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ROBERT GEORGE ELY, KEILOR, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

10:25 P.M, 8-10-2014.
Robert George Ely was the teacher at Tullamarine when a couple of Hendry lads and Joseph Jackson were persuaded by too much grog to vandalise Robert's school, which I believe was school 632 on the inside of the bend in Cherie St,Tullamarine,if I interpreted the title document correctly. See the court report in my journal EARLY CHRONOLOGY OF TULLAMARINE. I commented about Robert's role as Keilor's postmaster, shire secretary (or was it the earlier road board?) and Robert having to travel between two schools every lunchtime at one time.

No doubt Chris Laskowski, Angela Evans or Sue Jennison have written about Robert somewhere,otherwise I would not have known about his half-time schools, which are mentioned in the first entry which cropped up in a trove search for TULLAMARINE ISLAND. Let's see how much trove can tell us about Robert and his family. As the first President of the reformed Keilor Historical Society circa 1989, whose greatest achievement was handing over the reins to Susan Jennison O.A.M., it's about time my focus switched to Keilor as Bulla,Broady and Tulla have had a good run.

ROBERT GEORGE ELY.
The Keilor Road State School was examined last week by Mr. Inspector Brodribb, and the result of the examination reflects the greatest possible credit on Mr. Ely, the teacher. Though obliged to give half his time to another half-time school at Tullamarine Island, he worked so energetically for the past twelve months, that he has brought the schools up to and above some of the full time schools. The Inspector, besides giving Mr. Ely a flattering report, gave him over 60 per cent. results on the combined average of the two schools.

Seventy-five per cent of those presented got certificates, amongst whom figures Marion Harvie,aged ten, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harvie, of the Keilor Road hotel.
(The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 - 1918) Saturday 17 June 1882 p 3 Article)

ABOUT CRAWFORD HARVIE (crawford harvie,keilor road station search.)
Mr. Crawford Harvie, who died on Saturday last, was well known and universally respected during the many years that he,with his wife and family, kept the Keilor road hotel, at what was then the terminus of the line of coaches between the Keilor road station and Bacchus Marsh, and beyond. The late Mr. Harvie was one of the best type of colonists, whose conduct in every respect was a good example to everyone. He was auditor for Keilor
Shire for many years. The following paragraph is from the Terang Express of Tuesday last:-Our readers will regret to hear of the death of Mr. Crawford Harvie, proprietor of the Commercial hotel, Terang. For the past 8 years Mr. Harvie has been bedridden, and he passed away quietly on Saturday evening last.

Born in 1823 at Beith, Ayrshire, Scotland. he came to Victoria when a young man of 30 years of age, and settled at Keilor, where he remained for about 30 years. Seventeen years ago he purchased the Commercial hotel property, Terang, and with his wife and family has resided here ever since.The deceased leaves a widow and grown up family of two sons and three daughters to mourn his lose. The funeral was very largely attended yesterday by district residents and friends from a distance. The Rev. S. Fraser, M.A., conducted the service at the grave. (The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 - 1918) Saturday 14 February 1903 p 2 Article)

Ironically Crawford's son in law was probably related to the Hendry lads from Tullamarine who trashed Robert Ely's school.

HENDRY -HARVIE .-On the 14th December, at Keilor road Station, by the Rev. Wm. Groundwater Fraser, Wm. Hendry, of Moonee Ponds, to Janet, eldest daughter of Crawford Harvie. (P.1, Argus,20-2-1878.)

Keilor Road Station was renamed Sydenham. A document, produced by the defunct Sydenham Historical Society, explaining the origin of the new name with a photo of Crawford's now-demolished hotel and detailing its location should be in the custody of the Keilor Historical Society. The Crawford Harvie entry in my DICTIONARY HISTORY OF TULLAMARINE AND MILES AROUND has much extra information including the two hotels at Sydenham (Crawford's Union-by 1856, and Alex Furlong's Railway),Crawford's grants superimposed on Melway,the robbery at the Union and subsequent hanging and Crawford being the correspondent of the area's (schools)Board of Advice when the C. of E. school at the bottom of Bonfield St was replaced with a new school farther up the hill. Any Harvie descendants should private message me their email address if they would like a copy of the H1 file.

CRAWFORD'S OFF TO TERANG.
The following would never have been found if I had not had Keilor road station in the search term. I have left Crawford's name uncorrected to explain why.

THURSDAY,. 7th JANUARY, 1886.
CLEARING-OUT SALE AT KEILOR ROAD.
KING & COMPANY have received instructions from Mr.CaswBoan,HAnvis, to sell by Public Auction,, on the ground, at Keilor Road Station, on THURSDAY, 7th. January, 1886,commencing at 2 o'clock sharp, his very valuable freehold property containing 112a. 3r. 16p. of FREEHOLD LAND, adjoining the Keilor Road Station, with a long frontage to a Government road running along the Sandhurst line;- also a long frontage to the main Melbourne and Ballarat road; well fenced and permanently watered. A splendid block forsubdivision.
Also, the whole of his Cattle, Horses, Household Furniture, and Dairy Utensils,comprising 30 head of Cattle, consisting of Cows in full milk, dry Cows, and young stock, 5 Horses, including Draught Mare, Buggy Mare, and Saddle Horses, Buggy, Spring Cart, Dray, &c.The whole of the Household Furniture, including good Pianoforte.
The whole for Positive Sale, Without Reserve,as Mr. Harvie is leaving the district at once.
(The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 - 1918) Saturday 26 December 1885 p 2 Advertising)


BACK TO ROBERT.
POSTMASTER AND ELECTORAL REGISTRAR.
The postmaster, such as William Bethell at Bulla and George Couser at Broadmeadows Township was usually appointed as the electoral registrar for a district because people such as farmers and carriers would be unavailable when they were needed.

ELECTORAL REGISTRARS.
The Star (Ballarat, Vic. : 1855 - 1864) Thursday 16 July 1863 p 3 Article
... Brown, Footscray; Gisborne, Henry Carroll, clerk of petty sessions, Gisborne; Keilor, R G. Ely, postmaster, Keilor; Kororoit, W. Puller, secretary to road board, Braybrook; Lancefield, Dr Phipps

KEILOR ROAD BOARD.
There may never have been a road board, shire or city of Keilor if the local members of parliament (West Bourke) had not agitated so strongly. This was a large electorate including even Blackwood, that sleepy hollow that at the time was a booming gold mining settlement. In 1974-5, the City of Sunshine wanted to merge with the City of Keilor but this approach was firmly rejected. However the merger did take place about two decades later when Victoria's historic municipalities were Jeffed. Where are the City of Brimbank councillors in 2014?

The complicated dispute respecting the division of the Keilor district between three competing district road boards-viz., those of Bulla, Braybrook,and Melton-was yesterday brought before tho Hon. Commissioner of Roads and Bridges by a deputation consisting of Mr. P. Phelan, late member for West Bourke ; Messrs. M'Mahon and J. T.Smith, the sitting members for that electoral district; and several other gentlemen interested in the question. Their complaint was that they (the residents)had thus been divided against their will, and even without their knowledge, the advertisement of the boundaries not having been noticed by them; and they now
urged that Government should take some steps to allow them to have a separate road board of their own, and so assess themselves.

Mr. Mitchell pointed out that to do this would be a tedious and expensive process, whereas he offered to take care that their portions of the grants in aid to each district, as well as the amount raised by assessment were secured to them. Moreover, he reminded them that by the time they could be separated the District Councils Bill would probably have become law. At first the deputation seemed very unwilling to agree to this proposal, preferring to sacrifice their money if only they could be formed into a separate road board. In the end, however, they acquiesced in Mr. Mitchell's suggestion, and also decided to appoint representatives to confer with the three road boards as to the disposal of the assessment money and grant in aid. The deputation then withdrew. (Bottom of column 2, P.5, Argus,5-12-1862. N.B.DIGITISATION NOT CORRECTED ON TROVE.)

KEILOR ROAD DISTRICT.-To PATRICK PHELAN, Esq., J.P.
Sir,-We the undersigned landholders and householders, resident within the Keilor Road-District, do hereby request you to convene a meeting of the landholders and householders in such road district to form a Road Board for the purpose of superintending, providing; for, and completing the construction, repairs, and maintenance of the roads in such road district, and for carrying out therein the provisions of the Act of the Governor and the Legislative Council of Victoria, 10 Victoria, No. 40, and 17 Victoria, No. 29.
Landholders............. Householders.
William Taylor.......... Alex. Duncan
James Robertson......... James Laverty
John Eagling ............Donald Guthrie
Chas. Daniels........... W. Pinder
James M'Intyre.......... David Beaton
Wm. O'Neil ..............Benj. Ellis
Martin Tuans? ...........R. G. Ely
(Pro. Edwd. Wilson .......Thomas Bertram.
A.Morgan.)

(ABOUT THE ABOVE.
William Taylor of Overnewton,longtime President of Keilor Shire, owned a huge area of land indicated by Taylors Lakes and Taylors Rd and, by his death, land in Tullamarine, all of which was resumed by the crown for closer settlement in the early 1900's. James Robertson owned land north of Overnewton, including Calder Park Thunderdome and called it Upper Keilor. He also received the grants for land in the parish of Doutta Galla that was inherited by his sons,Francis (Mar Lodge, between McCracken St,Essendon and William Hoffman's Butzbach) and James (Spring Hill,renamed Aberfeldie.)Taylor must have been abroad when James became Shire President. Caroline Chisholm's third shelter shed (the first two being near the Essendon railway bridge and the park in Keilor Village)situated beside a creek just east of the road slightly north of the point where the railway made its closest approach to what became the Calder Highway, was described as being at Robertson's. John Eagling, who owned the Waggoners' Arms and, I think,lived in Dagenhurst next to the court house after the troopers departed, became a councillor. Charles Daniels had a farm in the village whose location was given in a source I've forgotten (K.H.S.newsletter/ Keilor pioneers: Dead Men do tell Tales.) James McIntyre had a farm (called "Riverside?)between the north end of McIntyre Rd and the river (parish of Cut Cut Paw.). William O'Neil bought Frederick Dawes Wickham's 19 acre grants to become the owner of "Horseshoe Bend" and leased J.F.L.Foster's "Leslie Banks" (section 20 Doutta Galla) before the Delaheys. Edward Wilson, co-owner and editor of The Argus, was going blind and had just bought part of the Glengyle Estate (section 1 Tullamarine) which he named Arundel within a year or two, on which he intended to retire; Morgan was his overseer. James Laverty owned the North Pole Inn on the west corner of North Pole (Milleara) road and a 50 acre portion of Main's estate on the north side of Rosehill Rd near Rose or Steele's Creek. He also had a hotel in Moonee Ponds east of Hinkins St (the Harvest Home?) which has been wrongly assumed to be in Keilor. Donald Guthrie might have been the father of Alexander and James Guthrie of Glengyle (possibly the portion where Brown's Rd is located right near Bertram's ford.) If I remember correctly,not long after, James was killed while the brothers were in the process of moving to Torgarf near Sunbury. (See EARLY CHRONOLOGY OF TULLAMARINE journal.) Thomas Bertram was in the same area,hence the name of Bertram's Ford. (See my BERTRAM journal.)David Beaton was a shoemaker who had moved to Keilor near Caroline Chisholm Park by 1849. His address was given as Keilor Bridge but he stayed longer than THAT bridge. (See KEILOR PIONEERS: DEAD MEN DO TELL TALES and his entry in VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS.) Benjamin Ellis was probably an ancestor of the Essendon footballer.)

REPLY TO THE SIGNATORIES. (UNDER THE REQUEST.)
Gentlemen,-In compliance with the above requisition, I hereby CONVENE a MEETING of the LANDHOLDERS and HOUSEHOLDERS in the KeilorRoad District, to be holden on Wednesday, 10th day of November, 1862, at 6 o'clock p.m., at tho Waggoner's Arms Hotel, Keilor, for tho purposes specified in such requisition.
P. PHELAN, J.P. Spring Park. Oct. 11, 1862. (P.8,Argus,8-11-1862.)


ROAD BOARD CLERK.
Robert was the first Clerk of the Keilor Road Board when it was formed in 1863.

KEILOR DISTRICT BOARD-I hereby notify that a MEETING of the BOARD will be held at the Keilor Court house, at noon, on the 18th inst., to make a rate. A statement of the proposed rate may be seen at the office of the board, agreeably to tho 183th Sec. of the Act No. 176. R. G. ELY, Clerk, Keilor, November 10,1863.
(P.8, Argus, 12-11-1863.)

An application was made for a quo warranto, calling on W. Bonfield to show by what authority he exercised the office of clerk of the Keilor Road Board. The objection raised against him was that his predecessor had not been properly dismissed ; he could only be dismissed at a special meeting of the road board, whereas he had been dismissed at an ordinary meeting. The Court reserved judgment. (Last column P.4,Argus,26-6-1869.)

MEMO!!!!!!!Was Bonfield's initial W? Check. Likely a mistake like Walter ClarkE of Glenara in the same article.Put the winegrowing involvement in the CLARK entry in DICTIONARY HISTORY OF BULLA journal.
The usual quarterly meeting of the Melbourne Vinegrowers' Association was held on Thursday lost, at Mr. Maplestone' wine stores, Elizabeth-street. The chair was occupied by the president, Mr. Walter Clarke (sic), of Glenara.(P.5, Argus, 26-6-1869.)


The Supreme Court have granted a rule nisi for a mandamus to compel the Keilor Road Board to pay the salary of Mr. Ely,clerk to the board, and whose dismissal had in a previous suit been set aside as informal.
((P.13, The Australasian,11-12-1869.)

My memory told me that Ebenezer Bonfield had succeeded Robert so I tried an ELY, BONFIELD search.

KEILOR ROAD BOARD.
The ordinary monthly meeting of the Keilor District Board on Saturday last lapsed for want of a quorum, but in consequence of the ruling of the Supreme Court in the case of Ely. v. Bonfield to the effect that the dismissal
of Mr. R. G. Ely was illegal, upon a technical point of law, written instructions signed by the Chairman and four of the members of the Keilor District Board, were handed to the Clerk requiring him to convene a special
meeting of the Board, and to give each member seven clear days notice in writing according to the provisions of the Local Government Act, No. 170, for the purpose of removing the said Robert George Ely from the offices
of Clerk, Treasurer, and collector, and to appoint E. Bonfield to the before named offices in his stead; also to appoint Messrs.E. Brown & Son Engineers to the Board, and for the appointment of valuators for the
ensuing year; the said special meeting to be held at the Court House, Keilor.
(P.4,The Bacchus Marsh Express,25-9-1869.)

TEACHER.
in the Crawford Harvie entry in DHOTAMA, I have quoted from a K.H.S. newsletter that William Savage and Robert George Ely were teachers at the Church of England school at the bottom of Bonfield St. As it was costing to much money for the Government to support competing denominational schools, common schools were introduced; Robert was one of the denominational school teachers whose positions became redundant.

MR.R.G. ELY.
Mr. M'MAHON moved "That this House will tomorrow, resolve itself into a committee of the whole to consider the propriety of presenting an address to His Excellency the Governor, requesting that provision may be made upon an Additional Estimate for 1864 for the balance of salary due to Mr. R. G. Ely, schoolmaster, Keilor." The hon. member remarked that Mr. Ely was one of those schoolmasters whose services had been dispensed with by the operation of the Common Schools Act, He had, however continued his duties for three months as the act came into operation, without receiving notice that his services were to be dispensed with, and it was for that period that he claimed payment. The subject had been brought before the Board of Education, but they had refused to pay the amount.

Mr. M'CULLOCH said that if the hon. member would withdraw the motion, he would endeavour to induce the Board of
Education to pay Mr. Ely the quarter's salary. Mr. M'MAHON agreed to withdraw the amendment.The amendment was accordingly withdrawn. (Second half of column 4,P.6, Argus,31-5-1864.)

CARELESS BUT LUCKY HARRY.
KEILOR.
(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT).
A GUN accident, happily unattended with fatal consequences, took place here on Saturday evening, when Mr. Ely's second son Harry, a lad about seventeen years of age, though generally very careful in handling firearms, was in this instance the unwilling cause as well as the victim of the occurrence. He was taking his gun from a corner of the storeroom, when the hammer got caught in a bag, and a charge of heavy shot caused a severe
laceration of the neck and scalp. Under Dr. Turner's care all danger is now over.
(The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 - 1918) Saturday 22 July 1882 p 3 Article)

YOUNG ROBERT.
ELY - On the 4th December, Robert Alexander Ely (of the Bank of Victoria Collins Street,city) dearly beloved son of Robert George Ely, of Keilor, aged 32 years. (P.1, Argus,6-12-1900.)

ELY.--In loving memory of "Our Dear Bob," who died the 4th of December, 1900, "Glenely," Keilor.
The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away; Blessed be the name of the Lord.(P.1, Argus, 4-12-1903.)

MRS ELY, POSTMISTRESS.

ARE YOU A DESCENDANT OF THE CAMPBELLS OF GLENGYLE (TULLAMARINE), CAMPBELLFIELD AND PORT CAMPBELL?

Andrew Campbell has sent me a private message which explains that the Campbells at these places were indeed members of the same family. He also confirmed my assumption that a member of this family had married John Bertram (after whose family Bertram's Ford between Keilor Village and the parish of Tullamarine was named.)

Andrew asked if I would like more genealogical information about the family, but my focus is to provide local history to make family histories more of a story rather than pure genealogy, just as family lore does. I do include family notices from trove; in many cases,family historians may never find these because of faulty digitisation and I save them the tedious task of correcting the text.

It would be of far more value for Andrew and others researching the same family to be put into contact with each other so they can pool and compare their information and help each other over stumbling blocks. I will ask Andrew for his email address so that anyone who desires to work with him on the Campbells of said places and sends me a private message to this effect can be put in touch with him.

Here is Andrew's message.

Hello,

I just arrived on your journal "HOW GLENGYLE, KEILOR (SECTION 1,TULLAMARINE) BECAME ARUNDEL, "TURNER'S" AND ELLENGOWAN. (VIC., AUST.)".

In case you need some family details, this John Bertram was the husband of Anne McLean Campbell, the last child of Neil Campbell, Mull, Scotland. The Elizabeth Campbell who died there was Anne's first cousin. McLean was indeed her mother's maiden name.

I need to check, but Colin Campbell, elder brother of Anne, went to VDL in 1820. He did quite a farming business near White Hills, Tas, and I believe, in Victoria. He sold all his properties in Australia in 1851 and returned to his family in Scotland. Perhaps this the the Colin Campbell "cousin" you refer to?

I'm trying to develop Anne and John's family tree down, as we have very little documented on them, though I probably have some other info I could try to dig out if you are interested.

For info, I'm a descendant of Archibald McArthur Campbell, a squatter and grazier in Victoria of the time. He is brother to Anne and Colin, and also Alexander (Port Campbell was named after him) and Neil Campbell (Campbellfield was named after him).

Let me know if I can help?

Best regards,

Andrew Campbell

The Campbellfield connection is of interest to me because Robert Campbell was granted land near Neil's grants in the parish of Will Will Rook, and it would be good to find out whether he was related to Neil.To get the Will Will Rook parish map, google WILL WILL ROOK, COUNTY OF BOURKE.

THOMAS ANDERSON, TULLAMARINE, ARSONIST? (AND OTHER TULLAMARINE WESLEYANS.)

THOMAS ANDERSON, TULLAMARINE, ARSONIST? (AND OTHER TULLAMARINE WESLEYANS.)
Tullamarine only ever had one church, the Wesleyan or Methodist Church. That was because the Catholics were more populous in Keilor and Bulla which very early had celebrations of the mass and the Presbyterians , such as the Grants and McNabs also had places of worship at Uniting Lane, Bulla, St Johns, Essendon, and Broadmeadows Township (Westmeadows). The Anglicans had one of the first churches outside Melbourne, St Pauls, still standing at Westmeadows after 164 years and the Bulla Church, built in 1858 on land donated by Mary Greene at the south west corner of Woodlands, but relocated to Bulla Township by Major Murphy in the 1970s because aircraft vibrations were threatening to destroy it.

Most landholdings in Tullamarine were large and the Methodists were more interested in being righteous than in becoming rich. John Carre Riddell and John Pascoe Fawkner made it possible for these virtuous yeomen to afford land by making blocks, often of 7 acres, available. Riddells main aim was profit but Fawkners motive was his adoration of the yeoman farmer according to C.P.Billot. Many Methodists also bought small blocks on the present Trade Park Industrial Estate site from J.F.L.Foster.

Charles Nash established Fairview on Riddells Camieston Estate and Bayview on Fosters section 3 land. Widow, Ann Parr, bought a small block near Bayview but the longtime Parr base was The Elms roughly between the northern end of todays Link Rd and Melrose Drive. Anns son, James Henry Parr, took over this farm and passed it on to his son, Sam (the first beardless man young Harry Heaps ever saw), while his other son, Bill (who like his father served many terms as Keilor Shire President) , bought a part of section 2 not swallowed by the Arundel Closer Settlement and gave it the historic name, Annandale.

As we shall see, the Wesleyans first held services at Edmund Dunns Viewpoint. No doubt Edmund was a gentle man but he had guts! His stand against the big wigs of the Melbourne Hunt encouraged farmers all around Melbourne to form a huge organization as detailed in my journal. While God fearing, he had no qualms about leaving Viewpoint through Stewarton or Camp Hill to avoid paying a toll at Tullamarine Junction every time he left his property.

The other denominations also held services on private properties before their churches were built. Dugald McPhail hosted Presbyterian services while leasing Spring Hill (Aberfeldie) and Mary Daniel did likewise for the Bulla Catholics at Narbonne on Oaklands Rd near Daniels Rd. George Langhorne, Melbournes first missionary to the aborigines, who supplied many aboriginal words to surveyor, Robert Hoddle that became names of parishes and towns, conducted Presbyterian Sunday School and services at Peter Youngs Nairn, almost across the road from Narbonne.

