etc.
(P.40, Leader, 2-9-1911.)
This confirms my assumption (later) of the location of the Dunhelen drain.

1913.
GEORGE HOSSACK'S SUBDIVISION

Farms ranged in size from 100 to 300 acres with the homestead on about 900 acres.

1914.
A plan of subdivision of the Dunhelen Estate (Horsach's-SIC!)had been submitted to the surveyor of the shire of Broadmeadows.Drainage was an issue. (The Essendon Gazette and Keilor, Bulla and Broadmeadows Reporter Thursday 7 May 1914 p 1 )

1916.
CAMERON.—On the 29th October, at "Dunhelen,"Broadmeadows, Ewen Cameron, loving father of Margaret and Hughena, aged 87 years. A colonist of 65 years. (P.1, Argus, 30-10-1916.)

CAMERON.—The Friends of the late Mr. EWEN CAMERON are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of interment, the Will Will Rooke Cemetery, Campbellfield. The funeral will leave "Dunhelen," Broadmeadows, TOMORROW (Tuesday), 31st October,1916, at 1.30 o'clock, per motors.(ditto.)

Ewen's wife, Isabella, had died at Dunhelen in 1915 and was buried at Will Will Rook Cemetery (Melway 7 B9.)

1917.
A Deceased Estate.
Claims against the estate of Ewen Cameron, formerly of Euroa* and Kyneton, grazier, who died on 29th October last, are to be sent to Hughina Souter, of Dunhelen, care of Whiting and Aitken. 101 William street, Melbourne, proctors, on or before 28th February.(The Essendon Gazette and Keilor, Bulla and Broadmeadows Reporter (Moonee Ponds, Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Thursday 25 January 1917 p 2 )

*Near Shepparton where George Hossack was an early settler before moving to Pascoe Vale (Coburg West.)

BROADMEADOWS SHIRE COUNCIL Thursday, February 22.
From S. E. Souter. re stone wall at Dunhelen.-The secretary said that Mr.Souter would accept a few coils of wire
for the use of the stone.-Approved.
(The Essendon Gazette and Keilor, Bulla and Broadmeadows Reporter Thursday 1 March 1917 p 4 )

I'm working from memory here. One of the parents at Gladstone Park while I was teaching at Gladstone Park Primary School was (Merna?) Gamble. The Gambles were descended from John Brock, a squatter north of Bulla who was dispossessed of his run by Big Clarke's special survey and then moved to the site of Latrobe University. The crown allotment on the north east corner of Mickleham and Somerton Rds was called Springfield. It was split into two farms of about 180 acres. Wally French bought the southern half and the Gambles bought Springfield North, renaming it as BROCKLANDS. The Gambles were related to the Souters, the one who was a teacher. Brocklands, now the site of Aitken College adjoins Dunhelen and as the Souters were also farming nearby, it's not surprising that Hughina or Hughena Cameron married another Souter male. It's a fair assumption that Ewen's executrix, Hughina Souter, was his daughter.

1918.
Regarding the complaint of flooding of Dunhelen drain near Swerdman's property,arrangements might be made to cut a drain and it would be only reasonable to ask Mr.Hossack bear part the cost. - Mr Hossack to
be approached on the subject, on motion of Crs. Cargill and Hall.(P.3, Kilmore Free Press, 5-12-1918.)

G.Hossack had been on the Dunhelen Estate from 1911 and stock reports indicate that he was a partner of Souter in 1916 and Irvine in 1918. Swerdman could have been on the Moonee Ponds Creek side of Mickleham Rd but there seem not to be any tributaries running west to this creek on what was the Dunhelen estate.

GEORGE HOSSACK was a resident of Coburg in 1916 but was earlier at Shepparton and before then near Orbost where he probably married a Miss Irvine. A Cameron family, possibly related to Ewen Cameron (as a man named Ewen Cameron was president of Orbost Shire in 1912-13 when his namesake son drowned in the Snowy River) was also prominent in the shire of Orbost. The following article shows no relationship to the Camerons but it is interesting that he was farming in partnership with Souter on Dunhelen in 1916.
OBITUARY OF GEORGE'S MOTHER IN LAW

This is the only mention of Swerdman in the area on trove and the name did not appear in my rate transcriptions (at intervals of 15 to 20 years.) I have explained earlier that Dunhelen's DIP PADDOCK was probably that part of Greenvale Reservoir north of Melway 179 B-D, the northern boundary of Springield North and Glenarthur. My first transcribed Gamble evaluation was I think, in 1920, so Swerdman may have been on one of those properties. Mrs John Bond (a widow since November 26,1902) was disposing of Glenarthur (the western half of the reservoir)in 1910 so Swerdman may have bought the property. I believe the stream in Melway 179 B 1-2 would have been the Dunhelen drain and Hossack's subdivision was of the large homestead block.

1924.
The Pigdons remembered Dunhelen with affection.

The Melbourne Grammar School chapel was the scene of a quiet and pretty wedding on December 15, when Isa, youngest daughter of the late Mr. J. C. Pigdon and of Mrs. Pigdon, of Dunhelen, Thorn street,Essendon (the home of the bride's sister,Mrs. R. S. Macalister), was married to Mr.Harold P. England, youngest, son of Mr.M. H. England, of St. Kilda. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. L. Arnold, and after the service wedding tea
was served at the Mia Mia tearooms.(P.43, The Australasian, 20-12-1924.)

1926.
PETER IRVINE'S SUBDIVISION
P.4, Argus, 4-9-1926.
The homestead on 392 acres 2 roods 10 perches was lot 1 and lots 2 to 13, varying in size from 40 acres 21 perches to 127 acres 36 perches comprised a total of 858 acres 3 roods 26 perches. The entire subdivision consisted of 1251 acres 1 rood and 36 perches.

The subdivision road was probably Dunhelen Lane east of Mickleham Rd, now the access to Aitken Hill BHP Global Leadership Centre (Melway 386 B-C 11-12) WHICH OCCUPIES ROUGHLY 169.4 ACRES and may have been lots 6 and 7.

(Re area calculations. Each centimetre on blue Melway maps represents a chain; ten square chains = 1 acre.
40 perches=1 rood. 4 roods = 1 acre.)

1928. Mr. P.Irvine (a relative of George Hossack, whose wife was an Irvine girl) was named as the occupant of Dunhelen in an article about Mickleham focussed on "Harpdale".(P.44, The Australasian, 24-3-1928.)

