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CATHOLICS IN MELBOURNE'S NORTH WEST AND ST. AUGUSTINE'S, KEILOR. (VIC., AUST.)

If information is required about Catholic pioneers near Bulla, the place to look is Kathleen Fanning's website about the Fanning family. A "Fanning,Bulla" search brought several results including:

Irish Settlement at Bulla Victoria Australia | Fanning Family ...
www.fanningfamilyhistory.com/irish-settlement-bulla-victoria

It is likely that many of the Irish pioneers had first tried their luck at the diggings. The Daniel family of "Narbonne" near Daniels Rd (Melway 177 K6)hosted many new chums before they set off for the diggings. Mrs Daniel
was a widow and shrewdly explained to her guests that they'd need to build up their muscles by practising the art of digging. "Narbonne " was highly cultivated!

In researching Bulla pioneers,I came across this website, which gives fantastic information about Irish pioneers from Footscray to the Sunbury and Broadmeadows areas (even Portland)BUT HAS A DANGEROUS FLAW.

KEILOR BAPTISMS - Freepages - Ancestry.com
freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/.../Keilor/KEILBAPT.htm

Many of the Irish diggers, after the alluvial gold had been found, did not have the resources to sink shafts, so they would have trekked towards Melbourne with empty bellies looking for employment. This time,in 1858-9, they were in luck. The Mt Alexander (Castlemaine)and Murray River railway was in construction and the workforce was largely comprised of their countrymen. So they would have found work pushing the line through the parish of Holden (Diggers Rest), Keilor Road Station (Sydenham) and on to Sunbury.

St Augustine's Keilor was started a few years before this time by local Catholics. Connor and Phelan were spirit merchants who received the grant for Spring Park,just east of the A.J.Davis Reserve on Keilor Rd and Connor was also granted much of "Keilor Binn Farm" which was part of the Doutta Galla portion of Keilor Township. Connor bought the rest of this farm but lost it to Hugh Glass by 1868. Keilor publican,Matthew Goudie,later came into possession and when his daughter married John Dodd who became owner,she insisted that it be called "Brimbank".

George Dodd, another trustee of the St Augustine's site, was originally a quarryman so he was well qualified to oversee construction. The related Dodds and Delaheys occupied land between North Pole (Milleara)Road and the river, including the part of today's Brimbank Park south of the E-W high tension power line.

When construction of the railway began, the number of worshippers increased dramatically! This fact has been overlooked in the following article but was emphasised in one of the Keilor centenary souvenirs.

About St Augustine's St Augustine's 150th Anniversary
staugustines150th.com/about-st-augustines/

The history of St Augustine's Catholic Church in Keilor is as old as Keilor itself even older!
St Augustine's Church Keilor 1863-2013.JPG (photo.)
Both Keilor and St Augustine's celebrate their 150th anniversary in 2013; but for the genesis of St Augustine's Church we need to go back even further.

A large proportion of the population in the area now known as Keilor were Irish Catholics, and as they settled down to a life far from their homeland and loved ones, they sought spiritual as well as physical comfort. Thus it was that the first Parish Priest, Father Matthew Downing, came to Keilor in July 1854 to set up the Keilor Mission. Matthew Downing was born in County Kerry in 1810, was ordained in 1837, and spent time in Italy and Ireland before coming to Hobart in January 1849 to serve as a penal chaplain. Much of his time there was spent at the convict prison in Port Arthur. By August 1852 he had moved to Victoria and in November 1852 the goldfields of Ballarat, where he remained until July 1854, when he came to Keilor.

The new Keilor Mission initially took in Flemington, Moonee Ponds, Essendon, Broadmeadows, Keilor, Sunbury, Mickleham and Darraweit Guim, and was then joined by Bulla Bulla in February 1855.

In those days Father Downing celebrated Mass in a number of venues, but it was his vision to build a Church at Keilor in honour of St Augustine, the patron saint of his order. In January 1855, five trustees of the Keilor Church Reserve were approved Father Downing, Bishop James Goold (first bishop of Melbourne), Patrick Phelan, Owen Connor and George Dodd (who became a key person in the development not only of the Church but of the Keilor area in general).

Building work commenced in 1857, with Mr Dodd appointed Foreman of Works.

The bluestone for the Church was quarried locally, but construction was slow, in part due to financial recession in the times, but also due to the lack of labour (as many men were attracted to the goldfields at Ballarat, Bendigo and Castlemaine).

It would take six long years before St Augustine's was finally completed.

By then Father Downing had transferred to Williamstown, to be succeeded by Father Patrick Madden and then Father James Moore. Father Moore was in residence when the Church was finally completed and on Sunday, 15 November 1863 St Augustine's Church was opened and blessed by Bishop Goold.

WHAT IS THE FLAW IN THE ST.AUGUSTINE'S BAPTISMAL REGISTER?
It was not until I looked at the Crotty entries that I realised why the Register didn't make sense. The columns are headed:
SURNAME; CHILD; D.O.B.; FATHER; MOTHER; CHRISTENING DATE; RESIDED

The Crotty entries read:
CROTTY JAMES MAURICE 11.08.1864 MAURICE McCORMICK, MARY 19.09.1864 KEILOR

CROTTY MARY 15.08.1866 MAURICE McCORMACK, MARY 16.09.1866 KEILOR

CROTTY MICHAEL PATRICK 17.11.1861 MAURICE McCORMACK, MARY 06.12.1861 KEILOR

The flaw is that the father is given the maiden name of the mother. This probably applies to all entries.
The last Crotty entry should read:
CROTTY, Michael Patrick; 17-11-1861; Maurice; Mary (nee McCormack); 6-12-1861; Keilor.


Maurice Crotty worked on the Brannigans' "St John's Hill" at Melway 384 J5 when he came to Australia. The McCormacks had fled Tasmania because they were wanted for smuggling in Catholic priests. They leased a 44 acre farm between the east end of Annandale Rd and an eastern extension of Sharps Rd (the DouttaGalla /Tullamarine parish boundary.) One of the McCormack boys was involved in the hanging of an aborigine at Keilor bridge and fled to Corryong to escape reprisal. His sister, Mary, who had married Maurice Crotty and moved onto The Springs,just across Fosters Rd(now Keilor Park Drive)in 1860 knew of a revenge plan so she made haste to Corryong and, bravely placing her body between her brother and the aborigines,persuaded them to spare his life.
(SOURCES: VICTORIA AND ITS METROPOLIS, Joe Crotty and his nephew, Glenn (Cotchen?), Mary Crotty's diary.)
See my FOSTER, SHARP, CROTTY journal for further details.

Although the Brannigans and Maurice Crotty probably attended Mass as "Narbonne",it is likely that this did not occur every week and that Maurice Crotty and Mary McCormack had first met at St Augustines.

JUST REMEMBER
the surname of the father is the same as that of the child and the surname following the father's given name is actually the mother's maiden name.

1 comment(s), latest 1 week, 6 days ago

ROLL OF HONOUR FOR RED HILL NEAR DROMANA, VIC., AUST.

Red Hill Community Action Inc - Can You Help?
www.redhillcommunityaction.com/
Requesting public involvement in providing names of servicemen and women for a war memorial in Red Hill, we need a Secretary and Public Officer.

Sheila Skidmore's THE RED HILL has much information about Red Hill lads that enlisted in World War 1 on page 49. Charles Trewin was the first to enlist but was living in Chiltern at the time. An original Anzac,he returned with the rank of Sergeant. William and Joseph McIlroy also enlisted elsewhere. The first to enlist locally was Will. Hind whose family had a farm at Merricks. {The surname is written as Hinds in ratebooks if I remember correctly and I have written quite a bit about the family and the farm, most likely in relation to John Shand or John Huntley as much of the information was supplied by Bill Huntley. I think the farm was called "Seven Oaks Farm" being part of the old "Seven Oaks" (79A Balnarring)and bounded by Junction Rd, the new part of Bittern-Dromana Rd from Junction Corner and Craig Avon Lane, which was the old course (Melway 161,parts of H-J 11.) J.Hinds was granted 80C, Balnarring of 17 acres 1 rood 34 perches on 14-9-1916 (north-west sixth of 161 H-J9.)} Will Hind(s?)died from a throat infection just prior to his unit going into action in Egypt. The first locally born lads to enlist,in mid 1915, were cousins Richard and Herb. McIlroy. Herb lost a foot. Sheila lists 17 others who enlisted, with great detail regarding injuries etc. I'm not sure whether Dave Barker from Main Creek was related to the Barkers of Cape Schanck and Boneo or the family of William Henry Blakeley's wife. Helen Blakeley might know. Thelma Littlejohn,Bill Huntley and Barry Wright of Balnarring (who is writing a history of "Wildwood") might have anecdotal information about those who served; I have their contact details.
Details about most of those who enlisted should be found in the A.I.F. PROJECT.

Let's see what trove can tell us.

HINDS.-Died in hospital at Heliopolis, Egypt,Private William Hamilton Hinds (Willie), second son of James and Elizabeth Hinds, "Seven Oaks," Red Hill (late of Somerville), and grandson of Robert Hinds, Blrregurra, aged 20. Duty nobly done. (P.61,The Australasian, 30-10-1915.)

Mr W. J. McIlroy, of "Red Hill", Dromana, a staunch methodist, is the father of a fine quartette of fighting
sons at the front. The Rev. Joseph McIlroy, who was a minister of the Clifton Hill Methodist Circuit, before he enlisted, is with the Army Medical Corps in France.- His brother, Mr William McIlroy is in camp at Claremont, Tasmania, and is a student for the Presbyterian ministry, and has finished his home mission course.
Sergeant Robert Mcllroy and Private Richard McIlroy are in the Infantry in France. (Dandenong Advertiser and Cranbourne, Berwick and Oakleigh Advocate (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Thursday 27 July 1916 p 2 Article.)

See pages 17-22 of Sheila's book re Joseph McIlroy's diary.

T.Counsel of Dromana could be considered a resident of the Red Hill district if the family was living on 21A Kangerong west of Forest Lodge,granted to C.Counsel on 27-6-1876 but this does not seem to be confirmed by 1900 and 1910 rate records. T.Counsel is not listed in the A.I.F. project. He is listed on the following.
31 Oct 1918 - VICTORIAN CASUALTIES. List No. 438 Issued.
P.6,Argus,31-10-1918.
RAMSAY, J. T. Mathoura, NSW, 31/8/18, RICE, T h Chillingollah, 2/0/18. ... Vi J Cork fngland (2nd occ gas) T Counsel, Dromana J T Coieiitn, Diamond Creek.

EMMOTT.Killed in action April 15, 1918, Sgt. Robert Emmott, son of Mrs. Emmott, Red Hill, Dromana, dear mate on Gallipoli and France of L.-Cpl. George V. Carter, Lake Meran, killed in action December 24, 1917.
(P.1, Argus,7-5-1918.)

EMMOTT.-Officially reported killed in action 15th April, in France, the beloved son of Alphina and the late J. S. Emmott, Red Hill, and beloved brother of J. S. Emmott and E.J. Emmott, of Inglewood, Grace, Mrs. Nicholson, Mrs. J. Morgan, Crystal, and Jim, aged 21 years. (P.11, Argus, 11-5-1918.)

1919-20 rates. Mrs.A.Emmott,5 1/2acres and building part crown allotment 9. This was possibly part of the old Red Hill township near the post office and across White Hill Rd from McIlroys Rd.