Not surprisingly the first school in Tullamarine (not counting Mr Trimmers mysterious school at the Springs in 1850 which was most likely near the Governors House ,Melway 15 F6?) was the Wesleyan school on an acre donated by J.F.L.Foster on the inside angle of the bend in Cherie St (as shown by title documents.)

WESLEYAN.-On Sunday, September 16th, a new school-room, which will be used also as a place of worship, in connection with the Wesleyan Church, was opened. Two sermons were preached by the Rev. J. C.Symons, of Collingwood. The congregations were exceedingly good, as also the collections which were made at the close of each service. On the following Wednesday a tea-meeting was held therein, and though the weather was showery, yet the school-room was filled. Tea being over a public meeting was held, over which J. L. F. Foster, Esq., late Colonial Secretary, presided. After a short, but appropriate speech from the chairman, the Rev. B.S. Walker submitted to the meeting a statement of accounts, and urged the liquidationof the remaining debt. The Rev. J. Eggleston, of Melbourne, next addressed the meeting in an excellent speech, on education and its benefits, and was followed by Messrs. Parnham and Williams. The gratifying information that the building is free from debt was then announced, the Doxology sung, and prayer offered, when the friends departed, pleased and benefited by the afternoon's entertainment. The building issituated in Tullamarine, in the PentridgeCircuit, and is near to the Lady of the Lake Inn, on the Deep Creek Road. The ground (an acre in extent) upon which it is erected is the gift of J. L. F. Foster, Esq., and is centrally situated. Previously divine service was conducted in the house of Mr. E. Dunn, farmer, on the afternoon of every Lord's Day. (P.5, Argus, 24-9-1855.)

THE CHARACTER OF THOMAS ANDERSON.
(Tullamarine Methodist Church centenary booklet 1970.) The booklet, quoted in DHOTAMA, and donated by me should be available at the Broadmeadows Library.
From pages A 23-4 of my Dictionary History of Tullamarine and Miles Around.
The Port Phillip Directory of 1847 lists Thomas Anderson as a milkman on Mains Estate. This estate, section 12 Doutta Galla, consisting of 640 acres was bounded by Rachelle Rd, East Keilor, Buckley St and Hoffmans Rd, extending north to a line joining Clarks Rd and the northern end of Moushall Avenue. The estate was split into parcels of about 50 acres and Thomas may have been leasing one of these. There is no certainty that he was the future Tullamarine resident.

The 1970 Tullamarine Methodist Church centenary souvenir states that Thomas was one of 18 signatories on an indenture for the sale of land to the Methodists which was enrolled in the Supreme Court of N.S.W. on 11-8-1840, one of the trustees of an original piece of church land, and one of the first trustees of the church on 4-10-1869.

In 1840, William and John Foster were granted a ten year lease on Leslie Park (presumably 21 Doutta Galla and 3 Tullamarine, later granted to Wiiliam and Leslie Banks,22 Doutta Galla, later granted to his younger brother, John.)

However the Fosters would have had no power to donate the acre for the Wesleyan school at that time, so the 1840 document is a mystery. The document signed in 1840 must have related to the Wesleyans being recognized as a body able to buy land.

Thomas was a trustee of the school site, presumably in 1855. The church opened in 1870 on a site on Charles Nashs Bayview, roughly the north corner of Trade Park Drive and Melrose Drive. Charles practically donated the land so the church probably paid only the 10 shillings transfer fee.

The conveyance, probably of the church land but possibly of Fosters donated acre circa 1855,was signed, sealed and delivered by Thomas Anderson in the presence of Thomas Crisp, an attourney of the Supreme Court of the Colony of Victoria (hence after 1850.) His signature was a cross, because Thomas could not write, but his fellow trustees chose him to sign on his behalf.

Given that Charles Nash, Wallis Wright and James Henry Parr, whose families were stalwarts of the church for over a century, and Edmund Dunn were fellow trustees, this was a high honour and illustrates the respect in which Thomas Anderson was held. No wonder the hard-to- believe Cleary did not make his accusations until he had left Tulla!

INCENDIARISM.
The following proclamation is published. " Twenty-five Pounds Reward : Whereas it has been represented to the Government, that in the night of Sunday, the 7th March last, a weather- board house, the property of Messrs. Marks and Taylor, situated at Tullamarine, near Broadmeadows, was destroyed by fire :And whereas there is reason to suppose that the said house was maliciously set fire to by some evil-disposed person or persons: Notice is hereby given, that a reward of 25 will be paid to any person who shall give such information as will lead to the apprehension and conviction of the person or persons who set fire to the said premises."
(THE GAZETTE, MAY 28 , P.7, Argus, 29-5-1858.)

Thomas Anderson and William Cassidy were brought up, on warrant, by Detective Williams, charged with arson. Solomon Lyon Marks said that he was a member of the firm of Marks and Taylor, La Trobe street. About four weeks ago he purchased 20 acres of ground and four-roomed house of Messrs. Symons and Perry. The property was situated near the Beech Tree Hotel, in the parish of Tullamarine, Broadmeadows. He saw the prisoner Anderson at the sale. Anderson asked him if he knew the property, and witness replied that he knew the person who was selling it. Anderson asked if he would take a profit on it, and made an offer, which witness refused. He offered a sum of about 5 or 10 profit. On seeing the property, witness was dissatisfied with it, and put it into the hands of Tennant and Co. Anderson again spoke to him about it, and on witness refusing to deal with him, replied that it would never do witness much good. The property was adjoining his own (Anderson's), and he did not want the land so much as the house.

On Monday, the 8th March, witness received letter from the landlord of the Beech Tree Hotel, and on going to the house, which he had purchased, found it burned down. He did not see the prisoners, and had no conversation with them afterwards. He had never seen the prisoner Cassidy that he knew of. Cross examined by Mr. Read : Witness gave L250 for the property. He left no one in special charge of the property, but asked the landlord if he would be kind enough to look after it. There were a good many workmen about the place.

-William Cleary, steward of the Lunatic Asylum, Yarra Bend, said that about the beginning of March he was residing with a Mr. Corcoran, in a place adjoining the paddock in which stood the house which had been burned down. On Saturday, the 6th March, at night, witness saw a light in the house, and, thinking it strange, the house being empty, went up to look at it. The middle wall of the house was then burning. Witness went and got some water, and extinguished it. This was about 8 o'olock in the evening. Saw neither of the prisoners that evening and went home.

On the following (Sunday) evening, witness was again passing the house and also by Mr. Anderson's. In the kitchen belonging to the latter witness heard some conversation going on about the fire, but could not tell who were in the kitchen, nor who was speaking. Returning back, about half an hour afterwards, he saw Anderson standing about 44 yards off the house. This was past 8 o'clock.

Witness was about 60 or 65 yards from Anderson. Passing on, he looked back, when he had gone about 20 yards, and saw Anderson walk up to the back-door of the house, and go in. He next saw a light, like that of a match or candle. He then went home and had supper, and went to the stable to attend the horses. As he opened the door a glare of light shone on the passage, and looking to the house he saw that it was on fire. A number of people were running towards it, and witness ran too. Before he reached it the roof fell in. He saw Anderson and his son, andAnderson said it was a bad job, as he had wanted to buy the house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Read : Never heard of a reward offered for the discovery of the authors of the fire until he had seen it in the office. The day after the fire a sergeant of police came to inquire, and witness told him that the neighbors had some suspicions about the persons who might have done it, but did not know who it was. He further told the sergeant, on being asked if he knew anything more about it, that he (witness) was not in the Government service then, and did not know anything more. Did not know how many times he had seen the sergeant afterwards. Knew nothing about rewards, and despised them ; and if he had any conversation with the police, it was in consequence of their thinking, perhaps, that he was unwilling to tell what he knew.

Saw the sergeant on a subsequent day, at his (thesergeant's) own house. Went to the house himself. Went through Moonee Ponds*. Moonee Ponds was not far from the station at Broadmeadows, the station to which witness alluded. Never spoke a word about rewards. Had often been to the sergeant's before. The sergeant was an acquaintance of his.
(*Moonee Ponds is a reference to the creek; the suburb did not exist.)

Saw a trooper at Flemington. Had been in the police, about three yearsago, at Ballaarat, Buninyong, Creswick's Creek, and other places. Resigned in consequence of the reduction in pay. Was not dismissed. Some time In May, Mr.Nicolson wanted to see him. Had never seen a detective to his knowledge. Oneof them had come out to tell him to come into Melbourne, but did not know that he was a detective. Another came out on Friday last with a summons.

Thedetective did not tell him there was a reward offered, to witness's knowledge. Saw Mr.Nicolson four-or five weeks ago. Did notwish to say anything to him at that time, because it was not to his interest to do so. His reason was that be was living with hiscousin at the time, near Mr. Anderson's, and he thought that if he said anything about hissuspicions he would not receive some money due to him. Would swear he had a conversation with Mr. Anderson on the night of the fire.

The Mayor asked Mr. Nicolson if he had any other evidence, as he did not attach much weight to that of the witness. Mr.Nicolson said if his Worship would allow the witness to explain he thought everything he stated would appear quite consistent. He would, however, call another witness.

RobertCluckton*, a senior constable stationed at Broadmeadows, said he knew the house inquestion, and proceeded to it on the night of the fire. He then saw Anderson, and the lastWitness, who pointed out the prisoner (Anderson) as the person who was suspected of having set fire to the place, adding, that he would tell him more on the following day. Witness went to see him on the following day, but could not get anything out of him, as his (Cleary's) cousin was by, and he did not like to say anything in his presence.

The presence of the cousin, and the fear that he would losehis situation if he said anything of what he knew about Anderson, were the reasons he gave to witness for not saying more. He afterwards, on the 5th of June, called on witness, and told him what he had seen about Anderson going into the house on the night of the fire.

This was before witness knew anything of a reward being offered. The reward did not reach the station until the Monday following, though it was dated the27th May. Cleary, on calling, said he was leaving his place, and could now tell witness what he knew. Mr. Nicolson said the date was nothing, as a document was often dated much earlier than it was received at the out-stations. Mr.Hackett* concurred in this remark, that the date was nothing to the point. Mr. Nicolsonstated that he had further corroborative evidence to produce, and the prisoners were remanded,-Anderson being allowed bail, as before, in two sureties of 600 each, and the other prisoner being liberated on his own recognizance of L100. (P.6, Argus, 22-6-1858.)

(*Hackett St,the boundary between Chandos and Broadmeadows Township, was probably named after the Mayor.)



The report on page 6 of The Age of the same date (22-6-1858) gives much the same detail with some exceptions. I had thought that Symons and Perry were the previous owners of the property but they were auctioneers and the sale was conducted in their rooms in Melbourne. That was why Marks went to see the property later. The name of Clearys cousin is given as Conoran; I believe that Corcoran (or Cochrane as seen later) is more likely correct. Thomas Anderson allegedly told Cleary that hed wanted to buy the block but a Jew had outbid him. The name of the Broadmeadows trooper was given as Robert Crighton*.


Also the Mayors opinion of Clearys testimony contains more detail. The Mayor asked if there was any other evidence, as he did not believe a single word the man had uttered. After some further examination by Mr Read and an attempt on the part of Mr Nicholson to bolster up the case, the Mayor said it was incredible that a man who had been so long in the police and had such frequent opportunities of communicating with the officers, should conceal the offence and then come forward to charge the prisoners with the offence. He was totally unworthy of belief.
If the Mayor had such a low opinion of the star witness why was the case not dismissed out of hand?
Inspector Nicholson asked for a remand, on the ground that Mr and Mrs Beechy had been subpic/iaed as witnesses, but were not in attendance. The prisoners were on bail. Mr Read opposed the remand, on the ground that their evidence could not be material, and he had witnesses in Court who would most distinctly prove an alibi.

Inspector Nicholson seems to have needed the assistance of an amateur sleuth such as Sherlock Holmes, Miss Marple, Father Brown or Australias own flapper, Miss Fisher!
He probably didnt care who suffered, as long as he got a conviction. Its a pity that Reads witnesses in court were not named; some of their names might have already been mentioned (Parr, Wright, Nash, Dunn and maybe Foster.)

I thought Id never discover the outcome of the case but a POLICE COURT, ANDERSON, ARSON, 1858 trove search bore fruit. Clearys cousin was accorded a third surname (Corcoran, Conoran and now Cochrane.) I now know exactly who built the house that was burnt down and where it was.

The Alleged Arson. The two men Anderson and Cassidy, who stand charged with arson at Broadmeadows, were again brought up for examination. John Beechy, a policeman, sworn, said : On the evening of the 7th of March my nephew told me Scarlett's house was on fire. I called one of my men, and we went down to the place together. By the time we got there the roof and walls had fallen in. There was no one within a hundred yards of the fire. The people present said they did not like to go up until some one else came. The question then arose who set the place on fire. I saw a man coming with a lantern. He stood about seventy yards from the fire ; did not know who the person was. By Mr Read : I know a man named Cochrane. Cleary lived with him. A person could not go to the police station near Broadmeadows without
going out of his road. Constable Lerment, a trooper deposed that he was at the fire; he saw Cleary there. Some time after the fire Cleary said if a warrant was offered, he could give evidence that would convict the perpetrator. The bench were of opinion that there was not the slightest evidence to support the charge. In fact, suspicion seemed to rest
elsewhere. The prisoners were accordingly discharged. Mr Read applied for the committal of Cleary for perjury. The magistrates declined to accede to this request, and said if he (wanted to?) institute any proceedings, he must take the ??? (P.6, The Age, 26-6-1858.)

WHERE WERE THEY?
From page A 23, DHOTAMA. The earliest Broadmeadows ratebook seen (1863) records that Thomas Anderson was assessed on four blocks of land on the east side of Bulla Rd. It is probable that three of these were lots 12,13 and 26 of Riddell and Hamiltons Camieston Estate purchased by John Anderson or lots 29, 30 and 31 purchased by James Anderson. The earliest Keilor ratebook (1868) shows that Thomas Anderson had 8 acres on the west side of Bulla Rd.

Across Melrose Drive from Strathconnan Square was Andersons Lane which left the main road at a right angle before turning due (magnetic) west to provide access to blocks on Fawkners section 6/7 subdivision. On the north side of the corner, fronting Bulla Rd, was a block purchased by George Bendrey (volume 2 folio 972.) It was surrounded by the Parrs The Elms on its north and west sides. Thomas Anderson possibly bought a fair portion of this block and built a house opposite Wright (now Springbank) St. The property seems to have absorbed other Fawkner subdivision blocks, growing to 102 acres (mainly west of todays Link Rd) and then shrank back to 41 acres, being occupied by Robert Foster Anderson (who married Miss Drain of Broadmeadows Township in 1881) before his move to Greenvale by 1920, Alf Hounslow who called the farm Sinleigh, and, from the early 1940s, John and Bertram Anderson who ran a piggery according to Harry Heaps whose block is now occupied by Strathconan Square. The block fronting Bulla Rd purchased from John and Bertram circa 1960 for the airport is almost identical to George Bendreys original purchase.

It would be the greatest coincidence for three unrelated lots of Andersons to occupy the same land for about a century so I strongly suspect that Robert Foster Anderson and John and Bertram were related in some way to the falsely accused Thomas.

The house that Thomas was accused of burning down was Scarletts according to John Beechy, the policeman. George Scarlett was the original purchaser from Fawkners land cooperative of lots 31 and 32 (and from a sale advertisement), apparently lot 30 to the west of a subdivision lane, which like the three lots ran south from Andersons Lane to Post Office Lane. The location of lots 30-31 can roughly be given as Melway 5, part C, and D, 10. The inferno would have been on one of these blocks.

John Beech bought a large block (58 acres or so) which fronted Bulla Rd and also extended south from Andersons Lane to Post Office Lane (roughly Melway, 5 F, part G 10.). The Beech Tree Hotel was across Bulla Rd from a point midway between the Tullamarine Reserve and the Henderson Rd corner. Beech bought the land on 1-5-1851 (volume M folio 481.)

It must have irritated the Wesleyans to have two pubs (the Beech Tree and the Lady of the Lake ) so close to their farms. The Lady of the Lake burnt down but was quickly replaced by the Junction Hotel at Greens Corner (opposite the plaqueless Camp Hill Park) which operated till about 1929 before another Methodist , Tommy Loft of Dalkeith, had it closed down due to the debauchery of clients such as Squizzy Taylor. When the Seafield school and the Wesleyan school were replaced in 1884 by State School 2613 Tullamarine, it was built on the north corner of Conders Lane so it would be as far as possible from such dens of iniquity.


This church, more than any other, promoted temperance, abstinence from drinking, smoking and swearing. I just wonder if Thomas Anderson gave Cleary a dressing down for breaches of one or more of these and Cleary sought revenge!

MAP TO BE PROVIDED TO BROADMEADOWS HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

6 comment(s), latest 1 month, 3 weeks ago

EARLY CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY OF TULLAMARINE, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA,FROM TROVE.

The purpose of this journal is to acknowledge pioneers of the parish of Tullamarine not uncovered in Keilor, Bulla and Broadmeadows rate records,directories,local histories and oral history interviews with descendants of pioneering families, the main sources for my DICTIONARY HISTORY OF TULLAMARINE AND MILES AROUND.

The chronology will be preceded by an alphabetical index listing surnames and years* under which they appear so that family historians can quickly find if their ancestors are mentioned and only those who have a general interest need to plough through the whole journal. (*Pioneers mentioned incidentally in important background information will be labelled IBI.)


INDEX.
Some families were not resident in the year indicated, so don't be put off by the year. For instance, Alan Payne was a much later owner of land between part of Gowrie Park and Glendewar on which the airport terminal was built but is MENTIONED under 1861, as are J.R.Murphy, Hyslop and W.S.Cox in relation to Peter McCracken's dairy at Kensington.

1868C9 is a warning that the 1868 article re Richard Mitchell's insolvency and associated comments about fellow 1863 Broadmeadows ratepayers would not submit in the journal and finally submitted in comment 9. Residents mentioned in other comments will have C1, C2, C3 etc. after their surnames.

ALLEN 1861; ALSTON 1863; ANDERSON 1865,1868C9; ANGUS Andrew 1861; ANNAND IBI; BEAMAN 1868C9; BEECH C1; BETHELL ,C7; BLACK 1849; BREES 1861; BROWNE 1863,1868C9; BUNBURY I.B.I.; CLARK 1849,1861;CLARKE 1861; COCK 1861,1868C9; COGHILL 1849, 1861; COUSER 1868 C9, C7; COUSINS C6, C7,C8;DEAKIN 1863; DEWAR 1861; DUNCAN 1861,1864; DUNN 1863,1868C9; ELLIS 1861; EVANS 1868C9,C7,C11; FAWKNER 1861; FOSTER IBI,1868C9; GAWLEY 1868C9;GLENN 1863,1865, 1868C9; GRANT 1861, 1867; GUTHRIE 1857,1861,1862,1863, 1865, 1868C9; HAMILTON IBI; HARVIE C13; HENDRY 1855, 1866,1868C9,C7, , C13; HOCTOR 1868 C9; HOLLAND C1, C7;HYSLOP 1861;JOHNSON 1861; KENNEDY 1861; KENNY 1849; KETTLE 1868C9,C6; LAZARUS C1; LOEMAN 1861; LOFT 1868C9; LOVE 1865,1868C9; McCLUSKEY 1847; McCRACKEN 1849; 1861; McKERCHAR 1861; McNAB 1861; MACONOCHIE 1863,1868C9; MANSFIELD 1861; MILLAR 1868C9; MITCHELL 1868 C9; MURPHY 1861; NASH 1868C9; NEWMAN 1849; O'NIAL 1849,1868C9; PAYNE 1861; PETER 1868C9; POWELL 1859,C1; PRAIN 1857,1861 (SEE TRAIN); PUCKLE 1861; PURVIS 1855, 1868C9; RIDDELL 1847,1868 C9; SALMON 1861; SHARP 1868C9; TAYLOR 1861; TENNIEL C1,C7; THOMSON 1861; TRAIN (sic,PRAIN) 1861; WRIGHT 1868C9; WRIGHT Tulip C1; YOUNG C1;

IMPORTANT BACKGROUND INFORMATION.
TULLAMARINE PARISH MAP.
This can be found online with a TULLAMARINE,COUNTY OF BOURKE search.


CROWN LAND: LOT NUMBERS NOT CROWN ALLOTMENT NUMBERS!
John Carre Riddell's selection of 640 acres previously occupied by William McCluskey in 1847 illustrates a danger which family historians must keep in mind. Lot 3 in the parish of Tullamarine was NOT crown allotment 3,parish of Tullamarine;it was crown allotment 6. Do not assume that lot numbers in advertisements and reports of crown land sales or occupation licences correspond to crown allotment numbers.

Crown allotment 3,Tullamarine of 640 acres (SUBMIT) on the north side(SUBMIT) of Sharps Rd(SUBMIT)fr(SUBMIT)om
Broadmeadows Rd (submit)to its western end,(submit)was granted to W.V.L.Foster on 27-1-1843.(submit)Riddell's selection,previously occupied by McCuskey, was crown allotment 6 of 640 acres, on the western side of today's Mickleham Rd f-r-o-m a point

just south of the Freight Rd corner

to a point across the road

fr-om

Forman St with its

south west corner being crossed by Link Rd before the road curves to the west (midpoint of bottom of Melway 5,E 10.) This square mile was granted to Riddell on 30-3-1848 and with crown allotment 15 to the north,for which he'd received the grant on 30-11-1842, became part of Riddell and Hamilton's Camieston Estate.

In this case, lot two was crown allotment (or section) two. But to make sure this was so, I needed to see evidence,which luckily was provided. Section 2 Tullamarine,west of William Foster's section 3, was granted to George Annand who must have been the successful bidder and received the grant on 22-6-1850. J.F.L. Foster's section 20 Doutta Galla,"Leslie Banks" was between Fosters Rd (now Keilor Park Drive)and the river to the line of Spence St and section 2 joined Bunbury's grant,section 1, at the boundary of Melway maps 14 and 15. Section 1 was known as Glengyle and later Arundel.

