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FRANKLINFORD 6, VIC., AUST. (HALLINAN, DYETT GENEALOGY, YANDOIT SCHOOL, SNIPPETS.)

ROOTSWEB HALLINAN-L HALLINAN ALSO IN VICTORIA.
I stumbled on this website while trying to determine if Patrick Molloy had remarried.
From: "Melanie Hallinan" <miss_melanie73@hotmail.com>
Subject: Hallinan also in Victoria
Date: Fri, 13 Apr 2001 11:37:05


Hello Malcolm and Lyn,

It was really interesting to read you letter. I will keep my eyes open for
anything that may be of use to you.

My first Hallinan ancestor was THOMAS Hallinan. He and his wife CATHERINE
Keating came to Australia from Co. Clare. On the shipping papers it says
Thomas was from Ennistimon Co. Clare and a miner. Catherine was from Inagh,
Co. Clare. They also arrived with their 2 children John aged 4 and Bridget
an infant. I don't know much of what came happened to John and Bridget. They
all arrived in 1851 on the Sarah into Sydney and had another daughter named
Catherine, she died aged 3. They then had a son named Michael Hallinan who
is my gr. gr. grandfather.

Michael was born in Victoria in 1856, at the goldfields in Bendigo. Thomas
was a miner there. His wife Catherine died aged 35. The family had a hut at
Sailors Gully, Sandhurst (the old name for Bendigo). Rates records state
that they had a hut and stables. I don't know much about what this means on
the wealth side of things.

As an adult MICHAEL married Elizabeth Molloy b. 1865. in Yandoit, Vic (near
Daylesford).They married 21st August 1889. Thanks to a wonderful lady I met
via one of these email groups I now have a copy of their wedding
certificate.

Michael and Elizabeth had a farm at Kerang and there they raised 9 children.
PATRICK my gr. grandfather was the 3rd born in 1893. Most of their children
stayed in the area I think.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
THE FOLLOWING COMES FROM JOHN HUTCHINSON'S POST ON THE DYETT-RANCE FAMILIES. CHARLES NORTON DYETT WAS A KEY WITNESS IN THE BRUTAL MURDER CASE OF 1862.
4. Charles Norton DYETT (Charles Norton DYETT2, John DYETT1) was born 1 AUG 1832 in Holy Trinity Kingston upon Hull, was christened 13 AUG 1834 in Holy Trinity Kingston upon Hull, and died 27 AUG 1901 in 97 Buckhurst Street South Melbourne. He married Sarah HOCTOR 10 AUG 1857 in Mt Franklin Victoria, daughter of John HOCTOR and Mary MALLOY. She was born 1838 in Tipperary Ireland, and died 8 APR 1875 in Franklinford Victoria Australia. He married Margaret RANKIN 11 AUG 1883 in West Hotham, daughter of Duncan RANKIN. She was born 1856, and died 1914.

Children of Charles Norton DYETT and Sarah HOCTOR are:
+ 6 i. Charles Norton DYETT was born 20 MAY 1858 in Mt Raglan Victoria.
+ 7 ii. John William DYETT was born 11 JUL 1860, and died in Adelaide South Australia.
+ 8 iii. Benjamin Patrick DYETT was born 1863 in Yandoit Victoria, and died 1936 in Bendigo Victoria.
9 iv. Frederick Thomas DYETT was born 1865 in Daylesford Victoria, and died 1867 in Died of Accidental Burns.
+ 10 v. Frederick Thomas DYETT was born 1868 in Shepherds Victoria, and died 1921 in Broken Hill.
11 vi. Hannah Mary DYETT was born 1871 in Franklinford Victoria, and died 3 NOV 1934 in Falkner Cemetary Victoria. She married Alfred Edward TAYLOR 1898 in Franklinford Victoria.
12 vii. Martha Josephine DYETT was born 1873 in Shepherds Victoria. She married John Skinner MELROSE 1899 in Franklinford Victoria.
It is possible that the C.N.Dyett's first wife was related to the pioneers near Broadmeadows and his second wife was related to John Rankin who lived at the corner of Macaulay and Rankins Rds at Kensington.
------------------------------------------- ---------------------
YANDOIT STATE SCHOOL.


It seems to me that the histories of Franklinford and Yandoit cannot be considered in isolation so in closing I'll include a bit about Yandoit State School which probably gave John and Cameron Morrison a clearance just to keep Franklinford's Boys' College going for a few more years.

Star, Ballarat, 3-12-1861 page 1s. Subscription lists had been issued to raise 50 pounds to build a National School schoolhouse. This building was ready for replacement 27 years later (A. 26-10-1888 page 7.)

Wodonga and Towong Sentinel, 1-2-1889 page 3. CORRYONG. G.E.S.Robinson was leaving on promotion to Yandoit.

A. 20-5-1899 page 5. G.E.Seaborne Robinson's son was stillborn.

A. 22-1-1914 page 10. Mr Francis was leaving Yandoit for Wail. (What a crying shame!)

A. 7-3-1933. Kenneth Charles Stevens had died on the 5th at the Ballara Private Hospital at Castlemaine, aged 4. His parents were Vernon and Emmie Stevens of Yandoit S.S. Vernon's parents James and Elizabeth lived in Guildford and Emmie's parents were Frances Cave of Werona and the late Charles Cave.Vernon and Emmie's other children were Verna and Lindsay.
A. 18-9-1936 page 6. Yandoit S.S. won many awards for fodder crops.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

ORIGINS OF STREET NAMES.
MILL ST possibly got its name because of Pozzi's, or an earlier miller's, flour mill.
MORRISON, FLEMING, STRAWHORN, SARTORI and probably CLARKE are streets named after pioneers.
WHYBROW and LIGAR Streets are both named after the Surveyor General, Charles Whybrow Ligar.
STUART could come from the Strawhorn property Mt Stuart or be a mistaken spelling of James Stewart's name.

THAT'S ALL FOLKS! Well, not quite. I thought I'd add a few more snippets because this cat doesn't believe that old saying. All articles and notices following are from the Argus.

The accident-prone Phillips family lived on Kangar Farm which would have been all or part of Richard Molloy's Kangar Park. Lucy, Robert Phillips' eldest daughter, was 20 when she sustained the burns from which she died, about six weeks later, in the Castlemaine Hospital. (21-7-1914 page 12.)

There is a photo of Gavan, 2, and Kelvin, 4. sons of Mr and Mrs Will Doolan of "Waverly", Franklinford, on page 6s of the Argus of 7-5-1947.Will was a good singer and received an honorable mention in the Bendigo competition in 1938.

Charles Menzies' widow, Ellen applied for probate of his will (A. 3-3-1877 page 8.)

A fire broke out in the Scheggia Bros. paddock near the Franklinford Cemetery. (A. 26-1-1933 page 11.)
Prudent Scheggia was killed when he was thrown from his horse, leaving a widow and eight daughters. (A. 22-9-1936 page 14.)

Martin Minogue, a farmer and storekeeper of Franklinford, was insolvent. (A. 23-8-1870 page 5.)

Gregory J. and Reginald A. Thomas of Franklinford had displeased the tax man.(A. 2-5-1921 page 9.)

Major T.Templeton, 4th Battalion, Victorian Mounted Rifles, was thrown from his horse when it stumbled near Guildford as he rode from Franklinford to attend a parade in Castlemaine. He was the teacher at Franklinford and President of the Fifth Class Teachers' Castlemaine Branch. 30-7 and 18-11-1889.

No doubt Franklinford residents took more care where they were walking after this snippet appeared in the paper! Robert Morris, a threshing machine operative, fell down a mine shaft when fighting a fire in a paddock of thistles. (24-1-1905.) Hopefully the thistles were not the legacy of William Campbell!

Mrs Marsh of Franklinford had provided the only fresh information about the Yandoit outrage. 7-10-1886 page 6. William Marsh died intestate on 2-10-1891. 19-2-1892 page 3.

Ann Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Ambrose Draper, and Frederick Langton Simmons of Dunolly were married at the Draper residence at Franklinford by a Wesleyan minister. 6-4-1866 page 4. I wonder if Simmons was a member of the family after which Simmons Reef at Blackwood was named.

William Strawhorn, born in Coburg, who came to Franklinford in about 1998. had died. He had been a member of the Daylesford Agricultural Society and Presbyterian Church. 30-3-1938 page 6.

An apology was tendered to Mr Fleming , ex sergeant of police, who had been blamed for a fatal incident in Daylesford when it was a policeman in that town with the same surname. Mr Fleming had been for a considerable time settled at Franklinford as a farmer. 3-10-1862 page 7. Mr Fleming was President of Mt Franklin Shire in the boom year of 1888, when a spider's web of railways was developing. He took the chair at the meeting where it was moved by JAMES MORRISON and seconded by CR. RICHETTO* that a line be built from Daylesford to pass through Yandoit and join the Castlemaine-Maryborough line at Strangways. Some wanted the line to go farther west through Dry Diggings but the motion was passed. 4-5-1988 page 11.

* I SPENT HOURS TRYING TO FIND ANY OTHER MENTION OF THIS PERSON, TO NO AVAIL. A DR ROSETTA WAS ELECTED TO COUNCIL SO IT WAS PROBABLY CR ROSETTA.

John Winter, a Franklinford farmer, hanged himself. 26-4-1892 page 6. There is a complete lack of mentions of the Franklinford Winter family on trove apart from the following, on page 2 of the Kyabram Union of 1892. James Winter of Franklinford, , an old resident, had made three attempts at suicide,by hanging, cutting his throat and choking himself. This may have been John, given that Franklinford was described as being near Dalesford. Otherwise the family's favourite sport seems to have been self-destruction. The only references to Winter (apart from millions of entries concerning the coldest season)concerned a Castlemaine butcher and a teacher at Sandon. By 1857, Williams and Winter were butchers at Castlemaine, a horse belonging to them having been stolen from the paddock known as Winters Flat. Considering that Castlemaine has such a great history, its wiki is pathetic regarding history, not even mentioning the origins of Winters Flat and Wesley Hill. George Winter, headteacher at Sandon, who was burnt by an exploding stove (Argus, 5-2-1937 page 4), may have also been related to Winter of Franklinford.

Franklinford resident, Edgar Doolan, aged about 40 and a married man with children, was killed at Yandoit. A blacksmith he was helping three men to remove a hopper they had purchased from the Steele's Pioneer Reef Mine when the fatal accident occurred. 22-6-1912 page 25. (Because of his given name, I wonder if the Doolans and Morrisons were related by marriage.) Francis Doolan had become engaged. 7-10-1939 page 8.

Charles Judkins, who had been at the aboriginal station for many years, had died just like his boss after a long and painful illness borne with Christian fortitude . It would be a fair bet that this wording came from Joseph Parker! 16-9-1864 page 4.

Mr and Mrs Quine were farewelled at the Mt Prospect hall. They were moving to Franklinford where they had leased Mr Frank Dougall's Mt Franklin Estate. 26-2-1914 page 11. (Mt Prospect must have been reasonably close to Franklinford because Father Slattery who built the R.C. church at the latter in 1863, while he was at Daylesford, started building a church at Mt Prospect before leaving for Geelong in 1870. (I had to check. It is about halfway between Daylesford and Creswick near the Midlands Highway.)

Mr Hugget, still a resident of German's Gully, south of Yandoit, made a significant discovery there in about 1858. 26-10-1888 page 11. This article also described the difficulty Mr T.Price, an old Franklinford resident, had in raising funds for his mining venture. His name was Tom, as I found later, and my heart skipped a beat as I thought of Mt Tom Price. Unfortunately this mine was named after the Vice President of an American steel company, not our Franklinford pioneer.

Miss Alice Mary Sartori was entertained at Franklinford on the eve of her wedding to Mr A.MacLaren. 7-4-1938 page 12.

William Strawhorn, farmer of Franklinford left real estate valued at 4045 pounds and personal property worth 873 pounds. 3-5-1938 page 2.

DANGEROUS JIM CROW CREEK. You may have scoffed at the reference, in the chronology, to the coach being unable to cross this creek and the passengers having to spend the night at Yandoit. Two men were crossing the creek in a buggy when the horse lost its footing. One of the men made it to the bank but the other, and the buggy, were swept rapidly downstream. Some miners came to the rescue. 17-12-1860 page 6.

T.Manning of Franklinford won a prize for his 3 year old draught horse at the Daylesford Show. 21-11-1908 page 18.

Grasshoppers were threatening potato crops. 10-1-1935 page 5.

Mary and Tom Powell of Franklinford S.S. won every event in their sections at the Daylesford and District Sports. 9-1-1937 page 13.

Mr Parry of Parry-Roberts the well-known prize butter makers of Franklinford has been appointed manager of the Daylesford Butter Factory. Tenders have been let for the building of the factory and creameries at Glenlyon and Franklinford. 17-8-1892 page 6. (A lengthy letter from W.Roberts of Franklinford, possibly Miss W.Roberts, entitled HOW TO MAKE GOOD BUTTER appeared on page 4 of The Capricornian of 24-10-1896. Miss W. Roberts of Franklinford had won the champion prize at the Melbourne Agricultural Show for fresh butter in 1886. South Australian Advertiser 26-8-1886 page 5.)

NEWSPAPERS THROUGHOUT THE COUNTRY COPIED STORIES FROM OTHER NEWSPAPERS, SO NEWS ABOUT FRANKLINFORD CAN OFTEN BE FOUND IN INTERSTATE PAPERS.

EMPIRE (SYD.)16-9-1874 page 3.Willy, 11, son of James K.Gilmore,was killed on the road between the lime kilns and Franklinford. Gilmore who lived near the lime kilns was returning home with a cart load of potatoes that he had obtained in Yandoit. After having to unload them when he became bogged and get a second, frisky, horse to extract the cart, he started to reload his cargo but the frisky horse caused the cart to overturn crushing the boy's skull. Willy was taken to Castlemaine in Mr Menzies' buggy but died minutes after admission. (The lime kilns were obviously not near the one on the west side of Limestone Creek mentioned previously in regard to the naming of Patrick Molloy's "Limestone" at Yandoit if the accident happened on the road to Franklinford.)