MORE TO COME UNLESS THE GREMLINS STRIKE AGAIN. SLOW WORK WADING THROUGH CLIFTON/PYRAMID/ BROKEN HILL RESULTS!

"RED HILL, VICTORIA,A.I.F.PROJECT" SEARCH.

McILROY, Robert - The AIF Project
https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=199112
Regimental number, 1791. Place of birth, Red Hill, Mornington, Victoria. School, Red Hill No 1301 State School, Victoria. Religion, Methodist. Occupation ...

8th Battalion, 12th Reinforcement - The AIF Project
https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showUnit?unitCode=INF8REIN12
3707, BURROWS, Henry George, Pyramid Hill, Victoria. 3971, CARRUTHERS, Henry .... Herbert, Red Hill, Victoria. 3863, McILROY, Richard, Red Hill, Victoria.

Allan, David Thomson - The War Graves Photographic Project
www.twgpp.org/information.php?id=1468959
Unit: 14th Bn.Australian Infantry, A.I.F. ... in action 08/08/15 Age 22 40 Son of George and Isabella Somerville Allan, of Craig Avon, Red Hill, Victoria, Australia.

Craig Avon was 80A Balnarring,across Craig Avon Lane from Hinds' "Seven Oaks Farm."

SEARCH FOR THOSE ON SHEILA'S LIST IN THE A.I.F.PROJECT.

Charles Lester Gordon TREWIN
Regimental number 532
Religion Presbyterian
Occupation Police Constable
Address Red Hill, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 26
Next of kin Father, Trewin, Red Hill PO, near Dromana, Victoria
Enlistment date 5 September 1914
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 4th Light Horse Regiment, C Squadron
AWM Embarkation Roll number 10/9/1
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board Transport A18 Wiltshire on 19 October 1914
Regimental number from Nominal Roll Commissioned
Rank from Nominal Roll Captain
Unit from Nominal Roll 4th Light Horse Regiment
Fate Returned to Australia 15 January 1919

William McILROY
Regimental number 16284
Religion Presbyterian
Occupation Presbyterian minister
Address Derby, Tasmania
Marital status Married
Age at embarkation 35
Next of kin Wife, Mrs M C McIlroy, Derby, Tasmania
Enlistment date 7 April 1916
Date of enlistment from Nominal Roll 19 February 1916
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name November 1916 Reinforcements
AWM Embarkation Roll number 26/99/2
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Fremantle, Western Australia, on board HMAT A34 Persic on 29 December 1916
Rank from Nominal Roll Private
Unit from Nominal Roll 3rd Field Ambulance
Fate Returned to Australia 28 February 1919

This would have to be the William McIlroy mentioned in the article about W.J.McIlroy's family where William was training for the Presbyterian ministry and was in camp in Claremont, Tasmania.

Joseph McILROY
Regimental number 15155
Religion Methodist
Occupation Methodist minister
Address Northcote, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 24
Next of kin Father, W J McIlroy, Red Hill via Mornington, Victoria
Enlistment date 23 November 1915
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 14th Australian General Hospital
AWM Embarkation Roll number 26/101/1
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A67 Orsova on 29 July 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A28 Miltiades on 1 August 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Adelaide, South Australia, on board HMAT A70 Ballarat on 12 August 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board RMS Orontes on 16 August 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A63 Karoola on 19 August 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A18 Wiltshire on 22 August 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Fremantle, Western Australia, on board RMS Mooltan on 28 August 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board RMS Kashgar on 2 September 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board RMS Kashgar on 5 September 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A1 Kymettus on 12 September 1916
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A25 Anglo Egyptian on 19 September 1916
Rank from Nominal Roll Private
Fate Returned to Australia 22 January 1917
Miscellaneous details (Nominal Roll) 14th Australian General Hospital

William Hamilton HINDS
Regimental number 1555
Place of birth Warncoort,Birregurra, Victoria
School State School, Victoria
Religion Presbyterian
Occupation Orchardist
Address Red Hill, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 20
Height 5' 7.25"
Weight 136 lbs
Next of kin Father, J Hinds, Red Hill, Victoria
Previous military service Nil (exempt area under Compulsory Military Service scheme)
Enlistment date 24 June 1915
Place of enlistment Melbourne, Victoria
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 22nd Battalion, 1st Reinforcement
AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/39/2
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A35 Berrima on 28 June 1915
Rank from Nominal Roll Private
Unit from Nominal Roll 22nd Battalion
Other details from Roll of Honour Circular 'He was the first Volunteer for this district and his good example was the means of gaining many recruits.' (Details from father)
Fate Died of disease 14 October 1915
Place of death or wounding Heliopolis, Egypt
Age at death 20
Age at death from cemetery records 20
Place of burial Cairo War Memorial Cemetery (Row D, Grave No. 132), Egypt
Panel number, Roll of Honour,
Australian War Memorial 96
Miscellaneous information from
cemetery records Parents: James and Elizabeth HINDS, Severn Oaks, Redhill, Victoria
Family/military connections Cousin: 622 Gunner William Sydney HINDS, 8th Bn, killed in action, 4 October 1917.
Other details
War service: Egypt, Gallipoli

Admitted to 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station, Anzac, 2 October 1915 (tonsilitis); transferred to HS 'Maheno', 2 October 1915 (dipteria), and transferred to No 1 Australian General Hospital, Heliopolis, 14 October 1915 (septic throat).

Died of diptheria, Choubra Hospital, Cairo, 14 October 1915.

Medals: 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal
Sources NAA: B2455, HINDS William Hamilton

Richard McILROY
Regimental number 3863
Religion Methodist
Occupation Orchardist
Address Red Hill, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 19
Next of kin Mother, Mrs W J McIlroy, Red Hill, Victoria
Enlistment date 6 July 1915
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 8th Battalion, 12th Reinforcement
AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/25/4
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Adelaide, South Australia, on board HMAT A40 Ceramic on 23 November 1915
Rank from Nominal Roll Private
Fate Returned to Australia 19 February 1919
Miscellaneous details (Nominal Roll) 59th Bn

Herbert McILROY
Regimental number 3862
Religion Methodist
Occupation Farmer
Address Red Hill, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 28
Next of kin Father, J McIlroy, Red Hill, Victoria
Enlistment date 6 July 1915
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 8th Battalion, 12th Reinforcement
AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/25/4
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Adelaide, South Australia, on board HMAT A40 Ceramic on 23 November 1915
Rank from Nominal Roll Private
Fate Returned to Australia 10 July 1917
Miscellaneous details (Nominal Roll) 58th Bn

Robert McILROY
Regimental number 1791
Place of birth Red Hill, Mornington, Victoria
School Red Hill No 1301 State School, Victoria
Religion Methodist
Occupation Gardener
Address Box 15, Frankston, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 32
Height 5' 6"
Weight 166 lbs
Next of kin Father, William J McIlroy, Red Hill, Mornington, Victoria
Previous military service Nil
Enlistment date 7 October 1915
Place of enlistment Melbourne, Victoria
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 58th Battalion, 2nd Reinforcement
AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/75/3
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A14 Euripides on 4 April 1916
Unit from Nominal Roll 59th Battalion
Fate Died of wounds 21 July 1916
Place of death or wounding Fleurbaix, France (Battle of Fromelles)
Age at death 33
Age at death from cemetery records 33
Place of burial Estaires Communal Cemetery (Plot III, Row B, Grave No. 30), France
Panel number, Roll of Honour,
Australian War Memorial 168
Miscellaneous information from
cemetery records Parents: William and Elizabeth MCILROY, Red Hill, Mornington, Victoria
Other details
War service: Egypt, Western Front

Taken on strength, 59th Bn, Ferry Post, 24 May 1916, and reverted to the ranks.

Embarked Alexandria to join the British Expeditionary Force, 18 June 1916; disembarked Marseilles, France, 29 June 1916.

Wounded in action, 20 July 1916 (gun shot wound, hip); admitted to No 1 Australian Casualty Clearing Station, 20 July 1916.

Died of wounds, 21 July 1916.

Medals: British War Medal, Victory Medal
Sources NAA: B2455, McILROY Robert

Sidney Harold SHEEHAN
Regimental number 34191
Religion Church of England
Occupation Orchardist
Address Halycon, Red Hill, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 19
Next of kin Father, John Sheehan, Halycon, Red Hill, Victoria
Enlistment date 3 January 1917
Rank on enlistment Driver
Unit name Field Artillery Brigade, March 1917 Reinforcements
AWM Embarkation Roll number 13/128/1
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A74 Marathon on 10 May 1917
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A11 Ascanius on 11 May 1917
Rank from Nominal Roll Driver
Unit from Nominal Roll 7th Field Artillery Brigade
Fate Returned to Australia 3 July 1919

Walter James Thomas CHAMPION
Regimental number 2844
Religion Church of England
Occupation Orchardist
Address Corner of Norwood and Camberwell Roads, Burwood, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 20
Next of kin Father, Walter Champion, Corner of Norwood and Camberwell Roads, Burwood, Victoria
Enlistment date 27 June 1916
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 2nd Pioneer Battalion, Reinforcement 6
AWM Embarkation Roll number 14/14/4
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A17 Port Lincoln on 20 October 1916
Rank from Nominal Roll Private
Unit from Nominal Roll 2nd Pioneer Battalion
Fate Returned to Australia 3 March 1919

There were only two Walter Champions, one from Queensland and the above one from Burwood. The Eastern suburbs had many orchardists so like the unfortunate Charles Thiele (killed on Eaton's Cutting Road and probably a descendant of the pioneer of the Doncaster district), Walter may have moved to Red Hill, perhaps to the Village Settlement.

Jack Hayden GIBSON ??????
Regimental number 4276
Religion Church of England
Occupation Farm hand
Address Quairading, Western Australia
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 18
Next of kin Father, J A Gibson, Kelmscott, Western Australia
Enlistment date 20 September 1915
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 16th Battalion, 13th Reinforcement
AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/33/3
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Fremantle, Western Australia, on board HMAT A54 Runic on 29 January 1916
Rank from Nominal Roll Lieutenant
Unit from Nominal Roll 8th Machine Gun Battalion
Fate Returned to Australia 24 August 1918

The above is an educated guess but it is wrong!.There were only two Jack Gibsons,the other one from Bondi, Sydney, whose next of kin was Mrs Annie Gibson. Many peninsula lads moved to Western Australia during the 1890's depression, attracted by employment offered by its gold rush,such as Harry Falby Gomm of Somerville and John and Thomas Chapman. Thomas Chapman married Edith Sheehan and after he died in Bunbury during a typhoid epidemic, Edith returned to Red Hill with their little daughter. (A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA p. 77-8.) W.Gibson was granted 78 Balnarring of 190 acres on the north corner of Red Hill and Stanley Rds on 22-7-1874 and from memory the property was split into two farms. In 1920,no Gibsons were assessed in the central riding so it is possible that J.A.Gibson was one of the sons and had moved to sandgroper land.

I was just about to move onto Bert Williams when something occurred to me; many Jacks were actually Johns!This is the Red Hill resident. My incorrect guess has been left in the journal as a warning not to ignore those little whispers even if they involve more work.

John Prowse GIBSON
Regimental number 6801
Religion Church of England
Occupation Labourer
Address Red Hill via Dromana, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 22
Next of kin Father, John Thomas Gibson, Red Hill via Dromana, Victoria
Enlistment date 19 February 1917
Date of enlistment from Nominal Roll 10 February 1917
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 22nd Battalion, 19th Reinforcement
AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/39/5
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A11 Ascanius on 11 May 1917
Rank from Nominal Roll 2nd Corporal
Unit from Nominal Roll 22nd Battalion
Fate Effective abroad (still overseas)

RED HILL ROLL OF HONOUR.
Nothing found for BERT WILLIAMS, WALTER BROWN, SAMUEL McKAY, JOSEPH SMITH.