2. 640, Six hundred and forty acres,
parish of Tullamarine, section No. 2.
Bounded on the north by section 7 ; on
the east by W. V. L. Foster's 640 acres ;
on the south by J. F. L Foster's 712
acres ; and on the west by R. H. Bun-
bury's 790 acres. (49-112)
(LEASES BY AUCTION. P.1, Argus,5-6-1849.)

SEGMENTATION AND CONSOLIDATION.
When crown land was first put on sale in the parish of Tullamarine in 1842, lot numbers and portion (section) numbers were the same but lot 19 was portion 1 in the parish of Bulla Bulla. The depression, which climaxed in 1843 and was basically caused by an oversupply of sheep, led to most of the huge areas of land not being sold.

Many sections fronting Deep Creek and the Moonee Moonee Chain of Ponds were broken into small crown allotments which were later consolidated to form farms such as Aucholzie on the former and Camp Hill and Viewpoint on the latter.

John Pascoe Fawkner bought portions 7, most of 13, and 10 on behalf of his land cooperative members in about 1850 and subdivided them into farms of about 7 acres. Riddell and Hamilton, who had swapped some land near Bulla Rd with Fawkner, subdivided the Camieston estate at about the same time, with Chandos (fronting the west side of today's Mickleham Rd
f-r-o-m
Freight Rd north to the creek)
comprising about 450 acres, and the rest consisting of blocks of about 7 acres that were consolidated into farms such as Fairview and Sunnyside.

The part of William Foster's section 3 east of Bulla Rd was leased in small parcels with the Lady of the Lake hotel operating by the late 1840's and most of the land was occupied by small farms such as Broombank and a paddock associated with the Junction Hotel. (Northedge, Andlon and Londrew Ct area.)


Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1840 - 1845) Monday 22 August 1842 p 4.
PORT PHILLIP---SALE OF LAND. HIS Excellency the Governor directs it to be notified that, at eleven o'clock of Wednesday, the 19th day of October next, the under-mentioned portions of land will be put up to selection, in some convenient place in the town of Melbourne, Port Phillip. The holders of land receipts under the regulations of 21st January, 1841,will be allowed to select, without competition,
f-r-o-m
the lands now advertised, and at the fixed price of 1 per acre, in satisfaction of their orders; but this permission will only extend to within one month
f-r-o-m
the day of sale, namely, to the 19th day of September inclusive, in order that the public may have due notice of the lots thus disposed of. Further information respecting the lands may be obtained f-r-o-m the Surveyor General, in Sydney, and the officer in charge of the survey department in Port Phillip ; and respecting the conditions of sale f-r-o-m the Colonial Treasurer, in Sydney, and the Sub-Treasurer, at Melbourne.

.1. Bourke. nine hundred and seven acres, parish of Tullamarine, portion 1,upset price 1 per acre.
2. Bourke, six hundred and forty acres, parish of Tullamarine, portion 2; upset price one pound per acre.
3. Bourke, six hundred and forty acres, parish of Tullamarine. portion 3; upset price one pound per acre.
4. Bourke, seven hundred and eightyone acres, parish of Tullamarine, portion 4; upset price one pound per acre.
5. Bourke, seven hundred and eighty.five acres, parish of Tullamarine, portion 5; upset price one pound per acre
.6. Bourke, six hundred and forty acres, parish of Tullamarine, portion 6; upset price one pound per acre.
7. Bourke, six hundred and forty acres, parish of Tullamarine, portion 7; upset price one pound per acre
.8. Bourke, six hundred and forty acres, parish of Tullamarine, portion 8; upset price one pound per acre
.9. Bourke, six hundred and forty acres, parish of' Tullamarine, portion 9; upset price one pound per acre.
10. Bourke, four hundred and forty eight acres, parish of Tullamarine, portion 10; upset price one pound per acre.
11. Bourke, nine hundred and sixty five acres, parish of Tullamarine, portion 11 ; upset~price one pound per acre.

12. Bourke, three hundred and thirty eight acres, parish of Tullamarine, portion 12 ; upset price one pound peracre. -
13. Bourke, nine hundred and sixty one acres, parish of Tullamarine, portion 13; upset price one pound per acre.

14. Bourke, six hundred and forty acres, parish of Tullamarine, portion 14 ; upset price one pound per acre.

15. Bourke, seven hundred and thirteen acres, parish of Tullamarine,portion 15 ; upset price one pound per acre.
16. Bourke, five hundred and thirty three acres~ parish of Tuilamarine, portion 16; upset-price one pound per acre.

17. Bourke, nine hundred and forty one acres, parish of Tullamarine, portion 17; upset price one pound per acre.
18. Bourke; seven hundred and twenty three acres, parish of Tullamarine, portion 18; upset price one pound per acre.

Seems crazy but it seems that part of my problem submitting was that FROM must be a dirty four letter word.
Imagine my relief to find that the text for lots 1 to 18 (which did not include that naughty word)submitted in one go!


CHRONOLOGY.

1847.
OCCUPATION LICENSES.
WITH reference to the sale of Occupation Licenses, to take place at Melbourne, on Wednesday the 30th instant,
Notice is hereby given that lot No. 3, county of Bourke parish of Tullamarine,containing 640 acres, under

license to William M'Cluskey until the 30th June, 1847, has been selected by John Carr Riddle (sic) at the

upset price of 1 per acre, in accordance with the Act of Parliament, 5th and 6th Victoria, Cap. 36, and is

therefore withdrawn

f-r-o-m

the sale above mentioned.
By order of his Honor,the Superintendent, ROBERT HODDLE, Surveyor. Survey Office, Melbourne,June 1, 1847.
(P.2,The Melbourne Argus, 8-6-1847.)

1849.
The 1849 electoral roll for the Port Phillip District included the following residents living in the parish of Tullamarine. The parish ran north f-r-o-m

the line of Sharps Rd and the east-west course of the Maribyrnong River to the line of Grants Rd. Moonee Moonee Ponds within the parish meant near the Moonee Ponds Creek, such as Camp Hill, Viewpoint, Stewarton, Chandos,Fairview, Sunnyside and Glendewar. Moonee Ponds also included residents outside the parish of Tullamarine such as the Napiers of Rosebank and the Robertsons of La Rose; some residents whose address was only given as Moonee Moonee Ponds have been included as they were known to live within the parish of Tullamarine.

ARGUS, 25-6-1849, 29-6-1849, 3-7-1849.
BLACK Neil, Moonee Moonee Ponds (owner of section 5, Stewarton,later renamed Gladstone,which was leased by Peter McCracken* 1846-1855); COGHILL George,Tullamarine (Glencairne, which became the southern part of Walter Clark's Glenara circa 1856-his father William Coghill,owned Cumberland across the Moonee Ponds in the parish of Will Will Rook); KENNY Air (Eyre) Evans, Camphill, Moonee Ponds (section 4,crown allotments 3 and 4);
NEWMAN,Daniel, Moonee Ponds; O'NIAL David William, Springs,Mt Macedon Rd (i.e.the Lady of the Lake hotel just south east of the present Melrose Drive/ Derby St corner); RIDDELL John Carre,Moonee Moonee Ponds (i.e.sections 6 and 15).
* Peter McCracken's own words (McCracken letters)but his address was given as "near River Plenty." on the roll.

1855.
MARRIED.
By special license, by the Rev. Thomas Odell, James Purvis, of Tullamarine, to Christina Hendry,youngest daughter of Mr. James Hendry, of Perth,Scotland.(P.4,Argus, 4-7-1855.)

Thomas Purvis bought lots 14, 27 and 28 of Riddell and Hamilton's Camieston Estate which had frontages to the west side of Wright(now Springbank) St and the north side of Derby St (roughly Melway 5 G8.) James Hendry,probably Christina's brother, was later the postmaster for Tullamarine, probably at the junction near the Junction Hotel and the toll gate.

1857.
Alex Prain marries Miss Hendry (mentioned under 1861.)

On the 28th ult., at her son's residence, Glengyle, after a long and protracted illness, Elizabeth Guthrie,
widow of late Mr. John Guthrie, Inch, Invernesshire,Scotland, aged 78 years. (P.4,Argus,3-3-1857.)
Elizabeth was the mother of Andrew and James Guthrie.

SORRY READERS;I CAN'T HELP MYSELF. I WONDER IF "INCH" GREW INTO A TWELVE TIMES BIGGER SETTLEMENT AND WAS RENAMED "FOOT".

1859.
CONTRACTS ACCEPTED. W.H. Powell, conveyance of mails to and f-r-o-m

Journal abandoned. See comment 1.

NO WONDER I RETIRED!

1861.
Tullamarine looked likely to get a railway in the 1880's and 1920's but they already had a Train in 1860. The store was probably at Tullamarine Junction near the toll gate and the Wesleyan school.

POSTSCRIPT. THE INSOLVENT MAY NOT HAVE BEEN A TRAIN AT ALL. SO MUCH FOR MY CORNY JOKE. I appear to have been correct in guessing that the Hendrys took over Alexander's store. See the marriage notice. Broadmeadows probably means the district rather than the township. Confirmation that the insolvent's surname was Prain,a list of those to appear at the insolvents' court, follows the marriage notice.


NEW INSOLVENTS.
Alexander Train, Tullamarine, storekeeper.Causes of insolvency-Depression in business and pressure of creditors. Debts. 69 15s. 3d. ;assets, 57 2s. 8d. ; deficiency, 2 12s. 7d. Mr. Goodman, official assignee. (P.1s, Argus, 14-1-1861.)

On the 26th inst., at Lonsdale-street Congregational Church, by the Rev. Thomas Odell, Mr. Alexander
Prain, of Campbelfield, to Miss Mary Hendry, of Broadmeadows. (P.4, Argus,28-3-1857.)

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 14 February 1861 p 6 Article
... , Benjamin Tinker, Friderick Leonard, Maslen and Litchfield, Thomas Cox, Alexander Prain, Richard ..

DEATH BY DROWNING.-Mr. Candler held an inquest, on Thursday, at Keilor, on the body of a man named Andrew Angus, who was found drowned in the Deep Creek, a few days ago. The deceased had been in the service of Mr. Guthrie, a farmer, at Glengyle, and was last seen alive on the 11th ultimo, on his leaving for Melbourne,
with a load of hay. The evidence appeared to lead to the conclusion that he had been drowned while attempting to cross the creek, which was Swollen at the time. The jury found a verdict to that effect.
(P.2,Bendigo Advertiser, 13-8-1861.)
Poor Andrew would have drowned at Bertram's Ford,just metres west of the modern Arundel bridge.

TULLAMARINE FARMS.
I was disappointed when I first read the following article because I was expecting the same sort of wide-ranging tour that the Mornington Standard conducted over most of the Mornington Peninsula in 1902,with detail of every farm. Despite the small number of farms described,the article contains much interesting detail. The itemised costs of farming,which I'd never thought about, are thorough but would be more meaningful if the expected return per ton of hay had been given. The wheat would probably have been carted through Glenara,with the permission of Walter Clark,(who had bought land and the Inverness Hotel from Alexander Kennedy and George Coghill's "Glencairn" to the south in about 1856) to the flour mill on Lochton (Melway 176 C4),whose ruins are heritage-listed.This mill closed in 1863 and, like Michael Loeman on Tullamarine Island, those mentioned as wheat growers below probably gave up wheat growing. I will make some comments about the article in italics re location,the farm and farmer etc. at the end of each farm description. I will have to guess that Mr.D.'s brother (Duncan? Dewar?) was the occupant of Gowrie Side and that Mr Coghill's forest was on "Cumberland."


FARMING IN THE DEEP CREEK
DISTRICT.
(FROM THE FARMERS' JOURNAL.)
At a distance of about twelve miles from Melbourne, 0n the road to Bulla, is situated Tullamarine, hamlet, village, or township,whichever it may be, but under which of these designations it now ranks we should be rather perplexed to decide. Time was, when Tullamarine might have hoped for development into a full-blown village, but that was ere railways had an existence, and before also the now capitally metalled, but little used road, had replaced the rugged and at times impassable bush track, the only facility afforded for travelling in those days. It was than that butchers, bakers, and storekeepers, plied an active trade with the multitude of draymen who thronged to the levees of the 'Lady of the Lake", (peace to her ashes)alas, no more. The ' Beech Tree' alone now offers the shade of its wide spreading branches,as a rest for tho thirsty traveller ; the slight wooden tenements, in which a thriving business once was done, are apparently deserted, and the
traffic 0n the road is insufficient to prevent the metal becoming nearly as verdant as the fields.

The road to Bulla Village from North Melbourne was declared in 1847 and was THE GREAT ROAD TO THE DIGGINGS in the early 1850's. Heavily laden drays during the early years of the gold rush left the road in deplorable condition. In 1854,the government chose the route through Keilor when spending much money on a good road to the diggings, and the first high level bridge in that village that would not be swept away in the next flood,Samuel Brees' bridge which lasted 14 years before being replaced by the iron "flower basket" bridge.

That new route took the passing trade away from Tullamarine, Bulla and Sunbury,the last named being overshadowed by "The Gap" on the road to Mount Alexander. Sunbury was saved from becoming a sleepy hollow in 1858 when the Murray River and Mt Alexander Railway reached the town. The planned village of Gretna Green on the part of Camp Hill west of Bulla Rd went down like a lead balloon.

It is now known that the Lady of the Lake was destroyed by fire PRIOR TO OCTOBER 1861. I knew that it no longer existed in 1867 when my great grandfather, John Cock, started his 15 year lease on the adjacent "Broombank".


But if the natural progress of settlement has been hostile to the commercial prosperity of the place, the agricultural interest has not been similarly affected ; farmers have proceeded with their ploughing, sowing, and reaping, much as farmers always do, excepting that a great deal of the land on this, as well as on the
Keilor road, exhibits unmistakeable signs of exhaustion from repeated cropping with cereals without manure. These symptoms are apparent on portions even of the best managed farms in this neighborhood, and must inevitably continue to characterise it until root and green crops are more generally grown, and live stock to a proportionate extent kept for consumption.

The wiser farmers continued the old country practice of crop rotation (including a year in fallow)but with the demand for hay from carriers to the diggings,most farmers placed more importance on the proverb:"make hay while the sun shines."

The first farm to which our attention was directed was that of Mr John Grant, of Seafield, who has 400 acres of naturally good agricultural land, 100 acres of which are under the plough and the remainder in native pasture. Artificial or English grasses,as they are termed, have not as yet been much sown in this neighborhood, but many of the farmers have made a beginning, and we here saw 22 acres of lucerne and rye grass, affording a strong contrast to the natural pastures, and which will ensure, we should think, a much wider breadth being sown in future. The wheat crop consists of 73 acres, the remainder of the arable land being occupied by oats, chiefly for hay.

This crop was looking very well, guano having been used on it at the rate of about 1 cwt to the acre. Hay being the staple product of the district, we endeavored to obtain, from good authorities,an estimate of the cost of this crop, which it was generally agreed was about as follows :
'Wages and maintenance of ploughman, 28s per week ;
keep of pair of horses, 3 bushels of oatsand 3 cwt hay, 27s per week ;
blacksmith, 3s per week ;
3.5 bushels of seed per acre, at 4s.

A man and a pair of horses could plough one acre per day, and thoroughly harrow five. It was considered that rolling would cost about 1s per acre. So far, then, the calculation would stand thus :
Ploughing and harrowing 5 acres,
man's wages and keep L 1 8 0
Horses' keep L 1 7 0
Blacksmith L 0 3 0
Rolling L 0 5 0
Seed, at 14s per acre L.3 10 0
Mowing, at 6 s 6d per acre L.1 12 6
Making, at ditto L.1 12 6
Stacking and thatching, at 5s per acre L 1 5 0
(total) 11 3 0
or about 2 4s 7d per acre in the rick, exclusive of rent and interest on capital invested, onwhich we could get no very satisfactory decision. Every farmer can add the l per acre he has been paying as rent, or the holder of an occupation license can add his half-crown. One and a half ton per acre was considered a fair
average crop, which would make the actual expenses enumerated above amount to 1 9 9 per ton.
Rent say at 1 per acre . . L.0 13 4 do. (per ton)
Trussing, 4s per ton L 0 4 0 do.
Marketing, commission,dues and all other expenses L. 0 16 0 do.
Making tho cost 3 3 1 per ton,exclusive of interest on capital.

The cost of growing and making hay differs in various parts of the colony, and we should be glad if any of our readers whose experience does not agree with the above would afford us the means of comparison, by informing us in what respect our figures differ from theirs. But to resume.

On our return from inspecting the corn crops, we passed through the orchard and garden, containing a moderate assortment of healthy trees in very full bearing. Near to this is a reservoir capable of supplying all the stock on the farm for more than a year, should a lengthened drought happen ; it was formed by damming a small creek in which, at the depth of 22 feet, a spring was met with. This creek, by a succession of dams, might be made a highly ornamental object when viewed from the windows of Mr Grant's new house, a fine bluestone
structure in process of erection on the adjoining rise. The stables and barn are commodious : the latter contained an easily worked thrashing machine, by M'Cartney and Drummond, and the bulk of the last year's crop of wheat, a fine sample of white Kent, which had the fortune to be well harvested.

The natural pastures were tenanted by a small herd of Ayrshires, and a second herd were in occupation of similar ground on the other side of the farm. Tho bull we saw and several of the cows were pure bred, and very good specimens of the breed, though rather low in flesh, the Ayrshires being great milkers, and inapt to lay on flesh till they are dried off, after which they rapidly get fat.Their value for the dairy is well known, and we were not, therefore, surprised that all of the dairy cows kept here had more or less of the Ayrshire blood in them. There is, as usual, a favorite old cow, from which most of the herd has sprung ; she is 17 years old, hale and hearty, but thin.

A few good mares were here with their foals one, a half-bred Suffolk, had just dropped a fine foal to Ben Lomond.

In the corner of the paddock, nearest the Deep Creek road, is the National school, on the site presented
by Mr Grant. We were startled to find about sixty scholars assembled, and wondered very much whence so many could have come.

It is amazing that the McNabs were not mentioned. John Grant was married to a McNab lass and both families purchased section 8 Tullamarine (640 acres)from the crown with Grant taking the northern half fronting Grant's Lane (Melway 4H 6-7 to 5 A 7,part 8)and the McNab brothers each having 160 acres,Victoria Bank adjoining Seafield and Oakbank further south (Melway 4 G 9 to 5 part A,parts 9,10.) The McNab Ayrshire herd was famed throughout Australia and formed the basis of the Tasmanian herd. I would not be surprised if the Grant herd originated from the McNabs' Oakbank Annie, the first Ayrshire cow imported into Australia, and the McKerchar herd at Greenvale originated in the same way.(See my MCNAB journal.)

The Seafield River Frontage (Melway 4 F8) comprised the rest of John Grant's 400 acres. The Seafield homestead was being built in 1861. This fact has not been established before. Seafield National School (Melway,bottom of 4 F5)operated from 1859 to 1884 when it and the Wesleyan School were replaced by State School 2613 at the Bulla Rd/ Conders Lane (Link Rd)north corner. It is no mystery where the large number of pupils came from.John Pascoe Fawkner had established a land co-operative settlement on both sides of Mansfields Rd (Melway 4 C 2-4 to G 3-5)circa 1850. This was north west of Seafield. He had done the same on section 7 east of section 8 and such as Joseph Allen (5 B8)would have found the Seafield school much closer than the Wesleyan one (Melway 5 H 12).

John Grant had a claim to fame. It was not as the pioneer of Ayrshires as members of his family later claimed. If this claim was true, John would surely have mentioned it in his 1888 biog.in VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS. But he is credited with growing the first large tract of wheat in Victoria while at Campbellfield, before moving to Tullamarine.


Taking leave of Seafield at this point, we entered on the farm of Mr David Duncan, a level piece of good agricultural land about 470 acres in extent, 332 of which are under the plough and the balance in natural pasturage.There is a fine stretch of wheat, 120 acres all in one piece, looking remarkably even and well,but sown rather later than we would have liked. Of oats intended for seed we inspected forty acres, very good and even ; next to which were forty acres of self-sown, intended for hay,of which we have only to say that they were better than self-sown oats deserve to be. It appeared, however, that they were not intended for a crop, but were considered too good to plough up. There is also a breadth of 120 acres for hay, which as far as the cursory glance we were enabled to give them permitted us to judge, were likely to give an average crop, ex-
cepting the late sown ones ; these must rely solely on the weather during the next two months ; the twelve acres of barley in ear was a capital piece.

Mr Duncan is among the successful exhibitors of horse-stock, both at Melbourne and country shows, and his pasture land contained several fine mares and young stock of various ages.

David Duncan was a joint grantee of section 14 Tullamarine in 1850 but later bought the share of his partner William Thompson. Bulla Rd had cut off 80 acres at the north east corner so that Gowrie Park (unsubdivided) consisted of 560 acres but the northern part,Gowrie Side of about 90 acres was obviously detached from it by 1861 because David only had 470 acres;perhaps Thompson's share of the grant had been the northern 90 acres and the north eastern 80 acres cut off by Bulla Rd. Gowrie Park is west of the airport terminal building and extends north to about Distance Rd. David Duncan was a founder of the Agricultural Society and was highly applauded for his contributions. (See PORT PHILLIP PIONEERS website.) He was also a builder and built the now-demolished Roseneath east of Woodlands Park, Essendon where Big Clarke died and William Salmon lived for many years. (See my DAVID DUNCAN THE BUILDER journal.)


The farm of Mr Dewar adjoins that of Mr D. Duncan ; there is also a farm in the occupation of a brother of Mr
D.'s, the homestead of which is prettily set off by Mr Coghill's forest,its sombre green forming an admirable background and shelter from hot winds.

It was rather stupid of the reporter to use Mr D. as an abbreviation when he was discussing both Mr Duncan and Mr Dewar. William Dewar's Glendewar was across Bulla Rd from Gowrie Park. It was part of Riddell's grant, section 15 Tullamarine, as was the south east corner now containing the original airport terminal,which Riddell sold to John Mansfield (volume 106 folio 595)that was Alan Payne's pig farm Scone when acquired for the airport.