1930.
RIEDELL -On the 7th January 1930 Charles beloved husband of Belle, Dunhelen, Yuroke,Late of Bulla, loved son of the late M.F. and K Riedell, formerly of Congupna, aged 57 years.At rest.(P.1, Argus, 9-1-1930.)

PRENDERGAST —-On the 8th April, at Hopetoun private hospital, Elsternwick, to the wife of Harry W. Prendergast, Dunhelen, Broadmeadow —a son. (P.1, Argus, 9-4-1930.)


1936.
Mr. and Mrs. Webster, of "Dunhelen,” Bulla, and Mr J. Raper of “Wanawer*,” Rosebud, were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. H. Park, for the Dookie College Jubilee.(P.4, Shepparton Advertiser, 15-10-1936.)
*"Wannaeue Estate", of 660 acres, was bounded by today's Eastbourne Rd,Jetty Rd, Old Cape Schanck Rd, an unmade road just south of Drumdrumalloc Creek and Boneo Rd. Jack's father was an Essendon footballer and committeeman. The Shire of Bulla did go down to Kenny St, the north boundary of Broadmeadows Township at some stage but I think that was later. Bulla was probably still west of the parish of Yuroke, (and thus Dunhelen.)

1939.
Death of Mr. J. S. Feehan

gY the death of Mr. J. S. Feehan,

which occurred in Melbourne
on Thursday, August 17, the Vic
torian Turf sustained one of its
most serious losses for many years.
His parsing will cause deep regret
all over Australia, and particularly
in Victoria and Queensland, where
he was best known, having spent
the greater part -of his life in those
States. As a young man he
managed the Beechal and Mount
Alfred Stations in Western Queens
land, and later took over the
management of the Donor's Hill
Station in the Gulf country. Later
he had the opportunity of purchas
ing Donor's Hill, and availed him
self of it. He retained possession
of it until his death. It was while
at Donor's Hill that he became as
sociated with racing, and won races
in Queensland towards the end of
the 'eighties. Mr. Feehan returned
to Victoria in the early years of
this century, and acquired several
properties, one being at Caramut,
in the Western district, and an
other, Dunhelen, in the Greenvale
district, a few miles out of Mel
bourne. Later he purchased the
Coolart Estate,, formerly owned by
Mr. P. S. Grimwade, who had Boba
bil there at the head of the stud
until his death, when Bobadil
passed into the possession of the
late Mr, James Wilson. Mr. Feehan
established a small stud at Coolart,
and bred a number of winners. He,
however, sold the property some
time ago, when his health began to
fail.etc. (P.6, The Australasian, 26-8-1939.)

1947.
CLYNE - WEBSTER. - Elsie Gladwin, younger daughter of Mr. R. Clyne, of Sunbury, to Kenneth Marriott, eldest son
of Mr. L. L. Webster, M.L.A., and Mrs.Webster, Dunhelen, Greenvale.9p.12, Argus, 8-2-1847.)

1948.
MORRIS-WEBSTER. - Joan Marcia, only daughter of Mrs. A. Morris, of 40 Oak Hill avenue. Regent, and the late Mr.
C H. Morris, to Philip Leslie, second son of Mr. and Mrs. L. I, Webster, of Dunhelen, Greenvale.
(P.8, Argus, 1-5-1948. ENGAGEMENTS ANNOUNCED.)

WEBSTER. — On June 12, at
"Dunhelen." Green Vale. Annie
Webster, widow of the late J.J.
Webster, of Elsternwick. Upper Bea-
contfleld and Black Rock, mother of Dr,
R. M. W. Webster, of Campbelltown,
Tasmania, and L. L. Webster. GreenVale, aged 84 years.(P.15, Argus, 2-12-1848.)

1949.
WEBSTER.— On June 12. at "Dunhelen" Greenvale. Annie Webster, widow of the late J. J. Webster, of Brunswick, Upper Beaconsfleld and Black Rock; mother of Dr. R. M. W.Webster, of Campbelltown. Tasmania, and L. L. Webster. Greenvale. Aged 84 years. (P.6, The Herald, 14-6-1949.)

1950.
T^EBRUARY 15 is the date
?*. set for the marriage of
Miss Joan Morris and Mr.
Philip Webster, son of Mr.
L. L. Webster, ex-M.L.A. for
Mernda, and Mrs. Webster,
of Dunhelen, Greenvale.
Miss Morris is the daugh-
ter of Mrs. A. L. Morris, of
Regent, and the late Mr.
Morris. The wedding will
be celebrated at St. Mary's
Church of England, Caul-
field.(P.12, Argus, 10-2-1950.)

Article about 77 year old Mrs.J.C.Pigdon: e.g. Mrs. Pigdon's love of horses began in her early youth. A daughter of a Gippsland pioneer, Alexander McMillan, she as a young girl often helped her brothers to cut-out cattle at "Caldermeade," their well-known grazing property.(P.17, The Herald, 17-5-1950.)

1954.
W.E.(William Eric)Taylor's 276 acre farm on the corner of Mickleham Rd and Dunhelen Lane was advertised for sale. (P.43, Weekly Times, 17-11-1954.)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NOTHING ELSE BELOW THIS LINE.
WRONG HOMESTEAD.
A LOST MELBOURNE post about the BRODIE FAMILY (5th result* if you google GEORGE SINCLAIR BRODIE) has a photo of a homestead that some dill claimed to have seen while riding her bike up and down Mickleham Rd. So much uninformed rubbish appears in comments about old photos on Facebook that historians accept them as gospel at their own risk! She must have had extraordinary eye sight because the GLENARA HOMESTEAD, which the author must have thought was Dunhelen, is 420 chains (8.4 km)west south west from the Dunhelen Homestead. Ray Gibb recognised the error and posted links for photos of the Harpsdale and Dunhelen homesteads as well as one of a painting of the Glenara homestead, almost identical to the photo re the homestead, garden and topography.

*Lost Melbourne - Bulla Bulla 1836 GS & R Brodie The... | Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/LostMelbourne/photos/a...27092.../323483037817942/



CRAIGIEBURN HISTORICAL INTEREST GROUP, BRODIE FAMILY
This article has photos of the Dunhelen homestead and barn. It is wrong regarding the number of acres purchased by John Edols.
EXTRACT.
It appears as though it was in fact Brodie who built the Mansion, although no records are to be found confirming this and it has been suggested that it was John Edols and his brother, George who had the Mansion built to accommodate the families. Ken Webster has had a historian research the matter, however, nothing conclusive has resulted.