WALTER BROWN. Walter Brown was a member of the Red Hill Band of Hope in 1902, along with some of his later comrades such as Joseph and Robert McIlroy. (Mornington Standard: P.2, 3-5-1902; P. 4, 25-10-1902.)
According to Sheila Skidmore, Walter lost a leg in the war so it is understandable that his sport was Chess. However this disability did not stop him from engaging in the physical life of a fruiterer until he was killed by a crank (handle). He had forgotten that the truck was parked in first gear.
CHESS AT RED HILL.A chess tournament conducted at Red Hill recently excited considerable local interest. The championship was won by Mr. W. Brown, of Main Creek. (P.4, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 16-8-1922.)
CRUSHED BETWEEN CARS.
MELBOURNE, January 12.
Walter Brown (42). fruiterer, of Red Hill, died in the Melbourne Hospital today from injuries received in the Victoria market yesterday, Brown was cranking his truck when it jumped forward and jammed his head between his radiator and the side of another motor truck. (P.18, The Courier-Mail, 13-1-1934.)

BROWN-on the 12th January (result ofan accident) Walter Harold Brown of Red Hill, dearly beloved husband of Florrie (nee Peel) and loving father of Elsie, Norman, Leslie and Marjorie -Loved by all.

BROWN -On the 12th January (result ofan accident) Walter Harold Brown of Red Hill, dearly beloved son of Walter and MaryBrown of 6 Barrow street, Coburg and loving brother of Ruby, Will, Myrtle (deceased), Alma, Doll. and Ivy.
(P.13, Argus, 13-1-1934.)




Andrew NICHOLSON
Regimental number 6377
Religion Church of England
Occupation Farmer
Address Main Creek, Dromana, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 23
Next of kin Father, Neil Nicholson, Dromana, Victoria
Enlistment date 15 September 1916
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 23rd Battalion, 18th Reinforcement

AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/40/4
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A20 Hororata on23 November 1916
Rank from Nominal Roll Private
Unit from Nominal Roll 23rd Battalion
Fate Returned to Australia 21 December 1917


BERT NICHOLSON-No obvious matches for Bert, Albert and Herbert.

ARTHUR McILROY- Only one,Mossman, N.S.W., mother Phoebe.

Albert Christopher WHITE
Regimental number 19699
Religion Methodist
Occupation Farmer
Address Main Creek, Dromana, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 26
Next of kin Father, R White, Main Creek, Dromana, Victoria
Enlistment date 4 January 1916
Rank on enlistment Driver
Unit name Field Artillery Brigade 8, Battery 29

AWM Embarkation Roll number 13/36/1
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A7 Medic on 20 May 1916
Rank from Nominal Roll Driver
Unit from Nominal Roll 8th Field Artillery Brigade
Fate Returned to Australia 4 June 1919
Family/military connections Brother: Lt Ernest Victor WHITE DCM, 24th Bn, returned to Australia.
Other details War service: Western Front
Medals: British War Medal, Victory Medal

Ernest Victor WHITE
Regimental number 307
Religion Methodist
Occupation Butcher
Address Main Creek, Dromana, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 20
Next of kin R White, Main Creek, Dromana, Victoria
Enlistment date 15 March 1915
Rank on enlistment Private
Unit name 24th Battalion, A Company

AWM Embarkation Roll number 23/41/1
Embarkation details Unit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A14 Euripides on10 May 1915
Regimental number from Nominal Roll Commissioned
Rank from Nominal Roll Lieutenant
Unit from Nominal Roll 24th Battalion
Fate Returned to Australia
Medals Distinguished Conduct Medal
'For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During an attack this N.C.O. who was in charge of the advance party of his platoon, led them with great gallantry against a machine gun post, which he captured, taking the gun, and accounting for all the gunners. He then collected his party and proceeded, with the greatest dash, to occupy the objective which had been assigned to them. He brought up a Lewis gun, which he disposed with much judgment to help in overcoming the last elements of the enemy's resistance, and then went out under heavy rifle fire to help in selecting positions for the outposts. Throughout the day he showed fine qualities of judgment and cool determination, which inspired his men with great confidence.'
Source: 'Commonwealth Gazette' No. 23
Date: 12 February 1919
Family/military connections Brother: 19699 Driver Albert Christopher WHITE, 8th Field Artillery Brigade, returned to Australia, 4 June 1919.
Other details War service: Egypt, Gallipoli, Western Front
Medals: Distinguished Conduct Medal, 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal

Frederick Hargrave WHITE
Regimental number 2081
and
David Vincent BARKER
Regimental number 35841
(See comment 2.)

Frederick Hargrave WHITE
Regimental number 2081
Religion Methodist
Occupation Farm labourer
Address Main Creek, Dromana, Victoria
Marital status Single
Age at embarkation 19
Next of kin Father, Robert White, Main Creek Dromana, Victoria
(Continued in comment 1.)


TREWIN, MCILROY, HINDS, SHEEHAN, CHAMPION,GIBSON,WILLIAMS, BROWN,MCKAY,SMITH,NICHOLSON,HARRISON,WHITE,BARKER.

7 comment(s), latest 2 weeks, 5 days ago

ALBERT COLEMAN'S BROTHER, HASTINGS' DEADSHOT JACK (THE GREAT JOHN COLEMAN) AND HARRY CASPAR.

Doug Ackerly's "Coleman" has recently been published. My aim here is to provide information that is not available in wikipedia or Doug's book.

Both played for Tyabb but in another game
Young Jack's stratospheric leaps and tons won far more fame.
When he first trained with Hastings, their offer he'd refuse
(To give him stops for better grip): "Not in my good shoes!"*

Did he squat in Hasting's goal square as he did at Windy Hill,
Nonchalantly chewing gum thrown by adoring fans, until
Rising with the speed of light from his haunches
He led into one of his spectacular launches?**

In one of Hasting's matches he was sorely pressed,
Kicking only eight; only A.Coleman was among the best.
Hastings won two premierships, won them back to back,
And Argus readers read of the feats of the "Standard's" Deadshot Jack.

(Trove, Tyabb Cricket Club website and Wikipedia. *George Slocombe,the Hastings coach.
** Fraser had felt his pulse quicken as a 10-year-old at Windy Hill when Essendon's on-ballers would win the football, Coleman would crouch in the goal square ready to explode like a sprinter from the blocks, and all in the Reynolds Stand would stamp their feet on the floorboards in anticipation. "It was just so exciting." I had written the poem before I saw Ken Fraser's account. It proves I wasn't dreaming!

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/afl/afl-news/john-coleman-book-has-everything-except-the-answer-to-goalkickings-mystery-20140528-zrr54.html#ixzz3B2NQea9E)

John Coleman did not forget Hastings when he hit the big time. Albert was invited to play with Richmond but that must have been when he suffered his injury.

PAGE 16.-THE STANDARD, Thursday, October 27, 1949.
Hastings Acclaims John Coleman. District's Great Tribute to Champion Forward.
Last Friday was a "Red Letter Night" for Hastings when a very big percentage of the town and district population attended at the Hastings Hall to officially welcome home the former local champion goalkicker, John Coleman, at a ball arranged in honor of his triumphant first season with Essendon League team, where he kicked the record of 100 goals, and stamped his claims as the greatest Victorian goalkicker of all time.

Prominent amongst the visitors were Messrs....W. French (senior Vice-President and Life Member of Essendon League Club, and an Essendon Club official for 42 years), who was accompanied by Billy Hutchinson, first rover;
George Hassell, champion wingster; and Bob Syme, first ruckman of the Essendon League team. Popular Mr. and Mrs. A. E.Coleman, the proud parents of the champion, were accompanied at the function by their other son,
Albert, who was also a fine footballer till he suffered a knee injury. Mr. Coleman, Senr., was a good footballer with teams in the Wangaratta-Albury district many years ago.

A surprising feature of the night-and the only regrettable one was the almost complete absence of representatives of most M.P.F.L. clubs, other than Hastings, and also the non-attendance of any members of the Shire Council, although the Shire President and two Councillors live in Hastings, and Centre Riding
Councillors reside close by in the Somerville-Tyabb area. However, the hall was packed to capacity by a crowd that found great delight in all the proceedings, and danced till 1 o'clock to splendid music by Neil Whitford's
Rhythm Trio (Sorrento). Warrant-Officer McKenzie (F.N.D.)proved himself the most efficient M.C. seen at Peninsula functions for a very long time. The function was exceptionally well organised, due mainly to the work
of Mr. Mayne, Hastings Club treasurer.

The hall was appropriately decorated with seven large premiership pennants won by Hastings Club, three of these being for the three last seasons, and due in large measure to Coleman's ability in front of goals. About
200 miniature club' pennants, large balloons, and a floral-decked, stage completed a fine picture of public appreciation.

Torchlight -Procession.. .
The opening of the "Welcome Home Ball" was preceded by a torchlight procession from the Hastings Hospital, headed by the Mornington Town Band, and followed, by the Hastings Fire Brigade members, in full uniform,
...A Great Reception.
John Coleman received a great ovation as he entered the hall, all present standing to sing ''For He's a Jolly Good Fellow," and giving three mighty cheers. Mr. Mayne expressed regret that Mr. Wallace Sharland, who
was to have made the presentation to John Coleman, was unable to attend on account of illness.
Mr.Mayne thanked all donors towards the present for Coleman, and the Mornington Town Band for giving its services free. He also thanked the Ladies' Committee for the' grand job they had carried out in connection with the supper arrangements.

Mr. Percy Wilson (captain of the Hastings Football Club), who made the presentation to John Coleman, of a bag of golf clubs valued at 40, said that night's entertainment had been organised by the Hastings Football Club
and admirers of John Coleman in honor of the wonderful record he had put up this year, and during the past two seasons. Hastings had never had a more popular player said Mr. Wilson, and John still came along to all club
functions as a Hastings player, just as he did when he took the field with the local team
. He then presented John with the golf equipment, expressed the hope that he would be as good a golfer* as he had been a footballer, and wished him every success in the world. The Band again played "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow," and the hall rang with cheers.

(*As a golfer John made some good cricket scores. See P.22,Argus,4-8-1955.)

John Coleman, in responding thanked all concerned for a very fine gift. He would remember and appreciate this evening for many years to come. He thanked Mr. Mayne for the way he had organised the function, and also
the Hastings Club generally. It gave him great pleasure to see so many Peninsula faces in the gathering.

Mr. W. French (Senior Vice President, Essendon League) expressed, great pleasure at being present. He said he would like to mention at the outset that Essendon had not "taken John Coleman off Hastings," for Coleman
had played first with the Essendon District Juniors, which team was holding its presentation night in the Masonic Hall, Essendon, that same night. He (Mr. French) had been told long ago by an official of that team, that "there is a kid here, who will be the greatest forward of all time.'" He (Mr. French) was sure John was
going to be the greatest forward of all time, and he was the "King of Essendon" as far as public popularity goes in that city. Essendon's gain had been Hastings' loss, but it would have been a pity to have kept a great player like John in Hastings. If it had not been for his great team spirit, in co-operating with his team
mates, John could easily have got 130 or 140 goals for his first League season, instead of 100,said Mr. French. He assured them that Essendon would look after John, and he hoped Hastings would produce another player of
his calibre for future play with the 'Dons'.