CORNWALL CHRONICLE (Launceston, started by J.P.Fawkner.)5-7-1869 page 3. Richard Horseman did not die for a while after his suicide attempt and made the following statement. I, Richard Horseman, state that I have contemplated self-destruction for some time past and that I was tired of my life. I had the gun loaded for three weeks previous, and on this morning I sent my wife on a message to Patrick Mahony, in order to get an opportunity to shoot myself in her absence. I placed a strap on the trigger and fastened it to a piece of wood in the partition. I caught hold of the barrel, placed its muzzle against my breast and discharged it, thereby causing the wounds from which I now suffer.

THE AUSTRALIAN NEWS FOR HOME READERS.25-6-1864 page 16. The prospectus for the formation of a tramway from Taradale via Fryer's, Kangaroo, Franklinford etc to Creswick, with a branch line from Franklinford to Daylesford is being prepared.

LAUNCESTON EXAMINER. 2-12-1869 page 3. Mr Joseph Parker of Franklinford is the fortunate competitor for the Town Clerkship of the Borough of Guildford. He is contracted to perform the duties of clerk, assessor, collector of dog tax and rates, inspector of thistles and nuisances, revenue officer and surveyor for 70 pounds per annum.

SOUTH BOURKE AND MORNINGTON JOURNAL. 27-5-1885 page 2. Mrs Dempsey of Franklinford won a prize in the art union (big raffle) to raise funds for a presbytery at the Roman Catholic Church at Dandenong. (Every parish was probably given tickets to sell.Father Patrick Joseph Slattery had built the Roman Catholic Church at Franklinford in 1863 according to his biography.)

LAUNCESTON EXAMINER 6-9-1897 page 3. Tom Price, an old Franklinford resident, did manage to start a company circa 1860, and its head office was going to stay at Franklinford no matter what the far-flung shareholders thought. I will not even try to summarise the comical events that occurred during this meeting, which resulted in a take-over by the Maldon push. You've got to read the article!

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN REGISTER. 26-1-1894 page 7. The Franklinford mines must have attracted very capable managers. Mr W.G.Williams, who had been manager of the Golgonda Quartz mine (in German Gully, resulting from the discovery of Mr Hugget, who had found the Golgonda line in about 1858 and still lived in the gully 30 years later) and other mines, had been appointed manager of the New Charlotte mine in Coolgardie, W.A.

STAR (BALLARAT)27-5-1862 page 1s. YANDOIT. Mr Pozzi, owner of a billiards room, had been fined 50 pounds for selling sly grog, No initial was supplied so we don't know whether it was the miller of Franklinford or one of his two brothers who became wine sellers at Daylesford.

FRANKLINFORD 5, VIC., AUST. (CEMETERY HEADSTONES, HALLINAN &DYETT GENEALOGY, YANDOIT SCHOOL, SNIPPETS.)

FRANKLINFORD CEMETERY HEADSTONES.
I stumbled upon this website while investigating the origin of the name of Clarkes Rd. It is not a complete index of burials. Photos of the headstones listed are available upon request to <judkins@netspace.net.au>.
COMMENTS IN BRACKETS ARE MINE, OBTAINED FROM TROVE. FF=Franklinford.

ALLISON Alison, David, Alexander, Eugenie Constance, James, Donald (No results were produced from an ALLISON, FRANKLINFORD search, so I suspect that there is a connection similar to that of WRIGHT.)

ARCHBOLD Florence (No connection found.)

ARMSTRONG Henry (No connection found.)

BALDOCK Keith William (No connection found.)

BARRETT Blade

BARRETT S J - died 1989

BAUERS Albert Paul

BEAR James, Harriet

BECKWORTH Gerard

BERENYT Mira

BERRY (Morgan) Christine

BIRD William Albert

BOWLES Justus, Mary Agnes

BULL Elizabeth Georgina, Leonard Franklin

BUMSTEAD W, Charlotte W

CAMPBELL Colin Clyde

CARRE Sarah Elizabeth

CARROLL Elizabeth

CHAPMAN Edward Joseph, Amy Priscilla
CHAPMAN Joseph Martin, Ellen Maud, Margaret Jane

CLARKE James Thomas, Ettie Winifred

COAD Dora Susan

COLLIHOLE John W, Miriam Ada

COLQUHOUN Mary, Grace, Henry, Isabella, Grace (Henry Colquhoun may have moved from Shepherd's Flat to Franklinford in 1878. He had been the electoral registrar for Shepherd's Flat but was relieved of the position and replaced by James Sandells. Henry was appointed the electoral registrar at Franklinford in the same gazette. Argus 16-11-1878 page 8.)

COOK Mary Arding

COOPER Edward S, Ashley W (Edw.S. was Mary Ann's husband. A.14-2-1920 p.13, MARRIAGE, COOPER-FOLETTA.)
COOPER George, Georgina
COOPER Mary Ann (Funeral of Mary Ann from Heidelberg to FF on 2-5-1944.)

CORBEN Arthur, Dorothy (Barker), Ruth (Grove)

CORMACK Alexander, Georgina

COUTTS Rachael Jane, Toby Jack

CRERAR Robert, Ethel May

DAVIES David, Ann
DAVIES Margaret

DELMUE Francisco

DIXON George, Anna E
DIXON Robert

DOOLAN Edgar John, Mary (Doule-Doolan engagement A. 6-10-1939 page 4.)

DOUGALL Caroline, William (These are possibly the parents of William Franklin Dougall of the Mt Franklin Estate, whose wife was Minnie. Minnie was a daughter of Hans Peter Jensen of Campbells Creek and was buried there after dying on 31-3-1923. Minnie's death was the spur for her husband to subdivide and sell the estate to such as the Strawhorns and Robertsons. The Dougalls had been on the estate for over 50 years- See the FRANKLINFORD NOTES journal.)

DOWNES (Whitlock) Elizabeth Ann, Robert

DUFF Alison Ellen, Sandells, James
DUFF Elizabeth
DUFF James, Alison and family
DUFF James, Alison

EBERY Walter Hamilton, Ellen Elizabeth (Sartori)

EDWARDS Leonard

ELPHICK (Parker) Rebecca

FIDDES James

FLEISCHER Alan John
FLEISCHER George, Margaret
FLEISCHER Matilda, Phillip Heinrich
FLEISCHER Norman George, Evelyn Maude

FLEMING Johanna, Thomas A
FLEMING Thomas, Christina, Mary Lydia, John William

GARLICK John James, Jane, Elizabeth

GARSED Frederick
GARSED Louisa
GARSED Walter Thomas, Ellen
GARSED

GERVASONI Antonio Giuseppi, Margaret Elizabeth
GERVASONI Ferdinand N, Margaret Mary McNab

NO HEADSTONE-GILLIES Colin(A.16-4-1940 page 4. Funeral leaving his daughter's residence, Oakleigh for FF, 17th)

GIBB William (William Dougall, grazier of Mt Franklin, was the only executor appointed in the will of William Gibb, gentleman, deceased, of Mt Franklinford and was to be granted probate in 14 days. Argus 1-4-1893 p.10. I can find no death notice for William Gibb in the 1890's. Incidentally, Gentleman meant one who does not need to work and was often used by retired businessmen. I wonder if William Gibb was the father or brother of William Franklin Dougall's mother.)

HARDING (Nicholls) Ellinor Gwendoline
HARDING Gerald D

HEDGES Edwin (Chas.Hedges, late of Yandoit was to be buried at Brighton, leaving the residence of Wm.D.Nicholls in Malvern.Argus 19-8-1892, page 1.)

HEFFERNAN Lloyd William, Marie Louise

HEFFORD (Harris) Martha Mary Ann

HENDERSON - SHRIVES family plot
HENDERSON Allan Herbert
HENDERSON Charles David, Juanita, Diamond V
HENDERSON John, Elizabeth A
HENDERSON Marian, David, Francis David (Funeral of Frank of Shepherds Flat 31-12-1926.)
HENDERSON Thomas Gabriel, Emily Jane (Diver)
HENDERSON Thomas, Edith Myrtle Eliza
HENDERSON Thomas, Mary

HERMANN Henry, Susan (Susan, late of Basalt, buried 11-6-1855.)

HIGGINS (Morgan) Anne
HIGGINS

HIGGS (McKinnon) Marion
HIGGS Ann, William H
HIGGS Robert J

HILLS - wooden marker

HIRD Catherine, Henry, Hannah, Henry Franklin, John, George Donald, Victoria Alice
HIRD Christina Dorothea, Arthur Simpson (Henry Hird J.P. died on 6 Aug. at Clydesdale, aged 93 and was buried (at FF on the 9th. His son, Frank, was at Yandoit.)

HOCKING Andrew, James, Ellen, Horace

HOWE William Weston

HOWELL John W, Vera Robbins

HOWELLS G, Ellen
HOWELLS John, Alice E, Sarah (R.D.Howells of Yandoit fought in W.W.1.)

HUGGETT Annie (A big find in German Gully was made by Mr Huggett in about 1858 and he was still living in the gully in 1888.)
HUGGETT W

JAMES Wilson

JAMIESON John

JAYES Thomas, Jane, Thomas Harris, Jane Alice

KASEK Franchick Sygmund Boleshaw

KIRKHAM William

KOLBAN Otto

KUHLE Walter

LAYFIELD Betty Elsie
LAYFIELD Kenneth Ronald

LECKIE (Robertson) (Jessie, widow of James A.Leckie and sister of Francis Robertson died at Hampton)
LECKIE Elizabeth (aged 80 on the 25th so the funeral was obviously on the 26th when the notice stated )
LECKIE William, Janet ("interred at Franklinford".)

LEE Hazel Jean, Allan Henry
LEE Henry Mathew, Francis Ellen

LEIPOLD Jane, Elizabeth, Nicholas, Henry

LLEWELLYN Dulcie Edna (Was she an aunt of Llewellyn Roberts?)

MANNING Alice, William (Thomas Manning was leasing much of Franklinford Township from the Molloys circa 1907.)

MARTIN William, William Henry (Agnes,daughter of late J.Martin, FF, married Edw.Schaffer: A.12-12-1903 page 9.)

McKINNON (Waterton) Florence Edna
McKINNON B D, Jane Johanna
McKINNON Flora, Hepburn C
McKINNON Marion Agnes (Gillies), Duncan
McKINNON R H - died 1949
McKINNON Vera Olive, Duncan Edward

MEAD Eric Alan

MILLS Thomas, Agness

MINOGUE Martin, Ellen

MINOTTI Andrew Vincent, Thelma
MINOTTI Daniel, Jessie
MINOTTI John, Ellen

MOLLOY Richard Antonio, Laura Mabel

MONICO Carolina, Battista

MORGAN - HALLETT
MORGAN David T
MORGAN Florence, Rachel G
MORGAN Henry Herbert, Emilie Bertha, Eric Mitchell, Ronald Samuel Herbert
MORGAN Irene E
MORGAN Lewis, Lucy Eliza, Lewis Llewellyn
MORGAN William, Thomas, David Rees, Gweneth, Elizabeth
MORGAN William

MORRIS Tudor Thomas

MORRISON Edgar, Dorothy Jean, Judith Ann
MORRISON J Katrina, George G
MORRISON James, Margaret, Georgina Gray, T Alfred E
MORRISON Lesley June
MORRISON

MULLER Alex C, Ellen Madeline

MURDOCH Eleanor

MUSCHIALLI F - died 1926, A V - died 1963
MUSCHIALLI Reginald W

MUSGRAVE George Anthony, Jessie Elizabeth

NASH K F - died 1991

NICHOLLS William, Eleanor (See Hedges.)

NICOL Peter, Dinah, William P, Rosetta Soady, William Peter, Thomas, Samuel (Rosetta Soady, wife of the late (William Peter Nicol,formerly of Franklinford, and mother of Ella (Mrs Thomas) ,died 28-3-1956 at a (hospital in Malvern, aged 93.)

O'CONNOR Elizabeth Lily, Kathleen Daphne

O'DONNELL Irene

OLIVER Thomas, Elizabeth Catherine (Thomas Oliver, 60, late of Yandoit, husband of the late Elizabeth Catherine (nee Pavilach), died in Castlemaine. Children named; Frank and Wm. at Yandoit. Argus, 1-12-1928 page 13.)

OLVER Robert Richard

PARKER Amelia, Joseph, Francis Ware, Mary Frances
PARKER Edward Stone, Mary Cooke, Edward Stone, Edward Leonard, George Alfred, Charles George Bright, 2 infant daughters, Hannah, Emilie Sarah

PARKHOUSE Frederick Latta, Frank

PARRY Henry P
PARRY, ROWLANDS, PHILLIPS, Roberts

PAVILACH

PAVILCH

PAYNE Nick

PAYNE Thomas Sutton

PEARCE Joyce

PEDRINI Vincenzo, Giosue

PENGELLY Geoffrey

PFEIFFER Barbara Anne

PHILIP (Osborne) Ruth, Percival Norman
PHILIP John Robert
PHILIP Lucy Ruth, Robert l, Isabel ((Isabella, wife of the late RobertL,Philip of FF, died on 9-8-1939 aged 72. Her son, William A.Philip, was still at FF.)

PHILLIPS David, Mary

POLLOCK Flo

POTTER W A - died 1963
POTTER

POWELL David Lloyd, Mollie Jeanette
POWELL Franklin Gwyn
POWELL Martha Belle, Thomas
POWELL William, Richard Rees

PRICE Thomas, Julia Eleanor

PRIEST William

PULLEN Noel William Reycraft, Doreen Ellen (Sartori)

RAMSAY
RAMSEY

RAWLINS Julie Elizabeth

REES Elizabeth W, William M, Elizabeth
REES Richard, John William

RICHARDS (Gervasoni) Margaret Elizabeth (The Richards family was in Yandoit by 1862.Star, 23-12-1862 p.2.)
RICHARDS Isabella

RIGBY Francis James, Gladys Noreen

RIMMINGTON Henry

ROBERTS William, Hester

ROBERTSON Francis, John MacDonald, Isabel, James Matthew
ROBERTSON Isabella, James Wilkie
ROBERTSON James W, Mary
ROBERTSON James, Jean
ROBERTSON Mary, John

ROCHFORT G W - died 1948

ROWLANDS Lewis

RYAN Leonie Maree

SANDELLS James, Jane Burn, John, James (See COLQUHOUN.)

