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CORRECTION: THE FIRST RYE HOTEL WAS IN DROMANA??? WILLIAM COTTIER GAVE RYE ITS NAME?? (VIC., AUST.)

Charles Hollinshed had presented about a truckload of papers to the Victorian Historical Society and was selected by the Shire of Flinders to write its history:LIME LAND LEISURE. I had been researching Mornington Peninsula History for about a month or so when I read his book, rather made notes from it, and although I found a few boo boos, such as Ned Williams' biography appearing in the WHITE entry,I was quite prepared to accept everything in the book as Gospel. Boy, I was excited when I found out that the first Rye Hotel was in Dromana some time before 1859! The alarm bells tingled when Charles called William Cottier JAMES Cottier. The Kangerong parish map, which I had obtained from the Rye Historical Society,made it quite clear that William Cottier was the grantee of the land that became Walter Gibson's "Glenholm". It is doubtful that William Cottier's supposed hotel was on the foreshore (actually the Survey) opposite the Dromana Bush Nursing Hospital;it would more likely have been the squared-log core of the Glenholm homestead (bottom of 160 D5,under the freeway.) William had received the grants in 1857.

QUOTED FROM PAGES 112-113 OF LIME LAND LEISURE.
James (sic) Cottier (pronounced "Cutter")and his wife came to Dromana in 1850.They may have begun as tenants on the Survey but built on the foreshore where Dromana Hospital is now. James (sic) took up timber getting and presumably stayed in that trade because he is said to have had bullocks hauling piles from the back country when the Dromana pier was being built in the 1870's. However he or perhaps Mrs Cottier soon began to take in boarders.

SOME TIME BEFORE 1859 A LICENCE ISSUED AND THE COTTIER HOUSE BECAME THE RYE HOTEL. (Charles then mentioned Cottier's grants which became Walter Gibson's "Glenholme", sic, Glenholm.)

IN 1866,IN PARTNERSHIP WITH A MR. CAMPBELL, HE PUT UP A BUILDING SPECIFICALLY TO BE AN HOTEL,AND ON TRANSFER OF THE LICENCE,THIS BECAME THE RYE HOTEL. Eventually the new hotel deteriorated and Campbell, probably still in partnership with Cottier (unlikely,see below), built the White Cliffs Inn,presumably on a site next to Cliff House (which was) on the(east)corner of Napier St. THE COTTIERS WERE AMONG THE FIRST SETTLERS AT RYE AND IT IS SAID THAT THEY WERE THE FIRST TO USE THAT NAME INSTEAD OF TOOTGAROOK.

Pencilled in one of the four copies of LIME LAND LEISURE in the local history room at Rosebud library are the following comments written by somebody who was obviously a frustrated Cottier family historian.

Who is the William Cottier who married Margaret Owen and had two children born at Tootgarook, Emily in 1872 and Mary Jane in 1869. A William Cottier paid rates on 564 acres at Fingal in 1865. William leased land in Rye from W.A.Blair in 1874,1 acre 3 roomed house.

The following is copied from my HERITAGE WALK, DROMANA journal.

COTTIER 1857.
According to Colin's map, William Cottier's house on the Survey was near today's Balmoral Avenue. William signed the 1861 petition in support of Robert Quinan's school becoming Dromana's Common School (P.133 in Colin's book.) William Cottier (pronounced Cutter)received the grants for crown allotments 9 and 10 section 1, Kangerong and built the initial part of what became Walter Gibson's Glenholm homestead. C/a 9 is now the Dromana Industrial Estate and c/a 10 is the Monaco Estate including all Lombardy St house blocks.

What did surprise me is the following grant in the parish of Fingal, south of the Boniyong (Boneo) pre-emptive right.
Lot 32. One hundred and twenty two acres three roods five perches, 22/- per acre.William Cottier.
(P.5, Argus, 19-2-1858.)

In another journal I have warned family historians about taking lot numbers to be crown allotment numbers. William Cottier's Fingal grant was crown allotment 13 of 122 acres 3 roods and twenty five perches.It was a triangular block fronting the west side of Truemans Rd south of the St Andrews Golf Club's Gunnamatta Course, indicated by Melway 252 B10 and C 10-11.

When I added Kangerong as a search term, to avoid millions of shipping intelligence articles in the 1850's (Captain William Cottier), I discovered that William had bought his grants between Collins Rd and (inclusively) Lombardy St in early 1857. Lot 5 is c/a 9 and lot 6 is c/a 10 (both section 1 Kangerong.)

Parish of Kangerong, County of Mornington. Upset price ã1 per acre.
Lot 5,151a. Sr. 8p, William Cottier, ã1 per acre.
Lot 6,116a. 2r., William Cottier, ã1 5s. do. (P.6,Argus,26-3-1857.)

LIME LAND LEISURE has much detail about Cottier and John Campbell (who also signed the 1861 petition in support of Robert Quinan.) Charles Hollinshed relied on the memory of elderly descendants and called Dromana's pioneer James Cottier. However he must have seen documents or articles to support his claim that Cottier established the RYE hotel at Dromana and that the licence was later transferred to Tootgarook where he and John Campbell (who built Rye's first pier in 1860) built the RYE HOTEL east of Napier St. (The present Rye Hotel is on the site of Patrick Sullivan's Gracefield Hotel, built about 15 years later, whose name came from the Dromana property that his father in law,William Grace, had sold in about 1871 before moving to Rye.)

Rye was known as Tootgarook, but as in the case of Rosebud, where people said that they were going to THE ROSEBUD,thirsty limeburners probably said ,"I'm going to THE RYE" and in each case THE was eventually deleted. Thus William Cottier is credited with giving Rye its name. So what's this?

FOUND, A quantity of SPARS. Owner can have a claim by applying to Mr. Cottier, Tootgarook Hotel, Tootgarook.
(P.1, Argus, 8-6-1869.)

JOTICE of APPLICATION for a PUBLICAN'S
LICENCE.-To the Bench of Magistrates. at
Mornington.-I, WILLIAM COTTIER, farmer, now
residing !nt Ryo, in tho colony of Victoria, do hereby
give netico that it is my intention to APPLY to the
justices, sitting at the Court of Petty Sessions to bo
holden at Mornington, In tho said colony, on tho 20th
day of Juno noxt.'for n CERTIFICATE authorising
the issuing of a PUBLICAN'S LICENCE for a house
situated at Rye aforesaid. The houso Is built of wood,
consisting of two slttlngrooms and six bedrooms ex-
clusivo of thoso required for tbo use of tho family ;
occupied and owned,by mo. It is not licensed. To
bo know n as tbo Tootgarook Hotel. i
Tho 14th'day of Juno, A.D. 1807. ,
- I ' (Signed) . WILLIAM COTTIER. (P.8 Argus, 21-6-1867.)

NOTICE.-The PARTNERSHIP hitherto subsisting
between WILLIAM COTTIER and JOHN CAMP
BELL, trading as " Wm. Cottier and Campbell," at
Tootgarook, has this day been DISSOLVED by
mutual consent.
All liabilities will be paid and all moneys received
by William Cottier.
JOHN CAMPBELL.
WM. COTTIER. ,
Melbourne 18th April, 1870. (P.3, Argus, 14-4-1870.)

William Cottier, of Rye, near Point Nepean,
limeburner. Causes of insolvency-Long de-
pression of trade and losses in business.
Liabilities, ã480 12s. 6d. ; assets, ã30 ; de-
ficiency, ã150 12s. 6d, Mr. Goodman, official
assignee. (P.5, Argus, 26-10-1870.)

A special examination was held in the
estate of William Cottier, of Rye, labourer,
late publican. The insolvent was brought in
custody from gaol, where he was imprisoned
on a charge of stealing meat, and was ex-
amined by Mr. F. Stephen in reference to his
transactions as a publican at Rye, and also
respecting, a lime-burning business that he
had been engaged in. (P.7, Argus,23-12-1870.)

Certificate Meetings.
Certificates of discharge from their debts were granted to the following insolvents :
....... ; John Blair, of Melbourne, surgeon*; ....... William Cottier, of Rye, limeburner ; F. W. Wilks, of Collingwood, commission agent. (P.6, Argus, 10-6-1871.)
*Blair,like Cottier,recovered and bought Villa Maria, naming it Blairgowrie, which eventually became the new name of Sorrento East.

CONCLUSION.
Until documentation of a licence being issued for William Cottier's house near Dromana under the name, Rye Hotel, is found, this claim must be treated as the type of myth that finds its way into family folklore, such as Rosebud's Captain Adams being the illegitimate son of Lord Vivian and receiving a grant of 750 acres. As William's application of 1867 shows, he intended to call the hotel the Tootgarook Hotel;he did not mention transferring a previous licence.

However,the fact that a "Tootgarook Hotel" had been operating earlier*(on part of the Tootgarook pre-emptive right, near the future Leonard St) might have required a different name to be used.
*Peter Purvis**, Tootgarook, Tootgarook Hotel.Granted.(P.5, Argus, 22-4-1857.) **Peter Purves d. 1860.

Since not one of the 170 results for "Tootgarook Hotel" in the 1860's mentioned a hotel of that name until William Cottier's application in 1867,the need for another name seems unlikely. It also means that Patrick Wee Wee and the four quarrymen who drowned on the way to the quarantine station in late 1869 had met in William Cottier's TOOTGAROOK HOTEL, which, by the way was probably built on John Campbell's grants, crown allotments 6 and 7 of section 1, extending from The Esplanade to Nelson St. They had a 40 metre frontage to both streets between points 60 metres east of Napier St and 100 metres west of Lyons St.

Was William Cottier ahead of his time in naming the area Rye? He used the name twice in his 1867 application. There was no mention of either Tootgarook or Rye Townships in The Argus in the 1860's,the only indication that a township was even in the pipeline being the following advertisement:

extension on mail road between Cheltenham and Tootgarook (in consequence of removal of post office, Tootgarook to another site), at contract rate per mile, from 1st of July to 31st of December, 1860, £8 6s. 6d,Henry Dunn ;
(The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 17 October 1860 p 7 Article)

In 1868 the school at Rye was still called the Tootgarook school when John Watt (whose house now stands next to the Sorrento Museum) was appointed to the committee.
Tootgarook, No. 623 -Robert H. Kelly, John Watt ;(P.7, Argus, 24-6-1868.)

RYE. County of Mornington, parish of Nepean, in the village of Rye, on Port Phillip Bay.Upset price, £8 per acre. Allotments 4, 6,7,8, Section 2 ; 7,10, Section 3. 2 roods each. (P.3, Argus, 21-4-1869.)

Now realising why I'd found no mention of either Tootgarook or Rye Townships,I entered VILLAGE OF RYE and the Cottier claim of giving Rye its name was shot down in flames.

COUNTRY LOT. NEPEAN. Situate on the southern shore of Port Phillip Bay, west of the village reserve of Rye, about seven miles east of the Sanatorium.Upset price, £1 per acre. Allotment 12. 163 acres.
)P.7, Argus,17-8-1865.)
(Crown allotment 12,parish of Nepean was on the north east corner of Melbourne and Canterbury Rds and became part of Owen Cain's Tyrone.)

ANY CRITICAL THINKER WOULD IMMEDIATELY RESPOND, "BUT IF CAMPBELL WAS SUPPOSEDLY (IF I REMEMBER CORRECTLY) BUILDING THE FIRST RYE PIER IN 1860,COTTIER MAY HAVE BEEN IN THAT AREA BEFORE 1865 TOO, SO THERE IS NO PROOF THAT HE DID NOT GIVE RYE ITS NAME."

It could be presumed that the people who signed the petition of 9-3-1861,scanned onto page 132 of Colin McLear's A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, had children enrolled at Robert Quinan's school at Dromana. It was signed by both William Cottier and John Campbell. This would indicate that both families were still living at Dromana in 1861. It is possible that Master Mariner, John Gibson (whose son,John, born in 1859 on the Survey later became a Kiwi) had a vessel and took Campbell to Rye each day, or the pier was built later than 1860. (John Gibson also signed the petition!)

Did the village of Rye have that name while John Campbell and William Cottier were still living at Dromana? Yes, in early 1860!

Nepean, situate from 8 to 10 miles south-easterly from Point Nepean adjoining the village reserve of
Rye, and west of Mr. Purves's pre-emptive section :etc.
(Column 4 about a third of the way down in the second MELBOURNE sale after GISBORNE, P.7,Argus,23-4-1860.)


Jennifer Nixon's FAMILY, CONNECTIONS, SORRENTO AND PORTSEA probably has much information about the Cottiers but let's see if trove can add anything.

COTTIER.

COTTIER.-In loving memory of our dear sister,Lily, who passed away on the 25th August, 1924,at Frankston; and our dear mother, who passed away on the 23rd August, 1913, at Sorrento; and our dear brother, Walter, who passed away on the 17th September, 1916, at Sorrento.(P.13,Argus,25-8-1928.)