A Popular Song
During the evening pleasing songs were rendered over the 'mike'" by the talented Hastings vocalist, Mr. Dave Ward. One that "brought the house down" was the following parody (tune"Four Leaf Clover" chorus) written in the hall by the Standard representative:- "

There's not a goalman like our John Coleman,
That we've ever seen, before.
Each kick is dead-shot, and goals
come like rain,
Tired, are the scorers who can't
stand the strain;
No need explaining, one w're entertaining.
Is somebody we adore;
There's not a goalman like our
John Coleman,
That we've ever seen before.

Another Coleman Trains At Richmond
By PERCY TAYLOR
ALBERT COLEMAN, whose full forward brother is doing so well at Essendon, trained at Richmond last night, but has promised to train with his brother on Tuesday. Richmond was much impressed by Coleman, "who is a 6ft l 1/2in. half-back, with heaps of football in him. There is a feeling that he will prefer to play with his brother, but Richmond hopes to see him again.(P.16,Argus, 25-3-1949.)

Albert was obviously too busy as an orchardist to train very much but he did play in Essendon's practice match soon after.* Before I forget, I must mention two of last night's incidental findings. Albert was a former schoolmate of Harry Beitzel and Harry Caspar. The former was a successful field umpire and broadcaster and Caspar, who transferred from Northcote to Carlton was the man who cost John Coleman four matches and Essendon a premiership. The school which Albert and these two attended together has not yet been found. Was it University High School? Jack Simpson from Doutta Stars became a labour politician who held the State seat of Niddrie for many years.

*COLEMAN PLEASES IN ESSENDON MATCH
By PERCY TAYLOR " "
JOHN COLEMAN, much discussed Hastings full forward, played at Essendon for the first time on Saturday, and proved to be just as good a footballer as expected. A large crowd came specially to see Coleman, and they were
well rewarded. He is fast, leads out well, marks safely, and is a most accurate kick, scoring seven goals from seven kicks.Although he is 6ft 2in in height, he does not carry much weight*,which might be a drawback in
League company.

Simpson, 6ft 4in, came from the Doutta Stars, and played so well in the junior match that he was taken out and included in the senior game. He could easily go further. Others to shape well were Mccallum (seconds), Calder
(Wonthaggi), who worried Leehane; McGilvray (Gunbower), Luck (Shepparton), Williams(Moonee Valley),Illingsworth
(district full-forward), and Donovan (seconds). A. Coleman (brother of Jack) has ability, but he is "short of a gallop." (P.17, Argus, 28-3-1949.)

Another incidental find last night was that John Coleman had broken Hastings' record for goals in a season set by John McMillan. To say that John Coleman did not carry much weight was actually an understatement as shown by a photo of McMillan and John Coleman both of whose families had lived in the south west of Victoria. I wonder if Doug had this photo in his book. See photo in the following accompanying the text which is supplied below in italics:
Dunrobin Football Team (1921) - Glenelg & Wannon Settlers
www.swvic.org/casterton/dunrobin_football(1921).htm

John Angus "Jack" McMILLAN, son of John and Florence McMILLAN (nee McGUINESS).

Mr McMillan was a member of the Footscray Seconds first premiership side in 1936. He came to the club from Hastings in that year and played four senior games before breaking his wrist. A full forward, he held the goal kicking record at Hastings for 13 years before it was broken by John Coleman in 1947 with 136 goals. Mr McMillans record was 119 goals established in 1934. Born in Casterton, Mr McMillan was from a family of nine children.

A primary school teacher, Mr McMillan had been actively associated with sports administration. He was coach of the Victorian Schoolboys football team in 1955 and 1962 and was manager of the side in 1968. He was also on the Council and the committee of the Kooyong Lawn Tennis Association. Mr McMillan was a member of the City of Hawthorn Lodge No 363, and had been Secretary of the Gould League of Bird Lovers for the 11 years prior to his death in 1969.

Thanks to Libby McMillan for the above images.




RUNS IN COLEMAN FAMILY
Alan (sic) Coleman, brother of Essendon League football champion, John, kicked another six goals for Hastings on Saturday to make his total for three games 22. In this period his team has scored 32 so Coleman's feat is equal to, if not better than, some performed by his now better-known brother, John, who were both former
residents of Port Fairy. Coleman's father, a former manager of the Port Fairy butter factory, residing at Tyabb, when asked to compare Alby with John, replied, "Alby hasn't had the chance John has had, on account of
trouble. I would not say that he is better than John, but without injury he would be just as good. When asked if Alby would go to the 'big game,' Coleman, senr., said, He doesn't intend to carry on with football. He is looking after an orchard and has his hands full. (P.2,Portland Guardian,26-6-1950.)

John Coleman was such a sensation that every time somebody kicked a bag he was touted as the new John Coleman. Most of them,such as the Spotswood lad that was invited to train with Williamstown, are unknown to me. However this article is of interest to me for two reasons. Firstly, John and Alby's father,Albert Ernest Coleman, had been a noted player in the Albury area and secondly Ken Smale had been the coach of East Shepparton in 1970 when I was on the V.F.L. list and umpired one of their games.

BULLDOGS CHASE NEW "JOHN COLEMAN"
Warracknabeal, Monday
Wimmera League's "John Coleman," Ken Smale, was interviewed today by Mr.Roy Russell, secretary of Footscray Football Club. Mr Russell made a special trip to Warracknabeal to do so. Smale, who is only 19,would have been Wimmera League's leading goal-kicker last season but for National Service training. He kicked 10 goals for
Warracknabeal against Murtoa on Saturday. Smale is similar in build to Essendon star John Coleman. He is 6ft. tall and a brilliant high mark. (P.9, Argus, 12-5-1953.)
Ken kicked 98 goals in 60 games with Collingwood and was belatedly made a life member of the club. See:
Pies honour Smale fo life | The Wimmera Mail-Times
www.mailtimes.com.au/story/965788/pies-honour-smale-fo-life/
Nov 4, 2008 - WARRACKNABEAL football living legend Ken Smale has been awarded a belated life membership to Collingwood Football Club. Smale, 78 ...

Doug Wade grew up in the Wimmera with Ken Smale as one of his heroes.
My all time hero was John Coleman but guys like Ted (Jarrard)and Kenny Smale who was from Warracknabeal werent far behind him. Kenny played in three Grand Finals, including the famous 58 side.
(KEN PIESSE FAVOURITE SON'S FROM THE WIMMERA
www.footyalmanac.com.au/ken-piesse-favourite-sons-from-the-wimmera/)


A PORT FAIRY PERSPECTIVE.
THE role Port Fairy played in the life and times of an Australian sporting legend has seen the town take up a prominent place in a new e-book.

Former Essendon champion the late John Coleman is the subject of the e-book, Coleman: The Untold Story of an AFL Legend, which has been written by former Heywood man and author Doug Ackerly.

The e-book is a prelude to a full biography about Coleman that Ackerly will release next April.

The release of the e-book coincided with the unveiling of the Avenue of Legends at the MCG yesterday of which Coleman was a part.

In the e-book, Port Fairy is the central location on the chapter which focuses on Coleman's early life.

The chapter explains how Coleman's parents moved to Port Fairy in 1922 when his father was appointed as the manager of the Port Fairy Cheese, Butter and Ice Factory in Gipps Street.

The young couple wasted no time in starting a family, with daughters Lawna and Thurla and oldest son Albert.

John Douglas Coleman was then born on November 23, 1928, with the story behind his second name an interesting one.

It appears his mother was struggling to find a second name when Sunday school teacher Ruth Engish suggested Douglas, which was the name of the guest house she ran in Gipps Street opposite the Colemans home.

Football was always a part of John Coleman's life as he and his brother would play football matches with the Pevitt boys, Frank and Don, along what was a then small back road covered in grass called Regent Street.

The book says the Pevitt boys remember John Coleman as a talented footballer but with an extremely competitive nature.

John Coleman may never have played official competition with the Port Fairy Seagulls, but these early games of street football give Port Fairy some right to the claim the town was the first step in his decorated football career.

The Colemans stayed in Port Fairy until January 1939 before moving to Melbourne.
(Legends link to Port Fairy | Moyne Gazette
www.moynegazette.com.au/story/1784599/legends-link-to-port-fairy/)

ONE GAME WONDER.
A great fan of Daryl Pittman's THE LOCAL FOOTY SHOW ON C.31 (digital channel 44), I remember seeing this story on the show some time ago. No doubt local residents named Coleman attended the game.

Was John Coleman the greatest forward ever to ever play ...
www.footyalmanac.com.au/was-john-coleman-the-greatest-forward-ever..

John Coleman

In early December 2012 I stumbled on a small article that appeared in the Argus on 8th October 1951 titled Win Ends Country Dispute. The article covered various country matches and finished with:

Freighters, runners up in the Federal District League, were defeated by North Albury in a match in aid of the local team at Albury on Saturday. Essendon full forward John Coleman kicked five goals for Freighters. Other Essendon players took part in the game. Final scores North Albury 17.25 Freighters 17.9.

I couldnt believe what I had found. The great John Coleman played for a Heatherton side! This was just a week after Essendon lost the 1951 Grand Final to Geelong. Coleman didnt play as he was reported in the final home and away game of the season and sensationally suspended for 4 weeks. It seemingly cost the Bombers the flag as they went down by just 11 points.

It just didnt make sense that the great John Coleman could have played with a local outfit and why did it only receive a few lines at the end of another article, especially given his fame and the recent events of that year?

I began trawling the internet and books on John Coleman without success. My next port of call was searching the newspaper archives at the State Library Victoria (SLV).

In a hard copy edition of the Border Mail 6th October 1951, I won the research equivalent of 1st Division in lotto. I found an advertisement and an article for the game and not only was John Coleman listed to play but also Bill Hutchison and Alan Dale (Essendon), Alan Ruthven (Fitzroy), Charlie Sutton (Footscray), Kevin Curran (Hawthorn) and Ted Jarrod (North Melbourne). What a side! I quickly turned to the Monday edition to see the photographs of these legends wearing our club colours. It was disappointing to discover that there were no photographs, just a two paragraph report of the game.

Big Crowd Sees Coleman At Albury

North Albury combine defeated Freighters (Melbourne Federal League) by 17 points at Albury sportsground on Saturday. Gate takings were 144.

Champion Melbourne goal kicker John Coleman got five goals for the visitors, and repeatedly drew the applause of the crowd for breath-taking leaps.

Final scores were North Albury 17.26 (128), Freighters 17.9 (111).

Best Players Freighters : Hutchison (Ess), Reeves (Nth M), Coleman, Sheppard, Tilley and Reid.

I grabbed the Moorabbin News and located the Freighters Club notes by H.C.J. in the edition issued the week after the game.

Freighters Club (By H.C.J.)

The Federal District League received a great boost when Freighters played Nth Albury football team during our visit to Albury last week-end. Our club was very fortunate in securing four league players, namely John Coleman, Bill Hutchison, Alan Dale and John Reeves. These players gave the game a great kick, and were a great attraction to the crowd that witnessed the game.

The marketeers of the game were obviously making sure a good crowd rolled through the gate with the extra star players notes in the Border Mail article and the advertisement. Still, the Freighters team contained three Essendon premiership players and John Reeves who played in North Melbournes losing 1950 grand final team which would have made for a more than handy side. Unfortunately, we returned Alan Dale back to Essendon slightly damaged, he received a nasty knock and suffered two broken ribs during the game.