SARTORI Annie, George Nicol
SARTORI Carlo, Frances Victoria
SARTORI Charles, Elsie
SARTORI Charlotte, Mary Madeline
SARTORI Dennis Wayne
SARTORI Gavin Michael, Maxene
SARTORI George Bennett, Rose Eileen
SARTORI George Wm, Ellen Myra
SARTORI Georgia Rose
SARTORI Giacomo, Madalena, Mary
SARTORI Joan Patricia, Ronald Nazzaro
SARTORI Laurence Arthur
SARTORI Leslie Joseph, Patricia Phyllis (Johnson)
SARTORI Mabel, Nazzaro
SARTORI Mary
SARTORI Nazzaro, Charlotte, Pietro
SARTORI Noel, Colin, Leonard Carl
SARTORI Stanley Francis, Dorothy Jean

SCHEGGIA Ada E, Prudento
SCHEGGIA Dorothy Irene, Gary Alan
SCHEGGIA Giacomo, Annie
SCHEGGIA Giovanni
SCHEGGIA Sylvester, Giovani, Johan, Margarita

SCHROEDER Bertha Rose
SCHROEDER C - died 1892, M - died 1917
SCHROEDER Ernest Charles, Ivy Irene (Ernest,only child of Fred and Norah, married Ivy:Argus 15-8-1949 re Fred.)
SCHROEDER Frederick, Norah (Frederick died 13-8-1949, aged 76.)
SCHROEDER Harold Ernest
SCHROEDER Henry G C

SEALEY Joyce Catherine

SEAMONS Edmund, Mary, Charles, Mary (Wedding notice, A.18-10-1913 p.11: Wm.B.Seamons 4th son of late Jas. Seamons, FF, married Annie Arkey at Wesley Church in Melbourne. Mary, daughter of Edmund Seamons of Kooroocheang died 17-9-1931 and was buried at FF on the 20th.)
SEAMONS John, Anna Maria, James, Elizabeth Anne, Albert Edward (Elizabeth Ann, relict of the late James Seamons of FF, died on the 8th at Yandoit, aged 86. Children listed. A. 9-3-1937 page 1.)

SHARP Charles Edward, Jane Galloway

SHRIVES Gabriel, Jane

SINGER Joanne

SLEETH Robert J, Hermiena A (Hermiena Anna, relict of the late James Seeth of FF, will arrive at FF cemetery) (at 2p.m. after passing through Newstead at 1:30 and Yandoit at 1:45. A. 20-10-1933 page 1.)

SMITH Maurice Reginald
SMITH Robert, Janet
STEEN Harrison James, Zachary Thomas

STEWART James A

STRAWHORN Jane, Alexander (Alex., son of Wm. and Grace died at Elmore 25-3-1949. A. 26-3-1949 page 15.)
STRAWHORN John, Andrew, Robert, Grace, William (Robert, 5th son of Wm.and Grace, died 22-10-1927,31, C'maine.)
STRAWTHORN Grace, William (William, husband of the late Grace, died at "Mt Stuart" FF, 28-3-1938 aged 82.)
STRAWTHORN William Alexander (All of their children are listed Argus 30-3-1938 page 12.)

SULLIVAN John Lawrence
SULLIVAN Laurence Daniel

TAINSH Peter, Doris May Fanny May

TAIT Elizabeth, Ann

TAYLOR (Reycraft) Dorothy Helen

THOMAS - GREGAN
THOMAS Clarence Michael
THOMAS James Francis, Annie Catherine Mary (James Francis Thomas, late A.I.F., son of Catherine and the late
James Thomas of Franklinford died 17-3-1937. Probably the parents.)
THOMPSON Arbor Henderson
THOMPSON Elizabeth, James
THOMPSON Henry Ainsley, Elizabeth, James, Edith, Beatrice, May, Gordon
THOMPSON Ian Russell, Antoinette Despointes

TINETTI Aquilino, Maria, Louis, Amelia, Andrew
TINETTI Edward James, Irene Marie
TINETTI Ferdinando, Veronica Madelina
TINETTI Pater, Orsola, Madeleine

TWIZELL John

UNKNOWN Father, Mother - died 1891

URL Anne Margaretta, John

VANZETTA Louisa, Ferdinand
VANZETTA Madeline Mary, Frank

WALKER

WEBB M E - died 1948

WHIDBURN Harriet Ann
WHITE Sandra Theresa

WHITLOCK Lucy Jean
WHITLOCK William, Ada

WILLIAMSON (Eyre) Edith Dorothea, Reginald Dudley

WINTER John (Committed suicide 1892,possibly after an earlier attempt. See Franklinford 6.)

WOODWARD (Whidburn) Hilda Pearl

WRIGHT Betty Doreen
WRIGHT Herbert Jackson

YOUNG Duncan James

FRANKLINFORD 4, VIC., AUST. (GENEALOGY OF HORSEMAN, MOLLOY AND OTHER PIONEER FAMILIES.)

A POST ON ROOTSWEB RE HORSEMAN/MOLLOY. (MY COMMENTS ARE IN BRACKETS.)
Hi One & All

I am researching the family of Richard HORSEMAN born c.1807 Co. Galway IRE, the son of Richard & Sarah HORSEMAN (nee GRAHAM). Richard his wife Ellen (nee COATES) and their children Richard, Henry, Jane and Sarah arrived in Victoria in 1860 aboard the Sarah M. They settled in the Yandoit area on land belonging to Richard's nephew Richard MOLLOY.
Of Richard & Ellen's children, very little is presently known of their sons - Richard born c.1843 is a complete mystery, and Henry born c.1849 married Mary Jane FAULL in 1878 possibly settling in NSW. Their daughters, Jane born c.1850 and Sarah born c.1853, married possibly in a double ceremony in Franklinford on 14 Apr 1868 Michael CARTY and John CARTY respectively. Michael born c.1838 and John born c.1844 were the sons of Michael & Catherine CARTY (nee LYONS) and were also possibly from Co. Galway, IRE. Both Jane & Michael and Sarah & John settled in the Shepherd's Flat and Yandoit area. (Mr R.Carty was leasing much of Richard Molloy's land in 1907. See chronology 21-9-1907. I wonder if his name was Richard!)

Richard died in Yandoit in 1869 and Ellen died in 1878 - both are buried in the Franklinford Cemetery in an unmarked grave. (Richard Horseman committed suicide. See chronology 28-6-1869.)

Richard's nephews Richard and Patrick MOLLOY, sons of Patrick & Eliza MOLLOY (nee HORSEMAN) arrived in Melbourne in 1854 aboard the Fullwood. Richard MOLLOY born c.1816 married Mary CANTWELL, daughter of Philip & Mary CANTWELL (nee EGAN), in Ballan in 1864 and the family settled in the Yandoit and Franklinford area. Patrick born c.1828 married Bridget COEN, daughter of Thomas & Julia COEN (nee LYONS), in Franklinford in1860 and they too settled in the Yandoit and Franklinford area.

Children of Richard & Mary MOLLOY (nee CANTWELL) were:
- Elizabeth Margaret married James Bernard BARRETT in 1880 in Franklinford
- Mary Dorothea married William O'CONNELL
- Sarah Jane married James COLLINS in 1894
- Theresa Bridget married George Frederick DUNKLEY in 1897
- Catherine never married, she became a Loretto Nun
- Lucy Agnes never married

Richard & Mary are buried in the Eganstown R.C. Cemetery.

Children of Patrick & Bridget MOLLOY (nee COEN) were:
- Mary Ann married Edward O'NEILL in 1881
- Charles died as an infant
- Elizabeth Julia married Michael HALLINAN in 1889
- Mary Jane married Francis Walter MURPHY in 1888 in Yandoit
- Margaret Agnes married Albert James ROSS
- Patrick Joseph married Sarah BENNETT in 1908
- Catherine Winifred married Arthur Patrick McIVER
- Richard Joseph married Matilda Seraphina VOSTI in 1898
- Theresa Bridget died as an infant

Patrick & Bridget are buried in the Sandon R.C. Cemetery. (Bridget died in 1928. See chronology.)

Kind Regards

Roz Voullaire

roz@voullaire.com.au
-------------------------------------------------
EXTRACT FROM HORSEMAN FAMILY TREE ON FREEPAGES.GENEAOLOGY ETC.(Also by Roz Voullaire.)What fantastic information about pioneers in the area around Franklinford!