A number of owners held that property from 1884, including: J. S. Hosie, F. B. Hann, Bennet, Ogden (1885), J. Walton and many others.

1 comment(s), latest 3 days, 18 hours ago

SQUATTING STATIONS OF FIREBRACE, DOWNIE, HUTTON and McNALL, NEAR TULLAMARINE, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA. (and W.H.Mutton, pioneer of Avenel.)

1842 GRANTS

OH DEAR, THE TIME THAT I HAVE WASTED!
THE TITLE OF THIS JOURNAL HAS BEEN CHANGED; MUTTON IS NOW HUTTON.
After finding no squatter named MUTTON pre 1842, discovering a pioneer of Avenel, guessing that the name might have been Hutton, providing evidence to support that assumption and postulating that a handwritten H had been misinterpreted as M by such as a typesetter, I decided that I had done all that was possible. Then the penny dropped! Was the trove digitisation wrong regarding the name of the station? IT WAS!!!!! I HAVE NOW CORRECTED IT ON TROVE BUT NOT IN THE JOURNAL as a lesson to myself to read the actual article before I worry about the digitisation.

Most squatters because of insecure tenure, erected hovels, later building substantial mansions on their pre-emptive rights if they survived the circa 1843 crash. These hovels were better than nothing and purchasers of land containing such head stations could at least move in immediately, perhaps supplying a reason for their choice of that particular land, as well as fencing for stock-holding paddocks and other buildings such as shearing sheds.

Cortland Taylor's grant, section 9 Bulla Bulla at Melway 384 K 11-12 south of Oaklands, extending east to the eastern boundary of the Readymix Oakland junction Quarry, and now consisting of the quarry and Balbethan was purchased by Walter Clark of Glenara and named Glenalister after his recently-born son, who became chairman of the Moonee Valley Racing Club and a famed breeder of roses. Bob Blackwell was the last manager of Dunalister and was given permission by the new owner (who renamed the farm as Balbethan)to use Dunalister as the name of a stud he established at Elmore. See the Balbethan citation for further information. The portion of Pascoe Vale Rd between Glass St(or Five Mile Creek) and Woodlands St was originally named after Major Firebrace.
FIREBRACE STREET

John Carre Riddell's grant, 15 Tullamarine, with another of his grants (section 6 Tullamarine)became the Camiestown Estate. Most of section 15 became John Mansfield\'s triangle on which the Melbourne Airport terminal building is located, Glendewar (initially 377 acres) purchased by William Dewar who previously managed the Camiestown Estate, Charles Nash and Wallis Wright's farms and the northern 123 acres of John Peter's Chandos north of Bamford Avenue.
See the following for a map showing the location of Downie's station.
DOWNIE\'S STATION

R.H.Bunbury's grant, section 1 Tullamarine, actually consisting of 907 acres, adjoined Annandale at a line indicated by the northernmost point of Annandale Rd and extended west to the Maribyrnong River. Bunbury lost his right arm arm in naval combat, but could paint beautifully with his left hand according to Georgiana McCrae who came out on the same ship. Bunbury apparently bought the land as a dummy for Colin Campbell who called it Glengyle. Edward Wilson named his farm on the Glengyle Estate "Arundel" and this name later described the Closer Settlement and one of its subdivision roads, the other being Browns Rd.

George Russell of Golf Hill in the Western District bought section 5 Tullamarine as a dummy for Niel Black of Mt Noorat in the same district. Black leased it from 1846-1855 to Peter McCracken, the property being named Stewarton after Stewart, a member of the Black syndicate, as was the prime minister's cousin, Gladstone. In about 1893 the property was renamed as Gladstone. The property fronted the east side of today's Mickleham Rd between the Lackenheath Drive and Forman St corners, extending east to the Moonee Ponds Creek which also comprised much of its northern boundary. The freeway divided the property into Gladstone Park (east side) and Gladstone Gardens fronting Mickleham Rd.

LOCATIONS OF STATIONS
Portion 9 — 640 acres, county of Bourke, parish of Bulla Bulla ; purchaser, Major Taylor, H.E.I.C.S. (per
James Simpson, Esq.) This includes Major Firebrace's station, near the Salt Water River.

Portion 15 — 713 acres, county of Bourke, parish of Tullamarinc ; purchaser. J. Carre Riddell, Esq. This includes the place known as Downie's station, on the Moonee Moonee Ponds.

Portion 1 — 902 acres, county of Bourke, parish of Tullamarine ; purchaser, Captain Bunbury, R.N. This includes Mr. Mutton's(sic, Hutton's) station, near Keillor, on the Salt Water River.

Portion 5 — 785 acres, county of Bourke, parish of Tullamarine ; purchaser, George Russell, Esq., manager for the Clyde Company. This includes M'Nall's station, on the Moonee Moonee Ponds.
(P.2, Port Phillip Patriot and Melbourne Advertiser, 8-9-1842.)

The link for this or an identical article is at the start of the journal.

Another land claim enabled by land orders was the selection of "Woodlands" in lieu of a special survey, discussed in my very recent journal:
LAND SELECTIONS BY WILLIAM RUTLEDGE OF PARAMATTA, N.S.W. AND ANDREW McCRAE IN 1842 THAT MAY HAVE CHANGED THE HISTORY OF BULLA AND ARTHURS SEAT.


A BIT ABOUT THE SQUATTERS.
FIREBRACE.
These two children were most likely the offspring of Major Firebrace, not of his nephew, W.P.Firebrace who remained unmarried. Their father was in Melbourne in 1842 but on the Moonee moonee chain of ponds in 1844, an indication that the major was still leasing the remainder of his run on Oaklands Rd, which was called an OCCUPATION ROAD when it was proclaimed in 1848.

FIREBRACE Given namesCharlotte Elizabeth EventBirth Father's name nameFIREBRACE William Mother's maiden name Anne (Unknown) Reg. year1844 Reg. no14013
Family name (surname)FIREBRACE Given namesGeorge EventBirth Father's name FIREBRACE William Mother's maiden name Ann (Unknown) Reg. year1842 Reg. no13056

Major Firebrace did not arrive till 1841* so he must have just obtained the lease of his run on the Moonee Ponds when he was dispossessed of part of it.