William Dewar was a caretaker for Riddell* before purchasing a large part of it.(volume 46 folio 766.) (*His biog.in VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS.) Glendewar's Bulla road frontage stretched from the bottom of Melway 5 E7 to the middle of 5 B4 and the new homestead built by the Johnsons (after the beautiful Cumberland homestead -Melway 5 C1-was burnt down)was at the junction of the freeway and Melbourne Drive in the top half of 5 D6. William Dewar's original homestead was much nearer the Moonee Ponds Creek.It is not shown on the ordnance map mentioned below but a driveway to nothing,nearly 800 metres long indicates that this bluestone dwelling was near Marker Rd in Melway 5D4.

An army ordnance map reproduced on page 17 of my EARLY LANDOWNERS:PARISH OF TULLAMARINE shows all the farm houses in the area under discussion in the article and far beyond. A driveway left Grants Lane (the southern boundary of Gowrie Park) 693 metres east of McNabs Rd and extended 800 metres due north to a house. At the time (about 2000), I assumed that this was the Gowrie Park homestead but I now notice what seems to be a house only 213 metres north of Grants Rd about 960 east of McNabs Rd and 1280 metres east of Ellis's corner (the bend in Melrose Drive which was the original Bulla Rd/ Grant's Lane corner.)

I now think that the more northerly house was the Gowrie Side homestead occupied by David Duncan's brother and that the one farther east was the Gowrie Park homestead.Thus the Gowrie Park homestead in the bottom left corner of 5 A5 and the Gowrie Side homestead would be near the top right corner of 4 J4.

Just where in Gowrie Park the reporter was standing when he saw Mr D's brother's farm "the homestead of which is prettily set off by Mr Coghill's forest,its sombre green forming an admirable background and shelter from hot winds" is not known. The hot winds would be northerlies so I believe he was at about the site of gate 18 in 4 J5 looking at the Gowrie Side homestead (east of the runway in 4 J4) with Coghill's "Cumberland" forest visible directly behind at 5 A1.



Time, however, prevented our visiting these places,but it may be mentioned that on most soils in that district, the early wheats are irregular; no rain having fallen for so long a time after they were sown, much of the seed perished or came away at uncertain intervals, some even as late as that sown in the spring. The same cause
operated unfavorably on the early sown oats, part of which are in jag whilst others have barely attained six inches in height. There is not, perhaps, much more wheat sown this year than in average seasons, in the district under notice, but there is certainly less hay, much of the land that once bore it being no longer
under cultivation. The larger farms are gradually initiating a reproductive system by increasing the amount of stock, though as yet not to much extent, and we were gratified to observe the importance of root crops beginning to be recognised. But on passing down the Deep Creek Road towards Melbourne, the number of small farms now vacant leads to the inference that such limited holdings do not, at the present price of produce, prove remunerative to the occupant. With proper farming, and attention to minor matters, they might have afforded a living to an industrious man ; but though attempting to cultivate more than can be done well is bad policy, it is equally injudicious and unprofitable to be cramped for room ; both extremes should be avoided.

The smaller farms of about 7 acres,or multiples thereof,would have been too small to allow rotation of crops and much grazing other than for a milking cow,a horse for ploughing, small gardens and orchards etc.,so the soil soon became depleted of minerals. On top of this,lack of farming expertise and the fall-off in passing trade due to the Keilor route, many members of J.P.Fawkner's land cooperative sold their blocks which were absorbed into Oakbank or were consolidated into Love's dairy farm or Spiers' 101 acre farm (later Bill Ellis's "Ecclesfield".)

Nearing Melbourne, and whilst still in the district of Moonee Ponds, many of the fields present one unbroken mass of sorrel, just now in bloom. To these no stronger contrast could be afforded than the beautiful paddock that connects Mr M'Cracken's farm with the road, now perfectly white with the blossoms of Dutch clover.Why, with such an example before them, the owners or occupiers of sorrel paddocks permit them to remain in so unprofitable a state, we cannot conceive. At best, it is very discreditable, and we hope they will take the hint.(P.7,The Age, 24-10-1861.)

As a city slicker, I had no idea what sorrel was. The Wikipedia entry has some good photos and much detail,of which I provide only the following.

Common sorrel or garden sorrel (Rumex acetosa), often simply called sorrel, is a perennial herb in the family Polygonaceae. Other names for sorrel include spinach dock and narrow-leaved dock. It is a common plant in grassland habitats and is cultivated as a garden herb or leaf vegetable (pot herb).

Peter McCracken's farm was "Ardmillan" which fronted Mt Alexander Rd between the lines of Derby St and the Ardmillan Rd/Park St midline. Peter had leased much of today's Gladstone Park from 1846 to 1855 and then leased two thirds of Murphy's grants between Macaulay Rd and Swamp (Dynon) Rd at Kensington to run a dairy farm while his Ardmillan mansion was being built with profits from the family brewery. He moved onto Ardmillan,probably leaving the dairy in the care of Mr Hyslop (Victoria and its Metropolis entry;can't remember his christian name)but poor returns and burnt haystacks etc.forced him to give up the Kensington dairy farm which (with part of Highett's grant fronting the east side of Footscray - now Kensington-Rd) became the Kensington Park Racecourse run by W.S.Cox until 1882 when Murphy's estate was subdivided,forcing a move to Feehan's Farm at Moonee Valley.

Peter was a major shareholder in the private railway between North Melbourne and Essendon,which was in operation by 1861. Therefore the beautiful paddock described was between the railway and Mt Alexander Rd. The railway closed in 1864 due to losses and Peter was forced to sell the majority of Ardmillan to Rev. Puckle's son and the beautiful paddock to Taylor, after whom Taylor St is named.He moved to a heritage listed house in Powlett St (Gipps St corner?),East Melbourne.


DEATH OF JOHN McNAB'S MOTHER.
THE Friends of Mr. JOHN Mc'NAB, farmer, of Tullamarine, are respectively Invited to follow the remains of his late mother to the place of interment,Campbellfield Cemetery, The funeral will leave Tullamarine to-morrow, Friday, at 11 o'clock a.m. (P.8, Argus,26-12-1861.)

Campbellfield cemetery could mean the Will Will Rook cemetery or the even more historic cemetery near the Scots Church in Sydney Rd. In this case it was the former.
Will Will Rook Cemetery - Australian Cemeteries
www.australiancemeteries.com/.../Will%20Will%20Rook%20Broadmead...
Will Will Rook cemetery is located off Camp Road Broadmeadows and is also ... then 2007. Looking towards McNab grave on left and the Camerons on right.


1862.
Dr Candler held an inquest at Essendon yesterday, on the body of a man named James Guthrie. The deceased was a farmer, residing at Tullamarine, with his brother. They had been to Melbourne together on the Monday, and his
brother went home on Monday evening, leaving him in town. From the evidence of a Mr Rocher, who keeps the Farmers' Arms Hotel, Moonee Ponds, it appears that deceased came to his house and stopped there drinking until a late hour in the night, when he called for his horse,which he mounted and rode away. He then appeared capable of taking care of himself. Charles Wooley, a laboring man, found the deceased at half-past six o'clock on Tuesday morning, lying on his face, quite dead, on the Keilor road, near the Lincolnshire Arms, to which place he conveyed him. There were no marks of any struggle having taken place near the spot. The horse belonging to the deceased had gone home, and was found by deceased's brother standing outside the stable door next morning. The jury returned a verdict that deceased had died from extravasation of blood on the brain, probably caused by a fall from off his horse. (P.5,The Age,28-8-1862.)

The Farmers'Arms still stands on the south west corner of Mt Alexander Rd and Buckley St,Essendon but is no longer a hotel. Mr Rocher was probably leasing the hotel from Peter Pitches who started it and is recalled by Pitches St just south of the hotel site. William Chadwick from Broadmeadows Township later ran it for many years before moving to Benalla and building a hotel of the same name which remains,near the station.

The Guthries would have travelled to Glengyle via Keilor Village and today's Borrell St (named after the 1916 Spanish pioneers on Gumm's Corner when the Calder Freeway cut it off) which was originally called Arundel Rd, crossing the river on Bertram's Ford.The Linc. still stands on the same site but is not Tulip Wight's original building. The Woolleys were early pioneers who lived in the area for a long time and I seem to remember George Woolley living in the historic "Laluma". Alexander and James Guthrie were co-grantees of 1022 acres in the parish of Bulla. As Andrew had moved onto Torgarf*just over a fortnight after his brother's death, I presume that the deceased was the co-grantee.

POSTSCRIPT. Andrew Guthrie would have gone to Torgarf (not Glengyle)on the Monday night to give his dairy cows a beauty treatment the next morning so they'd look attractive for the sale of his 65 cows and dairy implements on September 4.Ironically the advertisement and the inquest report were published on the same day! It appears that James was finalising the departure from Glengyle (selling the corn,or Maize? crops etc)while Andrew got Torgarf underway,having already transferred the dairying operation.
M .M'cCAW and ANOTHER have received instructions from A Guthrie, Esq., in consequence of his determination to confine his attention exclusively to sheep farming, to SELL by AUCTION, at Torgarf, near the Constitution Hotel, etc. (P.2, Argus, 28-8-1862.)
The Coopers'Constitution Hotel was across Sunbury Rd from the Lancefield turn off (Dunsford's Track.)


IN the SUPREME COURT of the COLONY of VICTORIA : in Its Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction.-
In the Goods of JAMES GUTHRIE, of Glengyle, in the Parish of Tullamarine, in the County of Bourke, in
the Colony of Victoria, Farmer, Deceased, Intestate -Notlce 1s hereby given, that, after the expiration of
fourteen days after the publication hereof, application will be made to this Honourable Court, In its eclesas-
tlcal jurisdiction, that LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION of all the personal effects whatsoever within the
colony of Victoria, of the above-named deceased, James Guthrie, may be granted and committed to Alexander Guthrie, of Torgart*, near Sunbury, in the county of Bourke, in the colony of Victoria, brother and next of kin to the said deceased.
Dated this 10th day of September, D 1862. MACGREGOR acd HENDERSON, 67 Little Collins street west, Melbourne, proctors for the above named Alexander Guthrie. (P.7, Argus, 16-9-1862.)

1863.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 3 January 1863 p 4 Family Notices
BIRTHS. BROWNE.-On tho 1st inst., at Camp Hill, Tullamarine, Mrs. H. J.Browne of a daughter.
Hugh Junor Browne was an early member of the Broadmeadows Road Board but resigned in 1864 or 1865 while serving a term as chairman, along with James Maconochie of Stewarton (northern 777 acres of Gladstone Park)and John Bethell of Broadmeadows Township. (P.55, BROADMEADOWS:A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.)Andrew Lemon can be forgiven for giving his surname as Brown (as it was written in the rate book!)

A letter from Hugh Browne, who said much the same as his neighbour to the north (Edmund Dunn of Viewpoint) about the Melbourne Hunt's disregard for farmers' fences and crops has been included in my journal DON'T YOU DARE MELBOURNE HUNT.

I'm guessing the baby was named Pattie and was the subject of one of a series of articles entitled WOMEN WHO HAVE HELPED TO MAKE AUSTRALIA. Good guess?
Deakin, Elizabeth Martha Anne - National Library of Australia
nla.gov.au/nla.party-728060
At age 19 in 1882 Pattie Browne married Alfred Deakin who became the ... Pattie Browne was born at Camp Hill, Tullamarine Victoria on 1st January 1863. ... In 1912 Pattie was invited to be president of the Lyceum Club, a new club for women



Glenn and Guthrie farming on Camp Hill. (Assessment in Broadmeadows rates.) The name of Robert Glenn's partner cannot be recalled at the moment but it was not Alexander and James (the Glengyle farmers); Glenn's partner's brother was W.J.Guthrie,as revealed in a progress report re the insolvency of Robert Glenn.

I.W.Symonds (BULLA BULLA) or Grant Aldous (THE SHIRE THAT TOOK OFF- unpublished manuscript perused at the Sam Merrifield Library)stated that Gilbert Alston conducted his trade at Tullamarine before becoming a Bulla pioneer.This advertisement confirms the claim. I wonder if his nephew, William Alston and young Gilbert (who became early Mornington blackmiths in partnership*) started their apprenticeships with Gilbert at Tullamarine or Bulla. (*THE BUTCHER THE BAKER THE by Bruce Bennett.) See the ALSTON entry in my DICTIONARY HISTORY OF BULLA journal for extensive information.

WANTED, an APPRENTlCE, or improver, to the wheelwright business. Apply to Gllbert Alston, Tullamarine.
(P.1,Argus, 11-7-1863.)

1864.
DAVID DUNCAN'S DEATH. The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 17 December 1864 p 8 Family Notices
... -park, Tullamarine, are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of interment in the Melbourne ...

1865.
William Love showed little love to Thomas Anderson whom he assaulted. William Love had a wedge shaped parcel of land on the west side of Victoria St which separated Charles Nash's Fairview from William Dewar's Glendewar and I believe that Thomas Anderson's land (assessed by Broadmeadows Road Board) was south of Fairview. The following record comes from Sue O'Neill and Angela Evans' "Selected Keilor Court records."
Keilor Court records - Freepages - Ancestry.com
freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~pobjoyoneill/.../keilcourt.h...
(found in a google search.)

ANDERSON, THOMAS LOVE, WILLIAM ASSAULTING THE COMP. BY STRIKING HIS HEAD AGAINST THE GROUND. 07 FEB 1865. DAMAGES 10/- COSTS 2.2 IMMEDIATE PAYMENT.

Not many Tullamarine residents seem to have appeared at the Keilor court but the LOVE AFFAIR continued with William Love accusing Thomas Anderson of hitting him with a spade. The charge was dismissed.

LOVE, WILLIAM ANDERSON, THOMAS ASSAULTING COMPLAINANT WITH A SPADE AT TULLAMARINE ON 28 JAN 1865. 07 FEB 1865 DISMISSED

INSOLVENT COURT. Saturday, 11th March. (Before the Chief Commissioner.) SPECIAL EXAMINATION MEETING.
The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Monday 13 March 1865 p 6 Article
... . IN RE ROBERT GLENN.The insolvent, who had been a farmer at Camp Hill, Tullamarine, was examined by ...

EXTRACT ONLY. He (Robert Glenn)affirmed his inability to tell the whereabouts of his partner, who had gone off he knew not whither. The wife of the insolvent was then called, and admitted that, on the occasion mentioned, she gave a book and a number of papers to a man named Guthrie, who was working in the garden, to keep them for
her. She was corroborated by Guthrie.

Broadmeadows' ratebook of 1863 had assessments for Hugh Junor Browne and for Glenn and Guthrie on Camp Hill. While researching Alex Guthrie and his brother,firstly on Glengyle (section 1 Tullamarine) and later near Sunbury,I thought that the Guthrie on Camp Hill might have been one of those two brothers but he wasn't. He might have been a third brother or totally unrelated. Robert Glenn said that he didn't know the whereabouts of his partner, whose brother W.J.Guthrie was the man working in the garden and who testified in court.

At first I thought that Glenn and Guthrie would have been on the part of Camp Hill between Bulla and Broadmeadows Rd later known as Mansfield's triangle but then realised that being Broadmeadows ratepayers they would have to be between Bulla Rd and the Moonee Ponds Creek.


1866.
The Hendry family had probably taken over Alexander Train's store and it was to be the polling place in Tullamarine for the South Province election. The polling places in Bulla was the common school (by 1866 in School Lane, I believe)and in Broadmeadows Township the Church of England School (on the site of the present Westmeadows Primary School, having earlier been on Mr Raleigh's farm and then in St Paul's if I remember the school's history correctly.) Keilor's was in the court house,now better known as the old shire hall.


Mrs. Hendry's store, Tullamarine. (P.8, Argus,1-10-1866.)

1867.
Campbellfield Cemetery was the Will Will Rook Cemetery in this case too.
THE Friends of Mr. JOHN GRANT, of Seafield, Tullamarine, are respectfully invited to follow the remains of his late daughter Mary Christina, to the place of interment, Campbellfield Cemetery. The funeral will leave his residence, Seafield, tomorrow (Tuesday), October 8, at 11 o'clock a.m.HENRY ALLISON, undertaker, Victoria-street west, Melbourne. (P.8, Argus,7-10-1867.)

1868.
See comment 9 re Richard Mitchell's insolvency and Tullamarine residents paying rates to the Broadmeadows Road Board in 1863.

15 comment(s), latest 1 month, 3 weeks ago

THE WEBSTER FAMILY OF SORRENTO, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

PRIVATE MESSAGE TO ITELLYA.
William Webster jumped ship (Genghis Khan) in 1853, somewhere in Port Phillip - maybe near to Sorrento, and then established himself in Sorrento eventually as a builder. He is our ggg grandfather. He married Catherine Condon in Melbourne in 1857 and together they raised their family in Sorrento. There are a few landmarks named after William webster but we would like to follow up more about his life in that area until he died in 1928. Any help would be appreciated. Rae (Surname supplied.)

P.156,LIME LAND LEISURE (C.N.Hollinshed-available for loan from Rosebud Library.)
William Webster deserted with five other crewmen in 1853 near the Quarantine Station.

UNCONFIRMED MEMORY
Lime Land Leisure or Rye Primary School 1667 by Patricia Appleton,most likely the former. I believe I remember a mention of William Webster snoozing in the Sullivans' lime kiln south of the present Browns Rd/Weeroona St intersection. I don't think he was badly burnt. FIND!!!!!!!!!!!!

FOUND!!! My memory's a bit tangled isn't it?
Webster, William 134
falls into lime kiln and is nearly killed 53, 156
works at Edward Russells lime kiln 147
(Index to Charles . Hollinshed, ECF Bird and oel Goss's Lime ...
www.anzsi.org/UserFiles/file/Index%20Series%207.pdf)

The only harvest from 422 results in a "Webster,Sorrento" google search has been posted in comments. By the way,the Williamsons mentioned in the Flinders Heritage Study (Sorrento area) might have been Webster relatives.



SORRENTO, MONDAY.
Dr. Rowan, of the Melbourne Lying-in Hospital, is attending a family named Webster, the members of which are laid up with scarlet fever. Two are convalescent, four are seriously ill, and two are unaffected. The cottage is quite isolated, being over a mile from the township. All communication with it has been prohibited.
(P.5, Argus, 7-12-1875.)

SORRENTO, Tuesday.
No other case of scarlet fever has occurred. Dr. Rowan reports the Webster children to be very much better. All danger is past.(P.5, Argus, 8-12-1875.)

TO LET, Sorrento, six roomed COTTAGE, close to baths, splendid bay view. Apply W Webster,Sorrento.
(P.8, Argus, 12-3-1878.)

WEBSTER, SORRENTO,VICTORIA,ARTICLE SEARCH.
W. Webster, Sorrento dayman, applying for leave of absence.-14 days, granted. (Flinders and Kangerong Shire Council. (CORRESPONDENCE.)Mornington Standard (Frankston, Vic. : 1911 - 1920) Saturday 4 May 1912 p 2 Article.)

Public Works, re council's application for wire netting.-The Secretary stated all preliminary action had been taken ; the netting would soon now be available. The following were appointed to receive the netting and
hand over to applicants, Messrs Lamble (Bittern), Wilding (Flinders), Webster (Sorrento), and J. Clydesdale (Dromana): (Flinders and Kangerong Shire Council.
Mornington and Dromana Standard (Vic. : 1908 - 1911) Saturday 5 June 1909 p 3 Article.)

ACCUSED BUT THE JUDGE DIDN'T BELIEVE IT!
(IN DIVORCE. Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1857 - 1918) Tuesday 7 August 1906 p 4 Article.)
(CURIOUS DIVORCE CASE. Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918) Tuesday 7 August 1906 p 8 Article.)
(The Prahran Telegraph (Vic. : 1889 - 1909; 1914 - 1918) Saturday 12 November 1904 p 3 Article.)

From Mr. Webster, asking council's permission to remove a sandhill in front of his house at Sorrento. Carried.
(COUNCIL NEWS. FLINDERS AND KANGERONG SHIRE COUNCIL.
Mornington Standard (Vic. : 1889 - 1908) Thursday 4 June 1896 p 3 Article.)

Miss Judith Armstrong will spend the Christmas holidays as the guest of her fiance's parents, Mr and Mrs Webster, at Sorrento. (Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939) Thursday 15 December 1938 p 33 Article Illustrated.)

RESUME FROM PAGE 6 OF RESULTS. Search continued to P.12 of results,then for 1880-9 and 1990-9 with no results.

CORRESPONDENCE. From W. Webster, resigning position as Inspector of Nuisances at Sorrento. Accepted.
(Flinders and Kangerong Shire Council. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30th.
Mornington Standard (Vic. : 1889 - 1908) Saturday 7 December 1907 p 3 Article)

Next article chronologically.
SORRENTO-At a well attended annual meeting of the Sorrento Progress Association on Thursday, the following office bearers were elected:
-President, Mr Walter Stringer; treasurer, Mr.A. Webster; secretary, Mr McKiernan; vice presidents.-, Councillor Macfarlan Messrs. C. Pope and Ploog; committee Dr Brown, Messrs. Hurr,Robins, Moffat, Tayton, Redman and Spunner -
Tenders for building the Soldiers' Hall will shortly be called.
(The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Monday 3 September 1923 p 15 Article)
N.B. Family noticesshoe that A. Webster was neither a son of William Webster nor William Webster Junior.

No more articles for the decade.


WEBSTER.-On the 22nd April, at Sorrento, Catherine, beloved wife of William Webster,snr., beloved mother of Mrs. Watson, Mrs. Priest,Mrs. Eldred, Mrs. Hastings, William, and Mrs.Williamson, aged 78 years.
(P.1, Argus,25-4-1916.)

WEBSTER.-On the 11th August, at his daughter's residence, 14 Rooding street, North Brighton, William, beloved husband of the late Catherine Webster, and loving father of Annie(deceased), Margaret Watson (deceased), Ellen
(Mrs. Priest), Catherine (Mrs. Eldred), Mary Jane (Mrs. Hastings), William, Caroline (Mrs.Williamson), late of Sorrento, aged 96 years. R.I.P. (P.1, Argus, 15-8-1928.)