Richard1 HORSEMAN
+Sarah1 GRAHAM
¦-- Eliza2 HORSEMAN
¦ +Patrick2 MOLLOY, d.c.1839
¦ ¦-- Richard3 MOLLOY, b.c.1826 Galway, IRE, d.1902 Franklinford, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ +Mary3 CANTWELL, b.c.1838 Tipperary, IRE, m.1864 Ballan, VIC, AUST, d.1884 Franklinford, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦-- Elizabeth Margaret4 MOLLOY, b.1865 Yandoit/Franklinford, VIC, AUST, d.1953 Caulfield, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +James Bernard4 BARRETT, b.1857 Ballinasloe, Galway, IRE, m.1880 Franklinford, VIC, AUST, d.1892 Brunswick, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Richard Philip5 BARRETT, b.1881 Ballan, VIC, AUST, d.1948 Heidleberg, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Margaret Phoebe5 BARRETT, b.1883 Fran., VIC, AUST, d.1935 Moonie Ponds, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ +James Gordon5 STEWART, b.1886 Prahran, VIC, AUST, m.1907 Castlemaine, VIC, AUST, d.1937 Pennant Hills, NSW, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- John Anthony6 STEWART, b.1908 Castlemaine, VIC, AUST, d.1981 Mentone, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ \-- Gordon6 STEWART, b.1916 Armadale, VIC, AUST, d.1982 Mentone, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- James5 BARRETT, b.1888 Taradale, VIC, AUST, d.1888 Elphinstone, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ \-- Mary Rose5 BARRETT, b.1890 Glenorchy, VIC, AUST, d.1960 Glen., VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +Edwin George5 WOOD
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- James Carlyle6 WOOD, d.1927 Glenhuntly, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Margaret6 WOOD
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Molly6 WOOD
¦ ¦ ¦ \-- Edward6 WOOD
¦ ¦ ¦-- Mary Dorothea4 MOLLOY, b.1866 Hepburn, VIC, AUST, d.1951 Fitzroy, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +William4 O'CONNELL
¦ ¦ ¦-- Sarah Jane4 MOLLOY, b.1868 Daylesford, VIC, AUST, d.1957 Kew, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +James4 COLLINS, b.c.1861, m.1894 VIC, AUST, d.c.1906
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Neal Joseph5 COLLINS, b.1895 VIC, AUST, d.1937 Melbourne, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Marie Rose5 COLLINS, b.1897 Adra., VIC, AUST, d.c.1933
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Kathleen Alice5 COLLINS, b.1899 Yea, VIC, AUST, d.1947 Caulfield, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ +Edward5 BRADY, m. 1925
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Patricia6 BRADY
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ \-- Marie6 BRADY
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- James Anthony5 COLLINS, b.1903 Coburg, VIC, AUST, d.1926 Armadale, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ \-- John Aloysius5 COLLINS, b.1904 Murrumbeena, VIC, AUST, d.1968 Carr., VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +Koromiko5 SANDILANDS, m.1926
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Geoffrey6 COLLINS
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Joan6 COLLINS
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Barbara6 COLLINS
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- John6 COLLINS
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Jennifer6 COLLINS
¦ ¦ ¦ \-- Michael6 COLLINS See chronology 21-9-1907 re Collins.
¦ ¦ ¦-- Theresa Bridget4 MOLLOY, b.1871 Shepparton, VIC, AUST, d.1949 East Malvern, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +George Frederick4 DUNKLEY, m.1897
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Albert Gerald Griffin5 MOLLOY, b.1897 Brunswick, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Athanie Teresa5 DUNKLEY, b.1899 Brunswick, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ \-- Leata Mary5 DUNKLEY, b.c.1903, d.1923 Macedon, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦-- Catherine4 MOLLOY, b.1873 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1961
¦ ¦ \-- Lucy Agnes4 MOLLOY, b.1876 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1957 Kew, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- Patrick3 MOLLOY, b.c.1828, d.1904 Yandoit, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ +Bridget3 COEN, m.1860 Franklinford, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦-- Mary Ann4 MOLLOY, b.1861 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1908 Daylesford, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +Edward4 O'NEILL, b.? Ballarat, VIC, AUST, m.1881
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Mary Anne5 O'NEILL, b.1882 Franklinford, VIC, AUST, d.1970 Glen., VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ +John5 BOLTON , m.1906 VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- John Patrick6 BOLTON, b.1908 Glenlyon, VIC, AUST, d.1977 Prahran, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- James6 BOLTON, b.1910 Glenlyon, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Francis Edward6 BOLTON, b.1912 Glenlyon, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Edward Lawrence6 BOLTON, b.1915 Glenlyon, VIC, AUST, d.1975 Glen., VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Lillian Margaret6 BOLTON, b.1916 Daylesford, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Patrick Anthony6 BOLTON, b.1918 Glenlyon, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ \-- Margaret Dorothy6 BOLTON, b.1920 Daylesford, VIC, AUST See chronology 21-9-1907.
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Honoria5 O'NEILL, b.1886 Gisborne, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- John Patrick5 O'NEILL, b.1889 Longwood, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Edward5 O'NEILL, b.1891 Franklinford, VIC, AUST, d.1904 Daylesford, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ \-- Ellen5 O'NEILL, b.1895 Franklinford, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦-- Charles4 MOLLOY, b.1863 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1864 VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦-- Elizabeth Julia4 MOLLOY, b.1865 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1941 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +Michael4 HALLINAN, b.c.1857 Sandhurst, VIC, AUST, m.1889 VIC, AUST, d.1929 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Thomas Leo5 HALLINAN, b.1890 Macorna., VIC, AUST, d.1976 Cohuna, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- John5 HALLINAN, b.1891 Kerang, VIC, AUST, d.1972 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Patrick5 HALLINAN, b.1893 Macarthur, VIC, AUST, d.1972 Port., VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Michael5 HALLINAN, b.1895 Kerang, VIC, AUST, d.1966 Bendigo, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Agnes5 HALLINAN, b.1897 Kerang, VIC, AUST, d.1977 Bendigo, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ +(--?--)5 DUNSTAN
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Winifred5 HALLINAN, b.1899 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Francis5 HALLINAN, b.1902 Kerang, VIC, AUST, d.1983 Gold., VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Mary5 HALLINAN, b.1904 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Elizabeth5 HALLINAN, b.1907 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ \-- Catherine5 HALLINAN, b.1909 Kerang, VIC, AUST, d.1960 Fitzroy, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +(--?--)5 MALONEY
¦ ¦ ¦-- Mary Jane4 MOLLOY, b.1867 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1956 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +Francis Walter4 MURPHY, b.1864 Daylesford, VIC, AUST, m.1888 Yandoit, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Francis Patrick5 MURPHY, b.1890 Kerang, VIC, AUST, d.1970 Ballarat, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Maree6 MURPHY
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Laurie6 MURPHY
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Joe6 MURPHY
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ \-- Brendon6 MURPHY
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Mary Florence5 MURPHY, b.1892 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Thomas Ernest5 MURPHY, b.1893 Kerang, VIC, AUST, d.1973 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- David Joseph5 MURPHY, b.1895 Kerang, VIC, AUST, d.1946 Fitzroy, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Walter Bernard5 MURPHY, b.1897 Kerang, VIC, AUST, d.1982 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Elizabeth Agnes5 MURPHY, b.1899 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Gerald5 MURPHY, b.1901 Kerang, VIC, AUST, d.1972 Murp., VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Vincent5 MURPHY, b.1901 Kerang, VIC, AUST, d.1977 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Leo5 MURPHY, b.1902 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- John Desmond5 MURPHY, b.1904 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Margaret5 MURPHY, b.1906 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Kath5 MURPHY, b.1907 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ \-- Eileen Dorothy5 MURPHY, b.1910 Kerang, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +John Patrick5 MCDONNELL
¦ ¦ ¦ \-- Christine6 (--?--)
¦ ¦ ¦-- Margaret Agnes4 MOLLOY, b.1870 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1945 East St Kilda, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +Albert James4 ROSS
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Martin5 ROSS, b.1896 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1966 Essendon, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Richard Joseph5 ROSS, b.1898 Franklinford, VIC, AUST, d.1972 Prahran, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Albert Edward5 ROSS, b.1899 Ascot Vale, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ \-- Ursula Veronica May5 ROSS, b.1902 Ascot Vale, VIC, AUST, d.1968 Melbourne, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +(--?--)5 MORRIS
¦ ¦ ¦-- Patrick Joseph4 MOLLOY, b.1872 Yandoit, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +Sarah4 BENNETT, m.1908 VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ \-- Marjorie Esther Fay5 MOLLOY, b.1911 Castlemaine, VIC, AUST, d.c.1995
¦ ¦ ¦ +(--?--)5 RICHARDSON
¦ ¦ ¦-- Catherine Winifred4 MOLLOY, b.1874 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1967 Bendigo, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +Arthur Patrick4 MCIVER
¦ ¦ ¦-- Richard Joseph4 MOLLOY, b.1877 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1953 Castlemaine, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ +Matilda Seraphina4 VOSTI, b.1876 Guildford, VIC, AUST, m.1898 VIC, AUST, d.1902 Yandoit, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Kathleen Genevieve5 MOLLOY, b.1898 Guildford, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ ¦-- Richard Antonio5 MOLLOY, b.1900 Guildford, VIC, AUST, d.1981 Maldon, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦ \-- Matilda Winifred5 MOLLOY, b.1902 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1902 Yandoit, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ \-- Theresa Bridget4 MOLLOY, b.1882 Franklinford, VIC, AUST, d.1882 Franklinford, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- Mathew3 MOLLOY
¦ \-- Charles3 MOLLOY
\-- Richard2 HORSEMAN, b.c. 1807 Galway, IRE, d.1869 Yandoit, VIC, AUST
+Ellen2 COATES, b.c.1807 Galway, IRE, d.1878 VIC, AUST
¦-- Richard3 HORSEMAN, b.c.1843
¦-- Henry3 HORSEMAN, b.c.1849
¦ +Mary Jane3 FAULL, b.1858 Donkey Hill, VIC, AUST, m.1878 VIC, AUST, d.1942 Castlemaine, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- Unnamed4 HORSEMAN, b.1878 Guildford, VIC, AUST, d.1878 Guildford, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- Mary Jane4 HORSEMAN, b.1889 Castlemaine, VIC, AUST, d.1950 Daylesford, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ +George Edward4 RICHARDSON, m.1911 VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦-- Henry Edward5 RICHARDSON, b.1912 Daylesford, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ ¦-- Albert George5 RICHARDSON, b.1913 Guildford, VIC, AUST, d.1914 Castlemaine, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦ \-- Daphne Phyllis5 RICHARDSON, b.1917 Daylesford, VIC, AUST
¦ \-- Ellen4 HORSEMAN, b.c.1893 NSW, AUST, d.1973 Campbells Creek, VIC, AUST
¦ +Robert George4 MEURER, b.1870 Eaglehawk, VIC, AUST, m.1909 VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- Mary Elizabeth5 MEURER, b.1910 Guildford, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- Robert Henry5 MEURER, b.1911 Guildford, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- Charles5 MEURER, b.1914 Campbells Creek, VIC, AUST, d.1985 Campbells Creek, VIC, AUST
¦ \-- Marjorie Christina5 MEURER, b.1916 Campbells Creek, VIC, AUST
¦ +(--?--)4 BARASSI
¦-- Jane3 HORSEMAN, b.c.1850, d.1915 Castlemaine, VIC, AUST
¦ +Michael3 CARTY, b.c.1834, m.1868 VIC, AUST, d.1901 Newstead, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- Richard4 CARTY, b.1869 Yandoit, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- Sarah4 CARTY, b.1871 Shepherds Flat, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- Kate4 CARTY, b.1873 Shepherds Flat, VIC, AUST, d.1874 Yandoit, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- Michael4 CARTY, b.1875 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1960 Birc., VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- Mary4 CARTY, b.1877 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1879 VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- John4 CARTY, b.1880 Yandoit, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- Ann4 CARTY, b.1883 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1915 Castlemaine, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- Lawrence4 CARTY, b.1886 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1886 Yandoit, VIC, AUST
¦ ¦-- William4 CARTY, b.1887 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1909 Guildford, VIC, AUST
¦ \-- Jane4 CARTY, b.1892 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1948 Kingston, VIC, AUST
\-- Sarah3 HORSEMAN, b.c.1853 IRE, d.1875 VIC, AUST
+John3 CARTY, b.c.1845, m.1868 VIC, AUST, d.1896 Castlemaine Hospital, Castlemaine, VIC, AUST
¦-- Kate4 CARTY, b.1869 Yandoit, VIC, AUST
¦-- Richard4 CARTY, b.1871 Shepherds Flat, VIC, AUST, d.1910 Guildford, VIC, AUST
\-- Patrick4 CARTY, b.1874 Yandoit, VIC, AUST, d.1874 Yandoit, VIC, AUST
Was Ellen Horseman RONALD DALE BARASSI'S grandmother or the great grandmother of the beautiful Gayle Barassi of Castlemaine in the 1960's?
There was a BRIDGET Molloy who was married to JOHN Molloy of "LIMESTONE", Guildford, the property name exactly the same as that of Richard Molloy's property at Yandoit!

FRANKLINFORD 3, VIC., AUST. (CHRONOLOGY FROM 1870.)

A. 29-6-1877 page 8. Willam Bumstead was the manager of the Franklinford Gold mining Company which was to have a meeting at GOURLEY'S HOTEL, Franklinford and was making a call on shareholders.

A. 1-11-1877 page 5. William Robinson, agent for The Argus for Yandoit and Franklinford districts,was thrown from his horse when it bucked outside Webb's hotel in Guildford.

A. 18-1-1879 page 5. Government Gazette. William Bumstead was appointed electoral registrar for the Franklin and Strangways divisions of the electoral districts of Creswick and the North Western Province in the place of W.H.Draper, resigned.

A. 19-2-1892 page 3. A notice about intestate estates included William Marsh of Franklinford who had died on 2-10-1891.

17-3-1894 page 3 (Sunbury News and Bulla and Melton Advertiser.) Roberts and Barry and Bull of Franklinford did well at the West Bourke Agricultural Society Show at Lancefield. They came 1st and 2nd in Two bags wheat and two bags oats while Bull won in malting barley.

8-6-1894, Alexandra and Yea Standard, Gobur, Thornton and Acheron Express, page 2. James, son of Neale Collins, County Derry, Ireland married Jenny, third daughter of Richard Molloy, Kangar Park, Franklinford on 15 May at St Francis', Franklinford.

A. 6-8-1899 page 8. The estate of the late Michael Sharry of Franklinford, farmer, deceased, left unadministered by Ellen Sharry,his executrix, may be granted in 14 days to Michael Collinan Gough of Daylesford, R.C. clergyman, during the minority of the infant children Michael, 16, and John, 14.

16-9-1899 page 16.(Australian Town and Country Journal.) Roberts and Parry of Franklin won 2nd prize at the Royal Melbourne Show for salt butter from a private dairy.

A. 9-11-1901 page 9. Mrs E.S.Cooper, Mr and Mrs Bumstead and Mr and Mrs R.Higgins thanked those who sent letters, telegrams and floral tributes.

2-5-1902 (Euroa Advertiser.) Richard Molloy, aged upward of 82, drowned at his property, Kangor Park, Franklinford. Arriving home, he had taken his horse to a dam so it could drink but was somehow thrown in. Until recently he had taken a lively interest in municipal affairs. (This information came from the Argus. Another account said that he was leading the horse which dragged him into the water. He probably had the reins twisted around his wrist because the horse was frisky upon seeing the long-awaited water.)

A. 19-8-1902 page 6. A hefty probate duty was paid on the estate of the late Richard Molloy, which was of a sworn value of 40 964 pounds 10 shillings and elevenpence.

A. 25-9-1902 page 1. Charlotte, the beloved wife of William Bumstead died at Franklinford on the 23rd. Their children were Mrs W.Little (Northcote), Mrs E.S.Cooper(Franklinford), Mrs G.E.Chapman (Golden Square) and Mrs W.P.Nichol (Warracknabeal.)

A. 2-11-1904 page 9. Patrick Molloy, a native of Ballinsloe, County Galway, Ireland, died at his residence, "Limestone", Yandoit on 2 November, aged 76.

A.8-11-1904 page 10. Probate of the will of Patrick Molloy of Yandoit was to be granted, after 14 days to John James Slattery, formerly a bank manager at Castlemaine but now a butter factory proprietor at Daylesford who was the sole executor appointed in the will. A later notice,(Argus 21-12-1904 page 5), stated the amount left to his widow and his sons. Unfortunately the widow's name was not given.* Francis Haven at Yandoit was donated to the Franciscan Friars by Dick and Laura Molloy. The friars moved into the homestead, apparently on 4-6-1981. The details of the donation are given in Franciscan News (vol.8 No.2) Was the homestead that of "Limestone" or "Kangar Park"?
(*I had not been able to find Bridget's death notice but tonight I finally found it in the 70th item in trove when I entered Bridget Molloy.The notice from page 13 of the Argus of 13-10-1928 is reproduced verbatim in the chronology and states that Bridget had died on the 11th October.Because her death notice had eluded me, and Bridget was not mentioned by name here or in Patrick Joseph's marriage notice of 25-4-1908, I had assumed that she had died and Patrick had remarried.)

A. 21-9-1907 page 3. SALE OF LAND AT MT FRANKLINFORD . (Ha, ha!) In the estate of the late Richard Molloy.
(See Horseman/ Molloy genealogy, after the chronology, and comment 6 about the Molloys at Yandoit.)
Lot 1, Kangar Park. Acreage, allotments indecipherable, section 5, allotments 7, 9-12 of section 9, and 6a, 9a, 9b and 10 of section 10, parish of Yandoit. The homestead had 10 rooms.
Lot 2, about 437 acres, parishes of Glenlyon and Holcome, occupied by BOLTON Bros.
Lot 3, 10 acres, parish of Glenlyon, occupied by Mrs Sheehy.
Lot 4, about 20 acres, parish of Franklin, occupied by Mr J.Thomas.
Lots 5-7, parish of Yandoit, 277? acres, parish of Yandoit, occupied by Mr R. CARTY.
Lot8, 10 acres, parish of Yandoit, occupied by Mr C.Higgins.
Lot 9, 38 acres, parish of Wombat, occupied by Mr D.COLLINS.
Lot 10, 45 acres, parish of Holcombe.
Lots 11-17 were in Franklinford township, totalling 24 acres of which 20 acres were occupied by Thomas Manning.
(Crown allotments and section numbers were given for each lot but the time necessary to record them was not justified without all parish and township maps being available. However the following property location in the advertisement helps a bit.)
The main road from Newstead to Dayleford runs through the great portion of the property, the (Franklinford) state school and general store being within a mile of the homestead.

A. 25-4-1908 page 13.At St Ambrose R.C.Church, Brunswick on 17 March, Patrick Joseph, the eldest son of the late Patrick Molloy Esq., "Limestone", Yandoit, married Fay, the eldest daughter of Thomas Bennett, ex sergeant of police of Killarney of Donald St Nth, Brunswick. Note that his mother's name is not given as was usual when the father had died.PERHAPS BRIDGET WAS INFIRM OR SUFFERING FROM DEMENTIA AND PATRICK JOSEPH WAS ASHAMED OF HER. Another mystery is John Molloy of "Limestone", Guildford. Neither Patrick nor Richard Molloy had a son called John. Was he Richard and Patrick's brother or cousin? Henry Guildford Molloy was most likely John Molloy's son.

A. 22-3-1909 page 8. Thomas Alfred Edgar Morrison, a clerk in the Railways office in Spencer St, who had been talking to David Henderson of Shepherd's Flat and was seen riding quickly by Annie Dempsey 100 yards from where he died was discovered at 8 o'clock the next morning by David Dimsey, state school teacher.As the accident happened about 7:45 , it was probably getting dark and Thomas had skidded on a stone and fallen onto a rock, breaking his neck. Mr Dimsey who had been the teacher at Franklinford for 17 years when he was promoted to Trentham at the start of the following year(A. 27-1-1910 page 5),identified the body.