So who was the greatest forward to ever play for Heatherton?


As mentioned before Doug Wade regarded John Coleman as the greatest player he had seen. Another with the same opinion was a player who rivalled his hero as a spectacular high flying aerialist. I loved this Fitzroy player who filled a void when John Coleman's career was cut short. As a young Bomber supporter, I could share in the excitement of Tony Ongerello's screamers, safe in the knowledge that they would be unlikely to result in a goal to hurt the Bombers (unlike Ray Poulter's huge torps from centre half forward for Richmond.)Leigh Matthews is generally regarded as the greatest-ever footballer,but not in the opinion of Tony,the last man to kick goals using place kicks. Some of Tony's screamers are shown on the following website,from which Tony's opinion is reproduced in italics.


OWAAT One Week at a Time Tony Ongarello: A ...
www.oneweekatatime.com.au/tony-ongarello-a-highflying-gentleman/

On Coleman, Tony is adamant. He is the greatest player to have played the game. He could do it all: he was quick, skilful, could jump and mark, was tough, but fair. He was without peer. I played in the game before his last. He kicked 14 goals on us and was untouchable. He would repeatedly jump and take the most sublime marks. Easily the greatest player I have seen.
Later, when discussing the Brisbane Lions coaching predicament and board troubles, Leigh Matthews was mentioned.
He would be Colemans competitor wouldnt he? I said.
In what way? he responded.
As the best.
Not as far as Im concerned. Matthews is one of the games greatest players, but to my mind Coleman stands alone.
The game following his 14 goals against Fitzroy, Coleman would kick 5 against North Melbourne before dislocating his knee. He would never play again.
It is easy to see why Tony Ongarello was such a fan of John Coleman, they played similarly. There are differences of course, and the main one is clearly that Coleman was an elite kick. In his 131 games, Tony is credited with kicking 247 goals, but the records dont show how many behinds he kicked. According to those who saw him, there were many.


COLEMAN NOT PICKED IN VICTORIAN TEAM TO PLAY WESTERN AUSTRALIA IN 1952!
Imagine my surprise to find that John Coleman had not been named in the team. There was a very good reason and it had nothing to do with his form.

John will be the draw
By HUGH BUGGY
Star League forward John Coleman was not omitted from the Victorian State side because of loss of form. He was left in the Essendon team to play in Brisbane on June 14 as the game's greatest drawcard. This opinion was
expressed by several League club officials last night. They said the whole object of the match between Essendon and Geelong in Brisbane was to promote the Australian game in the northern State.

To play a game there without John Coleman, they added, would be like playing a Test match without Lindwall and Miller. These officials agreed that Jock Spencer, North Melbourne forward, was now quite as competent as Coleman, but Spencer was not yet the big-name player that Coleman is. Coleman in five games this year has kicked 24 goals for Essendon. Spencer, in six games, has scored 23.

Ace kicker
They said the prowess of Coleman as a goal-kicker was well known to all followers of football in Brisbane.
His record as the first League forward to kick 100 goals or more in his first two seasons was as familiar
to them as it was to Victorian fans. Officials said that as the "away" round was solely a propaganda effort, Brisbane would be keen to see Coleman in action. (P.8,Argus,4-6-1952.)

N.B. John kicked 13 goals!
Essendon crushes Geelong at Brisbane COLEMAN GETS THIRTEEN IN GREAT WIN Brisbane, Monday
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 17 June 1952 p 8 Article.

JOHN MARRIES HIS "FINANCE".
Yes,that's what Monica Fernando of Merlynston was called when their engagement was announced in 1954! The crush outside the church when they married was described in graphic detail in the following article which has poor quality photos of the crowd and the newlyweds. (P.1,Argus,4-3-1955.)

OH THE PAIN!
I went to Kensington Central School where two of my mates were Reg. and Max Fairchild who barracked for South Melbourne. Reg.was a good-enough footballer to have attracted the attention of North Melbourne while at the Central School (form 1 and 2)and Max will be well-remembered as Beau in the Beaurepaire Tyre advertisements. They'd told me they were going to the match at the Lakeside Oval and when the Bombers lost despite John Coleman kicking eleven goals straight (not mentioned in the following report) they were the last people I wanted to see because I knew I'd get a ribbing. Sure enough they were waiting to gloat when we entered the subway at the station.

COLEMAN 11, BUT-
Speedy South earns 10-point win
By PERCY TAYLOR
SOUTH MELBOURNE'S tigerish finish gave it a sound 10-points victory over Essendon in a game of high standard on Saturday. South's pace, plus the varying fortunes of the sides, thrilled the 30,000 spectators.John Coleman, who kicked 10 goals for Essendon on the opening day, gave another exhilarating display to kick 11 brilliant goals. But despite his dominance, Essendon failed elsewhere. Its defence, in particular, became slack, and crumpled beneath the persistent and pacy play of the southerners. On Saturday's form South could do well this season. South was the dominant side for three quarters, due to high-flying and fast ruckmen, fast and clever rovers, and a forceful and high marking lot of half forwards. Essendon held control in two of the three centre line positions all day, but its forwards, with the exception of Coleman, did not take full advantage of it. etc.
(P.10,Argus,4-5-1953.)

JOHN'S LAST SCREAMER.
And is this his last great mark?
This could be the last of Coleman's fabulous marks-it was taken in Saturday's game-that stamped him as a champion. (P.1,Argus,7-6-1954. A GREAT PHOTO which shows clearly that John did not need opponents' backs to gain elevation.)

UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL.
It has been said that John Coleman was a "middling" high jumper and Ron Clarke said he would have been more successful as a triple jumper because he could take off on either foot. He was the Open champion of Uni High in both.

TWO RECORDS AT UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS
J. Nuttall won the 880 yards in record time of 2min 7 3-10sec at the University High School sports at Royal Park yesterday. G. Harry broke the long jump record in under 16.
Results:
BOYS' EVENTS: Open: 830 Yds: J. Nuttall. 2.7 3-10. Hurdles: J Coleman. 100 Yds:K. Kube. 220 Yds: H. Dowd.
High Jump.J. Coleman. Hop, Step, Jump. J. Coleman. etc. (P.14, Argus, 17-10-1946.)

Uni High could beat most opponents in footy but the most satisfying victory was always over Melbourne High and these were more common in the 1950's when Uni High's side was stacked with players such as Ron Carruthers, Barry McAuliffe,John Booth, Viv. Peterson, Bobby Clark, the Keddie twins,Terry Rodgers (who beat John's goalkicking record), Graeme Leydin, Graeme Beissel, Ron Evans (imported from Caulfield Grammar), etc., etc., etc.

Good Win For U H S At Carlton
UNIVERSITY HIGH. 14 gls 11 bhds (95) MELBOURNE HIGH . 9 gls 3 bhds (57)
For the first time in six years University High School defeated Melbourne High School in a football match at Carlton yesterday. A return match will be played on August 7.Best: University High: Coleman (5), Plumridge (4), Boyd (2). Melbourne High: Balson, Dunn, Witherow.(P.13, Argus, 25-7-1946.

John Coleman, captain University High School, trained at Essendon last night. He is a district boy, aged
only 17, 6ft lin, and 12 1/2 st. He should be a player next season.(P.9, Argus, 21-8-1946.)

I speculated earlier that John Coleman, Harry Beitzel and Harry Caspar had all attended University High School.
This has been confirmed by Harry Beitzel himself in a pop-up (click on the carictature of Harry Beitzel) on the following website, found in a Harry Caspar search. Harry Caspar's career at Carlton had a break in 1954,the reason being that he was playing forSorrento and was married in New Zealand in that year. Harry was working at Portsea in early 1953 and the Sorrento Football Club tried to sign him but the Carlton Football Club refused permission, obviously later relenting. Harry was one of many footballers to move to the beautiful Mornington Peninsula. Not surprising because he seems to have been living at Sorrento before he started playing for Northcote, according to another Carlton webpage (given in italics later.) Another pop-up on this website reports his death at Rosebud.

CASPAR, Harry : Blueseum - Online Carlton Football Club ...
www.blueseum.org/tiki-browse_gallery.php?galleryId=193...0...

HARRY CASPAR.(Google "Harry Caspar, Mahoney".)
From Post Office Directories of Melbourne Thaddeus Mahoney was a storekeeper and hardware dealer of 30 Queensberry Street, Carlton from 1862 until 1866. After this date the family appears at several addresses through Carlton, and Prahran until around 1884. There were ten surviving children all growing up, and only two were married before the father died.

Thaddeus was aged just 59 years when he died at Neil Street, Melbourne, on the 6th of February 1879 of general exhaustion and disease of the liver.[21] Jane O'Mahony died just five years later of Dropsy and Chronic Inflammation of the Liver on the corner of Newry Street and St Georges Road in Fitzroy on the 23rd March 1884, aged 50 years.[22]

Both were buried together in the Roman Catholic Section of R/C I 391 in Melbourne General Cemetery. Their youngest was also buried there as Eliza had died in 1880.[23]

Jane had left a family of nine living children and most married just before or just after her death. The pair of Thaddeus and Jane have left a large family of descendants who have married into many of the other families of Carlton and North Melbourne.


Some of the descendants of Thaddeus and Jane were footballers, and played for Carlton. One great grandchild of the couple was Harry CASPAR, who was involved in a punch up with the great full forward John COLEMAN. That John Coleman / Harry Caspar fight in the goal square cost Essendon the Grand Final when both were suspended for four weeks. Without Coleman, Essendon lost the 1951 Grand Final to Geelong by 11 points. The Essendon supporters have not forgotten it, and never forgiven it.

8.
Harry George CASPAR b. 4 Nov 1926 North Carlton, Vic. m. 6 Mar 1954 New Zealand. d. 1 Jul 1988 Rosebud, Vic.
June Lesley EGINTON b. 1930

Descendants of Harry and June were born at Mornington from 1957 and later at Rosebud as late as 1996. They are listed on this website.However, despite the Caspar name being mentioned in connection with the South Mornington Football Club, Harry was probably living near Sorrento,perhaps at Blairgowrie. These births and Harry's death were probably at the Mornington and Rosebud hospitals. Harry is buried in good company at the Sorrento cemetery.

IN GOOD COMPANY
John McCarthy is buried on a small rise in the middle of the Sorrento Cemetery.

Tucked away in scrubland on the edge of the Mornington Peninsula coastline, the graveyard is filled with notable figures.

Barry Hooker Harrison, who tagged Ron Barassi out of the 1958 Grand Final, is just a few metres from McCarthys grave.

A bit further along youll find Harry Caspar, the Carlton full back Essendon fans blame for John Colemans suspension at the end of the 1951 season which cost them the premiership.

Theres also Percy Cerutty, the athletics trainer who coached Herb Elliott to the 1500m gold medal at the 1960 Rome Olympics, and Prime Minister Harold Holts wife Dame Zara Bate.
( Remembering John McCarthy | Herald Sun
www.heraldsun.com.au/news/...john.../story-e6frf7jo-1226613235980

F - Australian Cemeteries
www.australiancemeteries.com/vic/mornington_pen/sorrentoafdata.htm
CASPAR, Harry George, 1/7/1988, 61, June, buried with son Phillip J Casper (sic).
Phillip, Harry and June's son, was only 11 years old.