WILLIAMSON.-On the 17th November, Caroline Edith, beloved wife of George Williamson,Clinton, Sorrento, and loved sister of Annie (deceased), Margaret (Mrs. Watson, deceased), Ellen (Mrs. Priest),- Katie (Mrs. Eldred), Jinnie (Mrs. Hastings), William Webster. R.I.P.

WILLIAMSON.-On the 17th November. Caroline Edith, beloved daughter of the late William and Catherine Webster, of Sorrento, and devoted sister of William and Jinnie Hastings, Fitzroy street, St, Kilda. R.I.P.
(P.13, Argus, 24-11-1928.)

WEBSTER - In sad and loving memory of my dear father, William, passed away August 11,1928, also my dear mother, Catherine, April 22,1916, late of Sorrento - R.I.P. (Inserted by their loving daughter, Jinnie Hastings, St Kilda.) (P.1, Argus, 11-8-1932.)

The following would be the son of William and Catherine. (See Rae's information.)
WEBSTER. - On March 5, at Sorrento, William, beloved husband of the late Margaret, and loving father of Dorothy (Mrs. Paul). Alicia (Mrs. Woods), and Edna (Mrs.White). -R.I.P. (P.2,Argus, 6-3-1946.)

WEBSTER.-The Funeral of the late Mr.WILLIAM WEBSTER will leave his residence,St. Paul's Road, Sorrento. THIS DAY (Wednesday), at 2.30 p.m., for the Sorrento Cemetery. CHAS. MORGAN. Sorrento. Phone 15.
(Argus,6-3-1946: digitisation with page 2, notice on page 18.)

The wonderful Muzza of McCrae has recorded so much of the peninsula's heritage with his photography.
Attanagh (2010). This was built in 1896, for William Webster, who was for many years the Crown Land Bailiff at Sorrento Back Beach. (The photo of Attanagh is the 7th in the top row.)
(Sorrento Photos | Lets Book Hotel
www.letsbookhotel.com Australia Photos)

Attanagh was obviously built for Willam Webster Junior whose 1946 funeral left from his St Paul's Rd residence.
Attanagh is at 60 St Pauls Rd.

60 St Pauls Road SORRENTO (Photos.)

Property Summary Features:
3 beds, 1 bath

Property Summary
Price:
$850,000 - $915,000
Property type:
House
Suburb:
SORRENTO (profile)
Region:
Melbourne Region

Attanagh - A Gorgeous Sorrento Coastal Cottage
Built in 1896 this pretty, refurbished and extended fisherman's cottage is perfectly located only 670m from the bay beach and just 4 blocks to Sorrento village.

The perfect character family beach house situated on a huge, level 1068sqm approximately, the home comprises 3 bedrooms, a cosy lounge with mantle and open fireplace, sitting room with second fireplace and a sunny living room extension opening through bi-fold doors onto a large north west facing deck area. With high baltic ceilings and a charm that only a true period Sorrento beach house can harbour, there's an attractive country eat-in kitchen, a central bathroom, separate toilet and a laundry.

Boasting a fully useable and rare grassy allotment of 1068SQM approximately, the opportunity exists to move in and enjoy this wonderfully comfortable beach escape as is, further extend, or even rebuild in this prime location. Plus your morning cappuccino and paper awaits at the St Paul's General Store...simply perfect!
(60 St Pauls Road, Sorrento - Real Estate for Sale ...
www.reviewproperty.com.au ... VIC Melbourne Region Sorrento
With high baltic ceilings and a charm that only a true period Sorrento beach house can harbour, there's an ... Attanagh - A Gorgeous Sorrento Coastal Cottage.)

KILVENNY (see comments) the house built by William Webster Snr in the 1850's does seem to be the core of the present dwelling. The text accompanying Muzza's photo says that Kilvenny was built in the 1920's but "extended" would seem to be a more appropriate verb, judging from the roof lines. This was almost certainly the dwelling that William leased out during the season in the 1870's. Like many other families, his family probably moved into a fairly basic shack for the season in order to boost finances. I can only presume from the google location that Webster's Corner was the corner of Pt Nepean Rd and St Paul's Rd. (No need to presume; I should have looked at Melway first! See 157 C 8.)

4 comment(s), latest 1 month, 2 weeks ago

CATHOLICS IN MELBOURNE'S NORTH WEST AND ST. AUGUSTINE'S, KEILOR. (VIC., AUST.)

If information is required about Catholic pioneers near Bulla, the place to look is Kathleen Fanning's website about the Fanning family. A "Fanning,Bulla" search brought several results including:

Irish Settlement at Bulla Victoria Australia | Fanning Family ...
www.fanningfamilyhistory.com/irish-settlement-bulla-victoria

It is likely that many of the Irish pioneers had first tried their luck at the diggings. The Daniel family of "Narbonne" near Daniels Rd (Melway 177 K6)hosted many new chums before they set off for the diggings. Mrs Daniel
was a widow and shrewdly explained to her guests that they'd need to build up their muscles by practising the art of digging. "Narbonne " was highly cultivated!

In researching Bulla pioneers,I came across this website, which gives fantastic information about Irish pioneers from Footscray to the Sunbury and Broadmeadows areas (even Portland)BUT HAS A DANGEROUS FLAW.

KEILOR BAPTISMS - Freepages - Ancestry.com
freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/.../Keilor/KEILBAPT.htm

Many of the Irish diggers, after the alluvial gold had been found, did not have the resources to sink shafts, so they would have trekked towards Melbourne with empty bellies looking for employment. This time,in 1858-9, they were in luck. The Mt Alexander (Castlemaine)and Murray River railway was in construction and the workforce was largely comprised of their countrymen. So they would have found work pushing the line through the parish of Holden (Diggers Rest), Keilor Road Station (Sydenham) and on to Sunbury.

St Augustine's Keilor was started a few years before this time by local Catholics. Connor and Phelan were spirit merchants who received the grant for Spring Park,just east of the A.J.Davis Reserve on Keilor Rd and Connor was also granted much of "Keilor Binn Farm" which was part of the Doutta Galla portion of Keilor Township. Connor bought the rest of this farm but lost it to Hugh Glass by 1868. Keilor publican,Matthew Goudie,later came into possession and when his daughter married John Dodd who became owner,she insisted that it be called "Brimbank".

George Dodd, another trustee of the St Augustine's site, was originally a quarryman so he was well qualified to oversee construction. The related Dodds and Delaheys occupied land between North Pole (Milleara)Road and the river, including the part of today's Brimbank Park south of the E-W high tension power line.

When construction of the railway began, the number of worshippers increased dramatically! This fact has been overlooked in the following article but was emphasised in one of the Keilor centenary souvenirs.

About St Augustine's St Augustine's 150th Anniversary
staugustines150th.com/about-st-augustines/

The history of St Augustine's Catholic Church in Keilor is as old as Keilor itself even older!
St Augustine's Church Keilor 1863-2013.JPG (photo.)
Both Keilor and St Augustine's celebrate their 150th anniversary in 2013; but for the genesis of St Augustine's Church we need to go back even further.

A large proportion of the population in the area now known as Keilor were Irish Catholics, and as they settled down to a life far from their homeland and loved ones, they sought spiritual as well as physical comfort. Thus it was that the first Parish Priest, Father Matthew Downing, came to Keilor in July 1854 to set up the Keilor Mission. Matthew Downing was born in County Kerry in 1810, was ordained in 1837, and spent time in Italy and Ireland before coming to Hobart in January 1849 to serve as a penal chaplain. Much of his time there was spent at the convict prison in Port Arthur. By August 1852 he had moved to Victoria and in November 1852 the goldfields of Ballarat, where he remained until July 1854, when he came to Keilor.

The new Keilor Mission initially took in Flemington, Moonee Ponds, Essendon, Broadmeadows, Keilor, Sunbury, Mickleham and Darraweit Guim, and was then joined by Bulla Bulla in February 1855.

In those days Father Downing celebrated Mass in a number of venues, but it was his vision to build a Church at Keilor in honour of St Augustine, the patron saint of his order. In January 1855, five trustees of the Keilor Church Reserve were approved Father Downing, Bishop James Goold (first bishop of Melbourne), Patrick Phelan, Owen Connor and George Dodd (who became a key person in the development not only of the Church but of the Keilor area in general).

Building work commenced in 1857, with Mr Dodd appointed Foreman of Works.

The bluestone for the Church was quarried locally, but construction was slow, in part due to financial recession in the times, but also due to the lack of labour (as many men were attracted to the goldfields at Ballarat, Bendigo and Castlemaine).

It would take six long years before St Augustine's was finally completed.

By then Father Downing had transferred to Williamstown, to be succeeded by Father Patrick Madden and then Father James Moore. Father Moore was in residence when the Church was finally completed and on Sunday, 15 November 1863 St Augustine's Church was opened and blessed by Bishop Goold.

WHAT IS THE FLAW IN THE ST.AUGUSTINE'S BAPTISMAL REGISTER?
It was not until I looked at the Crotty entries that I realised why the Register didn't make sense. The columns are headed:
SURNAME; CHILD; D.O.B.; FATHER; MOTHER; CHRISTENING DATE; RESIDED

The Crotty entries read:
CROTTY JAMES MAURICE 11.08.1864 MAURICE McCORMICK, MARY 19.09.1864 KEILOR

CROTTY MARY 15.08.1866 MAURICE McCORMACK, MARY 16.09.1866 KEILOR

CROTTY MICHAEL PATRICK 17.11.1861 MAURICE McCORMACK, MARY 06.12.1861 KEILOR

The flaw is that the father is given the maiden name of the mother. This probably applies to all entries.
The last Crotty entry should read:
CROTTY, Michael Patrick; 17-11-1861; Maurice; Mary (nee McCormack); 6-12-1861; Keilor.


Maurice Crotty worked on the Brannigans' "St John's Hill" at Melway 384 J5 when he came to Australia. The McCormacks had fled Tasmania because they were wanted for smuggling in Catholic priests. They leased a 44 acre farm between the east end of Annandale Rd and an eastern extension of Sharps Rd (the DouttaGalla /Tullamarine parish boundary.) One of the McCormack boys was involved in the hanging of an aborigine at Keilor bridge and fled to Corryong to escape reprisal. His sister, Mary, who had married Maurice Crotty and moved onto The Springs,just across Fosters Rd(now Keilor Park Drive)in 1860 knew of a revenge plan so she made haste to Corryong and, bravely placing her body between her brother and the aborigines,persuaded them to spare his life.
(SOURCES: VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS, Joe Crotty and his nephew, Glenn (Cotchen?), Mary Crotty's diary.)
See my FOSTER, SHARP, CROTTY journal for further details.

Although the Brannigans and Maurice Crotty probably attended Mass as "Narbonne",it is likely that this did not occur every week and that Maurice Crotty and Mary McCormack had first met at St Augustines.

JUST REMEMBER
the surname of the father is the same as that of the child and the surname following the father's given name is actually the mother's maiden name.

1 comment(s), latest 2 months, 3 weeks ago

ROLL OF HONOUR FOR RED HILL NEAR DROMANA, VIC., AUST.

Red Hill Community Action Inc - Can You Help?
www.redhillcommunityaction.com/
Requesting public involvement in providing names of servicemen and women for a war memorial in Red Hill, we need a Secretary and Public Officer.

Sheila Skidmore's THE RED HILL has much information about Red Hill lads that enlisted in World War 1 on page 49. Charles Trewin was the first to enlist but was living in Chiltern at the time. An original Anzac,he returned with the rank of Sergeant. William and Joseph McIlroy also enlisted elsewhere. The first to enlist locally was Will. Hind whose family had a farm at Merricks. {The surname is written as Hinds in ratebooks if I remember correctly and I have written quite a bit about the family and the farm, most likely in relation to John Shand or John Huntley as much of the information was supplied by Bill Huntley. I think the farm was called "Seven Oaks Farm" being part of the old "Seven Oaks" (79A Balnarring)and bounded by Junction Rd, the new part of Bittern-Dromana Rd from Junction Corner and Craig Avon Lane, which was the old course (Melway 161,parts of H-J 11.) J.Hinds was granted 80C, Balnarring of 17 acres 1 rood 34 perches on 14-9-1916 (north-west sixth of 161 H-J9.)} Will Hind(s?)died from a throat infection just prior to his unit going into action in Egypt. The first locally born lads to enlist,in mid 1915, were cousins Richard and Herb. McIlroy. Herb lost a foot. Sheila lists 17 others who enlisted, with great detail regarding injuries etc. I'm not sure whether Dave Barker from Main Creek was related to the Barkers of Cape Schanck and Boneo or the family of William Henry Blakeley's wife. Helen Blakeley might know. Thelma Littlejohn,Bill Huntley and Barry Wright of Balnarring (who is writing a history of "Wildwood") might have anecdotal information about those who served; I have their contact details.
Details about most of those who enlisted should be found in the A.I.F. PROJECT.

Let's see what trove can tell us.

HINDS.-Died in hospital at Heliopolis, Egypt,Private William Hamilton Hinds (Willie), second son of James and Elizabeth Hinds, "Seven Oaks," Red Hill (late of Somerville), and grandson of Robert Hinds, Blrregurra, aged 20. Duty nobly done. (P.61,The Australasian, 30-10-1915.)

Mr W. J. McIlroy, of "Red Hill", Dromana, a staunch methodist, is the father of a fine quartette of fighting
sons at the front. The Rev. Joseph McIlroy, who was a minister of the Clifton Hill Methodist Circuit, before he enlisted, is with the Army Medical Corps in France.- His brother, Mr William McIlroy is in camp at Claremont, Tasmania, and is a student for the Presbyterian ministry, and has finished his home mission course.
Sergeant Robert Mcllroy and Private Richard McIlroy are in the Infantry in France. (Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Thursday 27 July 1916 p 2 Article.)

See pages 17-22 of Sheila's book re Joseph McIlroy's diary.

T.Counsel of Dromana could be considered a resident of the Red Hill district if the family was living on 21A Kangerong west of Forest Lodge,granted to C.Counsel on 27-6-1876 but this does not seem to be confirmed by 1900 and 1910 rate records. T.Counsel is not listed in the A.I.F. project. He is listed on the following.
31 Oct 1918 - VICTORIAN CASUALTIES. List No. 438 Issued.
P.6,Argus,31-10-1918.
RAMSAY, J. T. Mathoura, NSW, 31/8/18, RICE, T h Chillingollah, 2/0/18. ... Vi J Cork fngland (2nd occ gas) T Counsel, Dromana J T Coieiitn, Diamond Creek.

EMMOTT.Killed in action April 15, 1918, Sgt. Robert Emmott, son of Mrs. Emmott, Red Hill, Dromana, dear mate on Gallipoli and France of L.-Cpl. George V. Carter, Lake Meran, killed in action December 24, 1917.
(P.1, Argus,7-5-1918.)

EMMOTT.-Officially reported killed in action 15th April, in France, the beloved son of Alphina and the late J. S. Emmott, Red Hill, and beloved brother of J. S. Emmott and E.J. Emmott, of Inglewood, Grace, Mrs. Nicholson, Mrs. J. Morgan, Crystal, and Jim, aged 21 years. (P.11, Argus, 11-5-1918.)

1919-20 rates. Mrs.A.Emmott,5 1/2acres and building part crown allotment 9. This was possibly part of the old Red Hill township near the post office and across White Hill Rd from McIlroys Rd.

MORE TO COME UNLESS THE GREMLINS STRIKE AGAIN. SLOW WORK WADING THROUGH CLIFTON/PYRAMID/ BROKEN HILL RESULTS!

"RED HILL, VICTORIA,A.I.F.PROJECT" SEARCH.

McILROY, Robert - The AIF Project
https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=199112
Regimental number, 1791. Place of birth, Red Hill, Mornington, Victoria. School, Red Hill No 1301 State School, Victoria. Religion, Methodist. Occupation ...

8th Battalion, 12th Reinforcement - The AIF Project
https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showUnit?unitCode=INF8REIN12
3707, BURROWS, Henry George, Pyramid Hill, Victoria. 3971, CARRUTHERS, Henry .... Herbert, Red Hill, Victoria. 3863, McILROY, Richard, Red Hill, Victoria.

Allan, David Thomson - The War Graves Photographic Project
www.twgpp.org/information.php?id=1468959
Unit: 14th Bn.Australian Infantry, A.I.F. ... in action 08/08/15 Age 22 40 Son of George and Isabella Somerville Allan, of Craig Avon, Red Hill, Victoria, Australia.

Craig Avon was 80A Balnarring,across Craig Avon Lane from Hinds' "Seven Oaks Farm."

SEARCH FOR THOSE ON SHEILA'S LIST IN THE A.I.F.PROJECT.

Charles Lester Gordon TREWIN
Regimental number 532
Religion Presbyterian
Occupation Police Constable
Address Red Hill, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 26
Next of kin Father, Trewin, Red Hill PO, near Dromana, Victoria
Enlistment date 5 September 1914
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 4th Light Horse Regiment, C Squadron
AWM Embarkation Roll number 10/9/1
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board Transport A18 Wiltshire on 19 October 1914
Regimental number from Nominal Roll Commissioned
Rank from Nominal Roll Captain
Unit from Nominal Roll 4th Light Horse Regiment
Fate Returned to Australia 15 January 1919

William McILROY
Regimental number 16284
Religion Presbyterian
Occupation Presbyterian minister
Address Derby, Tasmania
Marital status Married
Age at embarkation 35
Next of kin Wife, Mrs M C McIlroy, Derby, Tasmania
Enlistment date 7 April 1916
Date of enlistment from Nominal Roll 19 February 1916
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name November 1916 Reinforcements
AWM Embarkation Roll number 26/99/2
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Fremantle, Western Australia, on board HMAT A34 Persic on 29 December 1916
Rank from Nominal Roll Private
Unit from Nominal Roll 3rd Field Ambulance
Fate Returned to Australia 28 February 1919

This would have to be the William McIlroy mentioned in the article about W.J.McIlroy's family where William was training for the Presbyterian ministry and was in camp in Claremont, Tasmania.

Joseph McILROY
Regimental number 15155
Religion Methodist
Occupation Methodist minister
Address Northcote, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 24
Next of kin Father, W J McIlroy, Red Hill via Mornington, Victoria
Enlistment date 23 November 1915
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 14th Australian General Hospital
AWM Embarkation Roll number 26/101/1
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A67 Orsova on 29 July 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A28 Miltiades on 1 August 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Adelaide, South Australia, on board HMAT A70 Ballarat on 12 August 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board RMS Orontes on 16 August 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A63 Karoola on 19 August 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A18 Wiltshire on 22 August 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Fremantle, Western Australia, on board RMS Mooltan on 28 August 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board RMS Kashgar on 2 September 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board RMS Kashgar on 5 September 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A1 Kymettus on 12 September 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A25 Anglo Egyptian on 19 September 1916
Rank from Nominal Roll Private
Fate Returned to Australia 22 January 1917
Miscellaneous details (Nominal Roll) 14th Australian General Hospital

William Hamilton HINDS
Regimental number 1555
Place of birth Warncoort,Birregurra, Victoria
School State School, Victoria
Religion Presbyterian
Occupation Orchardist
Address Red Hill, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 20
Height 5' 7.25"
Weight 136 lbs
Next of kin Father, J Hinds, Red Hill, Victoria
Previous military service Nil (exempt area under Compulsory Military Service scheme)
Enlistment date 24 June 1915
Place of enlistment Melbourne, Victoria
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 22nd Battalion, 1st Reinforcement
AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/39/2
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A35 Berrima on 28 June 1915
Rank from Nominal Roll Private
Unit from Nominal Roll 22nd Battalion
Other details from Roll of Honour Circular 'He was the first Volunteer for this district and his good example was the means of gaining many recruits.' (Details from father)
Fate Died of disease 14 October 1915
Place of death or wounding Heliopolis, Egypt
Age at death 20
Age at death from cemetery records 20
Place of burial Cairo War Memorial Cemetery (Row D, Grave No. 132), Egypt
Panel number, Roll of Honour,
Australian War Memorial 96
Miscellaneous information from
cemetery records Parents: James and Elizabeth HINDS, Severn Oaks, Redhill, Victoria
Family/military connections Cousin: 622 Gunner William Sydney HINDS, 8th Bn, killed in action, 4 October 1917.
Other details
War service: Egypt, Gallipoli

Admitted to 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station, Anzac, 2 October 1915 (tonsilitis); transferred to HS 'Maheno', 2 October 1915 (dipteria), and transferred to No 1 Australian General Hospital, Heliopolis, 14 October 1915 (septic throat).

Died of diptheria, Choubra Hospital, Cairo, 14 October 1915.

Medals: 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal
Sources NAA: B2455, HINDS William Hamilton

Richard McILROY
Regimental number 3863
Religion Methodist
Occupation Orchardist
Address Red Hill, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 19
Next of kin Mother, Mrs W J McIlroy, Red Hill, Victoria
Enlistment date 6 July 1915
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 8th Battalion, 12th Reinforcement
AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/25/4
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Adelaide, South Australia, on board HMAT A40 Ceramic on 23 November 1915
Rank from Nominal Roll Private
Fate Returned to Australia 19 February 1919
Miscellaneous details (Nominal Roll) 59th Bn

Herbert McILROY
Regimental number 3862
Religion Methodist
Occupation Farmer
Address Red Hill, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 28
Next of kin Father, J McIlroy, Red Hill, Victoria
Enlistment date 6 July 1915
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 8th Battalion, 12th Reinforcement
AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/25/4
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Adelaide, South Australia, on board HMAT A40 Ceramic on 23 November 1915
Rank from Nominal Roll Private
Fate Returned to Australia 10 July 1917
Miscellaneous details (Nominal Roll) 58th Bn

Robert McILROY
Regimental number 1791
Place of birth Red Hill, Mornington, Victoria
School Red Hill No 1301 State School, Victoria
Religion Methodist
Occupation Gardener
Address Box 15, Frankston, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 32
Height 5' 6"
Weight 166 lbs
Next of kin Father, William J McIlroy, Red Hill, Mornington, Victoria
Previous military service Nil
Enlistment date 7 October 1915
Place of enlistment Melbourne, Victoria
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 58th Battalion, 2nd Reinforcement
AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/75/3
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A14 Euripides on 4 April 1916
Unit from Nominal Roll 59th Battalion
Fate Died of wounds 21 July 1916
Place of death or wounding Fleurbaix, France (Battle of Fromelles)
Age at death 33
Age at death from cemetery records 33
Place of burial Estaires Communal Cemetery (Plot III, Row B, Grave No. 30), France
Panel number, Roll of Honour,
Australian War Memorial 168
Miscellaneous information from
cemetery records Parents: William and Elizabeth MCILROY, Red Hill, Mornington, Victoria
Other details
War service: Egypt, Western Front

Taken on strength, 59th Bn, Ferry Post, 24 May 1916, and reverted to the ranks.