A.19-9-1911 page 9. Percival Phillip of Franklinford State School, presumably the teacher, wrote about the continuous blasting sounds at Franklinford and fears of an eruptions in the community. (Mt Franklin, like Mt Macedon, is a long-dormant volcano.)

A.16-8-1913 page 13. Llewellen, the third son of Mr and Mrs William Roberts of Brynhfryd, Franklinford, married Hannah Vernon, the fourth daughter of Mrs Jessie Wright and the late Reuben Wright of Loddon Valley, Guildford, at the Methodist Church in Daylesford on 19 July.

A. 22-1-1914 page 10. Frank Dougall had leased his Mt Franklin Estate and was moving to Melbourne.

10-5-1918 page 5 (Ballarat Courier.) An 18 year old Franklinford girl was assaulted while returning home from lectures.F.Semmons from the local area had been arrested. (One would assume that the lectures were not at Franklinford so the public transport must have been better than one would expect. The offender was from the Daylesford area so she may have been assaulted there while waiting for a coach -or a T model.)

18-11-1918 page 4 (Ballarat Courier.) Private N.Pavish, invalided, was welcomed back to Yandoit. (The correct spelling is Pavich as shown in a death notice.

A. 1-11-1921 page 1. Julia, wife of Daniel Dempsey of Franklinford, mother of Annie Scheggia of Franklinford, David, James, Daniel (deceased), Jack, Nicholas, Carli and Joseph, and sister of Mrs Gervasoni of Newstead and Mrs N.Pavich of Yandoit, died on 30 October aged 53 years.

A. 19-8-1923 page 16. The Strawhorn's had purchased the homestead block of Dougall's Mt Franklin Estate and ROBERTSON of Shepherds Flat had bought the adjoining lot of over 300 acres, the location that I recall.

A. 13-10-1928 page 13. DEATHS. MOLLOY. On the 11th October at Ballara Private Hospital, Castlemaine, Bridget, relict of the late Patrick Molloy and loving mother of Mary Ann (deceased), Elizabeth, Jane, Margaret, Joseph, Katherine, and Richard, aged 90 years.

13-7-1930, Sunday Times (Perth), page 2. During the week Mrs T.M.Dunkley returned by the trans train to her home Palsey, South Yarra.-----. Old Victorians will remember Mrs Dunkley as one of the wealthy and beautiful Molloy sisters of Kangar Park, Franklinford, near Daylesford.The objects of her trip were to visit her only son who is farming at Noongar and to attend the wedding of Miss Edna West from Mt Lawley and Clive Elston (who werealso at Noongar. Noticing the similar ending of Kangar and Noongar prompts me to wonder if the Kanga Track near Franklinford (as seen in maps on the internet) should actually be the Kangar Track. It may actually be that; the road near the cemetery is labelled Satori instead of Sartori.

A. 20-10-1930 page 1. The funeral of William Strawhorn's beloved wife, Grace, was to leave her residence, Mt Stuart, Franklinford, for the Franklinford Cemetery.

A. 12-4-1939 page 7. A combined school picnic was held at the Yandoit Park. (This involved athletics etc.) The cup was won by Franklinford again and it was presented to its captain, Miss A.Phillips.At the dance later, the novelty dance winners were Mr Roy Sartori and Miss M. Powell. (The Sartori family seems to be the only family from the 1960's still living at Franklinford!)

A. 11-8-1939 page 10. On 9 August Isabella, the dearly beloved wife of of the late Robert L. Phillip of Franklinford had died. She was the mother of Lucy (deceased), Robert L. (Kilmore), James F. (late A.I.F.), Percy N.(Carnegie), William A. (Franklinford), and Ernest R. (Bendigo.) The family seemed accident prone. Lucy almost certainly died from burns received when her clothes ignited while she was whitewashing a fireplace (Argus 28-7-1914 page 12), her brother Robert was kicked in the head by a draught horse (A. 4-11-1914 page 11) and the same unfortunate or his father sustained a broken leg when a bolting horse slammed him against a pole at the agricultural show.

A. 3-11-1943 page 2. Catherine, relict of the late James Stewart of Franklinford, died at Sandon on Nov.2 at 74. (Should Stuart St, Franklinford, be Stewart St? It may have been named after "Mt Stuart", the property established by Strawhorn senior in about 1898.)

A. 27-4-1955 page 14. Alice Gray Morrison, youngest daughter of the late James and Margaret Morrison of Spring Vale, Yandoit, had died at the age of 77.

FRANKLINFORD 2, VIC., AUST. (FRANKLINFORD CHRONOLOGY : YEAR DOT TO 1869.)

A FRANKLINFORD CHRONOLOGY.
As it is unlikely that there were any directories for Franklinford, this information may help family historians.(A=The Argus, S= The Star, Ballarat.)
YEAR/ DATE.
DOT. The Franklinford area was inhabited by the Gunangara Gundidj clan of the Dja Dja Wurrung. They remained during the tenure of the Protectorate and when this was ended by the Government in 1848, six settled at Franklinford.
TOMMY FARMER was the only one of these to survive until 1864 when he and all other aborigines were forcibly removed to the site of the Healesville Sanctuary.
(26-5-2004. Susan Rankin, an elder of the clan reclaimed traditional land.)

JUNE 1841. Edward Stone Parker establishes the protectorate. The Government, probably cash-strapped because of the depression of the 1840's, closes it on 31-12-1848 for purely economic reasons, but the Parkers and six of the clan remain.
(SOURCE: WIKIPEDIA.)

A.10-1-1855 PAGE 4. JIM CROW RANGES. Refuting a claim that there weren't enough stores in the area, the correspondent said there were plenty of stores. He was probably referring to Yandoit when he said that there were two hotels in the township and a large cordial manufactory had just commenced near the Clarence Hotel.(I'm not sure whether Franklinford had one or two stores in 1862. The inquest was held in Bumstead's store but Dyett was the only storekeeper mentioned,so he was probably leasing Bumstead's store. There was obviously no pub at Franklinford in 1862 as grog was obtained from Dyett.There was a hotel in Franklinford by 1877.)

A. 16-2-1859 page 4. A notice from the G.P.O. stated that closing times for mail to Franklinford was 4:30 p.m. and that mail from Franklinford was due in Melbourne at 8 a.m.

S. 25-6-1861 page 1s. YANDOIT. Messrs Morrison, Heyneman and Forster had been nominated as Justices of the Peace at a meeting but as Forster declined Mr Brown of Franklinford was nominated in his stead.
The coach from Ballarat to Castlemaine could not cross the Jim Crow Creek and the passengers had to spend the night at Yandoit.

S. 7-8-1861 page 1s.Messrs Fraser and MacDonald were elected in the Franklinford and Strangways division of the Creswick District.

20-11-1861 page 1s. Dominico Formoso had been killed in a tunnel collapse near Franklinford. He must have made known his intention to remove some timber because he was warned not to do so.

S. 25-12-1861 page 1s. A respected townsman of Yandoit, Guillaume Rachinger, had died.
The fence of the old cemetery at Franklinford, chosen by the first settlers and containing the remains of some, was so dilapidated that stock were grazing on it. Residents of Franklinford and Yandoit were asked to bestir themselves themselves to do something as, not being gazetted, the cemetery could not receive funds to remedy the situation.

1862. Carlo Sartori applied for land in the parish of Yandoit under the Act designed to encourage novel industrial enterprises. (Victorian Government Gazette 1862, volume 2.) This meant that when Mr Eric Sartori volUnteered to water the garden of S.S.257, Franklinford in the summer of 1966-7, his family had been in the area for at least 104 years and their tenure now is at least 150 years!

S. 17-10-1862 page 4. BRUTAL MURDER AT FRANKLINFORD.
I'll let you enjoy reading about the drama in numerous accounts from which details of the cast have been assembled. PHILLIP TURNER,the accused,a wooden fencer, who,while drunk, hit Mary for losing a ring and bashed her for "making connection" with Dyett;
MARY SIDDONS,called Poll, the intemperate victim, who had lived with Turner for some time;
CHARLES NORTON DYETT,storekeeper who sold grog and whose father-in-law also lived at Franklinford;
PHILLIP JOHNSON, a labourer who had a hut a quarter of a mile from Dyett's store, with a small field of oats behind it, and had known the deceased for 7 years;
JAMES BRACE,a labourer who lived with Johnson;
CONSTABLE H.BURROWS,stationed at Yandoit;
JOSEPH PARKER,farmer residing between Dyett's store and Johnson's hut;
HENRY ARMSTRONG,a storekeeper at Yandoit who happened to be at Franklinford the next day;
OTTO (KOLBAN/KOLBAU),a medical man residing at Yandoit who treated the dying Poll in vain;
DRS J.McKAY and DOW, the former a legally qualified medical practitioner at Castlemaine, who conducted the post mortem.
WILLIAM BUMSTEAD, who was not involved in the case but owned the store in which the inquest was held. He was still at Franklinford for at least 15 more years, as you will see.

S. 2-6-1864 page 3. Morrison and party had let their Christmas Reef mine on tribute to Kinlock and party. The tunnels on the Franklinford side of Jim Crow Creek were yielding well.Mackenzie and Dolan and their parties were also busy.

A. 25-7-1864 page 2. A site for a cemetery at Franklinford has been reserved from sale.

S. 29-8-1864 page 3. Residents of the area including Franklinford asked J.H.Wheeler of the Daylesford Steam Saw Mills to stand for the legislative assembly.

S. 8-10-1864 page 1s. The gold struck in Mr Parker's paddock has caused a little sensation.Calbert, Werry, Gray, Glouster, Brewer, Hopkins, Mackenzie, Thomas, Evans, Harris and Wray were all leading parties at Shicer's Gully. I had presumed that Shicer's Gully was near Franklinford but I have seen Shicers Gully Rd east of Guildford.
Goldsmith's Reef (now called Brown's Reef), in German's Gully, was sold to Mr Christopher Brown, who has produced 108 ounces of gold so far. Mr Campbell had applied for a reef but the miners got it. (William Campbell, after whom Campbells Creek was named, had returned home in 1854 but had come back and been elected to parliament by 1862.)

S. 13-10-1864 page 1. William Bumstead, Richard Molloy, Charles Menzies and Edward Stone Parker to be trustees of Franklinford cemetery.

A. 1-5-1865 page 6. A man was accused of a violent attempt to dishonout Mrs Abbios of Mt Franklin.

A. 17-5-1865 page 7. William Bumstead, Joseph Parker and Richard Molloy were to be members of the school committee at Franklinford.

A. 3-10-1866 page 5. James Morrison was to replace the late Edward Stone Parker as a trustee of the cemetery, Franklinford and Yandoit.

A. 12-10-1866 page 6. Ambrose Draper, newsagent, Franklinford, was insolvent.

A. 7-8-1867 page 5. The Government offered a reward of 25 pounds for the discovery of the body of James Warner, alias Brassey who had been missing since 16 June. He had been last seen drinking in the house of a man named Minogue at Franklinford. A good description was given of the well-known Ballarat pugilist.

A. 11-9-1867 page 4.Walter Alexander, the eldest child and only son of William and Charlotte Bumstead of Franklinford, died of heart disease, aged 10 years and 8 months. The Illustrated News For Home Readers, page 15 of the 20-9-1867 adds the information that he died at the residence of Mr Cocking, Guildford, after a painful illness of 5 months.

A. 29-9-1868 page 2s. In the estate of Alexander Pozzi, wine seller, intestate, Daylesford, letters of administration may be granted in 14 days to Stefano Pozzi, wine seller, Daylesford and Guiseppi Pozzi, Franklinford, miller, brothers of Alexander Pozzi. I wonder if Guiseppi milled his flour at the end of Mill St, Franklinford!

A. 24-9-1869 page 1.WANTED.A teacher for the Franklinford Common School; must be certified. Applications with testimonials will be received to the 30th inst. Average attendance for the last month, 44. Thomas Fleming, correspondent. It should not be assumed that Thomas Fleming lived in Franklinford, despite Flemming Rd (as given in the interactive online map) ending at Fiveways. I believe that the Government had Boards of Advice overseeing all schools in their district. A Dromana historian fell into this trap. Flemming seems to be yet another spelling mistake on the interactive map.See Fleming in headstones list. Trove soon proved that Thomas was a Franklinford resident. He was a good ploughman and his daughter died from poisoning after pricking herself with a needle.

28-6-1869 page 3, Empire, Sydney. The Daylesford Mercury reported on 22 June that Richard Horseman, a small settler living near Mr Molloy's farm, Franklinford,committed suicide. He had asked his wife to go outside and see if a neighbour had commenced fencing and tying the trigger to a slab of the house, he pulled the muzzle toward him.

A. 27-10-1869 page 4. Ambrose Draper of Franklinford had married Lydia Wright, third daughter of George Dando of Malmsbury, Somersetshire, at Emerald Hill (South Melbourne.)(Had George been an early resident of Malmsbury and responsible for its name? Is that how Ambrose met Lydia?)

FRANKLINFORD 1, VIC., AUST. (S.S. 257 AND THE PARKER FAMILY.)

If I had not taught at Franklinford S.S. 257 in 1965 and 1966 I would not be writing this journal. Happy memories of my time there were revived when I was writing the Inverness Hotel journal (in regard to Ken Sier knowing his customers by the sound of their footsteps.) Just about every lunchtime in the colder months there would be a full-scale footy match. The six boys would be divided as equally as possible into two teams and never did I have to mention fairness in regard to competition. There was fierce competition between opponents of equal maturity but the little ones were always allowed to get their kick. This spirit of fairness was a tribute to their parents' example of how to treat others. As the participants relaxed at the end of the match, I'd snatch a few minutes for a bite and to do some correction. If anyone entered the building, I'd know exactly whom it was before seeing him.

A COPY AND PASTE FROM AN EMAIL TO BILL O'DONNELL.