The following webpage explains why John Coleman lost it when he was punched. He had a boil on the back of the neck and that was the target his former Uni High schoolmate aimed at! Harry Caspar supposedly was originally from Sorrento so this could mean that he stayed with relatives each weekend during his career with Northcote. Amazingly,one of his sons played with Essendon Reserves.
Harry Caspar : Blueseum - Online Carlton Football Club ...
blueseum.org/tiki-index.php?page=Harry+Caspar
Jun 5, 2013 - Originally from Sorrento, Caspar later joined VFA front-runners Northcote ... the 1954 season playing for Sorrento on the Mornington Peninsula.
N.B.Northcote was hardly a front-runner when it cleared Harry to Carlton; the club had finished 10th!


It has been said that John Coleman never lived at Hastings but it seems that he spent time there with his parents after his knee was injured. These consecutive pars show that John and Harry Caspar were both on the peninsula at the time. Harry had been relegated to Carlton's reserves possibly because of a loss of form or his inability to get to training from Sorrento; this is why Carlton had a change of heart about clearing him to Sorrento.

Information from Hastings indicates that John Coleman is progressing slowly. His damaged knee is still in
irons. "We will be surprised if he plays again this year," said Mr. Howard Okey last night. "Perhaps he will be
fit to play for us in the finals."

CARLTON
Follower Harry Caspar was cleared to Sorrento by Carlton committee last night. He had previously expressed a desire to go to Footscray, but changed his mind, preferring to play where he is employed. (P.15,Argus, 29-6-1954.)

FROM New Zealand comes news of the recent marriage of Harry Caspar, former Carlton ruckman, to June, elder
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Eginton, Mayor and Mayoress of Motueka, Nelson. After a car tour of the South Island, they will return to live at Sorrento, Victoria, where Harry will resume football training.
(P.17, Argus, 29-4-1955.)
Harry had been one of Sorrento's best in its first semi final win in 1954 but returned to Carlton in 1955 because he needed only one more game to qualify for the provident fund.

HARRY'S BLUE WITH THE BLUES.
Was Harry's relegation to the reserves due to poor form or a blue with the Blues?

After serving his suspension through the first four games of 1952, Caspar was brought straight back into Carltons senior team. He celebrated his 50th match in round 18 (a 36 point win over St Kilda at the Junction Oval) and played in the first and only senior final of his career when the Blues lost a heart-stopping Semi Final by l point to Fitzroy in front of 18,000 fans at the MCG. In a dramatic post-match incident later that evening, Carltons promising full-forward Keith Warburton collapsed and was rushed to hospital, where only repeated blood transfusions over the next 24 hours saved his life. One of Keiths kidneys had been ruptured in a heavy collision during the game, but he somehow stayed on the field until the final siren.

That dramatic final marked the high point of Harry Caspars career at Carlton, because soon afterwards, his career went into decline. Injury delayed the start of his 1953 season, and he had added only four senior games by round 9 when he apparently became embroiled in a dispute with his captain, Ken Hands, or his coach Percy Bentley. As a consequence, Caspar spent the second half of the year with the seconds. In September, he was influential in driving his team right through to the Reserves Grand Final, and the Blues comfortably beat Essendon in the curtain-raiser to the Collingwood-Geelong Grand Final at the MCG.

Despite that success, Harrys problems continued into 1954. On the first day of the new season, Carlton Reserves unfurled their Premiership flag at Princes Park prior to the match against South Melbourne. Early in the game, Caspar and the Swans captain-coach Don Condon tangled, and Condon was reported. Then at half time, Harry became involved in a heated discussion with Carlton officials, and shocked everyone by demanding an immediate clearance and leaving the ground.

Caspar spent the 1954 season playing for Sorrento on the Mornington Peninsula.

Carlton stood firm however, and Caspar eventually returned to the fold and to senior football - in 1955. Wearing guernsey number 6 (after playing all of his career to that point in number 24) he was one of Carltons best in a big loss to Essendon in round 9, before his career imploded in less than ideal circumstances the following week. In the midst of another big defeat this time by Footscray - Caspar was reported for striking the Bulldogs Dave Bryden. And to make matters worse, he suffered a badly-bruised back during the last quarter. On the following Tuesday night, Harry was suspended for four weeks, and that brought the curtain down his career. He retired on the spot, and didnt play again at any level.

In 1956, Caspar headed off to play for East Ballarat that had just appointed his former team-mate John Brown as coach for the 1956 season.


In the years after his last match for the Blues, Harry returned to live at Sorrento, where he and his wife produced five sons. All of the Caspar boys represented Sorrento at some time in their sporting careers, and two went on to play at VFL Reserves level; Michael with South Melbourne in 1980, and David remarkably, with Essendon in 1984.

Harry Caspar passed away on the 1st July, 1988, aged 61.
(Harry Caspar : Blueseum - Online Carlton Football Club ...
blueseum.org/tiki-index.php?page=Harry+Caspar)

BALLARAT'S fast, open, smooth game, functioning around their winning centre and a more coordinated attack, should give them victory in the first semi-final against East Ballarat at Eastern Oval tomorrow.Geelong West and Maryborough will contest the second semi-final. Ballarat was the early premiership favorite, but injuries so depleted the line-up in the latter stages of the minor round that they were forced to struggle to hold a place in the final four. Ballarat won the last two premierships. East's hopes received a setback last Saturday when the team failed badly against Maryborough and lost second place.

East's strength lies in the ruck-rover combination of Caspar, Dodd,and Pascoe. Former Carlton ruckman
Harry Caspar "makes the game" for Dodd and Pascoe,the best pair of little men in the league.
(P.19, Argus,7-9-1956.)


The Mahoney family history gives little early genealogy for the Caspar family. Is it possible that Harry's move to the East Ballarat Club was influenced by family connections as well as the club's coach being a former Carlton player? Did the first Caspar come out to try the Ballarat diggings? Was Frank Caspar,our William Tell, the saw-miller (after whom the Swiss-like landscape between Bacchus Marsh and Gisborne was called CASPAR COUNTRY) his son? Is it possible that Harry's mother and father became acquainted through Frank Caspar and Cornelius Mahoney who is mentioned in the same article? "Goodman's creek was opened in May of that year by Mr. Cornelius Mahoney, J.P., who is still living in Bacchus Marsh, in his 84th year. We often want him to give us his recollections of early days, but have not succeeded very well. He has the first balance sheet of the old Road Board(of which he was a member) and we should like to have that framed in the Shire hall."
(IN CASPAR'S COUNTRY.
The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 - 1918) Saturday 4 March 1905 p 3 Article)

Unfortunately there is not enough Caspar genealogical information to link Harry's father with the families of Frank Caspar or William Louis Caspar who died in Ballarat in 1950.
CASPAR_On August 3, at Ballarat, William Louis Caspar, beloved husband of Alice, and loving father of Lillian (Jean, Mrs. Kemp). Frederick. Nellie (Mrs. McGregor), Robert, and Myrtle. (P.16, Argus, 4-8-1950.)

Harry Caspar's ancestor, Thaddeus Mahoney, from Killarney, was transported for picking pockets in 1833 at the age of 13. Cornelius Mahoney was also from Killarney and came out with his parents in 1837. Thaddeus had been transported to Sydney and after serving his sentence,moved to Melbourne in about 1944. Here's Cornelius Mahoney's obituary.

DEATH OF MR CORNELIUS MAHONEY, JP
One of the widest known personalities, and the oldest resident, of the district, in Mr Cornelius Mahoney, J.P., died at his residence, Bacchus Marsh, on Tuesday night, in his 94th year. Although of such advanced age, Mr. Mahoney had only been laid up during the last few months. Mr.,Mahoney was born at Killarney, County Kerry, Ireland, 31st March, 1821, and landed at Hobart, Tasmania with his parents,from the immigrant ship "Bussorah
Merchant," of London, Louis William Moncrief, Master, on 11th December, 1837. In 1838, after a stay in Tasmania, the family, consisting of his father, mother, himself (then 16 years old), and a younger brother,
came to Melbourne arriving on 22nd May; where his father and himself went into the building trade, and
carried it on successfully until 1844 when they went to Bacchus Marsh, and purchased the present homestead.
of 200 acres, lots 10 and 11, between the rivers Lerderderg and Werribee, and where his father died 9th January, 1887, aged 92 years.

Mr Mahoney was a member of the old Road Board, a Justice of the Peace, and was for several years Chairman and Correspondent of the School Board of Advice in the district. He was for 16 years a member of the Bacchus Marsh Troop of Prince of Wales Light Horse, during which time he rose to the rank of Captain.

Mr. Mahoney was always imbued with the spirit of adventure, and in 1849 he left his home for the Californian goldfields, and spent 2 years there, but not meeting with much success he returned to Bacchus Marsh, and has remained there ever since. Mr. Mahoney was the first to discover gold on the Goodman's Creek, at Cockatoo Gully, in 1854. He had many bushranging tales to relate.

Mr. Mahoney was married in Melbourne in 1849 to Miss Mary Hogan, a native of Tipperary, who came to the colony with her parents in 1841, by the immigrant ship "Agricola." Mrs. Mahoney survives her husband, and although 84 years of age, is wonderfully keen of intellect. There is also a grown-up family of sons and daughters; and a number of grandchildren. One of the latter (Mr. Clem. McFarlane) it is interesting to note at the present time,
is an Officer in the Australian Navy, being a Torpedo Instructor on board the cruiser Melbourne.The funeral took place on Thursday, and was largely attended. (P.3,The Bacchus Marsh Express, 22-8-1914.)

Thaddeus Mahoney married Jane Stafford. Fred Stafford was therefore related in some way to Harry Caspar. Like Harry,he played for Northcote before moving to Carlton (where he kicked the winning goal in the 1947 premiership win). There he would have played with Harry, as he probably also did in 1954.(*He did!)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Fred Stafford
Fred Stafford.jpg
Personal information
Date of birth 3 August 1926
Date of death 10 July 2009 (aged 82)
Original team Northcote (VFA)
Debut Round 1, 1947, Carlton v. Melbourne
Height/Weight 173 cm, 74 kg
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
1947-1952 Carlton 102 (68)
1 Playing statistics correct to end of 1952 season.
Career highlights
Carlton Premiers 1947
Fred Stafford (3 August 1926 10 July 2009[1]) is a former Australian rules footballer in the Victorian Football League (VFL).

He kicked the winning goal in the dying seconds of the 1947 VFL Grand Final.[2]

*Finishing second on the list in the Peninsula League, Mornington (coached by ex-local half-back Gordon Williams) failed by three goals against Seaford (led by Conley, ex Carlton) last Saturday. Mornington meets Sorrento tomorrow in the final. Caspar and Stafford (Carlton), Ollie (St. Kilda) and Ron Wilson
(Coburg) play with Sorrento. Alby Morrison (Footscray) played earlier in the season with Sorrento, although probably in his middle forties. (P.1, Williamstown Chronicle,17-9-1954.)

Sorrento won the premiership in 1954.
Between 1948 and 1954, Morrison served as captain-coach of Sorrento, finally retiring, aged forty-five, after the club's victorious 1954 grand final. Meanwhile, at the MCG on the very same afternoon, Footscray broke through for its first ever VFL pennant by downing Melbourne. - See more at: http://australianfootball.com/players/player/Alby%2BMorrison/4800#sthash.d2kh7rJF.dpuf

I wonder if my post on the Sorrento F.C. timeline will shed some light on the Caspar family,several members of which are life members of the club.
A BIT OF SORRENTO F.C. HISTORY. Why do you think Harry Caspar and Fred Stafford both played at Northcote, Carlton and Sorrento? The answer relates to Thaddeus Mahoney who was transported at the age of 13 in 1833. And what's that got to do with Albert Coleman whose brother kicked 23 goals against Sorrento? Is the photo of Alby Morrison and some of his Sorrento players that appeared in the newspaper article (1954?) hanging in the clubrooms?