Possibly related to William.
COTTIER.-On the 3rd inst., at Queenscliff, James Cottier*, aged thirty-one years. Gipps Land and
New Zealand papers please copy.(P.4, Argus,9-2-1867.)
*His son, James Edwin, was still at Queenscliff when he married in 1885.

COTTIER. -On the 11th Mar, at the Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Alan William, dearly loved grandson of Edwin John (deceased) and Josie Dark, Ophir, Sorrento, and William Cottier, Frankston* and the late Elizabeth Cottier, aged 9 years and 11 months. (P.1, Argus, 12-5-1925.) The boy's parents, John and Elizabeth, who placed the previous notice in the same issue,lived in Richmond.

*Possibly son of William in previous notice.
COTTIER, James.âOn March 10,at his residence, Lewis street,Frankston, loving husband of Isabella (Queenie).
COTTIER. âThe Funeral of the late Mr. JAMES COTTIER, of Lewis street, Frankston, will leave Cain street, Sorrento, THIS DAY (Thursday), after a service commencing at 2.45 p.m., for the Sorrento Cemetery.
(P.12, Argus,11-3-1954.)

Grandfather of Alan William.
COTTIER -On the 7th September at Charlescote, 23 Hope street Spotswood, William, the dearly beloved husband of the late Elizabeth Cottier and loving father of Jack and Ethel (Mrs W.R.Anderson), aged 77 years -Mother and
father reunited. (P.1, Argus, 8-9-1932.)

The late Elizabeth Cottier (nee Dark) above(Lily.)
COTTIER. âOn the 20th[?] August, at Fndley? street,Frankston, Elizabeth Hester (Lily), dearly loved wife of William Cottier, loving mother of Jack and Ethel (Mrs. Anderson), loved sister of Ted(deceased), Walter (deceased), Charlie, Minnie (Mrs. White), Annie (Mrs. Skelton), Frances (Mrs.Johnstone), Effie (deceased), and Harry, aged 65 years.(P,.1,Argus, 26-8-1924.)

Edwin John Dark's grandson.
COTTIER.âOn August 25, at Sydney, Edwin John dearly beloved son of Elizabeth and John, brother of Allan (deceased), Florence (Mrs.Gillson) and Charles aged 28 years. -Loved by all. (P.22, Argus, 1-9-1951.)

5 comment(s), latest 2 months, 2 weeks ago

THE GIBSON OF DROMANA WHO BECAME A KIWI.

COPIED FROM:
John Gibson 1859 - 1932 Kangarong, Victoria, Australia
www.wikitree.com/wiki/Gibson-2063
Cert reads: 3 August 1859, Jamiesons Survey, Kangerong, Victoria, John, not ... or nurse to certify, signatures of occupiers or other witnesses, Mrs Brownlee ... Registered 3 Oct 1859 at Schnapper Point by William Armstrong, Deputy Registrar ..

(The above was discovered when I was researching William Brownlee of the survey for my DROMANA HERITAGE TRAIL journal. My motto is USE IT OR LOSE IT. The witness to the birth would have been Mary Ann McLear, widow of John McLear who was killed at Plenty's Plough Inn during a race meeting on Boxing Day, 1849. Mary Ann may have met Mrs Brownlee in that area. Mrs McLear leased a property called The Willow, which was near the south-bound freeway off ramp and the drive-in. John Gibson, who married Emma P. Clinton, was possibly* a brother of Walter Gibson of the Survey and "Glenholm", Dromana. John Gibson's father was Adam Gibson and Walter's first-born was named Adam. William Brownlee may have also come from Lanarkshire.)

* I'm not a gambler but I reckon I could make good money betting on my guesses. John and Walter had the same father, Adam, who married a Purdie girl, so Walter may have married a cousin.

GIBSONâPURDIE.â(Golden Wedding)âOn the 22nd November, 1849, at Kilbuchs-place, near Biggar, Scotland, by the Rev. Hamilton Paul, Walter Gibson, son of Adam Gibson, of Wiston, to Margaret Purdie, daughter of Alexander Purdie, of Peebles. (Present address, Glenholm, Dromana, Victoria.) Scotch papers please copy.
(P.9,Argus, 9-12-1899.)


John Gibson
Born August 3, 1859 in Kangarong, Victoria, Australia
Son of John Gibson and Emma P. (Clinton) Gibson
Brother of Caroline E. (Austin) Rowe, James Gibson and William Henry Gibson
Husband of Edna (Dale) Gibson â married December 27, 1882 in New Plymouth, TNK, NZ
Father of Iris E. (Gibson) Way, Elsie Edna Gibson, Ellen Elizabeth Gibson, Robert Gibson, William Henry Gibson, Mabel Irene Gibson, Jessie Hilda Catherine Gibson, John Harold Gibson, Sydney Eric Gibson, Norman Parau Gibson, Lance V. Gibson and Vivian Phyllis Gibson
Died October 16, 1932 in New Plymouth, Taranaki, New Zealand
Profile manager: Lorna Henderson private message [send private message]
This page has been accessed 157 times.


This biography is a rough draft. It was auto-generated by a GEDCOM import and needs to be edited.

Name

Name: John /Gibson/ [1]
Birth

Birth:
Date: 03 AUG 1859
Place: Kangarong, , Victoria, Australia
Note: Ref #18714, indexed as Jno Gibson s/o John, mother Emma Parkes (sic) Clinton ? in the parish of Kangerong, Co. Mornington. Cert reads: 3 August 1859, Jamiesons Survey, Kangerong, Victoria, John, not present, male, s/o John GIBSON, mariner, 34, born Wiston, Lanarkshire, Scotland, married Emerald Hill, Melbourne, Victoria to Emma Parker Gibson, formerly Clinton, 32, born London, England. Issue living and deceased: Emma (no age given), John, 61 days. Informant, John Gibson, father, residence: Jamieson Survey, Victoria. Witnesses: No medical attendant, or nurse to certify, signatures of occupiers or other witnesses, Mrs Brownlee and Mrs McLein (sic).
Registered 3 Oct 1859 at Schnapper Point by William Armstrong, Deputy Registrar[2][3]
Death

Death:
Date: 16 OCT 1932
Place: New Plymouth, , Taranaki, New Zealand
Note: Coronary stenosis, aorta atheroma[4]
Burial

Burial:
Date: 18 OCT 1932
Place: New Plymouth, , Taranaki, New Zealand[5]
Reference

Reference: 1648
Data Changed

Data Changed:
Date: 28 FEB 2007
Prior to import, this record was last changed 28 FEB 2007

Marriage

Husband: John Gibson
Wife: Edna Dale
Child: Iris Emma Gibson
Child: Norman Parau Gibson
Child: Lance Vernon Gibson
Child: Vivian Phyllis Gibson
Child: Elsie Edna Gibson
Child: Robert Gibson
Child: Ellen Elizabeth Gibson
Child: William Henry Gibson
Child: Mabel Irene Gibson
Child: Jessie Hilda Catherine Gibson
Child: John Harold Gibson
Child: Sydney Eric Gibson
Marriage:
Date: 27 DEC 1882
Place: New Plymouth, , Taranaki, New Zealand
Note: exact date from ref 308. Folio #2758 John GIBSON to Edna DALE[6][7]
Husband: John Gibson
Child: John Gibson
Marriage:
Date: 31 DEC 1855
Place: Melbourne, , Victoria, Australia
Note: cert. #3632 shows: John Gibson, 30, single, born Lanark, Scotland, Master Mariner, present and usual address: Brigantine 'Express', Melbourne, s/o Adam Gibson, contractor, Janet Purdie;
Bride Emma Parker Clinton, 28, single, born London, d/o William Clinton, currier, Jemima Parker, present and usu. address Melbourne. No children by former marriage, either living or dead for either party (ie Emma ignores her previous marriage and existing child, Caroline Emma Austin).
I John Gibson, do hereby declare that I am a member of the Presbyterian church, and that I was married in the Manse at Emerald Hill. Signed by both parties. Witnesses: Andrew Boyd, Elisabeth Boyd. Minister: D Macdonald.[8][9]
Sources

WikiTree profile Gibson-2063 created through the import of HENDERSONLornaAncestorsPlus1Desc4WikiTree.ged on Oct 18, 2011 by L Henderson.
Source: S1314 Title: BDM: AUS Viital Records Index, Record Type: CD Roms, Subject: Australian birth death marriage Abbreviation: BDM: AUS Vitals Author: LDS Publication: 1998 Repository: #R21 Call Number: CD Roms
Repository: R21 Name: LDS library Address: State: Utah Country: USA Note: films and cd roms
Source: S191 Title: BC GIBSON, John; Kangerong, Victoria, Australia, Record Type: Birth cert, Name Of Person: John GIBSON (1648), File Number: VIC ref #18714 Abbreviation: GIBSON, John: BC 1859, Victoria, Australia Publication: 03 Aug 1859 Note: 3 August 1859, Jamiesons Survey, Kangerong, Victoria, John, not present, male, s/o John GIBSON, mariner, 34, born Wiston, Lanarkshire, Scotland, married Emerald Hill, Melbourne, Victoria to Emma Parker Gibson, formerly Clinton, 32, born London, England. Issue living and deceased: Emma (no age given), John, 61 days. Informant, John Gibson, father, residence: Jamieson Survey, Victoria. Witnesses: No medical attendant, or nurse to certify, signatures of occupiers or other witnesses, Mrs Brownlee and Mrs McLein (sic). CONT Registered 3 Oct 1859 at Schnapper Point by William Armstrong, Deputy Registrar Repository: #R158
Repository: R158 Name: VIC BDM Address: State: VIC Country: AUS Note: Victoria Govt BDM online certs: https://online.justice.vic.gov.au/bdm/index-search?action=getHistIdxSearchCriteria
Source: S372 Title: DCERT: GIBSON, John, New Plymouth 1932 Abbreviation: GIBSON, John: DCERT 1932 Publication: 16 Oct 1932 Note: Young St, New Plymouth, 16th Oct 1932, John GIBSON, farmer aged 73 years of coronary stenosis, aorta atheroma. Last seen by W R Wade, 6th Oct. Father John GIBSON, sea captain, mother Emma GIBSON. Buried 18 Oct, 1932, Te Henui cemetery, New Plymouth by G H Gavin, Anglican. Born Victoria Australia, in NZ 64 years. Married New Plymouth at age 23, to Edna Dale, now 72. 6 children still living: Males 40, 37, females, 47, 44, 42, 34.
Source: S58 Title: BDM: NZ fiche index- Birth Death Marriage, Record Type: NZ births deaths marriages (index on fiche) Abbreviation: BDM: NZ Fiche Indices Repository: #R70
Repository: R70 Name: Kapiti Genealogy Society Address: APFHC City: Paraparaumu Library State: WTN Country: NZ
â Source: #S191 Page: Inspection p/copy held, rcvd Oct 1993
â Source: #S191 Page: Inspection p/copy held, rcvd Oct 1993
â Source: #S1314 Page: GIBSON/PARKER births, searched Dec 2003
â Source: #S372
â Source: #S372
â Source: #S372
â Source: #S58 Page: GIBSON mar. 1882 extracted Mar 2002
â Source: #S193 Page: From Inspection p/copy held by L. McIntosh 1993
â Source: #S222 Page: Inspection p/copy held by L McIntosh Nov 1993, scanned Mar 2006
Acknowledgments

Thank you to Lorna Henderson for creating WikiTree profile Gibson-2063 created through the import of HENDERSONLornaAncestorsPlus1Desc4WikiTree.ged on Oct 18, 2011 and merging WikiTree profile Gibson-4481 created through the import of YeatesGibsonFinlayson4WTOct2013.ged on Oct 1, 2013. Click to the Changes page for the details of edits by Lorna and others.

1 comment(s), latest 2 months, 2 weeks ago

BOUNDARY ROAD, MOUNT ELIZA, VIC., AUST. DOES NOT APPEAR IN MELWAY. BE A DETECTIVE!

CATTLE TRESPASS
COUSINS GO TO LAW.
At Frankston Court on Friday, Mr Pyvis, P.M., was occupied from 11.30 a.m. until 5.30 p.m. with the hearing
of a claim for £20 damages by Leeland Davey, of Boundary road, Mt.Eliza, orchardist, against Albert McIlroy, also of Boundary road, Mt.Eliza. Davey alleged that McIlroy's cows had trespassed in and damaged his orchard at Mt. Eliza on the night of 10th January and early morning of 11th January.
(Frankston and Somerville Standard (Vic. : 1921 - 1939) Friday 17 February 1939 p 7 Article.)