Last night I was researching Alexander Kennedy who lived at Bowyard Station on the Loddon and was related to William Campbell after whom Campbells Creek was named. Alexander was the father of Henry, the first licensee of the Inverness Hotel, which was a stone's throw north of the end of the north-south runway at Melbourne Airport. I added a bit of detail about my time at Franklinford in my journal about the Inverness Hotel, written under the user name of itellya on FAMILY TREE CIRCLES on the internet. I just remembered the name of the other family that contributed to the enrolment of 6 boys in 1966; it was Allen. I think they moved into 800 Hepburn-Newstead Rd (which might have been called Jim Crow Rd) just in time to prevent closure of the school.
I stumbled across your website when I googled Franklinford Reporter. This was the name of the school newsletter that I started while there. I still have a copy of one issue somewhere and if you're interested, I could launch a search for it.
It contained some news but it was mainly a showcase for the children's writing about things like the joint excursion to Melbourne with the Fryerstown and Faraday schools. Franklinford did not have a duplicator so Ron Champion of the Campbells Creek school let me use theirs. I've attached an image of my final issue.
The Whitlocks moved to Maldon but I would love to know if the Morrisons and Glenns are still around. I've read some of Edgar Morrison's history. Max Glenn talked me into playing cricket for Guildford and used to drive half the team to away games in his beautiful yank tank.
I just remembered another family at the school, the Robertsons.
Well done Eleanor Marney! I don't know whether she's into historical novels but if she is, she might be interested in the Franklinford Murder detailed in The Star (Ballarat) of 17-10-1862, page 2, accessed through trove.
I hope all the residents in your area appreciate its rich history and have read Edgar Morrison's books. At the start of the above article, I was puzzled about why William Bumstead would be running a store at Franklinford.I imagined Franklinford as I knew it in the 1960's. The reason was explained when I came across the articles about the many gold mines.
I've found my copy of the Franklinford Reporter and attached the front page. Page 2 listed those who volunteered to water the garden during the holidays: Sharon and Karen Doolan, Mrs Eric Satori and John Morrison. Then followed some writing by the pupils.
THE ZOO. Last week we went to Melbourne. In the morning we went to the school for blind children. After dinner we travelled on a bus to the zoo. At the zoo you must not put your fingers in cages. We saw lions and tigers and funny monkeys. Cameron Morrison.
THE SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND. The blind school is situated in Burwood. Vast lawns surround the buildings and provide lots of playing room for the blind children. Pupils stay in expensive and well-kept living quarters. Some teachers are blind too. John Morrison ( who also wrote about their games, the pool, braille, and the importance of craft.)
Another story described the author's dad driving all the boys to Castlemaine where they met me, so it was probably written by Stephen Glenn and described the Royal Melbourne hospital as a large, cream brick building located on the corner near the Melbourne University.(The title and author must have been written too high on the master sheet for page 3.)
THE ZOO. An eagle soars/ And a lion roars./A monkey swings/And a lyre bird sings.
We all start to giggle/ When the snakes wriggle./It would take four days/ For a really good gaze. John Robertson.
Tony (Allen?) traced "Merry Christmas" very precisely and Stuart Glenn wrote his name and drew a Christmas tree.

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Much of the school's revenue came from the pine plantation near the school. We were in the Dayleford district for sports and used to have regular visits to the Daylesford school (one of the first in the state to have its own pool) for lessons in swimming and other special subjects. Another way the educational opportunities were broadened was the 3F alliance. The Franklinford Boys' College, as we jokingly called it, enjoyed shared excursions with Fryerstown and Faraday.
In the old days the children used to ride horses to school but the traffic problems described in the Yandoit, Franklinford and Clydesdale Chronicle of 2012 had started by my time there and the old paddock had waist-high grass. Ken Ginifer, a teacher at Winter's Flat, brought some calves down to munch the grass but when it was time for them to leave, they led us a merry dance through the forest of elm suckers. The old school was a school camp for a while but is now a hall for the community.

THE FOLLOWING IS A COPY, CUT, AND PASTE FROM THE JOURNAL ABOUT THE INVERNESS HOTEL.
I WAS THE TEACHER AT THIS SCHOOL IN 1965 AND 1966 AND DURING THAT TIME A CAIRN HONOURING THE PROTECTOR, EDWARD STONE PARKER, WAS ERECTED AT THE JUNCTION NEARBY.(THIS CAIRN IS SHOWN IN THE FRANKLINFORD WIKIPEDIA ENTRY.)
THERE WERE ONLY SIX PUPILS AT THE TIME, ALL BOYS FROM THE MORRISON,ROBERTSON, ALLEN AND GLENN FAMILIES, FRANK WHITLOCK HAVING MOVED HIS CARMEN GHIA AND FAMILY TO MALDON WHERE I TAUGHT PHILLIP AGAIN IN 1967. THE SCHOOL'S NUMBER WAS 257 AND A MONTHLY HIGHLIGHT FOR ALL RESIDENTS WAS "THE FRANKLINFORD REPORTER", PRODUCED WITH THE HELP OF RON CHAMPION, HEADTEACHER AT CAMPBELLS CREEK PRIMARY; THERE WOULD BE AN OUTCRY IF IT WAS PRINTED A DAY LATE.
THE NAMES OF MT FRANKLIN AND FRANKLINFORD HONOUR SIR JOHN FRANKLIN, GOVERNOR OF TASMANIA AND ARCTIC EXPLORER; THE FORD WOULD HAVE BEEN ON JIM CROW CREEK.

A photo of the pupils in front of the school is shown on the Rigetti family website. This family was one of many from Ticono, the Italian speaking part of Switzerland, which settled in Yandoit in the mid 19th century.
-----------------------------------------------------
EDWARD STONE PARKER.
There will surely be biographies available, so I will not go too much into his life story. Edward, William Thomas and the other aboriginal protectors were Methodist missionaries according to a source I have glanced at in passing.I will focus on Edward's obituary and details of his family's continued presence at Franklinford. For convenience of location, all Parker biography and genealogy are here rather than in the chronology.

11-12-1838 page 2 (Sydney Gazette and N.S.W. Advertiser.) Edward Stone Parker was appointed a magistrate.

30-11-1847 page 2 (Melbourne Argus.) Edward Stone Parker junior died at the aboriginal station, River Loddon, of heart disease on the 23rd at the age of 18.

S. 3-8-1863 page 3. Edward Stone Parker was to be the Hon. Secretary of the Board for the Protection of Aborigines.
A.23-4-1864 page 4. In a complaint about statistics not being provided to the press, it was pointed out that Mr Joseph Parker of Franklinford had for some time been collecting agricultural statistics for the County of Talbot. This would probably have involved much travel and missing the joy of spending time with his first-born son, Francis Ware.
A. 13-9-1864 page 1. Francis Ware, the only son of Joseph and Amelia Parker, died on 26 August aged 10 months.
Do you know what is remarkable about this death notice? It shows a special attitude that must have been passed down by Edward Stone Parker and his wife to their children, concerning EQUALITY.I have no doubt that William Thomas and Edward considered aborigines as being equal, in God's eyes, to the greatest white men, but this concerns women and family notices. Let me give examples of typical birth and death notices of the time.
BIRTHS. BLOGGS. The wife of William Bloggs of a son.
DEATHS. BLOGGS. The wife of William Bloggs at his residence on----. Notice what's missing? A married woman and her possessions were regarded as "belonging" to her husband and the only time a woman's name (with her own given name) would appear in a rate book was when she was a spinster or a widow. Joseph seems to have had the opinion that a woman should not have to cease being treated as an individual just because she was married.

S. 13-10-1864 page 1s. Edwaed was appointed a trustee of the gazetted Franklinford cemetery along with John William Wyett, Charles Menzies and Richard Molloy.

A. 1-5-1865 page 4. Edward Stone Parker Esq., J.P., had died at his residence, Mt Franklin, aged 63, after a long and painful illness borne with Christian fortitude.
A. 1-5-1865 page 6. Early on Thursday, Mr Edward Stone Parker J.P. of Mt Franklin died of a dropsical affection, resulting from disease of the heart and rheumatic fever. Mr Parker was 62 years of age and one of the oldest residents of the colony. He appears to have landed in Sydney so far back as 1838, whence he came to Victoria as protector of the aborigines. After various changes of residence, Mr Parker finally settled down on a station, remarkable for its beauty and fertility, at the foot of Mt Franklin. Here he lived up to the time of his death, for nearly a quarter of a century. He was a member of the old nominee (Legislative ) Council, and took an active part in obtaining the severance of Victoria from New South Wales. Mr Parker was also a candidate at the last general election for the representation of the Creswick district. In politics he was a liberal conservative. As an efficient and influential local preacher, he was widely known in the Wesleyan Methodist Church, and his loss will be a serious one for the denomination. It is said that among the manuscripts he has left behind are several relating to the remoter history of the colony, including many interesting traditions of the aborigines that are worth preserving.

South Bourke Standard 23-11-1866 page 3. Joseph Parker was secretary of the Glenlyon, Franklinford and Daylesford Agricultural Society.

LAUNCESTON EXAMINER. 2-12-1869 page 3. Mr Joseph Parker of Franklinford is the fortunate competitor for the Town Clerkship of the Borough of Guildford. He is contracted to perform the duties of clerk, assessor, collector of dog tax and rates, inspector of thistles and nuisances, revenue officer and surveyor for 70 pounds per annum. (This is repeated in the snippets at the end of the journal. As I intend to break this journal into parts so all surnames can be listed, I have pasted it to here so that it appears in the first part, including the Parkers.)

A.28-6-1892 page 1. Frederick Octavius , the eighth son of the late Edward Stone Parker Esq. of Mt Franklin, died at Clunes aged 38.

9-10-1893 page 3 (Portland Guardian.)Thomas Wilkinson, the first Chairman of the Brunswick Municipal Council 36 years earlier, had died. He and Edward Stone Parker had purchased a considerable amount of land in Brunswick on which the Wesleyan chapel and school stood.

29-9-1914 page 2 (Bairnsdale Advertiser and Tambo and Omeo Chronicle.)The death of James Williamson was announced. He had arrived in 1851 and spent several years as manager of the Union Bank at Ballarat. In 1860 he married Emma Mary, daughter of Edward Stone Parker, Mt Franklin, Daylesford, the first protector of the blacks in Victoria.

A. 21-6-1916 page 1. George Alfred, late incumbent of Christ Church Daylesford, youngest son of the late Edward Stone Parker and Hannah Ewardes Parker, Mt Franklin Estate, died aged 57. Interred at Mt Franklin on the 21st (i.e. that day.) I think he died in Bendigo but I forgot to record this. (See 23-6-1939.)

A.28-5-1918 page 4.Mr Joseph Parker who died at Castlemaine on Sunday at the age of 87 years was the only surviving son of Edward Stone Parker of Mt Franklin, protector of aborigines, and arrived in Victoria with his parents in 1838. He was therefore a colonist of 80 years standing. He had a clear recollection of Governor Latrobe, Sir John Franklin and other notabilities who were his father's guests in early days. (More details such as Joseph refusing an offer of land in Collins St at 5 pounds per acre.)

A. 23-6-1939 page 10. Charles George Bright Parker, vicar of All Saints, St Kilda, son of Rev. G.A. and E.S.Parker ( her own initials!), Bright, Daylesford and Bendigo, beloved husband of K.H.Parker, grandson of the late Edward Stone Parker of Mt Franklin Estate, Franklinford had died and his ashes were interred at Franklinford on the 21st June.
MY APOLOGIES ABOUT FAILING TO RECORD SOME DETAILS BUT AT LEAST YOU KNOW WHERE TO FIND THEM.


WILLIAM CAMPBELL'S HEAD STATION.
Alexander Kennedy who was related to William Campbell, is discussed in the journal about the Inverness Hotel near Bulla. It is likely that his Bowyard Station homestead was located near the Head Station of Campbell's Run.
I never thought that I would be able to tellya where William Campbell's head station was, but I can. I discovered it when I was trying to verify the location of Dean's Hotel at Bulla. I came across a map that had been produced for the chief commissioner of goldfields by G.Charing Cross (1852-3) and was called PLAN OF THE AURIFEROUS REGION OF MT. ALEXANDER. It shows the station in a slight horseshoe on the west bank of the already-named Campbells Creek not far north of the famous Guildford plateau. The Jim Crow Ranges to the south are also named on the map.

MOOROODUC MISTAKES IN "VICTORIA'S MORNINGTON PENINSULA".

I write this at 5 a.m., now wide awake because I went to bed early (11 p.m.) despite cheeky janilye's Wuss" comment and the temptation to finish the Franklinford chronology. As I drifted off, I read Malcolm Gordon's book (as in the title of this journal.) This book combines history with details about the Peninsula's industries and tourist attractions circa 1997 when the book was written. I glanced through this book in August 2010, when I was unable to access the rates microfiche one day because the Rosebud Library staff was using the local history room as a temporary office. I did read thoroughly the fascinating discussion of The Rip on page 216.

The book is a great read and details every area of the Peninsula, giving a potted history of each. One thing that struck me last night was how quickly current information can become history. The Arthur's Seat chairlift is just one example! If I had read the Mornington Region section thoroughly in August 2010, I would not have been aware of the three misconceptions I spotted last night. All historians need to make assumptions. I make them all the time. You will find my writing littered with words such as possibly and probably as I try jigsaw pieces to complete the puzzle; I do try to show that my guesses are speculation and not fact.

Every historian makes mistakes and not just because of wrong assumptions. I don't know how many times I have written west instead of east, which is a profound mistake when much of my work is based on locations of properties. I usually manage to spot these when I proof-read so I hope I have weeded out every example of this error. Mistakes can be caused by sources. Wally Mansfield told me that the Mansfield farm at Tullamarine was "Allas" and even provided the spelling; it was actually Glenalice! Other mistakes are caused by making logical assumptions. If I asked a churchgoer which parish he lived in, his answer would depend on which denomination he belonged to. Every time I try to find a parish map, the first umpteen possibilities presented by Mr Google revolve around church parishes.

It is the responsibility of every historian to point out these errors so that they are not perpetuated. I sincerely hope that, if there are any errors in my journals (or comments, such as in FAMILY CONNECTIONS ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA), somebody will point them out. Here we go.

Malcolm said that the original name for Mornington was Moorooduc because of a naming decision by the Church of England in very early days regarding a parish for the area. A parish had nothing to do with the church in Australia. In England's early days the church parish played a key role in administration, probably from the time of William the Conqueror. Registration of birth, deaths and marriages was one example of the link between the church parish and government. By the time Australia was settled, parish was an official term for a land area. Governor Bourke instructed his surveyors to survey the land along the moonee moonee chain of ponds, starting from Batman's Hill (Spencer St Station site) and divide it into parishes of about 25 square miles.