They came by ship William Mitchell in 1841 - OoCities
www.oocities.org/vic1840/41/wm41.html

William Firebrace hus Cabin 1)
Mary Ann nee Wade Firebrace wife Cabin 2)
Adelaide Grace Firebrace infant Cabin 9)
Robert Tarver Firebrace son wed 1858 Cabin 5)
Edward Bell Firebrace son wed 1875 Cabin 7)
John Firebrace son Cabin 8)
Mary Anna Firebrace dau wed 1845 Cabin 3)
Catherine/Christian Mehetabel Firebrace dau Cabin 4)
Elizabeth Firebrace dau Cabin 6)

W.P.FIREBRACE'S PROMINENT ROLE AND DEATH NOTICE. Anecdotal Photograph. Mr. W. P. Firebrace.

FIREBRACE.—On the 25th June, at "Bathwick,"Ivy-street, Prahran (suddenly), William Piggott Firebrace, late Prothonotary of the Supreme Court of Victoria, elder son of the late Judge Firebrace, Demaram, British Guiana, aged 76.(P.60, The Australasian, 4-7-1908.)

In 1845 Major William Firebrace replaced the Wilsons on a run called Vectis in the Horsham area according to a letter from William Taylor (The Father of Keilor) to Governor Latrobe about early pioneers.

"Several local histories say that Firebrace named this run Vectis;this was the ancient Roman name for the Isle of Wight (England), where he was supposed to have been born. However, I have recently come across a manuscript written in 1958 by high school principal I.T. Maddern, entitled The Early Days of Horsham, which states that the Firebrace family came from Duffield in Derbyshire." QUOTED FROM:
The Micro-toponomy of Mount Arapiles - ANPS
www.anps.org.au/documents/sept_2004.pdf

Major Firebrace's father was WILLIAM NEWTON FIREBRACE.
FIREBRACE.—On the 6th of May last, in London, Elizabeth Ann, daughter of the late Wm. Newton Firebrace, Esq., of Demerara, and sister of the late Major
Firebrace, in her seventy-first year.(P.4, Argus, 3-7-1868.)

The Major had obviously returned home* and certainly DIED on the ISLE OF WIGHT but his son Robert (Tarvers?Firebrace, who'd also been on Vectis, became a Gippsland pioneer by 1863, after marrying in Sydney and first living at Orrong, Toorak (both in 1860.)

*On the 28th July, at Newport, Isle of Wight,William Firebrace, Esq., late Major H.M. 58th Regiment, aged sixty-one years.(P.4, Argus, 21-10-1856.)


This seems to confirm that the children born in 1842 and 1844 were the Major's children, their mother's name being Ann(e).

FIREBRACE.—On the 2nd ult., at Orsett terrace, Hyde-park, in her 75th year, Anne, widow of the late Major Firebrace, of Melbourne, and formerly of H.M. 58th Regiment.(P.1, Argus, 18-7-1878.)

A SCOTT death notice shows that the portion of Pascoe Vale Rd, Essendon referred to in the journal was still called Firebrace Street in 1909.
(P.1, Argus, 29-3-1909.)


DOWNIE.
Late 1830's and 1841 results on trove indicate that he depastured sheep belonging to others, either as a manager or partner,and that he was at Wardy Yallock by 1841*, his lease near Keilor obviously having been cancelled when the parish of Tullamarine had been surveyed.

Notice is hereby given THAT any persons trespassing on the Runs of the undersigned with diseased sheep, will be prosecuted according to law.
McMILLAN & WILSON, and THOMAS W. DOWNIE Wardie Yallock. 21st May, 1841.
(P.3, Geelong Advertiser, 22-5-1841.)

His name was given as Thomas Walter (or Water[s]) Downie in the 1840's and he married Margaret Muir, John, apparently their first child, being born in 1844 and registered at Geelong. He was living at Wardy Yallock in 1846 when Mary was born. The Woady Yaloak River (whose name means big creek) and Linton southwest of Ballarat on the Glenelg Highway (named after the first pioneers in the area)roughly indicate the location of Wardi Yallock. Downie returned to Scotland where he died in 1862.

DOWNIE.—On the 20th February, at his residence,Stirling, Scotland, Thomas Waters Downie, Esq.,late of this colony. (P.4, Argus, 25-6-1862.)

MUTTON, OR IS IT HUTTON?
As the following shows, I have been unable to link anybody named Mutton to Bunbury's purchase. Christine Laskowski's STEELE CREEK AND THE LADY OF THE LAKE has a map showing HUTTON'S STATION near the south side of Keilor Rd in the parish of Doutta Galla. From that spot Hutton would have been able to walk to section 1 of the parish of Tullamarine without getting his feet wet, let alone having to cross the Saltwater River. If his run did extend from Keilor Rd to Bunbury's purchase north of the river from the Watson and Hunter run, "Keilor",if would make sense for him to have two stations upon it as Edward Hobson had at Kangerong (his house near the Mount Martha run and a station near the present south boundary of Safety Beach.) While no squatter named Mutton has been found before 1842, William Hutton certainly was and near the Saltwater River too. Was Mutton a typo?
Sam Merrifield'a Annals of Essendon stated that William and John Foster obtained a ten year lease of Leslie Park in 1840; perhaps William Hutton had held the lease previously, UNDER A DIFFERENT NAME as Leslie was a given name of both William and John Foster. See "MUTTON, OR WAS IT HUTTON?" after MUTTON.


MUTTON. (I'm feeling sheepish about such an indefinite commencement!)
Mutton is a terrible name to flesh out on trove as is Rye for a similar edible reason. Rather than beef about this difficulty, I'll make a guess that the squatter north across the river from Watson and Hunter's Keilor run was William Henry Mutton, based on the earliest Mutton birth on Victorian BDM.* We'll try a pay for view ancestry site to launch an investigation.**

* EventBirth Event registration number25552 Registration year1851
Personal information
Family nameMUTTON Given namesHenry James SexMale Father's nameMUTTON William Henry Mother's nameElizabeth (Unknown) Place of birthSEYMOUR

MY HERITAGE. (I don't want to advertise heritage scavengers who charge for information they obtain free.)
William Henry Mutton, 1825 - 1856
William Henry Mutton was born on month day 1825, at birth place, to Robert Mutton and Barbara Mutton (born Kellow).
Robert was born in 1805, in Callington, Cornwall.
Barbara was born in 1800, in Callington, Cornwall.
William had one brother: Harry J Mutton.
William married Elizabeth Mutton (born Lock).
Elizabeth was born on January 20 1823, in Bath, Somerset, England.
Her occupations were Dressmaker and Ag Lab Daur.
They had 4 children: Eliza Jane Cawtheray (born Mutton) and 3 other children.
William lived in 1861, at address.
His occupation was occupation.
William passed away on month day 1856, at age 31 at death place.
He was buried on month day 1856, at burial place.
No doubt somebody discovered his body at that address five years after his death because of the smell! Perhaps his 1861 address was his grave.