Mt. Eliza Public Hall Committee,with request for attention to ruts at corner of Boundary and Walker's roads, Mt. Eliza.-Engineer reported this had been done.
(Shire of Frankston & Hastings MONTHLY MEETING.
Frankston and Somerville Standard (Vic. : 1921 - 1939) Wednesday 16 April 1924 p 6 Article)

COUNCIL NOTES
Frankston and Somerville Standard (Vic. : 1921 - 1939) Friday 31 May 1929 p 2 Article
... , Mt. Eliza, from Pt. Nepean road to the beach. Members of the council will attend a special Empire Day ... COUNCIL NOTES The Shire of Mornington has agreed to pay half the cost of regrading Boundary road ..

TENDERS
PRICE wanted grubbing about 6.5 acres land at Mt. Eliza. Apply H. Ansall, Boundary road, Mt. Eliza.
(Frankston and Somerville Standard (Vic. : 1921 - 1939) Saturday 16 April 1932 p 5 Advertising)

Frankston, County of Mornington [cartographic material ... - Slv
digital.slv.vic.gov.au/dtl_publish/simpleimages/17/1123904.html

Moorooduc, County of Mornington [cartographic material ...
digital.slv.vic.gov.au/dtl_publish/simpleimages/20/1076739.html

OBITUARYâThe death of Mr Alfred Jones occurred at Somerville on Saturday. The deceased gentleman,who was in his eighty-fourth year,took up his residence in the district in the fifties. Until lately he took a prominent part in public affairs, was for many years a councillor, and also filled many other important offices.Deceased was universally respected.The funeral took place on Monday, the Rev. A. P. Macfarlane officiating at the grave.
(Mornington Standard (Vic. : 1889 - 1908) Saturday 3 February 1906 p 2 Article)

Read Alfred Jones' biography in VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS: PAST AND PRESENT (1888), which is in the local history room at Rosebud library and hopefully most municipal libraries. I seem to remember that Peninsula pioneers were under WESTERNPORT, but there is an index. (For Frankston, read MT ELIZA.) Where did Alf go at the age of 12? See if you can find entries for Hodgins and McCurley.

OBITUARY
MRS. CHARLOTTE HODGINS
One of the oldest and most highly respected residents of the district in Mrs. Charlotte Hodgins, sen., passed
quietly away on Saturday last at the residence of her son, Mr. Harry Hodgins, Grayden's road, Hastings. Until about a fortnight ago the deceased lady, who had reached the grand age of 90, was in her usual health, and took a keen interest in all matters pertaining to the welfare of the district, and was able to attend the last meeting of the Bush Hospital Women's Auxiliary held on June 7. She was confined to her room for about a fortnight, but was making a good recovery, when her heart failed suddenly and she expired peacefully.
To mourn their loss, she leaves a large family of sons and daughters as well as many grand-children and,
great-grand-children.

The burial took place in the Church of England portion of the Hastings cemetery and the service was conducted by the Rev. T. Gair, of Hastings. The funeral was a large one and a mass of beautiful floral tributes was
sent.The late Mrs. Hodgins was a very popular personality in the Hastings,Moorooduc, Somerville and Mornington districts where she was best known, and to her many friends she was regarded as the grand old lady of the Peninsula. Her capacity for interest in her numerous descendants was remarkable and her knitting needles were always busy making comforts for someone. Her cheery ways, kind face and clever hands will long be remembered. Only recently, she was the guest of honor at a Hastings social evening, when her 90th birthday was celebrated.

Arriving in Victoria in 1855 the late Mrs. Hodgins resided with her parents at Ferntree Gully and later settled on the Mornington Peninsula with her husband, the late Mr. James Hodgins, where she resided for the extended period of 72 years, braving, many troubles and sharing any joys. She was the mother of Mary (Mrs. Strachan, deceased), Susan(Mrs. Dobson), Thomas (deceased),John (deceased), James, Alexander,Henry, Charlotte (Mrs. Jones), Jean(Mrs. Doxey) and George .

The actual number of descendants of the late Mrs. Hodgins has been estimated at 10 children (three deceased), 45 grand-children; 30 great-grandchildren, 1 great great grandchild.Many records in the way of generations are heard of these times, but,it is not often five generations can be claimed. It is quite safe to say the Hodgins type is the kind needed in Australia, for they are all well, settied in occupations and delighting in a free life in the country. Virile,vigorous, honorable, and intelligent,they are people to be admired and respected. They may well be proud of "Grandma," as the late Mrs. Hodgins was known, and have received many messages of sympathy. (OBITUARY MRS. CHARLOTTE HODGINS.
Frankston and Somerville Standard (Vic. : 1921 - 1939) Saturday 2 July 1932 p 8 Article)

Read Mr Mann's EARLY HISTORY OF MT ELIZA ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA (Rosebud Library.)

WHY WAS BOUNDARY ROAD SO-NAMED?
WHAT IS IT CALLED NOW?
WHEN WAS THE NAME CHANGED?

Grading works have been carried out on Davey's Bay Road, Watt's Parade and Canadian Bay road, and the old macadam section of Towerhill road had been scarified and graded.
(MT. ELIZA BUSH FIRE BRIGADE.
Standard (Frankston, Vic. : 1939 - 1949) Friday 8 November 1940 p 7 Article)

SMETHURST-BRAIN.
The marriage of Elsie Vera, daughter of Mrs. A. Brain, of Middle Park,to Walter Arnold, eldest son of Mr.
and Mrs. J. Smethurst, of Canadian Bay road, Mt. Eliza, was celebrated at Christ Church, Ackland street, St.
Kilda, on May 11, by the Rev. Penicott.(Frankston and Somerville Standard (Vic. : 1921 - 1939) Saturday 17 June 1933 p 1 Article)

SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 13. At 3.30 p.m.
GILLIARD'S ROAD.
Mount Eliza(Off Baden Powell Drive. Near Boundary Road. Which Is Off Nepean Highway. Op. Mt. Eliza Post
office.) (The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 6 February 1954 p 22 Advertising)

Come on mate. Get a new Broadbent's; your old road directory must be at least 20 years old. Use your (smethurst)BRAIN! You've got something else wrong too,so I'll give you a clue.

GILLARD. - On the 28th February, at Myrina, Point Nepean road, Mount Eliza, Louisa, the beloved wife of James Gillard, and loved mother of Mrs. Nellie Crowther, aged 73 years.
(The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Monday 2 March 1925 p 1 Family Notices)

1 comment(s), latest 2 months, 3 weeks ago

REV. WILLIAM H. TAYLOR'S EASY JIGSAW PUZZLE: SAFETY BEACH AND MAIN RIDGE, VIC. AUST.

Well it was easy for me because I cut the outline of the pieces (A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA, trove articles and the evidence of a foundation member of the Safety Beach Country Club) and knew how to fit them together. The following comes from comments under my RED HILL POST 1940 AND PROPOSED BACK TO RED HILL journal. Taylor, Bean and Roberts descendants would be unlikely to find them there,hence the new journal.

TAYLOR. On the 21st April, at Safety Beach, Dromana, Victoria, Rev. William H. Taylor, dearly loved husband of Esther, and loving father of Rev. F. W. Taylor (Numurkah),Will H. Taylor (450 Little Collins-street, Melbourne), Win (Mrs. W. G.Roberts, Main Ridge), Rene (Mrs.A. McCutcheon, Cavendish), and Doris (deceased). At rest.(P.1, Examiner, Launceston,3-5-1935.)

Now I'm wondering why this notice was in a Tassie newspaper and how Win Taylor came to meet W.G.Roberts of Main Ridge.
by itellya on 2015-02-11 07:59:59
TAYLOR/ ROBERTS/ BEAN.

Reverend Taylor (see previous comment) had probably been at Safety Beach for at least seven years and was involved with the Mornington Peninsula Development League, apparently handling the sale of badges to raise funds for improvements on Arthurs Seat.

PENINSULA DEVELOPMENT LEAGUE MEETING AT HASTINGS.
Frankston and Somerville Standard (Vic. : 1921 - 1939) Friday 16 November 1928 p 2 Article.
BEAUTIFUL MARINE DRIVE.
Rev. Taylor said how favorably impressed Mr. Clapp was with Marine Drive when he visited Mornington recently. Mr. Clapp was most anxious to see the road trafficable: Rev. Taylor said the best thanks of the league were due to Mr. Jackson for his efforts in having Marine Drive attended to in Flinders shire portion.

I was thinking Rev. Taylor might have been the Presbyterian minister at Dromana in the 1890's until I found this.

News of the Churches. MORNINGTON AND DROMANA CIRCUIT
Spectator and Methodist Chronicle (Melbourne, Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Wednesday 18 April 1917 p 439 Article
News of the Churches.
MORNINGTON AND DROMANA CIRCUIT (extract)
Mr Roberts was appointed the Sunday School visitor. Rev. W. H. Taylor reported that he had visited most of the Sunday Schools in the interest of the Young Australia Temperance League, and that nearly all the scholars had signed the pledge. The resignation of Mr.Trewin, the Junior Circuit Steward, on account of ill health, was accepted, and Mr. Counter was appointed in his place.

IT'S A SMALL WORLD! You can say that again! Okay, IT'S A SMALL WORLD!
This has nothing to do with Red Hill but after all the Red Hill Lions Club does publish HILL 'N' RIDGE and the Roberts family pioneered Main Ridge decades before it had that name.

I wouldn't mind betting that the Rev.W.H.Taylor was living in the house on the north west corner of Seaview and Victoria St, Safety Beach at the time of his death in 1935. This house was the homestead of Mr Bean,one time president of the R.A.C.V., who organised the R.A.C.V.speed trials at Safety Beach, and was probably introduced to Spencer Jackson by Rev.W.H.Taylor himself. (See my journals about SAFETY BEACH and SPENCER JACKSON AND THE BUS BAN for sources.)

GOLDEN WEDDING.
TAYLOR-BEAN-On the 2nd April, 1885, at the residence of the bride's parents "Sutton"
Haines street, North Melbourne, by the Rev J W Crisp, assisted by the Rev.W.H. Taylor, brother of the bridegroom Frank E Taylor, youngest son of Mr and Mrs.J.E. Taylor,North Melbourne to Louisa, eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs J.Bean. (Present Address, 20 Grace St, Moonee Ponds.)
(Family Notices,The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 2 April 1935 p 1.)

2 comment(s), latest 2 months, 2 weeks ago

THE AMERICAN BACKGROUND GENEALOGY OF THE GRIFFITH FAMILY OF DROMANA, VIC., AUST.

I still haven't given up on the almost impossible task of trying to find the article in which Watson Eaton testified that he'd never attended university or had any medical training. Another go found the following. The extract is from page 21.
THERE'S A CHANCE THAT THE HURLEY FAMILY OF BALNARRING AND SORRENTO WAS RELATED TO REBECCA, ABRAHAM'S WIFE.

Family Tree Maker - Genealogy.com
familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/m/a/l/Verna.../PDFBOOK1.pdf
Esther Davis and William Griffith were witnesses at a wedding at Sadsbury. Monthly Meeting ...... Watson Eaton was a despondent at his inquest. He wrote: "The

Notes for JONAH GRIFFITH:
Abraham is the son of Jonah Griffith, grandson of Abraham & Elizabeth
This is the story of Abraham. He was born in Lancaster County, PA in the year
1816. He is reported as being "the captain of a whaling ship out of Philadelphia"
but I can find nothing to prove this. He met his wife Rebecca Hurley in PA and
they were married in Blair County. Sometime after this they went on the Oregon
Trail but apparently came back to PA. They had five children, but when they came
to Australia, they only had three with them so presumably the other two had died.
On the seventh day of March 1855 a small barque entered the heads and sailed
into Pot Phillip Bay. She was the "Nimrod" out of New York. Her captain was G.C.
Whiting and she carried a cargo of wheels, lobsters, furniture, scales and seventy
passengers. The Nimrod weighed in at 450 tons, built in Maine in 1849. Aboard
the Nimrod was Abraham Griffith, his wife Rebecca and three children; Arthamece
aged 15, John Calvin aged 9 and Jonah aged 7. Abraham and Rebecca had two
other sons but as they did not come to Australia it is presumed they had died. The
two boys who presumably died were William Harris and Sylvester. Family lore has
it that Abraham was interested in gold and 1855 was the height of the Victoria
Gold rush. They are believed to have arrived with a "black servant" and a
Conestoga wagon.
With the sub-division of Crown Lands in 1854, more settlers were attracted to the
district, among them being Richard Watkins, an Englishman who is credited with
building the first house in the township. In 1857 he was joined by Abraham
Griffith.
Abraham grew a crop of maize that was the "wonder of the district." They lived on
rented land on Jamison's Survey until the Land Act of 1869 brought changes
allowing settlers to select tracts of less than 350 acres, and those who lived on
the Survey made their application. In 1879 Abraham had 150 acres. In censuses
and old books of the time he is variously described as a farmer, builder and
contractor. He and Rebecca had no children born in Australia. Unfortunately little
is known of Abraham in Victoria. In 1861 he is a patron of the National School,
whatever that was, perhaps a forerunner of the State Schools. In 1861, he signed
a document praising a schoolteacher. On this document is also the signature of his
friend and partner, Watson Eaton. Nothing more is heard of Abraham until March
1874 when he had an accident at Mt. Martha and was injured from which injuries
he died a few days later.
Watson Eaton was a despondent at his inquest. He wrote: "The deceased Abraham
Griffith about 58 years old was my partner. I saw him the day before he was
brought by Mr. Wiseman. His wife and I found him a good deal agitated. The next
three days he was going about and he was able to explain what had happened to
PAGE 22
him. He said the horses ran away with him and that he kept them on the road but
could not keep them away from the saplings. He said the accident would not have
happened but for the saplings."
Abraham is buried in the cemetery at Dromana, as is Rebecca. In company with
about twenty other old graves they are kept tidy by the Dromana Historical
Society. Unfortunately no records have survived as to which grave is which and the
sea winds have worn the inscriptions from the headstones. Jonah is buried there
with his wife as is John Calvin and his wife and Abraham's great grandson Ves
(Sylvester) and his wife.
Child of JONAH and ELIZABETH HARRIS is:
i. ABRAHAM5
GRIFFITH, b. Abt. 1816; d. Australia; m. REBECCA HURLEY; d. Australia.