Embarked Alexandria to join the British Expeditionary Force, 18 June 1916; disembarked Marseilles, France, 29 June 1916.

Wounded in action, 20 July 1916 (gun shot wound, hip); admitted to No 1 Australian Casualty Clearing Station, 20 July 1916.

Died of wounds, 21 July 1916.

Medals: British War Medal, Victory Medal
Sources NAA: B2455, McILROY Robert

Sidney Harold SHEEHAN
Regimental number 34191
Religion Church of England
Occupation Orchardist
Address Halycon, Red Hill, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 19
Next of kin Father, John Sheehan, Halycon, Red Hill, Victoria
Enlistment date 3 January 1917
Rank on enlistment Driver
Unit name Field Artillery Brigade, March 1917 Reinforcements
AWM Embarkation Roll number 13/128/1
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A74 Marathon on 10 May 1917
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A11 Ascanius on 11 May 1917
Rank from Nominal Roll Driver
Unit from Nominal Roll 7th Field Artillery Brigade
Fate Returned to Australia 3 July 1919

Walter James Thomas CHAMPION
Regimental number 2844
Religion Church of England
Occupation Orchardist
Address Corner of Norwood and Camberwell Roads, Burwood, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 20
Next of kin Father, Walter Champion, Corner of Norwood and Camberwell Roads, Burwood, Victoria
Enlistment date 27 June 1916
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 2nd Pioneer Battalion, Reinforcement 6
AWM Embarkation Roll number 14/14/4
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A17 Port Lincoln on 20 October 1916
Rank from Nominal Roll Private
Unit from Nominal Roll 2nd Pioneer Battalion
Fate Returned to Australia 3 March 1919

There were only two Walter Champions, one from Queensland and the above one from Burwood. The Eastern suburbs had many orchardists so like the unfortunate Charles Thiele (killed on Eaton's Cutting Road and probably a descendant of the pioneer of the Doncaster district), Walter may have moved to Red Hill, perhaps to the Village Settlement.

Jack Hayden GIBSON ??????
Regimental number 4276
Religion Church of England
Occupation Farm hand
Address Quairading, Western Australia
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 18
Next of kin Father, J A Gibson, Kelmscott, Western Australia
Enlistment date 20 September 1915
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 16th Battalion, 13th Reinforcement
AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/33/3
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Fremantle, Western Australia, on board HMAT A54 Runic on 29 January 1916
Rank from Nominal Roll Lieutenant
Unit from Nominal Roll 8th Machine Gun Battalion
Fate Returned to Australia 24 August 1918

The above is an educated guess but it is wrong!.There were only two Jack Gibsons,the other one from Bondi, Sydney, whose next of kin was Mrs Annie Gibson. Many peninsula lads moved to Western Australia during the 1890's depression, attracted by employment offered by its gold rush,such as Harry Falby Gomm of Somerville and John and Thomas Chapman. Thomas Chapman married Edith Sheehan and after he died in Bunbury during a typhoid epidemic, Edith returned to Red Hill with their little daughter. (A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA p. 77-8.) W.Gibson was granted 78 Balnarring of 190 acres on the north corner of Red Hill and Stanley Rds on 22-7-1874 and from memory the property was split into two farms. In 1920,no Gibsons were assessed in the central riding so it is possible that J.A.Gibson was one of the sons and had moved to sandgroper land.

I was just about to move onto Bert Williams when something occurred to me; many Jacks were actually Johns!This is the Red Hill resident. My incorrect guess has been left in the journal as a warning not to ignore those little whispers even if they involve more work.

John Prowse GIBSON
Regimental number 6801
Religion Church of England
Occupation Labourer
Address Red Hill via Dromana, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 22
Next of kin Father, John Thomas Gibson, Red Hill via Dromana, Victoria
Enlistment date 19 February 1917
Date of enlistment from Nominal Roll 10 February 1917
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 22nd Battalion, 19th Reinforcement
AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/39/5
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A11 Ascanius on 11 May 1917
Rank from Nominal Roll 2nd Corporal
Unit from Nominal Roll 22nd Battalion
Fate Effective abroad (still overseas)

RED HILL ROLL OF HONOUR.
Nothing found for BERT WILLIAMS, WALTER BROWN, SAMUEL McKAY, JOSEPH SMITH.

WALTER BROWN. Walter Brown was a member of the Red Hill Band of Hope in 1902, along with some of his later comrades such as Joseph and Robert McIlroy. (Mornington Standard: P.2, 3-5-1902; P. 4, 25-10-1902.)
According to Sheila Skidmore, Walter lost a leg in the war so it is understandable that his sport was Chess. However this disability did not stop him from engaging in the physical life of a fruiterer until he was killed by a crank (handle). He had forgotten that the truck was parked in first gear.
CHESS AT RED HILL.A chess tournament conducted at Red Hill recently excited considerable local interest. The championship was won by Mr. W. Brown, of Main Creek. (P.4, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 16-8-1922.)
CRUSHED BETWEEN CARS.
MELBOURNE, January 12.
Walter Brown (42). fruiterer, of Red Hill, died in the Melbourne Hospital today from injuries received in the Victoria market yesterday, Brown was cranking his truck when it jumped forward and jammed his head between his radiator and the side of another motor truck. (P.18, The Courier-Mail, 13-1-1934.)

BROWN-on the 12th January (result ofan accident) Walter Harold Brown of Red Hill, dearly beloved husband of Florrie (nee Peel) and loving father of Elsie, Norman, Leslie and Marjorie -Loved by all.

BROWN -On the 12th January (result ofan accident) Walter Harold Brown of Red Hill, dearly beloved son of Walter and MaryBrown of 6 Barrow street, Coburg and loving brother of Ruby, Will, Myrtle (deceased), Alma, Doll. and Ivy.
(P.13, Argus, 13-1-1934.)




Andrew NICHOLSON
Regimental number 6377
Religion Church of England
Occupation Farmer
Address Main Creek, Dromana, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 23
Next of kin Father, Neil Nicholson, Dromana, Victoria
Enlistment date 15 September 1916
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 23rd Battalion, 18th Reinforcement

AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/40/4
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A20 Hororata on23 November 1916
Rank from Nominal Roll Private
Unit from Nominal Roll 23rd Battalion
Fate Returned to Australia 21 December 1917


BERT NICHOLSON-No obvious matches for Bert, Albert and Herbert.

ARTHUR McILROY- Only one,Mossman, N.S.W., mother Phoebe.

Albert Christopher WHITE
Regimental number 19699
Religion Methodist
Occupation Farmer
Address Main Creek, Dromana, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 26
Next of kin Father, R White, Main Creek, Dromana, Victoria
Enlistment date 4 January 1916
Rank on enlistment Driver
Unit name Field Artillery Brigade 8, Battery 29

AWM Embarkation Roll number 13/36/1
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A7 Medic on 20 May 1916
Rank from Nominal Roll Driver
Unit from Nominal Roll 8th Field Artillery Brigade
Fate Returned to Australia 4 June 1919
Family/military connections Brother: Lt Ernest Victor WHITE DCM, 24th Bn, returned to Australia.
Other details War service: Western Front
Medals: British War Medal, Victory Medal

Ernest Victor WHITE
Regimental number 307
Religion Methodist
Occupation Butcher
Address Main Creek, Dromana, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 20
Next of kin R White, Main Creek, Dromana, Victoria
Enlistment date 15 March 1915
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 24th Battalion, A Company

AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/41/1
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A14 Euripides on10 May 1915
Regimental number from Nominal Roll Commissioned
Rank from Nominal Roll Lieutenant
Unit from Nominal Roll 24th Battalion
Fate Returned to Australia
Medals Distinguished Conduct Medal
'For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an attack this N.C.O. who was in charge of the advance party of his platoon, led them with great gallantry against a machine gun post, which he captured, taking the gun, and accounting for all the gunners. He then collected his party and proceeded, with the greatest dash, to occupy the objective which had been assigned to them. He brought up a Lewis gun, which he disposed with much judgment to help in overcoming the last elements of the enemy's resistance, and then went out under heavy rifle fire to help in selecting positions for the outposts. Throughout the day he showed fine qualities of judgment and cool determination, which inspired his men with great confidence.'
Source: 'Commonwealth Gazette' No. 23
Date: 12 February 1919
Family/military connections Brother: 19699 Driver Albert Christopher WHITE, 8th Field Artillery Brigade, returned to Australia, 4 June 1919.
Other details War service: Egypt, Gallipoli, Western Front
Medals: Distinguished Conduct Medal, 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal

Frederick Hargrave WHITE
Regimental number 2081
and
David Vincent BARKER
Regimental number 35841
(See comment 2.)

Frederick Hargrave WHITE
Regimental number 2081
Religion Methodist
Occupation Farm labourer
Address Main Creek, Dromana, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 19
Next of kin Father, Robert White, Main Creek Dromana, Victoria
(Continued in comment 1.)


TREWIN, MCILROY, HINDS, SHEEHAN, CHAMPION,GIBSON,WILLIAMS, BROWN,MCKAY,SMITH,NICHOLSON,HARRISON,WHITE,BARKER.

7 comment(s), latest 3 months ago

ALBERT COLEMAN'S BROTHER, HASTINGS' DEADSHOT JACK (THE GREAT JOHN COLEMAN) AND HARRY CASPAR.

Doug Ackerly's "Coleman" has recently been published. My aim here is to provide information that is not available in wikipedia or Doug's book.

Both played for Tyabb but in another game
Young Jack's stratospheric leaps and tons won far more fame.
When he first trained with Hastings, their offer he'd refuse
(To give him stops for better grip): "Not in my good shoes!"*

Did he squat in Hasting's goal square as he did at Windy Hill,
Nonchalantly chewing gum thrown by adoring fans, until
Rising with the speed of light from his haunches
He led into one of his spectacular launches?**

In one of Hasting's matches he was sorely pressed,
Kicking only eight; only A.Coleman was among the best.
Hastings won two premierships, won them back to back,
And Argus readers read of the feats of the "Standard's" Deadshot Jack.

(Trove, Tyabb Cricket Club website and Wikipedia. *George Slocombe,the Hastings coach.
** Fraser had felt his pulse quicken as a 10-year-old at Windy Hill when Essendon's on-ballers would win the football, Coleman would crouch in the goal square ready to explode like a sprinter from the blocks, and all in the Reynolds Stand would stamp their feet on the floorboards in anticipation. "It was just so exciting." I had written the poem before I saw Ken Fraser's account. It proves I wasn't dreaming!

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/afl/afl-news/john-coleman-book-has-everything-except-the-answer-to-goalkickings-mystery-20140528-zrr54.html#ixzz3B2NQea9E)

John Coleman did not forget Hastings when he hit the big time. Albert was invited to play with Richmond but that must have been when he suffered his injury.

PAGE 16.-THE STANDARD, Thursday, October 27, 1949.
Hastings Acclaims John Coleman. District's Great Tribute to Champion Forward.
Last Friday was a "Red Letter Night" for Hastings when a very big percentage of the town and district population attended at the Hastings Hall to officially welcome home the former local champion goalkicker, John Coleman, at a ball arranged in honor of his triumphant first season with Essendon League team, where he kicked the record of 100 goals, and stamped his claims as the greatest Victorian goalkicker of all time.

Prominent amongst the visitors were Messrs....W. French (senior Vice-President and Life Member of Essendon League Club, and an Essendon Club official for 42 years), who was accompanied by Billy Hutchinson, first rover;
George Hassell, champion wingster; and Bob Syme, first ruckman of the Essendon League team. Popular Mr. and Mrs. A. E.Coleman, the proud parents of the champion, were accompanied at the function by their other son,
Albert, who was also a fine footballer till he suffered a knee injury. Mr. Coleman, Senr., was a good footballer with teams in the Wangaratta-Albury district many years ago.

A surprising feature of the night-and the only regrettable one was the almost complete absence of representatives of most M.P.F.L. clubs, other than Hastings, and also the non-attendance of any members of the Shire Council, although the Shire President and two Councillors live in Hastings, and Centre Riding
Councillors reside close by in the Somerville-Tyabb area. However, the hall was packed to capacity by a crowd that found great delight in all the proceedings, and danced till 1 o'clock to splendid music by Neil Whitford's
Rhythm Trio (Sorrento). Warrant-Officer McKenzie (F.N.D.)proved himself the most efficient M.C. seen at Peninsula functions for a very long time. The function was exceptionally well organised, due mainly to the work
of Mr. Mayne, Hastings Club treasurer.

The hall was appropriately decorated with seven large premiership pennants won by Hastings Club, three of these being for the three last seasons, and due in large measure to Coleman's ability in front of goals. About
200 miniature club' pennants, large balloons, and a floral-decked, stage completed a fine picture of public appreciation.

Torchlight -Procession.. .
The opening of the "Welcome Home Ball" was preceded by a torchlight procession from the Hastings Hospital, headed by the Mornington Town Band, and followed, by the Hastings Fire Brigade members, in full uniform,
...A Great Reception.
John Coleman received a great ovation as he entered the hall, all present standing to sing ''For He's a Jolly Good Fellow," and giving three mighty cheers. Mr. Mayne expressed regret that Mr. Wallace Sharland, who
was to have made the presentation to John Coleman, was unable to attend on account of illness.
Mr.Mayne thanked all donors towards the present for Coleman, and the Mornington Town Band for giving its services free. He also thanked the Ladies' Committee for the' grand job they had carried out in connection with the supper arrangements.

Mr. Percy Wilson (captain of the Hastings Football Club), who made the presentation to John Coleman, of a bag of golf clubs valued at 40, said that night's entertainment had been organised by the Hastings Football Club
and admirers of John Coleman in honor of the wonderful record he had put up this year, and during the past two seasons. Hastings had never had a more popular player said Mr. Wilson, and John still came along to all club
functions as a Hastings player, just as he did when he took the field with the local team
. He then presented John with the golf equipment, expressed the hope that he would be as good a golfer* as he had been a footballer, and wished him every success in the world. The Band again played "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow," and the hall rang with cheers.

(*As a golfer John made some good cricket scores. See P.22,Argus,4-8-1955.)

John Coleman, in responding thanked all concerned for a very fine gift. He would remember and appreciate this evening for many years to come. He thanked Mr. Mayne for the way he had organised the function, and also
the Hastings Club generally. It gave him great pleasure to see so many Peninsula faces in the gathering.

Mr. W. French (Senior Vice President, Essendon League) expressed, great pleasure at being present. He said he would like to mention at the outset that Essendon had not "taken John Coleman off Hastings," for Coleman
had played first with the Essendon District Juniors, which team was holding its presentation night in the Masonic Hall, Essendon, that same night. He (Mr. French) had been told long ago by an official of that team, that "there is a kid here, who will be the greatest forward of all time.'" He (Mr. French) was sure John was
going to be the greatest forward of all time, and he was the "King of Essendon" as far as public popularity goes in that city. Essendon's gain had been Hastings' loss, but it would have been a pity to have kept a great player like John in Hastings. If it had not been for his great team spirit, in co-operating with his team
mates, John could easily have got 130 or 140 goals for his first League season, instead of 100,said Mr. French. He assured them that Essendon would look after John, and he hoped Hastings would produce another player of
his calibre for future play with the 'Dons'.

A Popular Song
During the evening pleasing songs were rendered over the 'mike'" by the talented Hastings vocalist, Mr. Dave Ward. One that "brought the house down" was the following parody (tune"Four Leaf Clover" chorus) written in the hall by the Standard representative:- "

There's not a goalman like our John Coleman,
That we've ever seen, before.
Each kick is dead-shot, and goals
come like rain,
Tired, are the scorers who can't
stand the strain;
No need explaining, one w're entertaining.
Is somebody we adore;
There's not a goalman like our
John Coleman,
That we've ever seen before.

Another Coleman Trains At Richmond
By PERCY TAYLOR
ALBERT COLEMAN, whose full forward brother is doing so well at Essendon, trained at Richmond last night, but has promised to train with his brother on Tuesday. Richmond was much impressed by Coleman, "who is a 6ft l 1/2in. half-back, with heaps of football in him. There is a feeling that he will prefer to play with his brother, but Richmond hopes to see him again.(P.16,Argus, 25-3-1949.)

Albert was obviously too busy as an orchardist to train very much but he did play in Essendon's practice match soon after.* Before I forget, I must mention two of last night's incidental findings. Albert was a former schoolmate of Harry Beitzel and Harry Caspar. The former was a successful field umpire and broadcaster and Caspar, who transferred from Northcote to Carlton was the man who cost John Coleman four matches and Essendon a premiership. The school which Albert and these two attended together has not yet been found. Was it University High School? Jack Simpson from Doutta Stars became a labour politician who held the State seat of Niddrie for many years.

*COLEMAN PLEASES IN ESSENDON MATCH
By PERCY TAYLOR " "
JOHN COLEMAN, much discussed Hastings full forward, played at Essendon for the first time on Saturday, and proved to be just as good a footballer as expected. A large crowd came specially to see Coleman, and they were
well rewarded. He is fast, leads out well, marks safely, and is a most accurate kick, scoring seven goals from seven kicks.Although he is 6ft 2in in height, he does not carry much weight*,which might be a drawback in
League company.

Simpson, 6ft 4in, came from the Doutta Stars, and played so well in the junior match that he was taken out and included in the senior game. He could easily go further. Others to shape well were Mccallum (seconds), Calder
(Wonthaggi), who worried Leehane; McGilvray (Gunbower), Luck (Shepparton), Williams(Moonee Valley),Illingsworth
(district full-forward), and Donovan (seconds). A. Coleman (brother of Jack) has ability, but he is "short of a gallop." (P.17, Argus, 28-3-1949.)

Another incidental find last night was that John Coleman had broken Hastings' record for goals in a season set by John McMillan. To say that John Coleman did not carry much weight was actually an understatement as shown by a photo of McMillan and John Coleman both of whose families had lived in the south west of Victoria. I wonder if Doug had this photo in his book. See photo in the following accompanying the text which is supplied below in italics:
Dunrobin Football Team (1921) - Glenelg & Wannon Settlers
www.swvic.org/casterton/dunrobin_football(1921).htm

John Angus "Jack" McMILLAN, son of John and Florence McMILLAN (nee McGUINESS).

Mr McMillan was a member of the Footscray Seconds first premiership side in 1936. He came to the club from Hastings in that year and played four senior games before breaking his wrist. A full forward, he held the goal kicking record at Hastings for 13 years before it was broken by John Coleman in 1947 with 136 goals. Mr McMillans record was 119 goals established in 1934. Born in Casterton, Mr McMillan was from a family of nine children.

A primary school teacher, Mr McMillan had been actively associated with sports administration. He was coach of the Victorian Schoolboys football team in 1955 and 1962 and was manager of the side in 1968. He was also on the Council and the committee of the Kooyong Lawn Tennis Association. Mr McMillan was a member of the City of Hawthorn Lodge No 363, and had been Secretary of the Gould League of Bird Lovers for the 11 years prior to his death in 1969.

Thanks to Libby McMillan for the above images.




RUNS IN COLEMAN FAMILY
Alan (sic) Coleman, brother of Essendon League football champion, John, kicked another six goals for Hastings on Saturday to make his total for three games 22. In this period his team has scored 32 so Coleman's feat is equal to, if not better than, some performed by his now better-known brother, John, who were both former
residents of Port Fairy. Coleman's father, a former manager of the Port Fairy butter factory, residing at Tyabb, when asked to compare Alby with John, replied, "Alby hasn't had the chance John has had, on account of
trouble. I would not say that he is better than John, but without injury he would be just as good. When asked if Alby would go to the 'big game,' Coleman, senr., said, He doesn't intend to carry on with football. He is looking after an orchard and has his hands full. (P.2,Portland Guardian,26-6-1950.)

John Coleman was such a sensation that every time somebody kicked a bag he was touted as the new John Coleman. Most of them,such as the Spotswood lad that was invited to train with Williamstown, are unknown to me. However this article is of interest to me for two reasons. Firstly, John and Alby's father,Albert Ernest Coleman, had been a noted player in the Albury area and secondly Ken Smale had been the coach of East Shepparton in 1970 when I was on the V.F.L. list and umpired one of their games.

BULLDOGS CHASE NEW "JOHN COLEMAN"
Warracknabeal, Monday
Wimmera League's "John Coleman," Ken Smale, was interviewed today by Mr.Roy Russell, secretary of Footscray Football Club. Mr Russell made a special trip to Warracknabeal to do so. Smale, who is only 19,would have been Wimmera League's leading goal-kicker last season but for National Service training. He kicked 10 goals for
Warracknabeal against Murtoa on Saturday. Smale is similar in build to Essendon star John Coleman. He is 6ft. tall and a brilliant high mark. (P.9, Argus, 12-5-1953.)
Ken kicked 98 goals in 60 games with Collingwood and was belatedly made a life member of the club. See:
Pies honour Smale fo life | The Wimmera Mail-Times
www.mailtimes.com.au/story/965788/pies-honour-smale-fo-life/
Nov 4, 2008 - WARRACKNABEAL football living legend Ken Smale has been awarded a belated life membership to Collingwood Football Club. Smale, 78 ...