IN the Supreme Court of the Colony of Victoria. Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction.
Notice is hereby given, that after the expiration of fourteen days from tho publication of this advertisement an application will be made to the Supreme Court of the Colony of Victoria, in its Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction, on
behalf of the widow of William Henry Mutton, late of Avenel, in the colony of Victoria, blacksmith, deceased, that probate of the last will and testament of the said William Henry Mutton, deceased, may be granted to his widow as sole executrix.
Dated this 20th day of October, in the year of our Lord 1856.
JOHN MATTHEW SMITH. No.9 Elizabeth-street south. Proctor for the widow of the said William Henry Mutton.
(P.8, Argus, 21-10-1856.)

N.B. A subsequent application asked that probate be granted to Elizabeth Mutton, the widow, John Bignell, of Avenel aforesaid, innkeeper, and James Hilet, of the same place, storekeeper, the executrix and executors named in and appointed by the will of the said William Henry Mutton deceased.(P.7, Argus, 30-10-1856.)

This is almost certainly the son of the Avenel pioneer and his executrix, born in 1851 (birth record at the start of the MUTTON entry.)

EventDeath Event registration number9717 Registration year1910
Personal information
Family nameMUTTON Given namesHy Jas SexUnknown Father's nameMutton Wm Hy Mother's nameElizth (Locke) Place of birth Place of deathMfield Age59

This would be "Eliza Jane Cawtheray (born Mutton)" who is stated on the MY HERITAGE page to be one of four children. Henry James was one, so that leaves two more to find.*
EventBirth Event registration number2778 Registration year1854
Personal information
Family nameMUTTON Given namesEliza Jane SexUnknown Father's nameWilliam Henry Mother's nameElizabeth (Lock) Place of birthAVEN

HERE'S ONE.
EventBirth Event registration number2213 Registration year1855
Personal information
Family nameMUTTON Given namesGeorge Thomas SexUnknown Father's nameWilliam Henry Mother's nameElizabeth (Lock) Place of birthAVENEL

I CAN'T FIND ANOTHER BIRTH RECORD WITH THE RIGHT PARENTS.

This could be the Avenel pioneer but his mother's name is given as Sophia rather than Barbara and no place of death is recorded. However he was born in Cornwall, with his year of death (and age) conforming with the MY HERITAGE details.
EventDeath Event registration number4327 Registration year1856
Personal information
Family nameMUTTON Given namesWilliam Henry SexUnknown Father's nameRobert Mother's nameSophia Place of birthCOR Place of death Age31 Spouse's family nameLOCK Spouse's given namesElizabeth

I have tried everything I can think of, including an English MUTTON genealogical forum, Keilor and Tullamarine searches in 1841 etc., to link the Avenel pioneer to Bunbury's purchase without success.

Given that the Avenel pioneer did not arrive until 1846, he could not have been the squatter on Bunbury's purchase in or before 1842.
User stories about Avenel in Victoria - Bonzle Digital Atlas of Australia
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William & Elizabeth Mutton Early Pioneer of Avenel by 'greenfingers' (contact greenfingers about this story)

William & Elizabeth Mutton

These pioneers William Henry Mutton and his wife, Elizabeth, were immigrants, who had arrived at Melbourne, in the ship, Lady Loch, three years previously, in 1846, to seek a new life in a new land which was then known as the Port Phillip District of New South Wales.

W. H. Mutton was born at Callington, Cornwall, on 22 September 1825. He was the son of Robert and Barbara Mutton and grandson of William Kellow, squire of Callington. He was always described, by those who knew him to the end of his days, as a gentleman in every respect, by education and nature. He was twenty four years of age when he arrived in Avenel. His bride Elizabeth Locke, of the Jersey Islands, was of French descent and younger than he. Their long voyage on the sailing ship had been a great adventure for them, a journey to a land so different from everything they had known, where they would make a home for themselves in pioneering conditions.

In 1847, they had settled in Seymour, soon after their arrival in the colony, but had suffered losses in disastrous floods when the Goulburn River burst its banks. They then decided to move further north along the Old Sydney Rd to Hughes Creek, on the Avenel Run, where the Government was offering Crown land for sale. etc.


"MUTTON, OR WAS IT HUTTON?"
Caution.
I HEREBY caution the Public against employing an old scamp named Daniel Watkins. He absconded from my service on the 30th May, after I had paid his passage from Van Diemen's land. and advanced him money besides. A warrant will be applied for immediately for his apprehension, and any constable apprehending him will receive from me One Pound reward. Height, about five feet 8 inches, dark complexion, age about forty-five.
WILLIAM HUTTON, Saltwater River. (P.2, Port Phillip Gazette, 23-5-1840.)

William Hutton later had a run named Gazette consisting of 21760 acres near Mount Rouse, apparently by 23-12-1846 when he was reported to have a squatting licence in the Portland Bay squatting district. However on 23-11-1841, he was close enough to Melbourne to serve on a Supreme Court jury with such as George Evans despite their need to conduct shearing and harvesting. The resident judge stated,"Gentlemen, — The extent of the calendar and
the value of your time at this season of sheep shearing and of harvest, prevent me saying more to you than a very few words." (P.2, Port Phillip Patriot and Melbourne Advertiser, 29-11-1841.)

gazette homestead complex - Victorian Heritage Database
vhd.heritagecouncil.vic.gov.au/places/23134/download-report