SPENCER HUGH JACKSON AND THE BUS BAN (MORNINGTON PENINSULA, VIC., AUST.)

THE BUS BAN.
Spencer Jackson was Dromana's dynamo and his fellow members of members of the Mornington Peninsula Development League used a similar term to describe him: LIVE WIRE!

PENINSULA DEVELOPMENT LEAGUE MEETING AT HASTINGS.
Frankston and Somerville Standard (Vic. : 1921 - 1939) Friday 16 November 1928 p 2 Article (EXTRACTS.)
A "LIVE WIRE."
Mr.. Spencer Jackson forwarded
cheque for subscription, and £2/2/ as
his annual donation. He hoped that
members would use their best endea
vors to increase the membership. He
also offered the use of his Melbourne
office to the league if it was required
at any time. A vote "of thanks was
passed to Mr. Jackson for the great
interest he was taking in the. league.

R A.C.V. SPEED TESTS.
Mr Jackson reported that he had
had a visit from Mr H. J. Bean and
that the R.AC.V was holding speed
and acceleration tests on Safety
Beach, Dromana, on December 1. One
thousand motor cars were expected.
If the meeting was successful the club
would hold another in January. The
Dromana Progress Assdciation had
been asked to co -operate in organis
ing. Volunteers were, also required
to control the traffic.He suggested
that the league render assistance.
The profits would be donated to any
public charity that Dromana Progress
consents to give them to. He moved
that the league support.

I thought his BEAUTIFUL DROMANA of 1927 nothing more than an advertorial and that his incredible achievements of running the huge fundraising ball of 1928 that enabled construction of the road to the summit of Arthurs Seat, and being a prime mover in finally getting the coast road from Mornington to Dromana built and getting the bus ban lifted were motivated by his business interests.
UNTIL I SAW THIS!

DYSON. On July 27, at Dromana, George Robert Dyson, a truly noble character, much-esteemed friend of Spencer Jackson. (P.2, Argus,28-7-1944.)



BANNED ROAD SERVICES.
BAYSIDE RESORTS HARD HIT.
GREAT PUBLIC INDIGNATION.
What Will Railways Gain?
(BY OUR SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE.)
Residents of the Mornington Peninsula
who had enjoyed in recent years a period
of remarkable progress and prosperity, have
suffered a severe blow through the with-
drawal of private motor-omnibus services,
which has virtually thrown them back to
the unenviable stage when they had no
direct transport service to Melbourne. Lead-
ing residents of Dromana and Rosebud
yesterday said that the astonishing develop-
ment of the buside resorts in that district
was due entirely to motor transport, and
condemned the sweeping provisions of the
Motor-'bus (Urban and Country) Act which
have forced private motor-'buses off the
road and left the district without adequate
transport facilities. Investigation of the
business affairs of many traders suggests
that the falling off in passenger traffic
already (allowing for the diminution due
to the winter season) has seriously affected
them.
Back to the "Rabbit Express."
It is impossible to find logic in the reason-
ing of the authorities who have brought
the Mornington Peninsula within the scope
of the ban. It is poorly served by the rail-
way, and the most absurd part of the pre-
sent prohibition is that the Railways de-
partment has nothing satisfactory to sub-
stitute for the 'buses. Nor can it hope to
add more than a paltry few pounds a week
to its revenue by inducing a few visitors
to submit to the annoyance and inconveni-
encee of changing from the electric train
at Frankston to motor-'buses travelling to
Sorrento and Portsea. Ten years ago the
residents of Sorrento, Rosebud, or Dro-
mana who desired to travel to Melbourne
by train in the morning began the jour-
ney before daylight in a horse-drawn
vehicle which conveyed fish and rabbits
to Mornington. This conveyance is now
historic. It was known in the district as the
"rabbit express." It deposited its weary
passengers at the Mornington railway sta-
tion in time for the morning train. Several
residents of the district invested their capi-
tal in the purchase of motor-'buses, and
completely changed the outlook for the
peninsula. Not only were residents enabled
to go to and from Melbourne in an hour or
two, but the service attracted Melbourne
people to bayside resorts which hitherto
had boen inaccessible to the majority of
wage-earners. The direct result of these
'bus services was reflected in the erection
of new shops and dwellings. Land values
rapidly increased, and Dromana, Rosebud,
Rye, and other places experienced a pros-
perity undreamed of a year or two pre-
viously. Residents of townships inland on
the peninsula also enjoyed the privilege
of speedy motor transport. It would be
an exaggeration, of course, to suggest that
the district has been crippled by the 'bus
ban, but there has been severe retrogres-
sion. The population of the peninsula is
exceedingly loyal to the private bus owners,
and has been since the inception of the
services, and the obligation under the new
law to break the journey at Frankston has
increased the hostility which the district
has shown towards the Railways depart-
ment. This attitude began when the Rail-
ways Commissioners instituted a motor-'bus
service in opposition to private enterprise.
Residents objected strongly to that en-
croachment upon a field pioneered by
private enterprise, and in which, they
claimed, there was not sufficient competi-
tion with the railways to justify the step.
The exasperating delays, inconvenience,
and difficulty in reaching Dromana by the
"official" route (for several five-passenger
motor cars licensed by the hackney car-
riage committee of the Melbourne City
Council, still ply between Melbourne and
Sorrento) was shown yesterday. Inquiry
made at the Tourist Bureau elicited the in-
formation that the only train for passengers
to Dromana left Flinders street at 9.20 a.m.
A return ticket to Frankston was neces-
sary. Upon arrival at Frankston the pas-
senger walked along a ramp a distance of
about 400 yards to a motor- bus stand. The
walk suggested the difficulties which would
befall elderly persons with luggage or
mothers with infants and small children.
The passenger had boarded the train at
Caulfield, and it was not until he reached
Frankston that he was told that at Flinders
street he could have purchased a combined
train and 'bus ticket from Melbourne to
Dromana and return, although that infor-
mation could easily have been supplied by
the Tourist Bureau. At Dromana it was
leamed that the bus did not leave Dromana
for Frankston until 5 o'clock. The pas-
senger decided to return to Melbourne
earlier in the afternoon in one of the hire
cars, which cover the distance in little
more than an hour, or about half the time
occupied by the train and 'bus by way of
Frankston. The opinion was freely ex-
pressed at several bayside resorts visited
yesterday that the only persons whom the
Railways department could expect to travel
by the train and 'bus route would be
strangers. Residents of the district having
business in the city invariably patronise
the hire cars, and it was predicted that
Melbourne residents who have gone regu-
larly to the peninsula for holidays will also
adopt that method, or forego their visits.
Hardships of 'Bus Owners.
Apart from the widespread discomfort
to the travelling public, the ban has been
disastrous to those who invested their capi-
tal in motor-'buses. At Rosebud a limb-
less soldier, who has a wife and three chil-
dren, and is a skilful driver in spite of an
artificial leg, has six motor-'buses idle in
his garage. They represent all his capital.
His position is so acute that he has been
forced to dismiss his three assistants (all
former soldiers) and is now himself en-
gaged in carting wood. Before the ban
he used 500 gallons of petrol weekly; now
he sells about 12 gallons a week to motor-
ists and uses a gallon or two himself.
That is a typical instance of the strangling
of private enterprise which was performing
an essential public service. At Dromana
one of the most respected families in the
district is in similar straits. All of its capi-
tal is represented by splendid motor-'buses
idle in the garage, and for which no buyers
can be found. One private service has
undertaken the Frankston-Sorrento route,
and co-operates with the Railways depart-
ment. The other private 'bus owners de-
cline to apply for licences for this route
(although they state that they have been
urged by the Country Roads Board to do
so) because they are certain that the pas-
senger traffic would not enable them to
pay expenses. Several of them, however,
maintain a daily five-passenger service be-
tween Melbourne and Sorrento, because
they believe that the present ban cannot
continue. Although there are 24 trains
daily to Frankston in the winter, the Sor-
rento-Portsea 'bus meets only three. To
adapt Punchs' famous advice to those
about to marry, wise counsel to passengers
intending to travel on one of the 21 trains
which are not met by a 'bus is "Don't."
"Public Rights Infringed "
Indignation was expressed yesterday by
several leading towspeople of Dromana
and Rosebud over what was called "an
iniquitous position" and "an unwarrant-
able infringement of public rights." Mr.
W. J. Chadwick, of Dromana, said that it
was outrageous to penalise the private 'bus
owners who had served the public so well.
"What does this district contribute to the
railways?" asked Mr. Chadwick. "Little
or nothing. The ban is a most distressing
setback to the district. People had an
easy and cheap way of moving about the
peninsula. Many Melbourne residents have
come here for years because of the 'bus
service, and have become property-owners.
Many week-end residents have been built
solely because of the 'buses. The Railways
department will not benefit through their
withdrawal. Some people will stay away
from the district, and others who can afford
it will buy motor-cars. People will not
submit to the inconvenience of changing
from train to 'bus, when under the old
system the 'bus picked them up at their
doors and set them down at their destina-
tions.
Councillor Shaw, of the Flinders Shire
Council, said that the recent progress of the
district was due entirely to motor-'bus faci-
lities. The Frankston service, he predicted
would be a failure. People would not bother
to change. The ban would harm the dis-
trict considerably. He estimated that 96
per cent. of the residents of the bayside
from Portsea to Dromana would decline to
travel by train. He trusted that the leader
of the Opposition (Sir William McPher-
son) would lose no time in urging Parlia-
ment to amend the law to exempt certain
districts from the provisions of the act.
Similar views were espressed by Coun-
cillor T. W. Chadwick, of Rosebud. Land
values had increased greatly since the
'buses ran through to Melbourne, he said.
Land which six years ago was sold at £1
a foot had recently been sold at £10 a foot.
Storekeepers in the district had been hard hit.(P. 16, Argus, 29-6-1928.)