The colony was divided into vast land areas with names such as Bourke, and Grant, which contained many, many parishes. The original name for Mornington was Schnapper Point in the parish of Moorooduc in the county of Mornington.

Malcolm said that the early residents of Moorooduc were poor landless woodcutters. He has inserted the word "landless" into a quote in Leslie Moorhead's centenary history of Moorooduc Primary School. The residents had applied for the school at the newly built church to become a common school so that the Government would pay the teacher's wages. The following extract from my THE FEMALE DROVER: A HISTORY OF MOOROODUC shows that the inspector rightly assessed that the poor woodcutters would stay in the area.
The church served as the first school. In 1865 an application was sent for aid, the payment of a masters salary and for the school to be brought under the Common Schools Act. It was signed by members of the Blake, Benton, McKay, Matthie, Absolom, Norman, Wilson, Connell, White, Quinn, Andrews, Ricketts, Smith, Flood and Dunkerly families. It was pointed out that there were 64 children living within a two mile radius of the school. An inspector was sent out to assess the situation and reported that most of the inhabitants were woodcutters and labourers rather than farmers but were likely to stay in the area, ensuring a stable population.

THE PETITIONERS.
Blake was a captain, presumably a sailor. Benjamin Benton received the grant for 26A of 32 acres across Moorooduc Rd from Tuerong Rd and much land in the parishes of Bittern and Balnarring. He supplied timber for the Mornington pier.
J.H.Ricketts received the grant for 18a Bittern on 4-6-1884. He might have been leasing this land from the Crown at the time he signed the petition for a school, and being one of the many poor woodcutters on the area that the Inspector described, he probably took about 20 years to pay it off (the value of improvements deducted from the purchase price.)
S.Absolom received the grant for 11A and 11B Bittern, 100 acres, on the north east corner of Stumpy Gully and Graydens Rds. W.S.Absolom was granted 34 A Bittern, of 69 acres, on the south west corner of Coolart and Graydens Rds.
The parish of Bittern was south of Tyabb Rd and East of Derril Rd, which was parallel to Stumpy Gully Rd. Today, Derril Rd curves around the Devil Bend Reservoir whose waters cover the grants of George Dimmock, James Connell, F.P.Wagner, J.Ferguson and R.Turner in the parish of Bittern and part of Rennisons grant in the parish of Moorooduc, where the Schnapper Point Handicap was conducted in 1868.

Andrew McKay received the grant (title from the Crown) for allotment 5 in section A, 266 acres south of Tyabb Rd between Moorooduc and Derril Rds. Wilson was possibly J.B.Wilson of Tuerong Station or E.M.Wilson, granted 10D adjoining the east side of the Tuerong pre-emptive right. It could also have been Henry William Wilson who lived where Three Chain Road meets the highway before changing his occupation from bullocky to butcher. In view of the fact that the Wilson signature is followed by that of Connell, I believe that it was the founder of the butchering empire who signed.
James Connell received the grant for allotment 12 near the boundary with Kangerong and Bittern parishes. It was probably James whose rates on 50 acres and a hut in Dromana (probably 27C Kangerong at Melway 161 A7) were paid for him by Wilson at the deathknock on 20-1-1865. The rate collector didnt know much. As well as not knowing the given names of Connell and Wilson, he didnt realize that the name Dromana only applied to land west of McCulloch St.
Colin McLear tells us the following. The Connells were tenants on Jamiesons Special Survey in 1851 or shortly thereafter. (Anthony Connells block was probably near the one later occupied by Henry Wilson.) A descendant of Anthonys was a silent partner of Jack Rudduck in Mornington Station in the Kimberleys in the 1950s. Mornington Station was near Fitzroy Crossing 300 miles inland from Derby.
The Connell and White children were among the pupils of a school that operated near the Hickinbotham Winery site in the early 1850s. This school may have closed when the teachers wife died or because two private schools had been opened in Dromana by Quinan and Nicholson. Its closure was probably the impetus for the establishment of a school in Moorooduc.
Anthony Connell was obviously the forerunner of the Connell family in the area. He received the grants for allotments 27 and 29, totaling 337 acres, all or part of which became the rifle range.
In 1910, James Connell, a farmer of Mornington, was leasing 238 acres (lots 3-6 of Bruces) and James Connell, a farmer of Tuerong, was leasing 230 acres (lots 1,2 of Bruces.) This land was just south of Ellerina Rd in the parish of Kangerong. I presume that would be James senior and James junior. Bruces was the northern section of the Survey fronting the Sea Lane, which is now called Bruce Rd, and is the boundary between Kangerong and Moorooduc parishes.
The White and Quinn families have already been mentioned and it was probably a descendant of the next signatory, Smith, who bought Peter Whites farm on Three Chain Rd. I wonder if Matthie should be Mathieson. Margaret Matheson (sic?) was the grantee of 57 acres right across the road from the old church. James Flood had lot 75 of 178 acres on the north west corner of Stumpy Gully and Tyabb Rds and much land south of Tyabb Rd in the parish of Bittern.
Quinn, Norman, Smith and Dunkerly were not grantees, They probably bought part of a pre-emptive right or a Crown Allotment that had been granted to a speculator. Quinns farm was part of Sumners P.R.

Malcolm's third error was caused by an error in Graeme Butler's heritage study of the Moorooduc area. Graeme assumed that Spring Farm was at Jones' Corner. Malcolm tried to make sense of this error by assuming that the shop had been built on Spring Farm and relocated to Penbank in the 1920's. As Graeme told me, when we were working together on the heritage assessment of the Boyd cottage at Rosebud, they do not have access to people such as David Shepherd (whom I discovered through a chain of contacts after six months) who can supplement information in documents. As he runs a business, time constraints make it hard to discover such sources. The following is another extract from THE FEMALE DROVER.

The Argus of 19-12-1928 records the sale of 175 acres in Moorooduc to H.K.Field on account of the executor of Edward Jones. This was definitely Spring Farm, 15 A and B Bittern, a total of 175 acres 2 roods and 21 perches. Whether the sale fell through or the family leased and repurchased the property, the Jones occupancy continued until 1941.
As Graeme Butler confused Spring Farm and Penbank in the 1980s and Lorraine Huddles Spring Farm Heritage Assessment of 2009 did not remove the confusion, I have asked that it should be made crystal clear that Spring Farm was not at Jones Corner.

Part of a letter sent to councils planning department.
Not much has to be done to ensure the accuracy of the assessment so that historians using it in the future do not perpetuate mistakes (as Bruce Bennett did in The Butcher, the Baker, The because C.N.Hollinshed wrote about Edward Williams as if he was Edward White in Lime Land Leisure.)
The pages which contain inaccuracies are pages 7 and 28, mainly because of quotes from Butlers study and Lorraines statements that appear to support his misconceptions. I suggest that page 7, from The location formed a local hub (and the quote) be replaced with:
Spring Farm was at the south west of Mornington-Tyabb and Stumpy Gully Roads. Edward Jones family also owned two nearby farms, Criccieth and Penbank, both named after places in the area of Wales where Edward Jones had lived. It was Penbank on which the Jones store was built at Jones Corner. This farm is also referred to as the Derril Road Property. Although Spring Park was the home of Edward and Sarah Jones and not the community hub established at Jones Corner, it was certainly a focus of community life because of the entertainments held in the Spring Farm barn. It can be argued that if Edward had not lived at Spring Farm, and bought Penbank, the community facilities would never have been built at Jones Corner.
In his Shire of Mornington Heritage Study, Graeme Butler drew an incorrect conclusion that the Jones property at Jones Corner was Spring Farm. The following map shows Spring Farm, Criccieth and Penbank (the property at Jones Corner that Butler thought was Spring Farm.) Criccieth consisted of crown allotments 12A and 9A in the parish of Bittern (126 acres.) Penbank was Allotment 5, Moorooduc, of 266 acres and granted to A.McKay. By 1925, the name was applied to a 40 acre block occupied by Robert H. Morris, Edward Jones son in law. This block was later owned by David Shepherd and now houses the Penbank School.

RHYMES OF OLD TIMES (2), MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.

EARLY FISHERMEN XXXXXXXX AUGUST 2010

Before Coppin's town e'er saw a funnel
Men fished the Sorrento Channel:
At Portsea Jack Inglis, before the Watsons, led the way;
When they came he left for Queenscliff across the bay.

Henry and John came in '60, Alex in '62.
Sons of a Banff fisherman, who left the diggings for a trade they knew
And set up at Pt. Franklin to start their piscatorial labour;
Dennis McGrath's cottage housed their only neighbour.

Near The Sisters Scott, Holley, Watts and Stonner the Dane
Caught boatloads of fish time and time again,
With the help of a lookout and signals for detail:
Not getting them to markets fresh the reason they'd fail.

John Watson who'd used a lookout in the first place
Moved in 1873 to the group's West Sister base.
Hutchins came in the 80's, Erlandsen at decade's end.
For near a century Watsons plied the trade they kenned.

Ferrier, Freeman, Bucher by fishing earned a quid
At Rosebud: on the bowls club site Chinese sold their squid.
Lacco whose sons built boats, Jamieson the whaler, Fred the Greek
And Peatey, near whose block runs a drain once called Peatey's Creek.

At Dromana- Pidota,Vine, John McLear, Harry Copp;
Jonah Griffith fished and grew his maize crop.
Jimmy Williams and Harry Cairns transported the catch
To Mornington railhead, timetables to match.

At Flinders there were first fishermen Oriental;
Their dumping at Westernport perhaps instrumental.
Did they think the diggings too far away
And stay in the area to catch squid and cray?

Then Chidgey, Sidella and Mannix from Queenscliff came
And Johansen, Lucas and Kennon, whose Cove keeps his name.


CARRIERS

Peter Pidota had a craft to fish
But hed carry anything youd wish.
Like wood from up near Dromanas peak,
Loading near the mouth of Sheepwash Creek.

Walter Gibson carried mail to the Schanck
Jimmy Williams and Harry Cairns cargo stank,
But their passengers told them, Thanks,
Better than the pony owned by Shanks!

Jimmy sold to Keith McGregor who ran a Ford T van
To Melbourne, which they wanted to ban;
Thats when Spencer Jackson came to the fore.
Later Keith sold to Bill Adams, his Brother-in-law.

You cant carry horses, at least not very far
So the Pattersons drove Purves horses to Kirks Bazaar.
Blacks Camp Davey drove a cart for Benjie Shaw, draper,
Before Shaw turned to the guest house caper.

William Cottier liked to pull beers
But also pulled timber for building piers.
Wingy Wilson the bullocky and John Dysons cart;
Big businesses grew from humble start.

The Jennings delivered milk from house to house;
They worked early so the milk was cool and grouse.
Sorrento carriers fed their equine staff
With the Patterson and Cairns oaten chaff.

At low tide, see the propped- up forty ton craft
Being loaded from dray or raft
With lime (till Lilydales quarry killed the trade)
Then ti tree, for bakers oven made.

Blairs lime trolley from Kiln to pier
Carrying groceries and Gracefield beer.
The actors steam tram ran up Sorrentos hill;
Harry Watts drove it with a will!



NOTES ON CARRIERS.
To limit the poem to less than 20 pages, only a small selection of those who provided carriage of goods and people are mentioned here. There is enough material to write several more poems on the same topic. For example:
McLears bullock team at Dromana, another carter, Len Dunk, who did Jimmy Williams fish run at a later time, the men who carted lime and then ti tree to the bay at Rye, the cabbies who carried tourists from Sorrento pier to the Amphitheatre- before, during and after the time of the steam tram and the long-awaited rail service to Red Hill.

Peter Pidota operated in the Dromana area.

Jimmy Williams and his brother Ned lived at Eastbourne (17 William Cres).
They were both bachelors. Jim started his run from West Rosebud.

Harry (Carrier or Rabbity) Cairns had a property at Melway 253 C 10 where Cape Schanck Rd met Boneo Rd. Born in 1861, he was the son of James Cairns who settled at Boneo in about 1854. He apparently lived over the road from his cousin, Hill Harry (son of Robert Cairns born 1867) whose farm was at the corner of Patterson Rd. Rabbity probably made his first pick-up at Cape Schanck, which most likely included crayfish. As his nickname implies, part of his cargo consisted of rabbits, as did Jimmy Williams.

Going by Shankss Pony was an old saying that meant walking.

William Cottier ran the RYE HOTEL at Dromana before the Arthurs Seat and Dromana Hotels were built. It was between Spencer St and the bend in the highway. When Rudduck bought Karadoc in the sale of township land, Cottier, with John Campbell built a hotel of the same name EAST of Napier St in Rye.

Blacks Camp Davey Cairns lived near 259 E4 and Cairns Bay (260 G 12) is named after him.

Wilsons had butchers shops everywhere and the busline still carries the Dyson name.
The opening of the Lilydale quarry affected the demand for Peninsula lime but ti tree was an ideal fuel for bakers ovens.

No evidence that the beer had a trolley trip but it is possible.

George Coppin was a famous actor from the gold rush days and his acquaintance with the top flight of society enabled him to sell the idea of an exclusive summer retreat to them.










LIME. XXXXXX August 2010
I wonder if the Fawkner lad, in eighteen zero three,
On sunny day, while digging under spreading she-oak tree,
Observed the white sedimentary rock, while father did his time,
Because John, 36 years on, was advertising lime.

Some men who dug and burnt this rock on hills above the rip,
Such as Ford, Watts and Dillon, had decided to jump ship.
The most westerly when displaced, in 1852, for quarantine,
Were Dennis Sullivan and the first Cannon the heads had seen.

The men who lived at the corner, now braced by timbers high,
Dug lime for Campbell, Youle,and Walker's lime kiln standing nigh.
Then they used their napping tools to break the pieces down.
This isolated back-beach settlement was known as Canvas Town.

The big kiln on the fire station site was owned by merchant Blair
Who, to beat competitors, bought land up everywhere;
His bags of lime put onto trolleys that ran directly to the pier,
Half a block east of the Gracefield pub run by Sullivan, later Mrs Weir.

As the gold rush saw Melbourne's mortar demand becoming even keener
Ti tree began to replace dwindling stands of she- oak/Casuarina.
Women milked the cows , grew veg.,did all the chores around,
While the men dug and burnt the white rock from the ground.