Doug Wade grew up in the Wimmera with Ken Smale as one of his heroes.
My all time hero was John Coleman but guys like Ted (Jarrard)and Kenny Smale who was from Warracknabeal werent far behind him. Kenny played in three Grand Finals, including the famous 58 side.
(KEN PIESSE FAVOURITE SON'S FROM THE WIMMERA
www.footyalmanac.com.au/ken-piesse-favourite-sons-from-the-wimmera/)


A PORT FAIRY PERSPECTIVE.
THE role Port Fairy played in the life and times of an Australian sporting legend has seen the town take up a prominent place in a new e-book.

Former Essendon champion the late John Coleman is the subject of the e-book, Coleman: The Untold Story of an AFL Legend, which has been written by former Heywood man and author Doug Ackerly.

The e-book is a prelude to a full biography about Coleman that Ackerly will release next April.

The release of the e-book coincided with the unveiling of the Avenue of Legends at the MCG yesterday of which Coleman was a part.

In the e-book, Port Fairy is the central location on the chapter which focuses on Coleman's early life.

The chapter explains how Coleman's parents moved to Port Fairy in 1922 when his father was appointed as the manager of the Port Fairy Cheese, Butter and Ice Factory in Gipps Street.

The young couple wasted no time in starting a family, with daughters Lawna and Thurla and oldest son Albert.

John Douglas Coleman was then born on November 23, 1928, with the story behind his second name an interesting one.

It appears his mother was struggling to find a second name when Sunday school teacher Ruth Engish suggested Douglas, which was the name of the guest house she ran in Gipps Street opposite the Colemans home.

Football was always a part of John Coleman's life as he and his brother would play football matches with the Pevitt boys, Frank and Don, along what was a then small back road covered in grass called Regent Street.

The book says the Pevitt boys remember John Coleman as a talented footballer but with an extremely competitive nature.

John Coleman may never have played official competition with the Port Fairy Seagulls, but these early games of street football give Port Fairy some right to the claim the town was the first step in his decorated football career.

The Colemans stayed in Port Fairy until January 1939 before moving to Melbourne.
(Legends link to Port Fairy | Moyne Gazette
www.moynegazette.com.au/story/1784599/legends-link-to-port-fairy/)

ONE GAME WONDER.
A great fan of Daryl Pittman's THE LOCAL FOOTY SHOW ON C.31 (digital channel 44), I remember seeing this story on the show some time ago. No doubt local residents named Coleman attended the game.

Was John Coleman the greatest forward ever to ever play ...
www.footyalmanac.com.au/was-john-coleman-the-greatest-forward-ever..

John Coleman

In early December 2012 I stumbled on a small article that appeared in the Argus on 8th October 1951 titled Win Ends Country Dispute. The article covered various country matches and finished with:

Freighters, runners up in the Federal District League, were defeated by North Albury in a match in aid of the local team at Albury on Saturday. Essendon full forward John Coleman kicked five goals for Freighters. Other Essendon players took part in the game. Final scores North Albury 17.25 Freighters 17.9.

I couldnt believe what I had found. The great John Coleman played for a Heatherton side! This was just a week after Essendon lost the 1951 Grand Final to Geelong. Coleman didnt play as he was reported in the final home and away game of the season and sensationally suspended for 4 weeks. It seemingly cost the Bombers the flag as they went down by just 11 points.

It just didnt make sense that the great John Coleman could have played with a local outfit and why did it only receive a few lines at the end of another article, especially given his fame and the recent events of that year?

I began trawling the internet and books on John Coleman without success. My next port of call was searching the newspaper archives at the State Library Victoria (SLV).

In a hard copy edition of the Border Mail 6th October 1951, I won the research equivalent of 1st Division in lotto. I found an advertisement and an article for the game and not only was John Coleman listed to play but also Bill Hutchison and Alan Dale (Essendon), Alan Ruthven (Fitzroy), Charlie Sutton (Footscray), Kevin Curran (Hawthorn) and Ted Jarrod (North Melbourne). What a side! I quickly turned to the Monday edition to see the photographs of these legends wearing our club colours. It was disappointing to discover that there were no photographs, just a two paragraph report of the game.

Big Crowd Sees Coleman At Albury

North Albury combine defeated Freighters (Melbourne Federal League) by 17 points at Albury sportsground on Saturday. Gate takings were 144.

Champion Melbourne goal kicker John Coleman got five goals for the visitors, and repeatedly drew the applause of the crowd for breath-taking leaps.

Final scores were North Albury 17.26 (128), Freighters 17.9 (111).

Best Players Freighters : Hutchison (Ess), Reeves (Nth M), Coleman, Sheppard, Tilley and Reid.

I grabbed the Moorabbin News and located the Freighters Club notes by H.C.J. in the edition issued the week after the game.

Freighters Club (By H.C.J.)

The Federal District League received a great boost when Freighters played Nth Albury football team during our visit to Albury last week-end. Our club was very fortunate in securing four league players, namely John Coleman, Bill Hutchison, Alan Dale and John Reeves. These players gave the game a great kick, and were a great attraction to the crowd that witnessed the game.

The marketeers of the game were obviously making sure a good crowd rolled through the gate with the extra star players notes in the Border Mail article and the advertisement. Still, the Freighters team contained three Essendon premiership players and John Reeves who played in North Melbournes losing 1950 grand final team which would have made for a more than handy side. Unfortunately, we returned Alan Dale back to Essendon slightly damaged, he received a nasty knock and suffered two broken ribs during the game.

So who was the greatest forward to ever play for Heatherton?


As mentioned before Doug Wade regarded John Coleman as the greatest player he had seen. Another with the same opinion was a player who rivalled his hero as a spectacular high flying aerialist. I loved this Fitzroy player who filled a void when John Coleman's career was cut short. As a young Bomber supporter, I could share in the excitement of Tony Ongerello's screamers, safe in the knowledge that they would be unlikely to result in a goal to hurt the Bombers (unlike Ray Poulter's huge torps from centre half forward for Richmond.)Leigh Matthews is generally regarded as the greatest-ever footballer,but not in the opinion of Tony,the last man to kick goals using place kicks. Some of Tony's screamers are shown on the following website,from which Tony's opinion is reproduced in italics.


OWAAT One Week at a Time Tony Ongarello: A ...
www.oneweekatatime.com.au/tony-ongarello-a-highflying-gentleman/

On Coleman, Tony is adamant. He is the greatest player to have played the game. He could do it all: he was quick, skilful, could jump and mark, was tough, but fair. He was without peer. I played in the game before his last. He kicked 14 goals on us and was untouchable. He would repeatedly jump and take the most sublime marks. Easily the greatest player I have seen.
Later, when discussing the Brisbane Lions coaching predicament and board troubles, Leigh Matthews was mentioned.
He would be Colemans competitor wouldnt he? I said.
In what way? he responded.
As the best.
Not as far as Im concerned. Matthews is one of the games greatest players, but to my mind Coleman stands alone.
The game following his 14 goals against Fitzroy, Coleman would kick 5 against North Melbourne before dislocating his knee. He would never play again.
It is easy to see why Tony Ongarello was such a fan of John Coleman, they played similarly. There are differences of course, and the main one is clearly that Coleman was an elite kick. In his 131 games, Tony is credited with kicking 247 goals, but the records dont show how many behinds he kicked. According to those who saw him, there were many.


COLEMAN NOT PICKED IN VICTORIAN TEAM TO PLAY WESTERN AUSTRALIA IN 1952!
Imagine my surprise to find that John Coleman had not been named in the team. There was a very good reason and it had nothing to do with his form.

John will be the draw
By HUGH BUGGY
Star League forward John Coleman was not omitted from the Victorian State side because of loss of form. He was left in the Essendon team to play in Brisbane on June 14 as the game's greatest drawcard. This opinion was
expressed by several League club officials last night. They said the whole object of the match between Essendon and Geelong in Brisbane was to promote the Australian game in the northern State.

To play a game there without John Coleman, they added, would be like playing a Test match without Lindwall and Miller. These officials agreed that Jock Spencer, North Melbourne forward, was now quite as competent as Coleman, but Spencer was not yet the big-name player that Coleman is. Coleman in five games this year has kicked 24 goals for Essendon. Spencer, in six games, has scored 23.

Ace kicker
They said the prowess of Coleman as a goal-kicker was well known to all followers of football in Brisbane.
His record as the first League forward to kick 100 goals or more in his first two seasons was as familiar
to them as it was to Victorian fans. Officials said that as the "away" round was solely a propaganda effort, Brisbane would be keen to see Coleman in action. (P.8,Argus,4-6-1952.)

N.B. John kicked 13 goals!
Essendon crushes Geelong at Brisbane COLEMAN GETS THIRTEEN IN GREAT WIN Brisbane, Monday
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 17 June 1952 p 8 Article.

JOHN MARRIES HIS "FINANCE".
Yes,that's what Monica Fernando of Merlynston was called when their engagement was announced in 1954! The crush outside the church when they married was described in graphic detail in the following article which has poor quality photos of the crowd and the newlyweds. (P.1,Argus,4-3-1955.)

OH THE PAIN!
I went to Kensington Central School where two of my mates were Reg. and Max Fairchild who barracked for South Melbourne. Reg.was a good-enough footballer to have attracted the attention of North Melbourne while at the Central School (form 1 and 2)and Max will be well-remembered as Beau in the Beaurepaire Tyre advertisements. They'd told me they were going to the match at the Lakeside Oval and when the Bombers lost despite John Coleman kicking eleven goals straight (not mentioned in the following report) they were the last people I wanted to see because I knew I'd get a ribbing. Sure enough they were waiting to gloat when we entered the subway at the station.

COLEMAN 11, BUT-
Speedy South earns 10-point win
By PERCY TAYLOR
SOUTH MELBOURNE'S tigerish finish gave it a sound 10-points victory over Essendon in a game of high standard on Saturday. South's pace, plus the varying fortunes of the sides, thrilled the 30,000 spectators.John Coleman, who kicked 10 goals for Essendon on the opening day, gave another exhilarating display to kick 11 brilliant goals. But despite his dominance, Essendon failed elsewhere. Its defence, in particular, became slack, and crumpled beneath the persistent and pacy play of the southerners. On Saturday's form South could do well this season. South was the dominant side for three quarters, due to high-flying and fast ruckmen, fast and clever rovers, and a forceful and high marking lot of half forwards. Essendon held control in two of the three centre line positions all day, but its forwards, with the exception of Coleman, did not take full advantage of it. etc.
(P.10,Argus,4-5-1953.)

JOHN'S LAST SCREAMER.
And is this his last great mark?
This could be the last of Coleman's fabulous marks-it was taken in Saturday's game-that stamped him as a champion. (P.1,Argus,7-6-1954. A GREAT PHOTO which shows clearly that John did not need opponents' backs to gain elevation.)

UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL.
It has been said that John Coleman was a "middling" high jumper and Ron Clarke said he would have been more successful as a triple jumper because he could take off on either foot. He was the Open champion of Uni High in both.

TWO RECORDS AT UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS
J. Nuttall won the 880 yards in record time of 2min 7 3-10sec at the University High School sports at Royal Park yesterday. G. Harry broke the long jump record in under 16.
Results:
BOYS' EVENTS: Open: 830 Yds: J. Nuttall. 2.7 3-10. Hurdles: J Coleman. 100 Yds:K. Kube. 220 Yds: H. Dowd.
High Jump.J. Coleman. Hop, Step, Jump. J. Coleman. etc. (P.14, Argus, 17-10-1946.)

Uni High could beat most opponents in footy but the most satisfying victory was always over Melbourne High and these were more common in the 1950's when Uni High's side was stacked with players such as Ron Carruthers, Barry McAuliffe,John Booth, Viv. Peterson, Bobby Clark, the Keddie twins,Terry Rodgers (who beat John's goalkicking record), Graeme Leydin, Graeme Beissel, Ron Evans (imported from Caulfield Grammar), etc., etc., etc.

Good Win For U H S At Carlton
UNIVERSITY HIGH. 14 gls 11 bhds (95) MELBOURNE HIGH . 9 gls 3 bhds (57)
For the first time in six years University High School defeated Melbourne High School in a football match at Carlton yesterday. A return match will be played on August 7.Best: University High: Coleman (5), Plumridge (4), Boyd (2). Melbourne High: Balson, Dunn, Witherow.(P.13, Argus, 25-7-1946.

John Coleman, captain University High School, trained at Essendon last night. He is a district boy, aged
only 17, 6ft lin, and 12 1/2 st. He should be a player next season.(P.9, Argus, 21-8-1946.)

I speculated earlier that John Coleman, Harry Beitzel and Harry Caspar had all attended University High School.
This has been confirmed by Harry Beitzel himself in a pop-up (click on the carictature of Harry Beitzel) on the following website, found in a Harry Caspar search. Harry Caspar's career at Carlton had a break in 1954,the reason being that he was playing forSorrento and was married in New Zealand in that year. Harry was working at Portsea in early 1953 and the Sorrento Football Club tried to sign him but the Carlton Football Club refused permission, obviously later relenting. Harry was one of many footballers to move to the beautiful Mornington Peninsula. Not surprising because he seems to have been living at Sorrento before he started playing for Northcote, according to another Carlton webpage (given in italics later.) Another pop-up on this website reports his death at Rosebud.

CASPAR, Harry : Blueseum - Online Carlton Football Club ...
www.blueseum.org/tiki-browse_gallery.php?galleryId=193...0...

HARRY CASPAR.(Google "Harry Caspar, Mahoney".)
From Post Office Directories of Melbourne Thaddeus Mahoney was a storekeeper and hardware dealer of 30 Queensberry Street, Carlton from 1862 until 1866. After this date the family appears at several addresses through Carlton, and Prahran until around 1884. There were ten surviving children all growing up, and only two were married before the father died.

Thaddeus was aged just 59 years when he died at Neil Street, Melbourne, on the 6th of February 1879 of general exhaustion and disease of the liver.[21] Jane O'Mahony died just five years later of Dropsy and Chronic Inflammation of the Liver on the corner of Newry Street and St Georges Road in Fitzroy on the 23rd March 1884, aged 50 years.[22]

Both were buried together in the Roman Catholic Section of R/C I 391 in Melbourne General Cemetery. Their youngest was also buried there as Eliza had died in 1880.[23]

Jane had left a family of nine living children and most married just before or just after her death. The pair of Thaddeus and Jane have left a large family of descendants who have married into many of the other families of Carlton and North Melbourne.


Some of the descendants of Thaddeus and Jane were footballers, and played for Carlton. One great grandchild of the couple was Harry CASPAR, who was involved in a punch up with the great full forward John COLEMAN. That John Coleman / Harry Caspar fight in the goal square cost Essendon the Grand Final when both were suspended for four weeks. Without Coleman, Essendon lost the 1951 Grand Final to Geelong by 11 points. The Essendon supporters have not forgotten it, and never forgiven it.

8.
Harry George CASPAR b. 4 Nov 1926 North Carlton, Vic. m. 6 Mar 1954 New Zealand. d. 1 Jul 1988 Rosebud, Vic.
June Lesley EGINTON b. 1930

Descendants of Harry and June were born at Mornington from 1957 and later at Rosebud as late as 1996. They are listed on this website.However, despite the Caspar name being mentioned in connection with the South Mornington Football Club, Harry was probably living near Sorrento,perhaps at Blairgowrie. These births and Harry's death were probably at the Mornington and Rosebud hospitals. Harry is buried in good company at the Sorrento cemetery.

IN GOOD COMPANY
John McCarthy is buried on a small rise in the middle of the Sorrento Cemetery.

Tucked away in scrubland on the edge of the Mornington Peninsula coastline, the graveyard is filled with notable figures.

Barry Hooker Harrison, who tagged Ron Barassi out of the 1958 Grand Final, is just a few metres from McCarthys grave.

A bit further along youll find Harry Caspar, the Carlton full back Essendon fans blame for John Colemans suspension at the end of the 1951 season which cost them the premiership.

Theres also Percy Cerutty, the athletics trainer who coached Herb Elliott to the 1500m gold medal at the 1960 Rome Olympics, and Prime Minister Harold Holts wife Dame Zara Bate.
( Remembering John McCarthy | Herald Sun
www.heraldsun.com.au/news/...john.../story-e6frf7jo-1226613235980

F - Australian Cemeteries
www.australiancemeteries.com/vic/mornington_pen/sorrentoafdata.htm
CASPAR, Harry George, 1/7/1988, 61, June, buried with son Phillip J Casper (sic).
Phillip, Harry and June's son, was only 11 years old.


The following webpage explains why John Coleman lost it when he was punched. He had a boil on the back of the neck and that was the target his former Uni High schoolmate aimed at! Harry Caspar supposedly was originally from Sorrento so this could mean that he stayed with relatives each weekend during his career with Northcote. Amazingly,one of his sons played with Essendon Reserves.
Harry Caspar : Blueseum - Online Carlton Football Club ...
blueseum.org/tiki-index.php?page=Harry+Caspar
Jun 5, 2013 - Originally from Sorrento, Caspar later joined VFA front-runners Northcote ... the 1954 season playing for Sorrento on the Mornington Peninsula.
N.B.Northcote was hardly a front-runner when it cleared Harry to Carlton; the club had finished 10th!


It has been said that John Coleman never lived at Hastings but it seems that he spent time there with his parents after his knee was injured. These consecutive pars show that John and Harry Caspar were both on the peninsula at the time. Harry had been relegated to Carlton's reserves possibly because of a loss of form or his inability to get to training from Sorrento; this is why Carlton had a change of heart about clearing him to Sorrento.

Information from Hastings indicates that John Coleman is progressing slowly. His damaged knee is still in
irons. "We will be surprised if he plays again this year," said Mr. Howard Okey last night. "Perhaps he will be
fit to play for us in the finals."

CARLTON
Follower Harry Caspar was cleared to Sorrento by Carlton committee last night. He had previously expressed a desire to go to Footscray, but changed his mind, preferring to play where he is employed. (P.15,Argus, 29-6-1954.)

FROM New Zealand comes news of the recent marriage of Harry Caspar, former Carlton ruckman, to June, elder
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Eginton, Mayor and Mayoress of Motueka, Nelson. After a car tour of the South Island, they will return to live at Sorrento, Victoria, where Harry will resume football training.
(P.17, Argus, 29-4-1955.)
Harry had been one of Sorrento's best in its first semi final win in 1954 but returned to Carlton in 1955 because he needed only one more game to qualify for the provident fund.

HARRY'S BLUE WITH THE BLUES.
Was Harry's relegation to the reserves due to poor form or a blue with the Blues?

After serving his suspension through the first four games of 1952, Caspar was brought straight back into Carltons senior team. He celebrated his 50th match in round 18 (a 36 point win over St Kilda at the Junction Oval) and played in the first and only senior final of his career when the Blues lost a heart-stopping Semi Final by l point to Fitzroy in front of 18,000 fans at the MCG. In a dramatic post-match incident later that evening, Carltons promising full-forward Keith Warburton collapsed and was rushed to hospital, where only repeated blood transfusions over the next 24 hours saved his life. One of Keiths kidneys had been ruptured in a heavy collision during the game, but he somehow stayed on the field until the final siren.

That dramatic final marked the high point of Harry Caspars career at Carlton, because soon afterwards, his career went into decline. Injury delayed the start of his 1953 season, and he had added only four senior games by round 9 when he apparently became embroiled in a dispute with his captain, Ken Hands, or his coach Percy Bentley. As a consequence, Caspar spent the second half of the year with the seconds. In September, he was influential in driving his team right through to the Reserves Grand Final, and the Blues comfortably beat Essendon in the curtain-raiser to the Collingwood-Geelong Grand Final at the MCG.

Despite that success, Harrys problems continued into 1954. On the first day of the new season, Carlton Reserves unfurled their Premiership flag at Princes Park prior to the match against South Melbourne. Early in the game, Caspar and the Swans captain-coach Don Condon tangled, and Condon was reported. Then at half time, Harry became involved in a heated discussion with Carlton officials, and shocked everyone by demanding an immediate clearance and leaving the ground.

Caspar spent the 1954 season playing for Sorrento on the Mornington Peninsula.

Carlton stood firm however, and Caspar eventually returned to the fold and to senior football - in 1955. Wearing guernsey number 6 (after playing all of his career to that point in number 24) he was one of Carltons best in a big loss to Essendon in round 9, before his career imploded in less than ideal circumstances the following week. In the midst of another big defeat this time by Footscray - Caspar was reported for striking the Bulldogs Dave Bryden. And to make matters worse, he suffered a badly-bruised back during the last quarter. On the following Tuesday night, Harry was suspended for four weeks, and that brought the curtain down his career. He retired on the spot, and didnt play again at any level.

In 1956, Caspar headed off to play for East Ballarat that had just appointed his former team-mate John Brown as coach for the 1956 season.


In the years after his last match for the Blues, Harry returned to live at Sorrento, where he and his wife produced five sons. All of the Caspar boys represented Sorrento at some time in their sporting careers, and two went on to play at VFL Reserves level; Michael with South Melbourne in 1980, and David remarkably, with Essendon in 1984.

Harry Caspar passed away on the 1st July, 1988, aged 61.
(Harry Caspar : Blueseum - Online Carlton Football Club ...
blueseum.org/tiki-index.php?page=Harry+Caspar)

BALLARAT'S fast, open, smooth game, functioning around their winning centre and a more coordinated attack, should give them victory in the first semi-final against East Ballarat at Eastern Oval tomorrow.Geelong West and Maryborough will contest the second semi-final. Ballarat was the early premiership favorite, but injuries so depleted the line-up in the latter stages of the minor round that they were forced to struggle to hold a place in the final four. Ballarat won the last two premierships. East's hopes received a setback last Saturday when the team failed badly against Maryborough and lost second place.

East's strength lies in the ruck-rover combination of Caspar, Dodd,and Pascoe. Former Carlton ruckman
Harry Caspar "makes the game" for Dodd and Pascoe,the best pair of little men in the league.
(P.19, Argus,7-9-1956.)