Spencer Jackson's letter.
('BUS BAN. TO THE EDITOR OF THE ARGUS.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Monday 11 February 1929 p 17 Article)

MOTOR-BUS BAN.
MORNINGTON SERVICES.
Railways Commissioners' Defence.
A letter waS published on Monday from
the secretary of the Dromana Progress
Association (Mr. Spencer H. Jackson), in
which complaint was made of the Railways
motor-bus services on the Mornington
peninsula, which were described as shock-
ingly inadequate, and such as to retard
the development of holiday resorts on the
peninsula. At the same time, Mr. Jack-
son wrote to the Railways Commissioners,
expressing keen disappointment at the
manner in which the department was re
tarding the district.
In reply Mr. Jackson has received a let-
ter from the secretary of the department
(Mr. E.C.Eyers), pointing, out that at
the time of the introduction of the Motor
Omnibus (Urban and Country) Act five
commercial road motor passenger services
(including the service operated by the de-
partment) were running. When portion
of the route between Melbourne and
Frankston was prohibited the department
withdrew its road service, as did one of
the other operators (Dyson's Motors), who
applied for and obtained a licence to oper-
ate over the authoriscd route between
Frankston and the peninsula. All other
operators, Mr. Eyers states, in defiance of
the law, have continued to run to and
from Melbourne practically as formerly,
sometimes with large omnibuses and fre
qucntly with more than five passengers.
Dyson's Motors, who are the only author-
ised operators, and who are carrying pas
sengers between Frankston and the penin-
sula under contract with the department.
have so far obtained only a negligible por-
tion of the business they were entitled to
expect, because of the continued operations
of the unauthorised services to and from
Melbourne. The commissioners are op-
posed to the through running from Mel-
bourne in contravention of the law, but
they have no voice in the administration
of the act, and are therefore powerless in
the matter. In their opinion there is no
reason why the combined rail and road
facilities should not meet fully the require
ments of the district. The journey, they
consider, can be made in the same time
as by the through road services, and large
expenditure has been incurred at Frank-
ston to make the change at that point easy
and comfortable.
-"During the current holiday season," con-
tinued Mr. Eyers, both the department
and Dyson's Motors made elaborate ar-
rangements, at considerable cost, to handle
expeditiously an anticipated large volume
of traffiic to and from the peninsula. The
arrangements, however, proved to bo quite
unnecessary, and the expenditure was
money lost, because the business did not
go by rail, but was secured by the un-
authorised 'through' services. While
these unauthorised services are permitted
to continue it would be quite unreason-
able' to expect Dyson's Motors to incur
further losses by increasing a service which
is already greater than is necessary on the
basis of the patronage accorded it. At the
present time three trains are met by
Dyson's Motors in each direction daily
(except on Sundays, when two trains are
met), and on only a very negligible num-
ber of occasions have the train connections
been missed. With the exception of these
occasions, the time-table has been closely
adhered to.
In reply to Mr. Eyers' letter, Mr. Jack-
son- contends that the department
has proved beyond doubt that it cannot
offer inducements to the travelling public
to use its means of transport. He con-
siders the railway fare to Frankston and
the 'bus charge of 5/- for an 18-mile jour-
ney excessive when, compared with the
"unauthorised" motors' charge of only 7/0
for a 44-mile journey. The small amount
of money received by the department for
the actual use of its railroad does not, he
thinks, justify tho continuance of the re-
strictions on the motor services of the
peninsula. Mr. Jackson states that the
buses miss the connecting trains more
often than they meet them, and that they
have proved that they cannot consistently
do the journey in an hour and a half, as
the "unauthorised" motors do regularly.
(P.15,Argus, 14-2-1929.)

The president of the Dromana Progress
Association (Mr.S.Jackson) said that he
could produce the dates of 33 occasions in
February on which Dyson's bus had missed
the connecting train at Mornington.
( 'BUS BAN OPPOSED. PENINSULA SERVICE SAID TO BE INADEQUATE. Minister Will Not Promise Relief.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 27 March 1929 p 7 Article
... * deputation from the Mornington peninsula)

Things weren't looking so promising at the end of 1929 so I tried the next decade only to find one article. The Shire of Flinders had protested against the bus ban, this article hidden among countless articles about football.
'BUS BAN PROTEST. Flinders Council Takes Action.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 6 February 1930 p 10 Article

How could I confirm that through buses had been allowed to compete with the railways? Rosebud, Birkdale???
It worked.(Birkdale was the name that Whitaker's busline used for the suburb we now call Tootgarook because of Birkdale guest house on the east corner of Carmichael St.) This seemed to indicate that Whitaker's through service started in 1937 but out of curiosity I switched to the 1920's and found these two advertisements under MOTOR SERVICES TO EVERYWHERE.

DROMANA, SORRENTO, AND PORTSEA.
Return Fares, Sorrento, 17/3 1st Class, 16/, 2nd Class, Return Fares, Dromana, 12/3 1st class,11/ 2nd class. Book Govt. Tourist Bureau or Flinders st. station.

DROMANA, Rosebud-Whitaker's service leaves Batman av., 9:30 a.m., 5 p.m. Book Pioneer 15 Queen's Walk. C. 5224.
(Classified Advertising
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 9 November 1929 p 34 Advertising)

The first involved a combined rail/bus ticket but the numerous private bus operators such as Whitaker of Rosebud must have sensed that they would not be prosecuted.

"Fred Whitaker Senior established his garage in Dromana in the early 1920's and ran a bus to Rosebud.Later his sons amalgamated with Johnson and Metcher to form Portsea Passenger Service......Spencer Jackson organised a deputation of 200 to the Minister of Transport with the result that buses were permitted to run to Melbourne until W.W.11 necessitated economies.*" (*Petrol rationing.) P.53, A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.

A DESAILLY RUN ON THE MORNINGTON PENISULA? BORDERS? (VIC., AUST.) Also MEYRICK &HOBSON.

This journal resulted from a quest to confirm a theory that a building,the remains of which are shown in an aerial photo of portion of Dromana taken after the bushfires of December 1939, was the Kangerong guest house. My motto is USE IT OR LOSE IT now because I have often failed to find articles on trove that I have read in the past such as Watson Eaton's testimony that he'd never attended university or received any medical training, or my current problem of finding when Dromana was split over the proposal to relocate the post office from the Foote St corner.

Like George Smith's Wooloowoollboolook,Desailly's run on the peninsula has often been mentioned and I think I have seen a reference in a heritage study to it being on the southern side of Arthurs Seat's summit. The only actual place whose location I've been able to determine is Desailly's waterhole near which Victoria's second duel took place between Meyrick and Dr Barker. This was near the bend in Maxwell Rd in Melway 252 J6. (Location based on a map in Charles Hollinshed's LIME LAND LEISURE.)

This extract pertains to the family of Dr Desailly (who was on the staff of Sydney's hospital in 1832 and whose descendants married into the Dr Godfrey Howitt family and were valued members of the Camperdown community- none of which was mentioned in Billot and Kenyon's article.)

PASTORAL PIONEERS THE DESAILLYS WHEN 2,000,000 ACRES WERE HELD No. 103
The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 7 December 1935 p 4 Article

PASTORAL PIONEERS By R.V.B. and A.S.K.
THE DESAILLYS
WHEN 2,000,000 ACRES WERE HELD
No. 103
SOMETHING of the Desaillys has already been told in this series of articles, but there is much more. Dr.Francis Desailly, who was born in London in 1772, came over from Van Dieman's Land after having been in partnership
with Captain Harrison at Jerico. With him were his sons, Francis and George.

They arrived in the ill-fated Britannia on April 1, 1839. As agent for Sir John Owen, Dr. Desailly took up Fulham, on the Glenelg, in 1841, but legal troubles supervened, and the run was transferred to George Fairbairn, who represented the Simeon Lord estate. Subsequently Fulham fell into the hands of George Armytage, of Bagdad.

Meanwhile Dr. Francis Desailly went to Gippsland and acquired a run a few miles from Sale, then in the possession of a Sydney firm John King and Co. The Gippsland run was also named Fulham,and was held by Desailly till 1853.

The sons, Francis and George, went to Edward Hobson's Kangerong and Tootgarook stations, on the eastern shores of Port Phillip Bay, where now Dromana stands. Hobson, a grandson of Dr. Luttrell, surgeon at Hobart Town, and a friend of another Desailly (Dr. T. A.), who was assistant surgeon at the Colonial Hospital, Hobart Town, was the first to settle in that locality.

EXPLORING WESTERNPORT
Robert Jamieson, who for a time held all the country from Arthur's Seat to Point Nepean, persuaded Hobson and the Desaillys to accompany him upon an expedition to explore Westernport Bay.They took three blackfellows with them. They carried a whaleboat across the peninsula, and in it visited all parts of the Westernport Bay. The result of the expedition was that Jamieson sold out most of his holdings,including Cape Schanck, to Willoughby and Thomson, and they in turn sold to John Barker, who later was for 40 years clerk of Parliament.Jamieson then moved to the head of Westernport, and he called his new province Torbinurruck, now Tobin Yallock.
Francis (jun.) and George Desailly remained at Arthur's Seat for some time.

MEYRICK AND HOBSON.
Meyrick(a member of the family after whom the area known as Merricks is named)talks of Edward Hobson at Kangerong in his book Life in the Bush...
Before the close of June 1837,he (Hobson) moved down the bay past Arthurs Seat and took up the country between the present day townships and Rye*.His run, known to Henry Meyrick as PACKOMEDURRAWARRA became best known as Kangerong or Tootgarook." (P.25 of Colin Mclear's A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.)
*It is not certain whether Edward Hobson's run comprised all the land between Ellerina/ Bruce/Foxey's Hangout Rd and Government Rd, Rye at the same time, but he had moved past Arthurs Seat before Hugh Jamieson purchased his special Survey in 1841. The purpose of the above is to explain that "Henry's friend at PACKEMEDURRAWARRA" in the following article was Edward Hobson.

"And Some onâthe Wallaby Track" BOOKS OF THE DAY
The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 16 March 1940 p 34 Article Illustrated
... , the two boys, in order to be near Maurice, took up some land on Westernport, about half-way between ... . Finally they decided it was hopeless to stay at Westernport. Henry, on the recommendation of a friend ... 2520 words

Narre Gullen was probably Coolart. The Desaillys probably sat on the fence when two versions of the duel at Desailly's waterhole appeared, given that one version was written by Howitt, who received many grants in the parishes of Fingal (west of Boneo Rd and the Cape Schanck turn off road) and Flinders(fronting Boyds Rd.)

This extract from the above mentioned book of the day details how Henry Meyrick's life ended in the Thompson River in 1847 in an attempt to get medical attention for Mrs Desailly.

In May, 1847, Alfred and Henry were invited to stay at the station of Mr.Desailly, on the Thomson River. Mrs.
Desailly, whose confinement was expected, became suddenly ill. Desailly dared not leave his wife, and asked Henry to ride to Alberton for a doctor. The Thomson River was flooded at the time.To save time Henry insisted on swimming the river on horseback, despite Desailly's protests. Horse and man were sweptdown stream. By some means Henry lost his hold on the horse, and was drowned in midstream. Desailly witnessed the tragedy, powerless to give any assistance.

Next day Mrs. Desailly and her child both died. Henry's body was not found until a fortnight later.That is the story of one man who helped to make Australia. The final tragedy of the death of Henry and the mother and child must be typical of many such that have never been recorded.
"LIFE IN THE BUSH 11840-1847)," by F. J.Meyrick (London: Thomas Nelson); 10/.

1 comment(s), latest 2 months, 3 weeks ago

THREE CHEERS FOR CR TERRY OF THE SHIRE OF FLINDERS AND KANGERONG. (VIC., AUST.)

The Shire of Flinders and Kangerong wasformed by amalgamating the Flinders and Kangerong Road Districts. The former had listed ratepayers geographically which had made propertieseasy to identify,by looking at parish maps and the latter had listed ratepayers alphabetically,which made it easy to locate their assessments. When the shire was formed the Kangerong alphbetical listing was continued.
DEPRESSION,WALKOFFS,WHOM TO RATE, ALMOST BANKRUPT, JIM LITTLE BROWN

FIND REPORT TO COUNCIL RE TRYING TO LOCATE OWNERS OF PROPERTIES. LOOK IN TERRY ENTRY IN SHIRE OF F.JOURNAL.


"Helpless and Hopeless State of Affairs." A COUNCILLOR RESIGNS FROM THE FLINDERS AND KANGERONG COUNCIL.
Mornington Standard (Frankston, Vic. : 1911 - 1920) Saturday 2 September 1911 p 3 Article.

"Helpless and Hopeless
State of Affairs."
A COUNCILLOR RESIGNS
FROM TIIE FLINDERS AND
KANGERONG COUNCIL.
The Flinders and Kangerong shire
will soon have to alter its name. A
wag has suggested "Shindies-and
Hanged-if-we'll go on.' Certainly it is
in a continual state of unrest, and the
peculiarities of its management would
perplex anyone. Some of the coun
cillors are shrewd, level-headed busi
ness men, fit and able to grapple with
any ticklish municipal problem, but
others think their whole and sole duty
is to slang-whang each other, and to
fill in their spare time slap-banging
the printer who asks for their adver
tising and doesn't want their cheap
and nasty printing. The shire coun
cil's doings during the past 12 months
would give matter for an interesting
book. Their secretaries come and
holiday as long as they can by the
seaside, and when things get too un
comfortable off they go in search of
more congenial company.
*-At the last meeting` Cr Terry form
mally handed in his resignation, ac
companied by a letter which all through
said "Enough! enough!" Cr Terry
wrote :-"After due consideration I
resolved to tender you my resignation
as a councillor of the west riding of
the shire. There are several reasons
which have led up to my action, and
after having thoroughly considered my
duties to the ratepayers, to my fellow
councillors and to myself, I can see
no other alternative but to vacate my
seat at the council table. The reasons
are several. 1. The appalling state of
the main road from Dromana to Sor
rento, the starvation amount spent on
same road as compared with the large
amounts spent on the making of a new
road-a benefit to a few cabmen and
visitors during three months of the
year on which road rates collected are
a mere bagatelle, also the conditions
on which this, the London Bridge road,
was constructed being, in my opinion,
a disgrace to any municipality which
would for one moment entertain the
matter. 2. The financial position of
he counicil is far from right, and I con
sider the revaluation of the whole
Shire is an absolute necessity, and
when I moved to that effect my motion
was defeated by a large majority. The
council by throwing out this motion
showed that they were satisfied with
the present state of financial muddle.
3. The reports from the Public Works
Department from time to time have
proved up to the hiltthat the council
as a body are totally unable and in
capable of extricating the affairs of the
ratepayers from this chaotic stale 4.
The endorsement of the ratepayers on
August 24th, 1911, proved that the
majority were in favor of the present
helpless and hopeless state of the affairs
of the council, which must before very
long reach a critical stage, the result
if which will be no credit or honor to
those in office. It will no doubt be
laid at my door by some 'honest' men
that I am deserting my post when the
ship is in danger. I have thought of
this, and after having made attempts
to alter the course pursued by the
council I have been defeated. I reco
gnise that it is useless to stem the
drift that is going on, for things are
worse than they were twelve months
ago. I thank the councillors of the
east and centre ridings for their good
fellowship and courtesy since being a
member of the council ; as to the other
nembers of the west riding, I have no
thing to thank them for but opposition
to my best endeavors to serve the rate
payers, which, if they had stood to me
as men who wished to alter the hor
rible muddle we, as a body, are in, I
think things might have been different.
Asa protest, therefore, Sir, I tender
you my resignation, for I consider my
good name and reputation would be
at stake, being unable to alter the
chaotic state of the council's affairs."
(P.3, Mornington Standard, 2-9-1911.)