1 comment(s), latest 3 weeks, 3 days ago

ITELLYA HAS RETIRED.

After ten attempts to post a comment on the DICTIONARY HISTORY OF BULLA journal (second prize essay on the history of Bulla),itellya has retired. The essay has been posted on Ray Gibb's Facebook page. It is quoted almost verbatim in I.W.Symonds' BULLA BULLA.

2 comment(s), latest 2 weeks, 5 days ago

WOOLCOTT AND THE HEART OF ROSEBUD, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

Is it worth $40 million dollars (perhaps half as much again)to change the heart of a community? The Rosebud Fishing Village was Rosebud, the jetty being built roughly in the middle of it. The school was the first public building on the inland side of the beach road and of course,it was built in the HEART OF ROSEBUD. Today,Rosebud has two hearts,the second being Rosebud Plaza on the old Hindhope Estate.

On 16-5-1856, R.Glover and J.Wallace were granted crown allotment 17, parish of Wannaeue, consisting of 129 acres 2 roods and 28 perches. This was bounded by the beach road,Jetty Rd, Eastbourne and the line of Norm Clark walk (just east of Ninth Avenue.)

TUESDAY, 10th MARCH.
Parish of Wannaeue, Arthur's Seat. 129 Acres.
Four-roomed Cottage, Men's Huts, fronting Hobson's Bay, and within Thirty Miles from Melbourne by Water, and Forty-five Miles by Road.
H.A. COFFEY, for F. E. Beaver and Co., is instructed to sell by auction, at their rooms, 30 Collins-street west, on Tuesday, 10th inst., at eleven o'clock, 129 acres superior agricultural land, having a large
frontage to Hobson's Bay, and described in the Government plan as having water at a short distance from the surface ; together with a neat cottage containing four rooms and a garden ; fruit trees, fenced in. From the great rise in tho value of property in this locality, tho healthful air and the beautiful scenery, there can be no doubt but that this opportunity offers a fair chance for profitable investment to the small capitalist, or would be admirably adapted for a marine residence. The water is sufficiently deep in shore to admit the landing of provisions and goods close to the frontage. Terms Liberal.(P.2,Argus,5-3-1857.)

MONDAY, MAY 2.
Near Arthur's Seat, and Close to the Village of Dromana. Fronting the Bay.
ALFRED BLISS has received instructions from the proprietor to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, at his rooms, 37 Queen-street, on Monday,May 2, at one o'clock,
Section No. 17, parish of Wannaene, containing 129 acres 2 roods 28 perches, bounded on three sides by
Government roads. For the convenience of intending purchasers the above property has been cut up into 5 and 10 acre allotments. (P.2,Argus, 20-4-1859.)

On 3-9-1864,R.Glover was assessed on 129 acres,unencumbered,with a nett annual value of 16 pounds 10 shillings. By the Kangerong Road Board assessment of 2-9-1865, Richard Robert Woolcott had become the owner. Assessment No. 103 gives his name as Woolcott and he paid rates on 129 acres, Wannaeue, with a nett annual value of 6 ponds 10 shillings. By 3-9-1870 the nett annual value had risen to 10 pounds and, although the rate collector gave his Christian names,his surname was written as Woollcote. In the 15-9-1876 assessment he seems not to have been assessed but he might have been assessed under O in the alphabetical listings. Where the occupant was not clear a property was assessed against "Owner" and if the owner's name was entered if it was discovered.

In the 14-9-1879 assessment the N.A.V.was 12 pounds and remained so on 24-7-1879 although -.Woolcote now owned only 112 acres; 17 or 18 acres had been sold. If they were all 2 acres like the block that George and Susan Peatey bought in 1878,that would mean that nine blocks had been sold. By 16-7-1888 Woolcote (written only in the OWNER column)was assessed on 20 allotments,Wannaeue with a nett annual value of only 8 pounds. The next year it was written VERY FAINTLY as 40 acres and the N.A.V. was 40 pounds. Perhaps the council had decided that all building blocks must have a N.A.V. OF 2 pounds,a value that persisted well into the 1920's for vacant blocks. A modest dwelling would raise this to, or by, 5 pounds.

By 1900, many purchasers seem to have forfeited their blocks to the Commercial Bank which was assessed on 84 acres in crown allotment 17. Those definitely assessed on land in THE HEART OF ROSEBUD (c/a 17) were:
George Henry Chapman (Dromana blacksmith) 4 lots, Charles James 3 acres, Marshall (Moonee Ponds real estate agent) 7 acres, Mrs Peatey 2 acres and house lot 76, John Roberts (the postmaster) 4 lots and house, Formbisher 2.5 acres lots 74 and 85. A few more may have had land on c/a 17 but as descriptions were so vague it is impossible to be sure.

In 1919, Henry Bucher of Brighton owned lots lots 73 and 78 (and perhaps lots 7-10);Mrs Mary Butler,c/o Mrs McDowell, a building on lot 49; Mrs Annie Eliza Cairns of "Fernvilla" (top of Cairn Rd) Rosebud, had lots 1,2,29 and 30; Mrs Elizabeth Cairns of Rosebud had lots 43-6; "Rosebud Ted" Cairns had lots 74 and 85; the Dromana blacksmith still had lots 19 and 20; A.C.Allingham*, the teacher who replaced Charles Perrin* was occupying "quarters,state school",the bill sent to the Education Department; John Fallon of Windsor had lot 80; (former?) Rye teacher Henry Horneman had lots 62,81 and 82;Mrs Hownslow had lot 23; Mrs Helen Salina Mitchell (probably from the present Woodlands Historic Park near Melbourne Airport)had lots 13-18 and buildings; Joseph Maconochie of Richmond lots 37-41 and buildings and his wife store and lot 42 occupied by P.Ditchburn*; Robert McDowell of Rosebud had lots 77 and 79 and part of lot 75 and a building; Alf and John Peatey,sons of George and Sarah the 2 acre lot 76 on the south corner of Jetty Rd and McDowell St bought in 1878 but minus the house which burnt down in 1912; Ernie Rudduck of Dromana, still alive thanks to Melbourne Brindle,William John Ferrier etc, land and store occupied by L.C.Leech; Mrs(sic) Mary B.Stone (see the Polly Vine chapter in Peter Wilson's ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD)LOTS 25,26,28; and Mrs Charlotte Walker of Benalla (possibly Robert McDowell's sister in law) part lot 75.
(*See ROSEBUD ROLL OF HONOUR.)

Crown allotment 18, between Adams Avenue and Jetty Rd had been subdivided before c/a 17 but only one block was sold,lot 86 of two acres on its north west corner. Robert White (Blooming Bob White bought c/a 17 in 1875 and was unaware that Charles Blackey had sold lot 86 to Jack Jones. When Bob sold the property to the (Leak/Lake brothers circa 1890)the new owners assumed that they had bought the whole 152 acres and took Jones to court to have him kicked off. Jones, who had conducted a store on his fishing village block, proved that he owned the block and built Rosebud's first proper shop on the corner. The buyer in 1913 was probably Mrs Mitchell who conducted what Isobel Moresby and Rosalind Peatey remembered fondly as a lolly shop.

W.A. KORNER WILL SELL BY PUBLIC AUCTION on the above date, on the ground,
1.All deceased's right, title, and interest in that piece of land being part of Crown portion l8, parish of Wannaeue, having frontage to Government road of 57ft. by a depth of 329ft, more or less, together with store and other improvements thereon.
2. All that piece of land, being part of Crown portion 18, parish of Wannaeue, having frontage of 60ft. by a depth of 330, more or less.Terms at Sale.W. A. Korner, auctioneer. Mornington.
(P.4, Argus,6-12-1913.)

Although 150 acres of c/a 18 was a farm for nearly 40 years after R.R.Woolcott subdivided the heart of Rosebud (c/a 17)until suicide man, De Garis,launched his so-called HEART OF ROSEBUD ESTATE,lot 86 and Jack Jones' store certainly deserved to be included in the true heart of Rosebud.(See the chapter HENRY POTTON'S FARM in Peter Wilson's ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD.)

THURSDAY, JANUARY 13. DROMANA. DROMANA. Large Bay Frontage.
To Parties Looking for an Unrivalled Site for a Marine Residence or Farm.
C.J. and T. HAM have received Instructions from Mr. J. T. M'Kean, agent for owner, to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, at their rooms, on Thursday, 13th January next, at twelve o'clock, All that piece of land being Lot 17 in parish of Wannaeue, near to village reserve of Dromana, containing 130 acres, well and permanently watered by springs, and having large bay frontage. (P.2, Argus,7-1-1876.)

By 1879, -.Woolcote (sic) was assessed on an unknown number of acres with a nett annual value of 12 pounds.

ROSEBUD BAY.
That picturesque neighbourhood a little to the south west of Dromana, on the main road to Sorrento. The remaining unsold lots in the estate of R. R. Woolcott, Esq., being part of portion 17, parish of Wannaeue, each lot having an area of 1.5 acres and upwards. A new jetty, state school and other improvements have recently been added to the attractions of this place, which must ultimately become one of the most popular of our suburban watering-places.Solicitor, J. S. Woolcott, Esq., Chancery lane And SANDRINGHAM.
(P.2, Argus, 1-2-1888.)


Can the Clacton-on-Sea Estate ever become the heart of Rosebud? This estate was between Norm Clark Walk and First Avenue. There is much detail in LIME LAND LEISURE about the failure of the estate and how the shire and social agencies developed the forfeited land nearer Eastbourne Rd as a residential area for the elderly.

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 10 At 10 a m MECHANICS HALL Rosebud
Shire of Flinders RATE RECOVERY AUCTION
The Shire of Flinders through its Auctioneers Mr G. G .Austin of Frankston and Mr. S. L. Butler of Mornington as auctioneers in conjunction will sell by auction the following properties on Wednesday the 10th day of October 1951 at 10 a. m. in the Mechanics Hall, Rosebud under the provisions of the Local Government Acts
(Municipal Rates Recovery)
ALL THOSE pieces of land being Lots on Plan of Subdivision Number 6108 lodged in the Office of Titles (and which lots are more particularly set out hereunder)being part of Crown Allotments 15 and 16 at Rosebud, Parish of Wannaeue, County of Mornington.

N.B.Unless otherwise specified,all lot sizes are frontage 53 links and depth 181.8 links. A link is a hundredth of a chain (which close enough to 20 metres long) so each link equals 20 centimetres. Therefore the frontage is
53x20 cm or 10.60 metres and the depth is 36.36 metres. In (k)the depth is 219 links or 43.8 metres.