Heritage Listing
Southern Grampians Shire
Statement of Significance
Last updated on - November 8, 2003
What is significant?
The present Gazette Homestead complex is located about 10kms south-west of Penshurst, on the edge of the
lava flow from Mount Rouse and on the Eumeralla River. The squatting run called Gazette dates from the early
1840s but its homestead was located some distance to the south-west. It was occupied by the Hutton family,
which had extensive and continuing pastoral interests centred on Penshurst and commercial interests in Port
Fairy. The run was divided into a northern half running sheep and a southern half running cattle. The present site
may have been an outstation for the northern half and it includes the original stone shearing shed, sheep dip and
associated but later outbuildings. A substantial manager's house, now in ruins, was built in 1882. The freehold
and leasehold land of Gazette was acquired in 1870 as the last great purchase of the important pastoral
partnership, Thomas Robertson and Sons. After the dissolution of the partnership, John and Mary Robertson
owned Gazette. It was their daughter Eliza with her husband, Dr William Cross, who commissioned the Ballarat
architect, Percival Richards to design the new homestead in 1895. It can be compared directly with another
Robertson property, Kongbool, designed by Richards in 1898. Descendents of Thomas Robertson still occupy
the property. The Gazette Homestead Complex remains substantially intact and in good condition, apart from the
ruinous manager's residence and the dilapidated timber outbuildings associated with the shearing shed.
How is it significant?
The Gazette Homestead Complex is of historical and architectural significance to the State of Victoria and to the
Southern Grampians Shire.
Why is it significant?
The Gazette Homestead Complex is of historical significance as the descendent of one of the earliest squatting
runs in the Hamilton part of 'Australia Felix' and particularly for its long associations with William Hutton and his family and with John George Robertson and his family, now to the fourth generation. The woolshed is of
architectural significance as one of the most complete surviving and still in use (with its historic extensions and alterations, the sheep dip and associated plant, and the nearby outbuildings). The manager's house, although in ruins, demonstrates the role and status of that position. The stables are distinctive for their scale and form. The homestead (with its drive, gardens, orchard and outbuildings) is of architectural significance as an example of very late Victorian architecture, for its setting within a formal but conventional garden and its siting within the broader landscape and as an example of the work of the architect, Percival Richards.

The following article implies that William Hutton came to Victoria from Van Diemen's Land in 1844 but the above evidence and the article itself show that he was here before David moved to the mainland. Frances Johnson's family history, below, shows that William bought land in Melbourne on 1-6-1837.
WILLIAM AND DAVID HUTTON

Keilor road was also known as the Portland road and the mail to Mount Macedon went through Keilor with the Portland Mail by 1851 after originally passing through Tulip Wright's patch that became Bulla*. If the squatter near Steele Creek and the Saltwater River was dispossessed, it makes sense that he would move farther from Melbourne along the same artery. That William Hutton was the squatter whose station was on Bunbury's purchase depends on an assumption that somebody (perhaps a typesetter) thought a handwritten H was M.
* PETER YOUNG'S RAGE.

WILLIAM HUTTON'S ANCESTRY AND FAMILY
This is a fabulous family history provided by Frances Johnson. It indicates that William Hutton and his partner Brown had a run by 1838, probably the one near Keilor. William was still shuttling between Launceston and Melbourne.
In June 1838 a government agent collected the first 12 successful applications
for Pasturage Licences. On 20 July the same year he sent in a further 24
applications, one of which was from William Hutton and his partner, Brown,
who were squatting with 4,000 sheep, 2 horses and 13 free men. The range of
holdings of the 24 applicants, by way of comparison, was up to 8,000 sheep,
1,800 cattle, 13 horses, and 32 free and assigned men.

THE WESTERN DISTRICTS
By 1840 the Hutton family had established themselves in the Western
Districts of “Australia Felix” at Mount Rouse, where their four youngest
children were born. However, William continued to run stock at Saltwater
River, where he is recorded as a settler in 1842. 55

WILLIAM HUTTON & ANN PARTRIDGE
WILLIAM HUTTON
BORN: 1799, Scotland
DIED: 1862 Wangoom, Vic.
MARRIED: 8 May 1829, Hobart, Tas.
ANN PARTRIDGE
BAPTISED: 21 June 1812, Droitwich, Worcestershire
DIED: 1847, Mt Rouse, Vic.
ISSUE: (1) Isabella Anne
(2) William George
(3) Thomas David
(4) Susanna Sarah
(5) Mary Paul
(6) James Charles
(7) Lucy Eleanor
(8) Alexander
(9) Jane Charlotte
(10) Henry Partridge




McNALL.

EventBirth Event registration number794 Registration year1842
Personal information
Family nameMCNALL Given namesJohn SexMale Father's nameMCNALL John Mother's nameSarah (Unknown) Place of birthMOONEE PONDS

EventDeath Event registration number385 Registration year1843
Personal information
Family nameMCNALL Given namesJohn SexMale Father's nameUnknown Mother's nameUnknown (Unknown) Place of birthUNKNOWN Place of deathMOONEE PONDS Age35

There was no death notice for John who was probably the notorious insolvent of 1842 accused of swapping valuable for less valuable property (obviously for cash)so he would be less-damaged by sequestration of his belongings.
Provincial News.
Melbourne Times (Vic. : 1842 - 1843) Saturday 23 July 1842 p 2 Article

DIED.
On the 1st April., 1848, at 9 p. m., at her residence, New Town*, Sarah, relict of the late John McNall, in the 37th year of her age, deeply regretted by a large circle of friends.(P.2, Port Phillip Patriot and Melbourne Advertiser, 3-3-1848.) *Newtown was later renamed Collingwood.

EventDeath Event registration number2087 Registration year1848
Personal information
Family nameMCNALL Given namesSarah SexFemale Father's nameUnknown Mother's nameUnknown (Unknown) Place of birthUNKNOWN Place of deathMELBOURNE Age37 Spouse's family nameMCNALL Spouse's given namesUnknown

John McNall, apparently their son, was at Smythesdale (near Wardi Yallock) by the 1860's so the McNall and Downie families may have been associated in some way. As this John McNall's death is not on Victorian BDM, he may have moved to Bourke N.S.W. He married Maria Moore.

EventMarriage Event registration number3725 Registration year1869
Personal information
Family nameMCNALL Given namesJohn SexUnknown Spouse's family nameMOORE Spouse's given namesMaria

There are only three results for John McNall on Victorian BDM (1843, THE SQUATTER'S DEATH AND 1842 AND 1869-THE BIRTH AND MARRIAGE OF,PRESUMABLY, HIS SON.)