'SORRYENTO.'
To the Editor of "The Standard."
Sir,--Ratepayers at Sorrento,
now feel the loss of Ex-Councillor
Terry, for when he was in the
council he kept things in order,
and saw that every officer did his
duty: But since he resigned his
seat, things are drifting back at
Sorrento to the same groove as they
were 20 years ago. Boxthorn is
growing on the sides of the roads
and in private properties, and
apparently that by-law is now
deadl; cattle and horses are per
mitted to wander at their leisure
about the roads and streets all day
and night, and even closet pans are
allowed to flow over, and nobody
seems to care. People are continu
ally complaining, but without re
dress, so now several people are
emptying their own pans. No
wonder our finances in the shire
are in such a deplorable state, as
the outstanding rates and pan
rates in Sorrento alone, are enor
mous, and run into over three
figures. There are several who
have not paid their pan rates for
the last four years. "'Why"?.
Yours, etc.
SORRYENTO. (P.3,Mornington Standard, 16-12-1911.)

EMBARRASSMENT is a mighty powerful weapon against any government or beaurocracy in a democracy.

A COMPARISON.

1910. Robert Henry Adams,200 acres, Wannaeue; 60 acres and buildings Wannaeue.
1919. Robert Adams,200 acres and buildings, part crown allotment 19, Wannaeue and 6A Wannaeue.

Crown allotment 20 Wannaeue (between The Avenue and Parkmore Rd)had been reserved as Wannaeue Village and was alienated in about 1877, about five years after the Rosebud Fishing Village was declared. Section 19 (191 acres) was sold by Robert Adams to a developer who subdivided the area bounded by Pt Nepean Rd, Parkmore Rd,South Rd and Adams Ave. The rest of c/a 19 reverted to Robert's ownership as well as several of the subdivision blocks. The 200 acres would have been much of c/a 19, and c/a 6A of c/a 20 (19 acres and 4 perches.) The 60 acres on c/a 20 was actually 5A of c/a 20 consisting of 59 acres and 12 perches.

While the difference to you might not seem great, and the description in 1919 is by no means perfect,Cr Terry's resignation had made ratepayers aware of the reason their potholed roads and crumbling bridges could not be repaired. The shire had nearly become bankrupt because over the years knowledge of the ownership of many properties had been lost and therefore no rates had been paid on them. If an owner or occupier of a property was discovered,the assessment would be found in the alphabetical listing under O (for owner) or even in a supplementary assessment after the councillor signatures confirming that the original projected revenue and expenditure had been accepted.

COMPANION TO "A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA" : LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS, ADDITIONAL GENEALOGY etc. (VIC., AUST.)

I don't know how many times I had to search through Colin McLear's great book about the pioneers and events in Dromana's history to find certain illustrations such as the map showing early tenants on the Survey. I was sure there was a photo of Beauvoir in the book and flicked through the whole book, only to find there wasn't. That's probably why Beauvoir is not in the present DROMANA HERITAGE WALK pamphlet. I thought a list of illustrations in the book was necessary so I stopped working on my journal about a Dromana heritage trail to accomplish this.Those who have already purchased the book will find this list to be of value. Genealogists always give a distinguishing detail such as year of birth so that people with the same name are not confused but Colin failed to do this regarding the photo of William Gibson and his wife on page 83. This led to genealogical research which revealed the maiden name of Walter Gibson Snr's wife, the correct spelling of Glenholm and details about descendants that weren't available to Colin.

These details appear in NOTES. One map has been found to be wrong so far,the one on page 39. The Dromana Hotel is shown on crown allotment 4, Section 1, Kangerong,between Pier St and the east end of Gibson St and crown allotments 5 and 6 are shown as being occupied by Holden, John McLear and Peter Pidota. The Dromana Hotel and all the people mentioned were all on crown allotment 5. This and any further errors discovered will be discussed under CORRECTIONS.

A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA: LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
(plus notes & corrections.)

Page and description.
1. Anthony's Nose,1920's.
3. Dromana from Arthur's Seat c.1920.
4. Dromana from Mt. Martha c.1920.
5. Forest scene.
6, Fern gully.
10. Fern in forest.
13. McCrae homestead.
27. Early tenants on the Survey.
29. Matthew Flinders cairn.
32. Waterfall.
34. The Burrell family.
35. Jonah Griffith 1912.
37. The McLear bullock team.
38. Dromana Hotel and McLear bullock team.
39. Section 1 Kangerong (needs correction.)
41. Timber and firewood on Dromana pier.
42. Fishing nets on Dromana pier.
43. Dromana pier (arm at end,rail and luggage,waiting for the steamer.)
45. Godfrey Burdett Wilson.
46. Wilson's butcher shop (probably next to Beauvoir.)
47. Wilson's butcher shop in McCulloch St before 1934.
48. Beachwear of the early 1900's.
49. Guest houses (Aringa, Kangerong,Belmont.)
51. Berthing steamer and waiting day trippers at Dromana;
Dyson's bus fleet; Whittaker's bus.
53. Shaw's bus that did the Arthur's Seat run (in front of Kangerong?)
54. First Dromana post office on the corner of Foote St near the Scurfield / ArthursSeat Hotel.
58. Henry George Chapman.
59. Chapman's forge in Pier St.
61. Nelson Rudduck's "Jetty Store".
63. Nelson Rudduck and Jack Rudduck.
64. Nelson Rudduck and Jane Sophia (nee Chapman.)
67. Page from George McLear's account book re Gay Lad's "service".
71. Albert Griffith,blacksmith, and Mary and John Griffith.
73. Arkwell's packing shed, Red Hill.
76. Former Lighthouse as tower atop Arthur's Seat.
78. William Moat.
82. Walter Gibson's "Glenholm(e)".
83.A young William Gibson and his wife (see note ) in later years.
85. Mr and Mrs Bill Dyson. (See P.84 under CORRECTIONS.)
86. JamesMcKeown, Catherine McKeown.
87. Gracefield in 1964. Eva McKeown.
88. Archibald Vine Shaw.
93. Mary Ann McLear.
94. McLear family tree.
95. Mary Ann McLear 1801-1884, Mary Ann 1893-1970 and Emmeline, Mary Ann McLear 1849-1923.
97. George McLear.
100. Maryfield.
102. Sons of Mary Ann McLear:Bill,George, John, Thomas.
103. Fishermen-Fred Vine; Harry Copp; John McLear, Harry Copp, Jim Singleton and Jonah (Doan)Griffith.
104. James McLear and his bride Alice (nee Prossor.)
108. Henry McLear and bullock team passing Kangerong guest house,apparently in Kangerong Avenue.
110. George McLear's wife, Emmeline Louise (nee Newstead.
112. Maryfield driveway.
113. Dromana's tree church.
115. St Mark's, Dromana.
117. Inscription in prayer book presented to the Union Church by Rev.T.Quinton.
120. Frank Moat.
121. Dr Weld.
122.Old Joe the yardman.
123. The first Presbyterian Church.
125. TheDromana Methodist Church.
128. The first Catholic Church built on land donated by Laurence Murphy.
131. Dromana State School No.184 in very early days.
132. Petition of 9-3-1861 supporting choice of Robert Quinan's school to become Dromana's Common School.
133. Dromana School's attached residence (visible at left of p.131 photo.)
134. The bus which carried students from as far afield as Portsea to Frankston High School.
135. Past pupils from the Rudduck,Aust, Aust, Gunn,Chapman, Evans and Singleton families in 1946. (The old school behind them was burnt down four years later and Connie Cornish (nee Evans), who wrote this at a later reunion in (1887?)stated that a granite wall in the school ground was built with the salvaged McCrae granite. If it is still there,the wall should be heritage-listed.)
136. Piawola, built by Nelson Rudduck using bricks secured from a pit on his Karadoc property.
137. Heronswood.
138. Machinery at granite quarry (opened on 17 acres of George McLear's grant) in 1920.
140. Ralph and Ben Wilson in front of butcher shop that is shown on page 46.
143. Aftermath of Christmas 1939 bush fires.
144. 1939 devastation shown on aerial photo. (The block shown seems to be that bounded by Seacombe St and Kangerong Avenue, based on the tennis court photo on 170 and the kink in Carrigg St in the photo on page 172. The destroyed building at the right was possibly the Kangerong Guest House. BUT...)although there was no mention of the guest house in 1940,advertisements were found in 1941. The aerial photo shows that the positions of the two buildings are very similar to those shown in a Rose Series photo of 1939 that is advertised for sale. However two photos of Kangerong taken in 1954 and 1937 are identical, namely:
Kangerong House Dromana FE Brown 1954;
and Kangerong Dromana M M Shaw 1937.

As the Kangerong Guest House obviously wasn't burnt down, we must assume that the lack of advertising in 1940 was because there were no vacancies and that the tennis court was on the west end of the present football oval. That being so, the destroyed buildings at the right of the photo would have to be at the south west corner of Pier and Gibson Streets.
146. Dromana Fire brigade:?, Malcolm McLear, Alby brasser, Tom Cauacoud, Wally Guy, Frank Singleton, John Ross, Kevin Clydesdale, Norm Osborne.

147. Will (Pop) Littlejohn.
150. Local Volunteer Defence Force.
152. Mrs Christie and Mr J.P.Wallace; Victory Celebrations near Jetty Store.
155. Slaughteryard and shed near the corner of Shergolds Lane and Nepean Highway.
157. Julia Clydesdale; James Clydesdale.
160. NedWilliams, Bill Sears' son-in-law, Bill Sears, George McLear; Messrs N.Rudduck 81, W.J.McIlroy 86 and
Ault 86; Mr and Mrs William Evans on their wedding day.
161. Tom Singleton, John's son,at Dromana racecourse.
164. Dromana F.C. Premiership Team. George Osborne,D.McLardy,Jack Skillen,Peter Gleeson, Eddie Farrell, Henry McLear, Reg. Birch, Mick Nolan, Lou Todd, Sam McLear, Jack Clydesdale, Bill Dyson, Tom Singleton, Jack Rudduck, Bill Evans, R.Gray, Jack Young, F.Harmer, Bob Clydesdale, Bert Aust, Norm Osborne (mascot), G.Wilson,Wally Guy, Bert Griffith, Bill Patterson.
166. 1946 Dromana F.C. team. Bob Friend, Norm Osborne, Ticky Hazeldine, Wally Guy, Burton Allen, Scotty Gourlay, Alan Hosking, Bluey Earles, Bob Moorehead, Vern Humphrey, Doug Goad, Ru Griffith, Jack Brown, Ian Christie, Bert Aust, Spencer Brown, Sandie Christie.
169. DromanaC.C. Premiers 1926-7 season.Stan Evans, H.Head, R.Birch (inset), M.Nolan,Bill Evans Snr., Bob Gray, Alf Farrell, Dr Beattie, R.Stephens, George Osborne,T.Rutherford, E.Inglefinger, Bill Evans,Ru Griffith.
170. The foreshore tennis courts.
171. Dromana Tennis Club. Les and Mavis Wallis, Mr McWhirter, Colin McLear, Mary Bristow, Ken Greer, ?, Maurie Shaw, Gwen Wallis, Charles Kemp, Neil Forge, Norm Osborne, Mrs Dwerryhouse.
172. Dromana 1927 with Foreshore and Panoramic Estates and Aerial Landing Ground (the 45 acres that H.W.Wilson bought from Carrington)labelled.
173. The township from the pier.
176. View from the pier 1927 showing Spencer Jackson's office and with "Panoramic Estate" superimposed.
179. Shaw's bus at the Garden of the Moon on Arthurs Seat.
182. The new ArthursSeat roadon Opening Day , December 14,1929.
183. One of the diving platforms.
186. Dromana Grand Ball 1928; Groovy Spencer Jackson.
188. View of the bay from the Panoramic Estate with Dyson's orchard in foreground.
191. Girls from the Black Lance factory above the jetty Store.
194. "Nip" McLear behind the counter at Rudduck's grocery store.
195. George Wong delivering vegetables from his cart.
196. Looking east (from Pier St?) with Dromana Hotel at rear and the Tea Rooms of Fred Warren's long-time widow (nee Janet Patterson) halfway between.
197. Sketch floor plan of "Maryfield".