The Mahoney family history gives little early genealogy for the Caspar family. Is it possible that Harry's move to the East Ballarat Club was influenced by family connections as well as the club's coach being a former Carlton player? Did the first Caspar come out to try the Ballarat diggings? Was Frank Caspar,our William Tell, the saw-miller (after whom the Swiss-like landscape between Bacchus Marsh and Gisborne was called CASPAR COUNTRY) his son? Is it possible that Harry's mother and father became acquainted through Frank Caspar and Cornelius Mahoney who is mentioned in the same article? "Goodman's creek was opened in May of that year by Mr. Cornelius Mahoney, J.P., who is still living in Bacchus Marsh, in his 84th year. We often want him to give us his recollections of early days, but have not succeeded very well. He has the first balance sheet of the old Road Board(of which he was a member) and we should like to have that framed in the Shire hall."
(IN CASPAR'S COUNTRY.
The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 - 1918) Saturday 4 March 1905 p 3 Article)

Unfortunately there is not enough Caspar genealogical information to link Harry's father with the families of Frank Caspar or William Louis Caspar who died in Ballarat in 1950.
CASPAR_On August 3, at Ballarat, William Louis Caspar, beloved husband of Alice, and loving father of Lillian (Jean, Mrs. Kemp). Frederick. Nellie (Mrs. McGregor), Robert, and Myrtle. (P.16, Argus, 4-8-1950.)

Harry Caspar's ancestor, Thaddeus Mahoney, from Killarney, was transported for picking pockets in 1833 at the age of 13. Cornelius Mahoney was also from Killarney and came out with his parents in 1837. Thaddeus had been transported to Sydney and after serving his sentence,moved to Melbourne in about 1944. Here's Cornelius Mahoney's obituary.

DEATH OF MR CORNELIUS MAHONEY, JP
One of the widest known personalities, and the oldest resident, of the district, in Mr Cornelius Mahoney, J.P., died at his residence, Bacchus Marsh, on Tuesday night, in his 94th year. Although of such advanced age, Mr. Mahoney had only been laid up during the last few months. Mr.,Mahoney was born at Killarney, County Kerry, Ireland, 31st March, 1821, and landed at Hobart, Tasmania with his parents,from the immigrant ship "Bussorah
Merchant," of London, Louis William Moncrief, Master, on 11th December, 1837. In 1838, after a stay in Tasmania, the family, consisting of his father, mother, himself (then 16 years old), and a younger brother,
came to Melbourne arriving on 22nd May; where his father and himself went into the building trade, and
carried it on successfully until 1844 when they went to Bacchus Marsh, and purchased the present homestead.
of 200 acres, lots 10 and 11, between the rivers Lerderderg and Werribee, and where his father died 9th January, 1887, aged 92 years.

Mr Mahoney was a member of the old Road Board, a Justice of the Peace, and was for several years Chairman and Correspondent of the School Board of Advice in the district. He was for 16 years a member of the Bacchus Marsh Troop of Prince of Wales Light Horse, during which time he rose to the rank of Captain.

Mr. Mahoney was always imbued with the spirit of adventure, and in 1849 he left his home for the Californian goldfields, and spent 2 years there, but not meeting with much success he returned to Bacchus Marsh, and has remained there ever since. Mr. Mahoney was the first to discover gold on the Goodman's Creek, at Cockatoo Gully, in 1854. He had many bushranging tales to relate.

Mr. Mahoney was married in Melbourne in 1849 to Miss Mary Hogan, a native of Tipperary, who came to the colony with her parents in 1841, by the immigrant ship "Agricola." Mrs. Mahoney survives her husband, and although 84 years of age, is wonderfully keen of intellect. There is also a grown-up family of sons and daughters; and a number of grandchildren. One of the latter (Mr. Clem. McFarlane) it is interesting to note at the present time,
is an Officer in the Australian Navy, being a Torpedo Instructor on board the cruiser Melbourne.The funeral took place on Thursday, and was largely attended. (P.3,The Bacchus Marsh Express, 22-8-1914.)

Thaddeus Mahoney married Jane Stafford. Fred Stafford was therefore related in some way to Harry Caspar. Like Harry,he played for Northcote before moving to Carlton (where he kicked the winning goal in the 1947 premiership win). There he would have played with Harry, as he probably also did in 1954.(*He did!)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Fred Stafford
Fred Stafford.jpg
Personal information
Date of birth 3 August 1926
Date of death 10 July 2009 (aged 82)
Original team Northcote (VFA)
Debut Round 1, 1947, Carlton v. Melbourne
Height/Weight 173 cm, 74 kg
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
1947-1952 Carlton 102 (68)
1 Playing statistics correct to end of 1952 season.
Career highlights
Carlton Premiers 1947
Fred Stafford (3 August 1926 10 July 2009[1]) is a former Australian rules footballer in the Victorian Football League (VFL).

He kicked the winning goal in the dying seconds of the 1947 VFL Grand Final.[2]

*Finishing second on the list in the Peninsula League, Mornington (coached by ex-local half-back Gordon Williams) failed by three goals against Seaford (led by Conley, ex Carlton) last Saturday. Mornington meets Sorrento tomorrow in the final. Caspar and Stafford (Carlton), Ollie (St. Kilda) and Ron Wilson
(Coburg) play with Sorrento. Alby Morrison (Footscray) played earlier in the season with Sorrento, although probably in his middle forties. (P.1, Williamstown Chronicle,17-9-1954.)

Sorrento won the premiership in 1954.
Between 1948 and 1954, Morrison served as captain-coach of Sorrento, finally retiring, aged forty-five, after the club's victorious 1954 grand final. Meanwhile, at the MCG on the very same afternoon, Footscray broke through for its first ever VFL pennant by downing Melbourne. - See more at: http://australianfootball.com/players/player/Alby%2BMorrison/4800#sthash.d2kh7rJF.dpuf

I wonder if my post on the Sorrento F.C. timeline will shed some light on the Caspar family,several members of which are life members of the club.
A BIT OF SORRENTO F.C. HISTORY. Why do you think Harry Caspar and Fred Stafford both played at Northcote, Carlton and Sorrento? The answer relates to Thaddeus Mahoney who was transported at the age of 13 in 1833. And what's that got to do with Albert Coleman whose brother kicked 23 goals against Sorrento? Is the photo of Alby Morrison and some of his Sorrento players that appeared in the newspaper article (1954?) hanging in the clubrooms?

2 comment(s), latest 1 month ago

ITELLYA HAS RETIRED.

After ten attempts to post a comment on the DICTIONARY HISTORY OF BULLA journal (second prize essay on the history of Bulla),itellya has retired. The essay has been posted on Ray Gibb's Facebook page. It is quoted almost verbatim in I.W.Symonds' BULLA BULLA.

2 comment(s), latest 3 months ago

WOOLCOTT AND THE HEART OF ROSEBUD, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

Is it worth $40 million dollars (perhaps half as much again)to change the heart of a community? The Rosebud Fishing Village was Rosebud, the jetty being built roughly in the middle of it. The school was the first public building on the inland side of the beach road and of course,it was built in the HEART OF ROSEBUD. Today,Rosebud has two hearts,the second being Rosebud Plaza on the old Hindhope Estate.

On 16-5-1856, R.Glover and J.Wallace were granted crown allotment 17, parish of Wannaeue, consisting of 129 acres 2 roods and 28 perches. This was bounded by the beach road,Jetty Rd, Eastbourne and the line of Norm Clark walk (just east of Ninth Avenue.)

TUESDAY, 10th MARCH.
Parish of Wannaeue, Arthur's Seat. 129 Acres.
Four-roomed Cottage, Men's Huts, fronting Hobson's Bay, and within Thirty Miles from Melbourne by Water, and Forty-five Miles by Road.
H.A. COFFEY, for F. E. Beaver and Co., is instructed to sell by auction, at their rooms, 30 Collins-street west, on Tuesday, 10th inst., at eleven o'clock, 129 acres superior agricultural land, having a large
frontage to Hobson's Bay, and described in the Government plan as having water at a short distance from the surface ; together with a neat cottage containing four rooms and a garden ; fruit trees, fenced in. From the great rise in tho value of property in this locality, tho healthful air and the beautiful scenery, there can be no doubt but that this opportunity offers a fair chance for profitable investment to the small capitalist, or would be admirably adapted for a marine residence. The water is sufficiently deep in shore to admit the landing of provisions and goods close to the frontage. Terms Liberal.(P.2,Argus,5-3-1857.)

MONDAY, MAY 2.
Near Arthur's Seat, and Close to the Village of Dromana. Fronting the Bay.
ALFRED BLISS has received instructions from the proprietor to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, at his rooms, 37 Queen-street, on Monday,May 2, at one o'clock,
Section No. 17, parish of Wannaene, containing 129 acres 2 roods 28 perches, bounded on three sides by
Government roads. For the convenience of intending purchasers the above property has been cut up into 5 and 10 acre allotments. (P.2,Argus, 20-4-1859.)

On 3-9-1864,R.Glover was assessed on 129 acres,unencumbered,with a nett annual value of 16 pounds 10 shillings. By the Kangerong Road Board assessment of 2-9-1865, Richard Robert Woolcott had become the owner. Assessment No. 103 gives his name as Woolcott and he paid rates on 129 acres, Wannaeue, with a nett annual value of 6 ponds 10 shillings. By 3-9-1870 the nett annual value had risen to 10 pounds and, although the rate collector gave his Christian names,his surname was written as Woollcote. In the 15-9-1876 assessment he seems not to have been assessed but he might have been assessed under O in the alphabetical listings. Where the occupant was not clear a property was assessed against "Owner" and if the owner's name was entered if it was discovered.

In the 14-9-1879 assessment the N.A.V.was 12 pounds and remained so on 24-7-1879 although -.Woolcote now owned only 112 acres; 17 or 18 acres had been sold. If they were all 2 acres like the block that George and Susan Peatey bought in 1878,that would mean that nine blocks had been sold. By 16-7-1888 Woolcote (written only in the OWNER column)was assessed on 20 allotments,Wannaeue with a nett annual value of only 8 pounds. The next year it was written VERY FAINTLY as 40 acres and the N.A.V. was 40 pounds. Perhaps the council had decided that all building blocks must have a N.A.V. OF 2 pounds,a value that persisted well into the 1920's for vacant blocks. A modest dwelling would raise this to, or by, 5 pounds.

By 1900, many purchasers seem to have forfeited their blocks to the Commercial Bank which was assessed on 84 acres in crown allotment 17. Those definitely assessed on land in THE HEART OF ROSEBUD (c/a 17) were:
George Henry Chapman (Dromana blacksmith) 4 lots, Charles James 3 acres, Marshall (Moonee Ponds real estate agent) 7 acres, Mrs Peatey 2 acres and house lot 76, John Roberts (the postmaster) 4 lots and house, Formbisher 2.5 acres lots 74 and 85. A few more may have had land on c/a 17 but as descriptions were so vague it is impossible to be sure.

In 1919, Henry Bucher of Brighton owned lots lots 73 and 78 (and perhaps lots 7-10);Mrs Mary Butler,c/o Mrs McDowell, a building on lot 49; Mrs Annie Eliza Cairns of "Fernvilla" (top of Cairn Rd) Rosebud, had lots 1,2,29 and 30; Mrs Elizabeth Cairns of Rosebud had lots 43-6; "Rosebud Ted" Cairns had lots 74 and 85; the Dromana blacksmith still had lots 19 and 20; A.C.Allingham*, the teacher who replaced Charles Perrin* was occupying "quarters,state school",the bill sent to the Education Department; John Fallon of Windsor had lot 80; (former?) Rye teacher Henry Horneman had lots 62,81 and 82;Mrs Hownslow had lot 23; Mrs Helen Salina Mitchell (probably from the present Woodlands Historic Park near Melbourne Airport)had lots 13-18 and buildings; Joseph Maconochie of Richmond lots 37-41 and buildings and his wife store and lot 42 occupied by P.Ditchburn*; Robert McDowell of Rosebud had lots 77 and 79 and part of lot 75 and a building; Alf and John Peatey,sons of George and Sarah the 2 acre lot 76 on the south corner of Jetty Rd and McDowell St bought in 1878 but minus the house which burnt down in 1912; Ernie Rudduck of Dromana, still alive thanks to Melbourne Brindle,William John Ferrier etc, land and store occupied by L.C.Leech; Mrs(sic) Mary B.Stone (see the Polly Vine chapter in Peter Wilson's ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD)LOTS 25,26,28; and Mrs Charlotte Walker of Benalla (possibly Robert McDowell's sister in law) part lot 75.
(*See ROSEBUD ROLL OF HONOUR.)

Crown allotment 18, between Adams Avenue and Jetty Rd had been subdivided before c/a 17 but only one block was sold,lot 86 of two acres on its north west corner. Robert White (Blooming Bob White bought c/a 17 in 1875 and was unaware that Charles Blackey had sold lot 86 to Jack Jones. When Bob sold the property to the (Leak/Lake brothers circa 1890)the new owners assumed that they had bought the whole 152 acres and took Jones to court to have him kicked off. Jones, who had conducted a store on his fishing village block, proved that he owned the block and built Rosebud's first proper shop on the corner. The buyer in 1913 was probably Mrs Mitchell who conducted what Isobel Moresby and Rosalind Peatey remembered fondly as a lolly shop.

W.A. KORNER WILL SELL BY PUBLIC AUCTION on the above date, on the ground,
1.All deceased's right, title, and interest in that piece of land being part of Crown portion l8, parish of Wannaeue, having frontage to Government road of 57ft. by a depth of 329ft, more or less, together with store and other improvements thereon.
2. All that piece of land, being part of Crown portion 18, parish of Wannaeue, having frontage of 60ft. by a depth of 330, more or less.Terms at Sale.W. A. Korner, auctioneer. Mornington.
(P.4, Argus,6-12-1913.)

Although 150 acres of c/a 18 was a farm for nearly 40 years after R.R.Woolcott subdivided the heart of Rosebud (c/a 17)until suicide man, De Garis,launched his so-called HEART OF ROSEBUD ESTATE,lot 86 and Jack Jones' store certainly deserved to be included in the true heart of Rosebud.(See the chapter HENRY POTTON'S FARM in Peter Wilson's ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD.)

THURSDAY, JANUARY 13. DROMANA. DROMANA. Large Bay Frontage.
To Parties Looking for an Unrivalled Site for a Marine Residence or Farm.
C.J. and T. HAM have received Instructions from Mr. J. T. M'Kean, agent for owner, to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, at their rooms, on Thursday, 13th January next, at twelve o'clock, All that piece of land being Lot 17 in parish of Wannaeue, near to village reserve of Dromana, containing 130 acres, well and permanently watered by springs, and having large bay frontage. (P.2, Argus,7-1-1876.)

By 1879, -.Woolcote (sic) was assessed on an unknown number of acres with a nett annual value of 12 pounds.

ROSEBUD BAY.
That picturesque neighbourhood a little to the south west of Dromana, on the main road to Sorrento. The remaining unsold lots in the estate of R. R. Woolcott, Esq., being part of portion 17, parish of Wannaeue, each lot having an area of 1.5 acres and upwards. A new jetty, state school and other improvements have recently been added to the attractions of this place, which must ultimately become one of the most popular of our suburban watering-places.Solicitor, J. S. Woolcott, Esq., Chancery lane And SANDRINGHAM.
(P.2, Argus, 1-2-1888.)


Can the Clacton-on-Sea Estate ever become the heart of Rosebud? This estate was between Norm Clark Walk and First Avenue. There is much detail in LIME LAND LEISURE about the failure of the estate and how the shire and social agencies developed the forfeited land nearer Eastbourne Rd as a residential area for the elderly.

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 10 At 10 a m MECHANICS HALL Rosebud
Shire of Flinders RATE RECOVERY AUCTION
The Shire of Flinders through its Auctioneers Mr G. G .Austin of Frankston and Mr. S. L. Butler of Mornington as auctioneers in conjunction will sell by auction the following properties on Wednesday the 10th day of October 1951 at 10 a. m. in the Mechanics Hall, Rosebud under the provisions of the Local Government Acts
(Municipal Rates Recovery)
ALL THOSE pieces of land being Lots on Plan of Subdivision Number 6108 lodged in the Office of Titles (and which lots are more particularly set out hereunder)being part of Crown Allotments 15 and 16 at Rosebud, Parish of Wannaeue, County of Mornington.

N.B.Unless otherwise specified,all lot sizes are frontage 53 links and depth 181.8 links. A link is a hundredth of a chain (which close enough to 20 metres long) so each link equals 20 centimetres. Therefore the frontage is
53x20 cm or 10.60 metres and the depth is 36.36 metres. In (k)the depth is 219 links or 43.8 metres.

(a) Lots 46 48 54 56 58 and 62 Block A each lot having a frontage to Second Avenue.
(b) Lots 55 57 61 63 Block B each lot having a frontage to Second Avenue.
(c) Lots 50 52 54 60 62 and 72 Block B each lot having a frontage to Third Avenue.
(d) Lots 55 59 and 63 Block C each lot having a frontage to Third Avenue.
(e) Lots 56 58 60 64 66 72 and 74 Block C each lot having a frontage to Fourth Avenue.
(f) Lots 61 65 67 69 79 81 and 83 Block D each lot having a frontage to Fourth Avenue.
(g) Lots 72 84 86 and 88 Block E, each lot having a frontage to Sixth Avenue.
(h) Lots 63 69 71 73 75 93 and 95 Block F each lot having a frontage to Sixth Avenue.
(i) lots 66 68 84 94 and 96 Block F each lot having a frontage to Seventh Avenue.
(j) Lots 55 57 63 71 73 79 83 91 93 05 97 and 101 Block G each lot having a frontage to Seventh Avenue.
(k) Lots 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 and 13 Block 12 each lot having a frontage of 53 links to Ninth Avenue by a depth of 219 links* approximately. (*Presumably the east side.All the avenues seem to be 4.5 chains apart but Ninth and Rosebud Pde are 5 chains apart, an extra 10 metres.)
(l) Lots 12 16 l8 20 24 and 30 Block I. each lot having a frontage to Ninth Avenue.
(m) Lots 3 5 9 23 25 27 Block I. each lot having a frontage to Eighth Avenue.
(n) Lots l8 20 24 26 and 30 Block J each lot having a frontage to Eighth Avenue.
(0) Lots 1 3 5 7 13 15 25 27 Block J each lot having a frontage of 53 links to Seventh Avenue.
(p) Lots 2 4 14 16 l8 20 22 24 26 28 and 30 Block K each lot having a frontage to Seventh Avenue.
(q) Lots 1 9 11 15 19 and 21 Block K, each lot having a frontage to Sixth Avenue.
(r) Lots 8 10 12 14 16 l8 22 24 28 and 30 Block L each lot having a frontage to Sixth Avenue.
(s) Lots 9 13 17 25 and 27 Block L each lot having a frontage to Fifth Avenue.
(t) Lots 2 4 12 14 18 20 22 24 26 28 and 30 Block M each lot having a frontage to Fifth Avenue.
(U) Lots 1 3 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 and 20 Block M each lot having a frontage to Fourth Avenue.
(V) Lots 2 4 14 l8 20 22 24 26 and 30 Block N each lot having a frontage to Fourth Avenue.
(X) Lots 2 8 12 20 22 24 26 28 and 30 Block O each lot having a frontage to Third Avenue.
(y) Lots 1 3 7 10 21 23 27 and 29 Block O each lot having a frontage to Second Avenue.
(z) Lots 5 13 17 and 19 Block F, each lot having a frontage to First Avenue.
TERMS AT SALE etc. (P.24, Argus,6-10-1951.)

Not only the Clacton-on-Sea blocks were forfeited. The depressions of the 1890's and 1930's resulted in widespread unemployment and many purchasers were flat out putting food on the table. Paying rates on a holiday block would have been the lowest priority. But councils still needed to cope with road maintenance and drainage issues and were almost broke. There was a sell-off in 1946 as well, and it was suggested that returned servicemen should be given priority as purchasers. Here were the forfeited blocks near the end of the 1930's depression. 17= the heart of Rosebud (Rosebud Estate); 15 and 16= Clacton-on-Sea.

ROSEBUD PROPERTIES
TUESDAY MARCH 15
At Three O Clock At Mechanics Hall Dromana
LOT 5.-Thirty Lots Each Having a Frontage of 53 Links by a Depth of 181.8 Links and Being Lots on Plan of Subdivision No 5108 Lodged in the Office of Titles and Being Part of Crown Portions 15 and 16 at Rosebud, Parish of Wannaeue, County of Mornington.
(a) Fronting First Avenue Lots 45 47 103 Block P
(b) Fronting Third Avenue Lot 48 Block B
(c) Fronting Fifth Avenue Lot 07 Block F Lot 21 Block L Lot 16 Block M
(d) Fronting Sixth Avenue Lots 47 49 77 Block K Lot 32 Block E Lot 42 Block L
(e) Fronting Seventh Avenue Lot 50 Block F Lot 81 Block G Lot 11 Block J Lot 78 Block K
(f) Fronting Eighth Avenue Lots 70 100 102 Block G Lot 73 Block H Lots 95 07 Block I Lots 12 10 28 42 Block J
(g) Fronting Ninth Avenue Lots 04 100
LOT 6.-Lot 114 on Plan of Subdivision No. 5108 Lodged In the Office of Titles Being Part of Crown Portion 16 at Rosebud Parish and County Aforesaid frontage of 53 Links to Government Road by Depth of 277.9 Links.

LOT 7.-24 lots, Each Having a Frontage of 50 Feet by Varying Depths and Being Lots on Plan of Subdivision No. 5134 Lodged In the Office of Titles and Being Part of Crown Portion 17 at Rosebud Parish of Wannaeue County of Mornington
(a) Lots 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 l8 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Block H Fronting Spray Street
(b) Lots 27 28 Block G Fronting Spray Street
(c) Lot 35 Block B Fronting Foam Street
(d) Lot 36 Block B Fronting Government Road
LOT 8-Lots 28 29 30 Block H on Plan of Subdivision No 5134 as Aforesaid Each Lot Having a Frontage of 22 Feet 6 Inches to a Government Road by a Depth of 150 Feet. (P.14, Argus, 10-2-1938.)