This John McNall was probably the grandson of the Moonee Moonee Ponds squatter.
OBITUARY MR. JOHN McNALL
Western Herald (Bourke, NSW : 1887 - 1970) Friday 16 September 1949 p 8 Article
... OBITUARY MR. JOHN McNALL One of the oldest and highly respected graziers of the north west of the ... State, in the person of Mr. John Mc-Nall, passed away in the Bourke District Hospital on Thursday

3 comment(s), latest 1 week, 2 days ago

LAND SELECTIONS BY WILLIAM RUTLEDGE OF PARAMATTA, N.S.W. AND ANDREW McCRAE IN 1842 THAT MAY HAVE CHANGED THE HISTORY OF BULLA AND ARTHURS SEAT.

RUTLEDGE AND McCRAE'S SELECTIONS

William Rutledge,of Eastwood, Parramatta, who had a land order for a special survey in Gipps' Land received selections for a total of 4549 acres with a 10 mile frontage to the Leigh and Barwon Rivers 25 miles from Geelong.

There were huge protest from the Port Phillip District about the Special Survey provisions which were designed to encourage men of capital, while remedying the decline in demand for land in South Australia, by allowing them to buy 5120 acres before survey at a pound an acre-paid directly to the British Government. The scheme was cancelled soon after it started, in 1841. Jamieson's special survey was obtained although the act had been rescinded but Rutledge had been far too late in presenting his land order.

I don't know whether William's selections near Geelong influenced history in that area but if he had remained on another selection, portion 2 of the parish of Bulla Bulla of 671 acres, adjoining "Cumberland", the history of Bulla would have been significantly altered. St Mary's Anglican church, Bulla, relocated to the corner of Somerton Rd after the airport opened, would never been constructed at the south west corner of "Woodlands" (Melway 177 J9),the diagonal west end of Somerton Rd would not have been called Green (sic) Street and there would have been no Rawdon Street or St Johns Rd because William Pomeroy Greene's groom, Thomas Branigan, would have never have established "St John's Hill". Woodland's connection with the area's early horse racing and the Oaklands Hunt Club (founded in 1888) may not have happened.

If Rutledge paid his annual licencing fee, he probably would not have had to occupy his selections, which was a later requirement to prevent such huge land grabs. With the addition of the extra 671 acres, his land holdings totalled 5220 acres, 100 acres more than the area of a special survey. Any history of Woodlands is likely to start with W.P.Greene's purchase of section 2 the very next year, with no mention of William Rutledge, so that has caused this journal.

Andrew McCrae was desperate in 1842. His brother Dr Farquhar McCrae might have been part of the problem. It may have been circa 1842 that the grantee of Moreland bought La Rose and started building the heritage-listed Wentworth House in Le Cateau St, Pascoe Vale South, which might have been the reason he was unable to repay a loan Andrew had given him. In 1843, Andrew secured a lease of the Arthur's Seat Run and while he stayed only about eight years before selling the run to the Burrells, much of the early history of the Mornington Peninsula would never have been recorded in Georgiana's journal, there would be no McCrae's Homestead at McCrae, and Henry Tuck's involvement in building it would not have been verified. Andrew's wife Georgiana, would have been writing about the Bacchus Marsh area instead. In all the many accounts of the McCraes that I've read, I've never seen any mention of his selections on "Captain Bacchus' station, on the Weiraby." Frankly, Andrew would have been better off settling on his Bacchus Marsh selections because Arthur's Seat was a shocking cattle run.

JOHN PASCOE FAWKNER WAS FURIOUS AT ROBERT HODDLE BLOCKING TODAY'S PASCOE VALE ROAD AT THE MOONEE VALLEY RACECOURSE SITE.

This letter was found while researching NEW ROAD in 1847 on trove in reference to Chris Laskowski's STEELE CREEK AND THE LADY OF THE LAKE. As I have limited time to finish the journal about Christine's book, I cannot correct the digitisation of John Fawkner junior's letter. I provide a link.

FAWKNER BLASTS HODDLE

The letter explains why there were so many early roads to Sydney*. Today's Sydney road only went as far as the stockade at Pentridge (which was the original name for Coburg until a royal visit** led to a request to replace that stigmatised name with a regal one.) See:* P.31 BROADMEADOWS: A FORGOTTEN HISTORY. ** Richard Broome's BETWEEN TWO CREEKS.

Fawkner had good reason to oppose* a new Sydney road past the stockade. One of the features of his Pascoeville Township was the Young Queen Inn, "the" landmark for the Sydney-bound. As soon as the new Sydney road was underway a new Young Queen Inn was built on the direct route, prospering while William Smith's one near the Pascoe Vale bridge suffered a lingering death. (*See Page 19, BROADMEADOWS: A FORGOTTEN HISTORY, Andrew Lemon.)

Fawkner's "Section No. 151" was section 151 of the parish of Jika Jika at the north west corner of the parish and adjoining the parishes of Will Will Rook and Doutta Galla to the north and south respectively. Fawkner was not very neighbourly to Major St John, the grantee of section 23 Doutta Galla south across the creek, denouncing him for corruption and causing him to leave in shame.

Section 151 was bounded by the Moonee Ponds Creek on the south and west, extending north to the parish boundary near Victoria St/Rhodes Parade and east to Northumberland Rd, Pascoe Vale.

Robert Hoddle's "petty fifty acres" was probably one of two (of three adjoining) crown allotments in the parish of Doutta Galla granted to the surveyor. Crown allotment 3 of 5, the northernmost was granted on 11-3-1846 and allotment 4 on 24-2-1847, about two months before the letter was written and the southernmost, allotment 5 on 21-7-1847 after the letter was published.

Hoddle's grants were bounded by Pascoe Vale Rd, Bent St, the creek and a southern boundary just south of Coats St.

EXTRACT FROM MY EARLY LANDOWNERS:PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA.
Allotment 6 and 5 (MOONEE VALLEY RACECOURSE)
Moonee Valley Racecourse now occupies part of allotment 4. An extra 6 acres in this allotment was purchased by May 1909. In the previous November, tenders were called for the construction of a 1 ½ mile track taking in all the vacant land between the old track and Wilson St.

The history of the ownership of allotments 6 and 5 follows:
Allotment 6 -------------- Allotment 5
Dean St to Coats St.------ Coats St to Thomas St.
Grantee: John Mooney.----- Grantee: Robert Hoddle.
1-1-1848. 10 year lease to Mooney.------24-12-1847.Sth. half sold to Mooney.
------------------------- 7-6-1850. Northern half sold to Mooney.