CORRECTIONS.
P.39.THE PAGE 39 MAP IS WRONG,AS STATED IN THE FOREWORD.
Crown allotment 5 ,section 1, Kangerong has been calculated as being between the east ends of Gibson St and Sea Quinn Close. It consisted of 36 acres and 25 perches(36.16 acres.) On the thousand link (200 metre) frontage by 1864 were Holden's store*, next to which was Peter PIDOTO'S hut for his workers, such as Robert Rowley, and the two year old Dromana Hotel,described as a 12 room brick house and garden with a staggering nett annual value of 100 pounds. (P.37 A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA,RATES.) In 1874 John McLear married Janet Cairns of Boneo and made his home by Nepean Highway between the Dromana Hotel and the corner of Carrigg St. He was a fisherman and his home was as close to work as he could get without having a hut of the foreshore like Fred Vine did. John's son,John (Nip) lived out his life at this house which was demolished for extensions to the Dromana Hotel. (Melbourne Brindle's map re Fred Vine, P.103-4 of Colin's book.)
(*For much bigraphical detail about Frances Holden, who died aged almost 102, see my journal: PIONEERING NEIGHBOURS NEAR CARRIGG ST, DROMANA.

So we have a store, Pidoto's 4 roomed hut, John McLear's home and the pub on the frontage by 1879, with the second and the third possibly one and the same.In that year Peter Pidota(sic) was assessed on 17 acres, Dromana. Amazingly the Dromana Hotel doesn't seem to to have been assessed,unless my transcription was sloppy.

When I embarked on a project about Dromana's two hotels, which resulted in Ray Stella's place mats, I had great difficulty because every type of construction, a palace or a hovel,was called a building. Eventually I cracked the code; building and 17 acres meant the Dromana Hotel and building and five town lots meant the Scurfield/ Arthurs Seat Hotel with the respective nett annual values also being an indicator.

Cr Terry kicked up a stink in about 1910 because the shire was almost broke,mainly because of inadequate description of properties, but not getting any support from his colleagues, he resigned in protest. Two examples in the 1910 assessment were:1. George S.Edwards, Dromana Hotel (and 17 acres???) and 2. John McLear, fisherman, 1 lot and buildings, Dromana. Both were on c/a 5, section 1, Kangerong! Mrs Pidoto of Clifton Hill, was listed as the person to be rated on "17 acres, Kangerong" but the following comments were made- W.E.Thompson,occupier. G.S.Edwards,owner.

The Liardets were pioneers of Sandridge (Port Melbourne). On page 42, referring to Georgiana McCrae, Colin wrote,"She talks of Liardet who established the first hotel at Sandridge. He told Georgiana that he would like to hire portion of Jamieson's Survey and have a boat and seine net,presumably to use along the shores of Safety Beach.By 1889-90,Richard Watkin was described as a gentleman. Arthur C.C.Liardet, hotel keeper, was assessed on 17 acres and buildings. Arthur had probably seen this advertisement.
HOTEL-DROMANA HOTEL, Dromana, better known as Watkins, brick, slate roofs, highly furnished, containing 12 rooms, very large dining and billiard rooms, coachhouse, stables, outbuildings, about 16 acres land. Let or sell. Immediate possession. Apply Stevenson and Elliot.(P.12, Argus,24-8-1888.)

(Stevenson and Elliot were Melbourne coachbuilders who owned Robert Caldwell's old Dromana Hill and renamed it Fairy Vineyard.)

You will remember that crown allotment 5, section 1 Kangerong consisted of just over 36 acres. (If you didn't I've told you again anyway!) The building (hotel)occupied one of Liardet's 17 acres,leaving about 16 acres of land behind it. Frances Pidoto's land was assessed later (when she was living in N.S.W.) on 17 acres, PART C/A 5,SECT.1, KANGERONG and the remaining two acres are accounted for by John McLear's house and the site of Holden's Store.

Soon after buying the hotel, Lou Carrigg bought the Pidoto land and was assessed on the hotel and 34 acres (on which horse racing-and footy-were conducted until about (no horse racing or racecourses in index so there's something else that needs to be improved.) A check of trove found no mention of racing behind the hotel after 1922. This was because (as stated by Colin somewhere in his book) the government had told the club it could not continue to hold races there and on the present Dromana Secondary College site. Lou Carrigg had been a prime mover in that club and the footy club which played behind the pub until seemingly the 1926 season.

In 1927 all or most of the 34 acres had become Spencer Jackson's foreshore estate.(See P. 172 aerial photo.) The blacksmith mentioned on the plaque at the south east corner of Pier and Charles Sts virtually donated the present footy ground. Who's going to be first to write the blacksmith's name in comments? Reminds me to mention the pub racecourse/footy ground and the plaque in the heritage trail.

P.76.Elsewhere I have referred to Colin's statement that the wooden light house (at today's McCrae)was replaced by the present iron structure in 1874; the replacement was constructed in 1874 but it was not installed until about seven years later so the original lighthouse would have had to operate until installation was completed. This was found by chance during an investigation re relocation of Dromana's post office.

DROMANA.
It is in contemplation to erect a new tower on the site previously occupied by the old trigonometrical tower on Arthur's Seat, and the question has been mooted whether this elevated position (1040 feet above the level of
the sea) might not be utilized as a signal station for both Port Phillip and Western Port Bay.
(South Bourke and Mornington Journal (Richmond, Vic. : 1872 - 1920) Wednesday 8 May 1878 p 3 Article)


P.82.The children of Walter Gibson and Margaret (nee Purdie) are listed on page 82. Their fourth son is missing unless he was known as Tom (which he wasn't.)
GIBSON-HUTCHINSON.-On the 27th December, 1899, at "Waddella," Lilydale, Walter James, fourth son of Walter Gibson, "Glenholm," Dromana, to Sarah, second daughter of the late John Hutchinson, Lilydale. (P. 55, The Australasian, 27-1-1900.)

P.84.Charlie Dyson was working for George McLear at Dromana by 1864. One of his sons, George,planted orchards, on what became Spencer Jackson's Panoramic Estate of 1927,and started Dyson Bus lines. Another son, Jack,had the following children,according to Colin: Mary or Martha,John (Bunny), "Babe" (Mrs Thornell of Somerville), and Bill (Squeaker.) Bill Dyson and wife are pictured on P.85 and I wanted to give the wife a name. Jack's death notice lists his children. There was a Mary and a Martha (Babe, Mrs Thornell.)

DYSON.-On August 16, at Alfred Hospital, John Charles, of Dromana, loved husband of Margaret Mary, and father of Mary(deceased). John, Martha (Mrs. Thornell,Somerville), and William, aged 81 years.
(P.2, Argus,16-8-1943.)

N.B. A NOTE placed here for convenience, not a correction. While I have suggested that Spencer Jackson's 1927 history BEAUTIFUL DROMANA was of an advertorial nature, promoting his Foreshore and Panoramic Estates, a death notice under that submitted by the family of Jack's brother, George (mentioned earlier), shows that the DROMANA DYNAMO did not serve as progress association president,get a road to the summit (funded in part by the huge 1928 ball-see ILLUSTRATIONS p.186), pay for historic plaques and write his history just to make more money.

DYSON. âOn July 27, at Dromana, George
Robert Dyson, a truly noble character,
much-esteemed friend of Spencer Jackson.
(P.2, Argus,28-7-1944.)

N.B.(Also a note.)Colin said on page 84 that George's brother, Jack,spent his time working in the bush. It seems that his house in Palmerston Avenue, east of Pier St (Panoramic Estate) was called St Benedict's and his work in the bush took him to the vicinity of Roberts Rd, Main Ridge. Perhaps he worked in Alexander Shand's old Steam Saw Mill near Main Creek on the Roberts' farm.(Sale notice in my RED HILL POST 1940 journal.)

DYSON (nee Roberts). âOn the 13th September,at St. Benedicts, Dromana, to Mr. and Mrs.J. B*. Dyson, Dromana â a daughter.(P.1, Argus, 15-10-1924.)
*If this initial is correct, it would probably be Jack's son John (Bunny) and the assumption of how he met his wife would still stand, as he probably worked with his father after leaving school at 12 and was discovering that the other sex didn't really have girl germs.

Bunny and Squeaky Dyson, sons of Jack, both served in W.W.1., as did a son of Martha Ellen Dyson who married James Clydesale (P.84.)

Honouring ANZACS
dromana-vic.honouringanzacs.net.au/search-anzacs.php?...Dromana...


ANZACS born in Dromana, VIC
John Alexander Davey Create Anzac Certificate
Service Number: 138
Place of Birth: Dromana, VIC, Australia
Place of Enlistment: Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Next of Kin: Davey, Mary Anne (mother)

BUNNY.
John Burns Dyson Create Anzac Certificate
Service Number: 326
Place of Birth: Dromana, VIC, Australia
Place of Enlistment: Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Next of Kin: Dyson, John (father)

SQUEAKY.
William Robert Dyson Create Anzac Certificate
Service Number: 1668
Place of Birth: Dromana, VIC, Australia
Place of Enlistment: Dromana, VIC, Australia
Next of Kin: Dyson, John (father)

FOR FURTHER DETAILS, SEE:
DYSON, William Robert - Details
https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=87241
Address, Same as next of kim. Marital status, Single. Age at embarkation, 18. Next of kin, Father, John Dyson, Dromana, Victoria. Enlistment date, 21 April 1915.

DYSON, John Burns - Details
https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=87218
Next of kin, Father, John Dyson, Spring Hill, Dromana, Victoria. Enlistment date, 6 May 1916. Rank on enlistment, Private. Unit name, Machine Gun Company 15, ...

CLYDESDALE, William Dyson - Details
https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=56146
Weight, 145 lbs. Next of kin, Brother, M Clydesdale, Dromana. Previous military service, Nil. Enlistment date, 25 February 1915. Date of enlistment from Nominal ...


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NOTES.
P.83.William Alexander Gibson, third son of Walter and Margaret (nee Purdie) does not seem to have married, being only mentioned as an uncle in his 1949 death notice. Therefore William Gibson, pictured on page 83, was not Big Will and was most likely a son of Adam Gibson and Mary Ann (nee McLear), William Thomas Gibson (listed as one of Big Will's nephews.) If this assumption is correct, his wife, also pictured on page 83, was Minnie.
(P.2, Argus,

GIBSON William Thomas Died 11/07/1965 Wife Minnie 11/07/1965


Wife Minnie
G - N - Australian Cemeteries
www.australiancemeteries.com/vic/mornington
.../dromanagn_data.htm

Colin knew nothing about Walter and Margaret's second son. No wonder,because John probably lived far away from Dromana.

GIBSON-CLYNE.âOn the 23rd inst, at the residence of
the bride's parents, Fairy Bower, Lake Rowan, by
the Rev. C. Thomson, John, second son of Walter
Gibson, Glenholm, Dromana, to Ellie, eldest
daughter of George Clyne, Fairy Bower, Lake Rowan.
(P. 1, Argus, 31-5-1882.)

It is of interest that Big Will was christened in Moorooduc. This would have meant Mornington. Dromana had no church of any type in 1868, the Union church being constructed about a decade later.

William Alexander Gibson
Australia, Births and Baptisms
Name: William Alexander Gibson
Gender: Male
Christening Date: 24 Aug 1868
Christening Place: Moorooduc, Victoria, Australia
Birth Date: 09 May 1868
Name Note: Dromana, Victoria, Australia
Father's Name: Walter Gibson
Mother's Name: Margaret Gibson


P.88.SHAW. Additional information.

The Shaw-McKeown Reserve was given that name in recent years but shamefully the history board explaining the name was defaced in record time. (view report - Mornington Peninsula Shire
www.mornpen.vic.gov.au/files/656900ff-949d.../110905ca_rep_26.pdf
May 9, 2011 - Proposed Naming of Reserve at 26 Atunga Terrace, Dromana â ... Dromana the 'Shaw McKeown Reserve' after two of Dromana's pioneering )

Mr. Archibald Vine Shaw, of Kangerong, Dromana, died on Tuesday, aged 63 years. Mr Shaw was one of the leading citizens of Dromana, and was a councillor of the Shire of Flinders for more than 20 years, during which he was president on two occasions. Mr. Shaw held office in almost every semi-public institution in Dromana for many years, and conducted the guest house Kangerong for nearly 46 years. (P.6,Argus,27-10-1932.)