With the roads so bad, Stenniken, Blair and Cain sailed lime up the bay
And returned with goods that would take ages to come by dray;
For Rye's school fence timber, there were agonising waits;
But then they could get luxuries like willow- patterned plates.

Men toiled to chop, dig and fire, jobs never made for ease:
Natives, Chinese, Maoris, Greeks and Portugese.
Sullivan and Page at the end of Weeroona Road;
Albress loaded lime and wood:Webster himself did load!

At last the need for lime declined.
The depression forced them other jobs to find.
Cairns boys born and bred to lime at Boneo,
As farmers, farther south, near Pattersons, did go.

For others, bakers saved the day;
Ti tree was felled and carted to the bay;
Cut in sections two foot six in length
To heat the ovens with fiery strength.

When Dr Blair and the Sorrento-bound came to their cool retreat,
Coppin's tram hauled tourists on rails up the hilly street
From Pier to amphitheatre surf. Later many roads were white
But lime was slippery and sharp on hooves: it really wasn't right.

Land held by owners who were absent,
Smothered by ti-tree growing rampant,
With rabbit burrows everywhere;
Restored by Jim Brown's visionary flair.

NOTES ON LIME XXXXXXX August 2010


John Pascoe Fawkner's mother should have been declared Australia's first saint!
Hannah Pascoe had been born into a fairly well-off family, as we shall see later, and little suspected, when she married the silversmith, possibly an apprentice at the time, that a blunder he was to make would estrange her from them. When he was sentenced to transportation, Hannah made the hard decision to farewell her loved ones, and with 12 year old John, join Collins on the voyage to the settlement he was to establish briefly at Sullivan Bay.
In Van Dieman's Land, this Peninsula pioneer lovingly produced a literate son who cared for others, although by the time he was full-grown at 5 foot 2 he was starting to develop the spite which slightly tarnished his accomplishments. To manage this when the boy was surrounded by the dregs of London's slums was indeed a miracle. Melbourne may have been centred on Fisherman's Bend instead of Queen St if it had not been for Hannah's loyalty to husband John. She returned to England to collect an inheritance but came back to her husband; the money probably set young John up in his Launceston newspaper and hotel businesses.(John Batman, who favoured the Fisherman's Bend site had boasted of his land in Fawkner's pub.)
Hannah's son adopted her maiden name as his second name upon her death as a mark of respect for this wonderful woman. I was delighted to have Hannah Pascoe Drive (Melway 16, C/3) so-named to acknowledge her contribution. John Pascoe Fawkner's main contribution, in my opinion, was to be fifty years ahead of the government in providing freehold land for his beloved yoeman farmers. He formed co-operatives to obtain Crown grants at Coburg, Hadfield,Airport West, and at Tullamarine near Mansfields Rd and on Airport land near Melrose Drive.For a small contribution a small plot of land, often 7 acres, was available to anyone near neighbours like Taylor, Robertson and Clarke who had thousands of acres.

Many of the Scandinavian, Greek, Portugese etc pioneers of the area may have jumped ship. Certainly enough pioneers of British stock did so. There may have been crewmen who knew that most of their ship mates would desert and head for the diggings. Perhaps knowing of the lime industry and certain employment, from previous trips, they decided to save days of starvation and a walk back from Melbourne. The Chinese were probably diggers who had landed at Westernport (to avoid restrictions) and had returned to the peninsula because of racial tensions on the goldfields. The Wong family of the east side of Chinamans Creek on Cairns' land may have come in this fashion.
Sullivan was able to move to another family kiln but Cannon seems to have left.
Canvas Town was near the corner of Tasman Drive and Canterbury Jetty Rd. I believe that Youle should properly be Yuille and that a spelling mistake on a document has been perpetuated.
The trolley went through the general store site on the way; there was a branch line so goods for the store could be unloaded without blocking the passage of lime.
Mrs Weir was born a Sullivan.
Ti tree had constituted a minor part of the open parkland that explorers saw; she-oak and Banksia were the common species. The lack of Ti tree was due to burning by the aborigines; a burn at least every five years is needed to stop it getting out of hand. Absentee owners failed to control it.
There were more ship owners of course. It was W.A.Blair and Co that made them wait.
A pioneer in lime land leisure said that everyone had these plates.
At the end of Maori Street was the Maori Farm.
Jim Brown came from the mallee and cleared the ti tree jungle to produce rich pastures.

RHYMES OF OLD TIMES (1), MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.

I don't believe in repeating history that's already been written but basically that's what I did in "Canterbury Tales" (okay I copied the title too!) These first two poems were written two weeks after I started researching Peninsula history; I don't mess around!


`GET TO THE POINT AUGUST 2010.

Two creeks joined before they could reach
The breaking waves at Safety Beach:
One is named after Henry Dunn
Who lived on the Survey until 1851.


The creek near Mt. Martha named after Tassell
Now involved in developer financial hassle:
George Peatey was nearby in '59, (160,G/4)
Then owned 100 acres where they now make wine.(160, K/6)


Hume made pipes locally before work was begun
That brought water from Dromana Basin in 1941.
Their aim was as mine; get to the Point-
Past Rosebud and Rye, seal every joint.


Rudduck and Karadoc both mean red breast;
By Nelson's generosity I'm really impressed:
For the church at Rosebud his help was at hand;
For Dromana's hospital he offered more land.


Sarah Ann Cain, lost for four days and five nights
Round mid 1840's, poor little mite.
But rescuers found her; the near dead tot they took
To George Smith's nearby Wooloowoolooboolook. (259,E/4)


Arthurs Seat homestead and schoolhouse by Tuck,
Georgiana's diary, which we still have by luck;
Frenetic efforts by Spencer Jackson
To make Dromana and its mount a tourist attraction.


Boniyong, a run settled by Meyrick
(The spelling of both has changed just a skerrick);
The Cairns family came in 1852;
Some moved to Cape Schanck, Rosebud and further west too.


In foul weather, Vine Bucher and Lacco took a brave stance;
Joe Peters, black fiddler, played music to dance.
These fishers, Cain and Stenniken's craft on the bay
Carrying lime, timber and fish away.




When Owen Cain came, they were fairly alone;
Then he built a fine house by the name of Tyrone,
And the family continued burning the lime:
Cains number one for Rye and the Buds at this time!(2010!)



Dod Jennings played for the Pivot, then tried Camperdown.
Boy if he lost his hat he would frown!
After waiting at Anthonys Nose for the sea to subside
They reached Kariah, fifty years to reside.



Robert Rowley was at the heads, Ford and Sullivan too;
Bullocks, veg and limeburning the things they would do.
John Watts proposed to Jane Skelton when she was one more than five;
Jumped ship (Dromana in a tub) worked lime, wed her in 1865.


Rob Rowley and Clarrie Jennings led Rye Footy Club!
Ford and Purves' petition got a snub:
Stop the fence from White Cliff to the surf
Blast police horses-for our bullocks the turf!




NOTES ABOUT GET TO THE POINT
SOURCES:
A. A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA Colin McLear
B. ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD Peter Wilson
C.RYE PRIMARY SCHOOL 1667 Patricia Appleford
D.JENNINGS: A PIONEERING RYE FAMILY Linda Berndt SOUTHERN PENINSULA NEWS 17-7-2010 P20
E.THOSE COURAGEOUS HARDY WOMEN Betty McMeekin
F. MPNFL RECORD TEAMLISTS
G. THE CAIRNS FAMILY OF BONEO Peter Wilson.

Numbers relate to verses and letters to sources:
1 a 2a 3b 4ab 5a 6a 7g 8bc 9 cf 10d 11e 12 cb.
Safety Beach was part of Jamieson's Special Survey which went east to Bulldog Creek Rd (161,K/3)
Henry Dunn was there 1846-1851and was followed by Brown-Lee, Marshall and Cottier in 1851, joined by Tassel, Peatey, Griffith/Eatons (1860) Paterson/McLear(1861) and Connell.Cottier soon bought 282 acres bounded by the present Jetty Rd. and Lombardy St. and later built the original Rye
Hotel with John Campbell.
Walter Gibson took over many of their leases as well as buying Cottier's 282 acres between Palmerston Ave and Boundary Rd. He rerouted the last mile of Dunns Creek which originally flowed into the creek in which he washed his sheep. Peatey's 100 acres is now occupied byDromana Estate Winery.
Nelson Rudduck was a leader of the community. The Methodist Church on the Rosebud foreshore became redundant when the United Church was formed and is now a medical centre. The hopital at Dromana was on part of his property, Karadoc between the highway, Williams St. and Spencer Ave the last street probably being named after Spencer Jackson.
Henry Tuck built the homestead and schoolroom and his son,whose poetry is available at the museum at Sorrento, was born there.
David Cairns settled near Cape Schanck in 1888 and Cairns Bay ( 38 degrees 29 minutes south, 144degrees 57 minutes east ) was named after him according to Eric Bird's website on place names on the coast of Victoria. He also lists Rowley Cove, between Gunnamatta (aboriginal term for sandhills) and Cape Schanck,(38 d 29m south, 144d 53m e).
The Portugese imported African slaves to the Cape Verde Islands. Two descendants of these slaves were involved in our history, Joe Peters at Rosebud and Emanuel De Santo at Rye (Rye P.S. 1667 P117, 121).
Owen Cain,Sullivan and his son-in-law Ford, Skelton,Robert Rowley and his widowed mother-now Mrs Kenyon,and their families would have been, for years,the only residents between the heads and the Tootgarook Run occupied by Edward Hobson and then James Purves.
Michael Cain is No 1 for Rosebud, and Ben Cain wears the same number for Rye.Sorrento's No 1
is Brendan Cairns and other pioneering names listed in Nepean League are Kenyon,Stringer, Eaton, Caldwell,Appleford, Jennings, Dunn,Page and Baxter.
At Anthony's Nose a traveller had two choices: wait for low tide and go along the packed sand or climb Arthurs Seat, from what is now the base of Foote St, on the road to Cape Schanck.
Purves and Ford ,who had 800 bullocks between them,knew that fencing off tharea west of the white cliff would deny them free grazing. They had gone to all their employees and neighbours, most of them lime burners, struggling farmers or in some way obligated to Purves and Ford, to gain their support. An official was sent from the Quarantine Station to speak to the petitioners and found that many of them actually wanted the fence (which was never built anyway.)



ALONG THE BACK TRACK C.1860 AUGUST 2010
Charles Graves (back from Melbourne with goods
To hawk to those further west near she-oak woods)
With Bill, the 22 year old son of his partner, Widow McLear,
Left Bill at The Willow; his helper now Godfrey in his tenth year.

The son of Henry Wingy Wilson, named for a crushed hand,
A bullocky living on the eastern end of Jamieson's Survey land.
To the north, over yankee Griffith's maize, Charles saw
Big Clarke's wedding present to his son-in-law.

To the left, young Godfrey saw Cottier's hut coming nigh
Now housing a hotel which Cutter called the Rye.
Look, said Charles, Pidota and Rowley do it tough;
The bay at the moment is looking quite rough!

When they reached The Rocks, Graves headed back
To climb Arthurs Seat on the Cape Schanck track.
We'll never get through that surf alive
And I'll not wait asleep like Meyrick in 1845!

As they climbed with Gracefield on their left
Charles exclaimed, There's a vine up in the cleft!
Do you mean the Swamp Village's Fred the Greek?
Young Wilson asked with tongue in cheek.

So they climbed through Burrell's 12 500 acres,
Dragging logs on downhill slopes as brakers,
Past the back road to Purves' Tootgarook.
Soon, blonde Cairns on their right, left Wooloowoolooboolook.

At the next crossroad right turn and then left;
Graves' handling of the drapery laden cart was deft.
Godfrey saw the smoke, sobbed Cometh my time!
Don't panic lad; they're just burning lime.

We started in Kangerong,
Through Wannaeue travelled along
Features and people of history seein'.
Now we stop as we reach Nepean.

As they turned back to Kangerong
A well-known man came riding strong,
(With five year old Maria), running late.
Godfrey wed Maria in 1878.




NOTES FOR ALONG THE BACK TRACK.

1 Henry Wilson's accident probably happened after Godfrey's marriage but I just had to use
Wingy.
2. The well-known man in verse 9 was Stenniken who lived at Rye but had some land at Melway 151, D/10 near Wilson's 125 acres.
3. The Griffith and Eaton families came from America. W.J.T.Clarke gave the northern part of the Survey, including Wilson's 125 acre lease, to his son-in-law, Bruce. (Bruce Rd.) Big Clarke's land was south of that owned by the family of another son-in-law, Hearn. Clarke's life ended at Hearn's Roseneath in Essendon which was later owned by William Salmon.(28, G/1)
4. Cottier took the name and the licence to White Cliff when he and John Campbell built a hotel there.
5. Peter Pidota was an early fisherman, loading and unloading with the help of Rowley, near Sheepwash Creek.
6. THE ROCKS was an early name for Anthony's Nose. The Cape Schanck track started where Latrobe Pde does today. The name change to Bayview Rd was probably driven by developers wanting to promote the spectacular views.
7. Meyrick fell asleep while waiting for low tide as he made his way to Boneo in 1845.
8. William Grace planted grapes in a hollow in the mountain slope of Gracefield. One of the Sullivans married one of his daughters. He built the Gracefield Hotel which was demolished by the Hunts circa 1927 so they could build the present Rye Hotel. Cottier's hotel was further east.
9. Fred Vine, whose children were possibly sailed to the Dromana School until the Rosebud one opened much later.
10. The Burrells took over the Arthurs Seat Run following the McCraes' departure in 1851.
11. This method of making a safe descent was used well into the 1920's.
12. Hiscock Road, now closed, is shown between Colchester Rd and the street named after the successful butcher known to you as WINGY.
13. The break in Browns Rd at Truemans Rd.
14. Three parish names.

MAR LODGE AND TWEEDSIDE RE OAKLANDS HUNT (2) JOURNAL.

THE IMMEDIATE PURPOSE OF THIS JOURNAL IS TO PROVIDE A MAP SHOWING THESE TWO PROPERTIES TO ACCOMPANY THE OAKLANDS HUNT (2) JOURNAL. SEE ATTACHED PLAN.