Mooney creates Norwood Township. (Undated map at Sam Merrifield Library).
Richard Feehan bought lots 63-70. Thomas Baillie apparently built his house in this township in 1859.

18-12-1855. Richard Feehan bought all of allotments 5 and 6 east of an un-named road (which, being 525 links from the north west corner of allotment 5, was certainly Walker St).
This deal had been agreed upon while Feehan rode to Keilor with Mooney who had received the grant for section 30 Maribyrnong (Calder Raceway site) on 9-5-1854.
1883.Kensington Park (Allotments 17-19 section 2) having been sold to John Straker on 7-11-1882, W.S.Cox leased Feehan’s Farm for seven years with an option to purchase.

2-10-1895. W.S.Cox dies at 64.
25-1-1912. W.S.Cox Jun., eldest son of Moonee Valley’s founder, dies.
22-11-1913. The Moonee Valley Estate is placed on sale. Mary McPherson became W.S.Cox’s wife and she had connections with the Coats family, Cox’s daughter married a Kenna, Mrs Walker was the mother of Mary Cox, Alexandra Hoskins was born a Cox.
Thomas Cox, who owned the southern half of the Niddrie quarry (subdivision lot 10 in section 12) from 12-11-1850 might have been related but “Street Names of Essendon” gives several possible origins for the name, including a vague reference to the Cox family in the Coats St entry.
1917.The racecourse had been owned by proprietors (the Cox family). The Moonee Valley Racing Club is now formed at a meeting at Hosie’s Hotel in the city, whose owner, J.B.McArthur of Arundel and a descendant of Richard Feehan are elected Vice Presidents. Alister Clark of Glenara, a world famous rose breeder is elected Chairman and retains that position until his death in 1949. One renowned jockey valued the roses more than the dough when he won the Alister Clark Stakes.

Postscript. The titles research on the racecourse land was prompted by an article entitled “Ships of the Desert blow into Valley” (Community News 26-10-1999) in which it was claimed that J.M.Ardlie, a pioneer of Tullamarine and Warrnambool, had owned the racecourse land in 1839. The title, that supposedly confirms this claim, was actually to lot 2 of section 4 Tullamarine (Shawlands Dr. to Gabrielle Cres. in Tullamarine!) He might have held a squatting lease nearer to the racecourse land but no record of this has been found.


JIKA JIKA

DOUTTA GALLA

The Jika Jika map shows the carving up of Fawkner's grant, and the direct route to Sydney only as a dotted line past the stockade. Fawkner, the main opponent of squatters, became insolvent, mainly because of losses incurred on his squat near Mt Macedon that gave Monageeta its name and only saved Belle Vue (later renamed Oak Park), the portion of his estate west of Pascoe Vale because he'd put it in his wife's ownership. Lot 5 bought by H.G.Ashurst became John Kernan's Merai Farm.William McCulloch, a Murray River steamboat operator bought the adjoining (to the north) Glenroy Farm in 1874.)

ROBERT DENY DENISON QUINAN, GRAZIER, POUNDKEEPER, LIMEBURNER AND TEACHER, VIC., AUST.

Somewhere, perhaps in reports of James Ford's and Peter Purves' dodgy petition of (1859?) against the proposed fence from White Cliff to the back beach (to keep the Ford/Purves bullocks out of the police paddock), the story being in Peter Wilson's ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD and Jenny Nixon's FAMILY, CONNECTIONS, SORRENTO AND PORTSEA -or a rate record of about that time, R.Quinan was named as a lime burner. Could he have been the early Dromana teacher I thought. Surely not, I decided! Now I think he was.

The Braybrook pound in 1850 was at about Melway 27 E 8, so what's this got to do with pioneers of the Mornington Peninsula?
IMPOUNDED At Braybrook, 21st
January 1850
I dark red bullock', supposed brnnd KN
or KN off ribs, lina apiece of green
hide round his neck
If not released on or before the 1.0th
day of February next, he will bo sold ut
the Pound Yard, according to Act of
Council.
4s. 3d,
R. D. QUINAN,
Pound keeper. (P.1, Argus, 6-2-1850.)
Robert Deny Denison Quinan born in Dublin about 1816, arrived in Port Phillip as a passenger aboard the ship China from London and Plymouth in 1840. From around until June 1847, Quinan was in partnership with Charles Ryan as a stockholder at Kilfera on the Broken River. Several children were born to Quinan and Frances Emma, nee Shackcloth, during this time.
In October 1852 Quinan had been dismissed as poundkeeper. In 1853 he was accused of stealing a surveyor's compass.
By 1857 the Quinans had moved to the Point Nepean area. Quinan had established a private school at Dromana by November 1860, his wife assisting with teaching the pupils. The following year, he asked that his establishment become a national school, a request which was granted on 1 June 1861.
P.174-5,STEELE CREEK AND THE LADY OF THE LAKE, Christine Laskowski.

The next paragraph tells the story of Robert's suicide but does not mention the part time book-keeping job for the Kangerong Road Board and the discrepancy of 5 pounds presented by Colin McLear on page 130-131 of A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA. Neither Colin nor my longtime Keilor Historical Society friend Chris mentioned the daughter who married James Purves,( son of Peter who died in 1860 and was buried in today's Point Nepean Park near the Quarantine Station.)

Emily Caroline Quinan b. 16-3-1844 at Broken River (Benalla)
married James Purves on 16-6-1862. Both died at Rosebud (Green Hills in Purves Rd of course), Emily on 4-8-1910 and James on 6-11-1913. (MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN, Hec Hanson and Petronella Wilson.)

ROBERT'S WIDOW.
DEATHS.
QUINAN.— On the 21st of June, at 'Green
Hills.' Dromana, Victoria, Frances Emma, in
her 85th year, relict of the late R. D. D.
Quinan, and mother of Mrs, John Laird,
Gawler, Mrs. James Purves, Victoria, and
Robert and Arthur Quinan, W. A., and sister
in-law of Lady - Ribton, Henry and Dr. E.
Quinan, Dublin, Ireland. Dublin papers please
copy.(P.2, Bunyip ,Gawler S A., 5-7-1907.)
I'm writing a review of Christine's fabulous book as I did for Rosalind Peatey's one about the Peninsula.