P.178.The 1930's depression affected Dromana too. Colin stated that Passiflora was on the Harrison property, (which probably included Thomas Appleyard and George Peatey's grants by that time, giving a total of 397 acres 1rood and 32 perches fronting the west side of Harrisons Rd. The following indicates that the Passiflora employees mentioned by Colin were again looking for a job before the end of 1938.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5
AT THREE O CLOCK ON THE PROPERTY
under Instruction from Mr H Chapman 313 Little Collins Street Melbourne Chartered Accountant (Aust.) as the Receiver for the Debenture Holders of Passiflora Plantations Pty Ltd
RECEIVER'S REALISING AUCTION
Passiflora Plantations, Dromana-Red Hill.
395 ACRES (About 179 Acres in Passionfruit),
First to be Offered As A Whole But If Not Sold to be Offered In Subdivision, Comprising ? ACREAGE BLOCKS OF 16 ACRES TO 140 ACRES EACH
Extensive Outbuildings. Pine Plantations Netting fences &c.
Terms 25 Per Cent Deposit, Balance 3 Years at 5 Per Cent
Plans and full Details from Manager on Property or Auctioneer
COGHILL AND SON,79 Swanston Street Melbourne and Canterbury, Cent. 2793 W.2059.
(P.19,Argus, 17-9-1938.)

2 comment(s), latest 2 months, 3 weeks ago

DROMANA'S THREE GOLF COURSES, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

DROMANA.
A well attended working bee in connection with the new golf links was held the other afternoon, and under the direction of the president of the club, who was a most energetic toiler, a very creditable amount of work was done. Messrs Shaw, of the Kangerong boardinghouse, kindly dispensed refreshments during the afternoon. Needless to say these were highly appreciated by the heavy grafters.

The new links should prove attractive to golfers, as they are conveniently situated in a picturesque spot in one of Mr Gibson's paddocks*, close to the sea shore. The annual meeting of the Dromana Golf Club was held in the hall on Tuesday week, the president (Mr Welling) in the chair. The treasurer submitted last year's balance-sheet,which showed a credit of 13s. 6 d. Mr Welling was re-elected president, Mr G.H.Rogers** secretary and treasurer,and Messrs W. Gibson and A. V.Shaw auditors. (P.5,Mornington Standard, 18-11-1905.)

*In 1910, Walter Gibson was assessed on 447 acres and buildings, 400 acres and 670 acres, all described on being in Kangerong (parish.) Glenholm consisted of only 268 acres. Much of the extra land would have been leased on Clarke's majority portion of the survey where he washed sheep in Sheepwash Creek and straightened the last mile of Dunn's Creek but the 1879 rates seem to indicate that he owned 365 acres exclusive of Glenholm.

In 1919-20,William Gibson was assessed on 659 acres on the survey (exact locations given), while Margaret Gibson (probably Walter's wife, Margaret, nee Purdie)was assessed on 166 acres, c/a 4 section 2, east of Glenholm across Collins Rd. William Gibson had land near post office (N.A.V. 35 pounds and crown allotment 10 section 1, Walter J.Gibson crown allotment 2 section 19, Jessie Gibson 164 acres and buildings c/a 9 and 9a, section 2 (actually section 1,the eastern portion of Glenholm fronting the west side of Collins Rd)and Adam Gibson 116 acres and buildings,c/a 10,section 2 (actually section 1,the western part of Glenholm, consisting of 116 acres and 2 roods, which included today's Rainier Ave and Lombardy Ave sold as the Monaco Estate. Even the critical Cr Terry, who had resigned about a decade earlier because of inadequate description of properties, would have though things had improved by 1919.But without a parish map and knowledge of the location of Glenholm (William Cottier's grants),he would not have noticed that the two parts of Glenholm were incorrectly described as being in section 2 (east of Collins Rd)and that William Gibson was wrongly assessed on the Western part of Glenholm (on which he was was living) because Adam Gibson paid therates on the buildings and the entire 116 acres.

However we are concerned with determining the new golf course site " conveniently situated in a picturesque spot in one of Mr Gibson's paddocks*, close to the sea shore." and the two best possibilities,in light of Melbourne Brindle's map, seem to be :
William Gibson's land near post office (N.A.V. 35 pounds)
and Walter J.Gibson's crown allotment 2 section 19.

finddateofmovetorelocatepostoffice





**Mr Rogers was the teacher at Dromana State School for 12 years until mid 1906,and was very involved in community activities, such as serving as secretary of the Show committee. (See: Mornington Standard (Vic. : 1889 - 1908) Saturday 21 July 1906 p 2 Article.)
His son,Hunter Rodgers, wrote a history of the peninsula in 1961.
The early history of the Mornington Peninsula / by Hunter ...
nla.gov.au/anbd.bib-an20139419
Also Titled. Early history of the Mornington Peninsula : Westernport, Frankston, Geelong &â Queenslcliff. Author. Rogers, Hunter. Edition. 8th ed. Published.

Ewart (Melbourne) Brindle grew up in Dromana between 1904 and 1918 and the power of observation that made him renowned internationally for his illustrations on American magazine covers is displayed in a map of Dromana drawn nearly three decades after he left for America. The map,available from the Dromana Historical Society shows every tee,fairway and green of the first Dromana golf course.

The first tee was on the west side of Arthur St quite near the present George St corner. Arthur St had a slight dogleg to the left and met Palmerstone Avenue slightly more to the east than it does today, possibly because of boggy or rocky ground,and the green was near the present corner. The second fairway ran along Palmerston Avenue stopping just short of Boundary Rd and the third was a short one over today's Boundary and Caldwell Rds. It is unlikely anyone using such streets and roads was in danger of being collected by a topped drive!

The third hole was in the township of Dromana, whose eastern boundary was McCulloch St,with the part of modern Dromana to the east being properly called section 1,Kangerong. The fourth fairway was from just south of Arthurs Seat Rd to the Glenone Avenue corner.The fifth hole went from near the present Rosebud- bound on ramp to near the corner of Foote and Claredon Sts. The sixth was very short but a test of nerves existed in the form of a dry gully. The seventh crossed Heales St to a part of the present schoolground opposite the James St corner, the creek, which provided mudfight fun for the scholars such as Ewart and his sister, requiring a confident pitch onto the green. This hole was Miss Noble's* Waterloo,even from the ladies' tee which was on the east side of Heales St.

The eighth crossed McCulloch St with the green near the midpoint of the length of James St. Jolly Barker's house was at the corner of the non-existent Thomas and Francis Sts; The ninth ,starting near the present freeway went north on the east side of Jolly's house nearly to the bend in George St.

*Despite her bogie hole, Miss Noble was a very good golfer.
Her timing was often astray on the seventh but what about the timing of her trip to England?

Departure of Miss Noble from Dromana.
A very pleasant evening was spent on Monday last to bid farewell to Miss Noble, late matron of the Convalescent
home, ". Airlie, " who left on Wednesday by the " Orvetes," on a pleasure trip to England.(etc.)
(P.2,Mornington Standard, 16-5-1914.)

Miss, Miss, Miss; didn't the matron have a given name? It was probably Edith?
DEATHS. NOBLE.âOn the 27th December, Edith Noble, of "Airlie," Dromana, (P.1,Argus,28-12-1918.)

Edith was obviously an independent spinster and may have been living at Dr Weld's

PROPERTY SALES.-The 6-roomed villa known as "Airlie," situated in Palmerston avenue, Dromana, has been purchased by Miss Edith Noble, of Dromana.(P.2,Mornington Standard,18-8-1906.)


OPENING AND CLOSING.
This is the last mention of the original golf course.

DROMANA.
The opening tournament of the Dromana Golf Club was played on 25th ult., for the trophies donated by the Club. The following are the results :-Nine holes. Mixed Foursome-Miss McKewen (McKeown, of the Aringa guest house) and A.V. Shaw (25 handicap, 44 net), Miss Hazeldine and W. Evans(scratch, 47), 2nd; Miss Ritchie and Mr McWilliams (8 handicap, 52 net), 3rd. Twelve pairs competed.

The score of 47 put up by Miss Hazeldine and Mr Evans (the local scratch players) was a great performance, and has reduced the record for a mixed foursome from 52, held by two players from the Riversdale Club, Melbourne.
(P.3, Mornington Standard, 4-7-1914.)

The second and third courses were those of the ROSEBUD COUNTRY GOLF CLUB and the SAFETY BEACH COUNTRY CLUB.

SUMMIT COURSE?
The following seems to indicate that a course was to be built on Arthur's Seat,(perhaps on Seawinds.) This was the only mention of it that I have found. Perhaps the depression stymied their plans.

ARTHURS SEAT ROAD.
Opening Before Christmas.
The continuation of the Arthur's Seat
road at Dromana is being completed, and
it is proposed to have the official opening
before the Christmas holidays. The
tower on the mountain is being repaired,
and a nine hole golf course is being laid
out A rustic kiosk will be built.
(P.13, Argus, 8-10-1929.)

L8888888888888888TER ON.

DROMANA -Nearly 70 acres at Safety Beach has been set aside for a golf course, and a club has been formed under the name of the Dromana Country Golf Club. The designing of the course is left to Mr A. Russell and the links will be open about the middle of December. It will be available to visitors and members alike.
(P.10, Argus,5-9-1930)

DROMANA COUNTRY GOLF CLUB.
New Links at Dromana.
Golfers and others from all parts of the peninsula
attended the opening of the new links of the Dro
mana Country Golf Club. The course, which is
in a rough state is situated at the foot of Mount
Martha, and the nine holes all command beau
tlful views of Port Phillip Bay, Arthur's Seat
and Mount Martha. The nature of the soil and
the layout of the course proved a surprise to the
many golfers. The club is applying for affiliation
with the V.G.A. (P.3, Argus, 22-12-1930.)

There is much more detail about the course in my journal about SAFETY BEACH such as the location of the course and the extant clubhouse which later served as a guest house.

"Between the wars a course was constructed on part of Bean's Safety Beach property.It was thickly studded with clumps of reeds,silver tussocks and bracken fern. After W.W.2 the Bean property began to operate as Locksley Chase Guest House." (P.171, A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.)

The aforementioned journal spills the beans on Mr Bean and the R.A.C.V. speed trials, proceeds from which went to the bush nursing hospital,Lou Carrigg using the course to promote his hotel, and the probable involvement of the McDonalds* of Rye in the last few years of the course.
SAFETY BEACH AND THE SURVEY NEAR DROMANA, VIC., AUST.
by itellya on 2013-02-16 04:45:09. page views: 1206, comments: 3

(*The McDonalds' course at Rye, bounded by Dundas St and Golf Parade, became the Ryelands Estate and was sold by Bill Prentice who drove down every week andparked his car at the end of Lyon St to serve as an office.




SAFETY BEACH COUNTRY CLUB.
Safety Beach Country Club started its life under a different name and as the grand vision of property developer David Deague to create one of the first integrated housing and sports facilities in Victoria.

Following the example of the Gold Coastâs Sanctuary Cove, David planned an estate of some 400 homes intertwined with a nine hole golf course, and boasting a spectacular club house/function centre now known as The Atrium.

Five floodlight tennis courts and a swimming pool between the course and the function centre added more sporting facilities. The Mt Martha Valley Country Club, as it was then named, was for the use of all residents and land owners who were to bel contracted to pay yearly maintenance fees.

During construction more than 1,000 palm trees were transported to the site. Coco palms were sourced from northern New South Wales and Canary Island date Palms from Queensland, all of which led to a very different and stunning look for the locale. Land sales were promoted around Australia and in Asia.

CHANGE OF DIRECTION

Unfortunately the original project was before its time and fell on hard times. Slow land sales meant that income to support maintain and enhance the golf course was not sufficient. To protect their lifestyle a group or residents and estate land owners formed the company Mt Martha Valley Estates Limited which purchased the sporting facilities and the function centre from the developers.

To become viable the club needed to open all facilities to the public; to be competitive with other Mornington Peninsula golf courses and attract golfers, it upgraded the golf course to eighteen holes.

Over a period of two years, and the majority of work being accomplished by the dedicated team of four grounds staff, nine new holes were constructed without interruption of play on the existing nine holes. The original holes were sown with seaside bent and the new greens with Penn links bent. Fairways are sown with fine ryes, all cool season. Some 200 palm trees were relocated to define the new fairways, and over 3,000 native trees and bushes have been planted.

A new club house and ProShop built by volunteers from the Estate blends into the panorama, along with the New Atrium restaurant/convention centre, and the valley resort with its fine accommodation units.
Safety Beach Country Club's Story & History
(safetybeachcountryclub.com.au/our-story/
Safety Beach Country Club started its life as the grand vision of David Deague to create one of the first integrated housing & sports facilities in Victoria.)