(a) Lots 46 48 54 56 58 and 62 Block A each lot having a frontage to Second Avenue.
(b) Lots 55 57 61 63 Block B each lot having a frontage to Second Avenue.
(c) Lots 50 52 54 60 62 and 72 Block B each lot having a frontage to Third Avenue.
(d) Lots 55 59 and 63 Block C each lot having a frontage to Third Avenue.
(e) Lots 56 58 60 64 66 72 and 74 Block C each lot having a frontage to Fourth Avenue.
(f) Lots 61 65 67 69 79 81 and 83 Block D each lot having a frontage to Fourth Avenue.
(g) Lots 72 84 86 and 88 Block E, each lot having a frontage to Sixth Avenue.
(h) Lots 63 69 71 73 75 93 and 95 Block F each lot having a frontage to Sixth Avenue.
(i) lots 66 68 84 94 and 96 Block F each lot having a frontage to Seventh Avenue.
(j) Lots 55 57 63 71 73 79 83 91 93 05 97 and 101 Block G each lot having a frontage to Seventh Avenue.
(k) Lots 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 and 13 Block 12 each lot having a frontage of 53 links to Ninth Avenue by a depth of 219 links* approximately. (*Presumably the east side.All the avenues seem to be 4.5 chains apart but Ninth and Rosebud Pde are 5 chains apart, an extra 10 metres.)
(l) Lots 12 16 l8 20 24 and 30 Block I. each lot having a frontage to Ninth Avenue.
(m) Lots 3 5 9 23 25 27 Block I. each lot having a frontage to Eighth Avenue.
(n) Lots l8 20 24 26 and 30 Block J each lot having a frontage to Eighth Avenue.
(0) Lots 1 3 5 7 13 15 25 27 Block J each lot having a frontage of 53 links to Seventh Avenue.
(p) Lots 2 4 14 16 l8 20 22 24 26 28 and 30 Block K each lot having a frontage to Seventh Avenue.
(q) Lots 1 9 11 15 19 and 21 Block K, each lot having a frontage to Sixth Avenue.
(r) Lots 8 10 12 14 16 l8 22 24 28 and 30 Block L each lot having a frontage to Sixth Avenue.
(s) Lots 9 13 17 25 and 27 Block L each lot having a frontage to Fifth Avenue.
(t) Lots 2 4 12 14 18 20 22 24 26 28 and 30 Block M each lot having a frontage to Fifth Avenue.
(U) Lots 1 3 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 and 20 Block M each lot having a frontage to Fourth Avenue.
(V) Lots 2 4 14 l8 20 22 24 26 and 30 Block N each lot having a frontage to Fourth Avenue.
(X) Lots 2 8 12 20 22 24 26 28 and 30 Block O each lot having a frontage to Third Avenue.
(y) Lots 1 3 7 10 21 23 27 and 29 Block O each lot having a frontage to Second Avenue.
(z) Lots 5 13 17 and 19 Block F, each lot having a frontage to First Avenue.
TERMS AT SALE etc. (P.24, Argus,6-10-1951.)

Not only the Clacton-on-Sea blocks were forfeited. The depressions of the 1890's and 1930's resulted in widespread unemployment and many purchasers were flat out putting food on the table. Paying rates on a holiday block would have been the lowest priority. But councils still needed to cope with road maintenance and drainage issues and were almost broke. There was a sell-off in 1946 as well, and it was suggested that returned servicemen should be given priority as purchasers. Here were the forfeited blocks near the end of the 1930's depression. 17= the heart of Rosebud (Rosebud Estate); 15 and 16= Clacton-on-Sea.

ROSEBUD PROPERTIES
TUESDAY MARCH 15
At Three O Clock At Mechanics Hall Dromana
LOT 5.-Thirty Lots Each Having a Frontage of 53 Links by a Depth of 181.8 Links and Being Lots on Plan of Subdivision No 5108 Lodged in the Office of Titles and Being Part of Crown Portions 15 and 16 at Rosebud, Parish of Wannaeue, County of Mornington.
(a) Fronting First Avenue Lots 45 47 103 Block P
(b) Fronting Third Avenue Lot 48 Block B
(c) Fronting Fifth Avenue Lot 07 Block F Lot 21 Block L Lot 16 Block M
(d) Fronting Sixth Avenue Lots 47 49 77 Block K Lot 32 Block E Lot 42 Block L
(e) Fronting Seventh Avenue Lot 50 Block F Lot 81 Block G Lot 11 Block J Lot 78 Block K
(f) Fronting Eighth Avenue Lots 70 100 102 Block G Lot 73 Block H Lots 95 07 Block I Lots 12 10 28 42 Block J
(g) Fronting Ninth Avenue Lots 04 100
LOT 6.-Lot 114 on Plan of Subdivision No. 5108 Lodged In the Office of Titles Being Part of Crown Portion 16 at Rosebud Parish and County Aforesaid frontage of 53 Links to Government Road by Depth of 277.9 Links.

LOT 7.-24 lots, Each Having a Frontage of 50 Feet by Varying Depths and Being Lots on Plan of Subdivision No. 5134 Lodged In the Office of Titles and Being Part of Crown Portion 17 at Rosebud Parish of Wannaeue County of Mornington
(a) Lots 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 l8 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Block H Fronting Spray Street
(b) Lots 27 28 Block G Fronting Spray Street
(c) Lot 35 Block B Fronting Foam Street
(d) Lot 36 Block B Fronting Government Road
LOT 8-Lots 28 29 30 Block H on Plan of Subdivision No 5134 as Aforesaid Each Lot Having a Frontage of 22 Feet 6 Inches to a Government Road by a Depth of 150 Feet. (P.14, Argus, 10-2-1938.)

OWNERS AND OCCUPIERS OF STEWARTON / GLADSTONE PARK, VIC., AUST.

This journal was prompted by Bezza sending me the information in italics. Mr Fenwick was probably managing the farm for Helen Melville. Thomas Steuart Gladstone was cousin of the prime minister. Stewarton and a farm of the same name in the Western District were probably named after Gladstone's partner. Stewarton was renamed Gladstone in the second year of John Cock's lease.

The will of the late Mr Thomas Gladstone has been proved. The personalty in the estate amounts to 25=,000.Kilmore Press 23 May 1889 p3. This is Thomas Steuart Gladstone. There was also a Sir Thomas Gladstone that died in 1889.

Fenwick seem to have Gladstone park in 1917 when it was sold.
Essendon Gazette 22 Feb 1917
Gladstone Park Sale. Campbell and Sons and McCulloch Hancock will sell, on Wednesday,. Inst., at 1 p.m., at Gladstone Park, Broadmeadows. under instructions from A. G. and C E. Melville. the whole of pedigreed and farm mares, dairy breeding sows, sheep, machinery, farm implements and sundries. Particularly given in our advertising columns, and other details may be had from the auctioneers or from Mr. A. Fenwick. Gladstone Park, Broadmeadows.

Essendon Gazette 14 Sep 1916 p2
Clearing Sale at Broadmeadows. .Last Tuesday week, 5th September, a very successful clearing sale was held at Gladstone Park, Broadmeadows, by McPhail, Anderson and Co., in conjunction with McCulloch and Hancock. The proprietors having decided to relinquish dairying and to go in solely for sheep and cropping, instructed the above agents to hold a clearing sale of all the dairy stock, plant, etc. A large number of buyers attended and a good sale resulted. Cows. in milk some time, made to 11 10s; springers, to 14; 21-year-old heifers, in lines, 6 12s 6d;: 18 months to 2-year-olds, 4 12s Gd; 9 to 12 months olds, 3 2s 6d; bull,.to 10 2s 6d. The plant. etc.. also sold at good values.


Essendon Gazette 8 August 1918 p3
MR. A. E. HOADLEY Has secured the Imported Welsh Cob, GWALIA CAESAR Who will stand the Season at GLADSTONE PARK, BROADMEADOWS. Terms on Application.



Section 5 in the parish of Tullamarine fronted the east side of today's Mickleham Rd from the Lackenheath Drive corner to Forman St where it adjoined Broadmeadows Township.The first bridge in the township joined the two parts of Ardlie St.

Today's suburb of Gladstone Park is separated from the rest of SECTION 5'S 777 acres (subdivided as the Gladstone Gardens Estate) by the freeway. It also includes most of "Viewpoint" which ran south to the junction. Marigold Crescent in Gowanbrae is also part of Viewpoint. About half of Camp Hill/ Gowanbrae is in Gladstone Park while the portion south east of the Ring Road carries the farm's second name.

GLADSTONE PARK.
Page G.30, DICTIONARY HISTORY OF TULLAMARINE AND MILES AROUND.
George Russell of Golf Hill in the Western District who bought Section 5 Tullamarine is shown on the Parish map as the grantee. He bought it for Niel Black of Mt Noorat near Colac who arrived in 1839 as the representative of Niel Black & Co. The partners in this firm were A.Stewart,Thomas Steuart Gladstone, Alex Struthers Finlay and Niel Black. Section 5, Tullamarine was probably intended as a holding paddock or depot to rest sheep hoofing it to market in Melbourne and was owned by Neil Black until his death in 1880 and in 1881-2 by his estate.

In 1882-3 Gladstone became the owner and from 1888-1892, land speculator, G.W.Taylor, was recorded in rate books as the owner;he'd anticipated a killing because of the proposed railway to Bulla with a possible branch to Broadmeadows Township. Taylor fled the country leaving massive debts and the Gladstones regained title as well as pocketing the deposit and part payments.Andrew Lemon said the Gladstones owned the 777 acre farm "until the 1920's" but the rate collectors thought otherwise;the next owner was Frederick Newman Levin, from 1949 till 1952 when he sold to Stanley Korman.

Lessees were Peter McCracken 1846-1855 (McCracken Papers), J.Maconochie , 1863-4, Edmund Dunn of "Viewpoint",the next property south 1865-1873, John Taylor 1873-5, John Kerr of Kerrsland 1875-1892 (Kerr and sons 1881-2), John Cock my great grandfather 1892-1912, HELEN MELVILLE 1912-1917, A.E.Hoadley 1917-1920, L.Roxburgh 1920-1930, Jim Barrow 1930-1949. Owner/Occupiers from then were Levin 1949-52, Stanley Korman 1952-1964, Costain Development Pty. Ltd (Broadmeadows: A Forgotten History.) The last occupant of the second Gladstone Park Homestead (site known) was Ian Farrugia who was also the last occupant of the remaining house on THE LAST OF THE BROADY FARMS (Camp Hill/ Gowanbrae), the second farm south.

WOYNA AVENUE (ROSEBUD WEST, VIC., AUST.), A NOBLE NAME!

ZICHY-WOINARSKI seemed out of place. There were plenty of Cape Verde Islanders, Chinese and Maoris involved in the early history of the Southern Peninsula but no New Aussies with a name like Zichy-Woinarski. Then I saw the name mentioned in trove articles about Mornington and in a heritage study, HO239, regarding Woyna House in Rosebud West. After about two years,I finally twigged that there might be a connection between the names WOYNA and WOINARSKI. Little did I suspect that both names were connected with Polish nobility,that the Zichy part of the name has been traced back to Hungary in the 13th century or that the official Language of Hungary until 1848 was Latin (a world record!) The Zichy genealogy does not include the origin of the ZICHY-WOINARSKI name but the Table Talk article does. I have included the Zichy-Woinarski genealogy down to George Alexander,the owner of the Woyna farm at Rosebud West.

Realising Auction of a Peninsula Farm,
BALANCE OF WOYNA ESTATE, DROMANA.
By order of G. A. Woinarski, Esq. We will Sell as above, Woyna Farm, 32o Acres,
SITUATED on main Melbourne-Sorrento road, 2 miles from Rye and Rosebud and 5 miles from Dromana, comprising about 140 acres of flat and 180 acres of undulating country.
THE FLATS are peat land of a rich alluvial character, with an abundance of lime, as rich and fertile as Carrum or Koo-wee-rup. The light land also has lime in it and is suitable for Hay, Rape, or Melilotus. THE HOMESTEAD comprises an 8roomed Villa, with Lawn and Garden, windmill, Water laid on, Bathing Box, Motor Garage with brick floor.
IMPORTANT.-Failing a Sale as a whole, the property will be offered in two lots.
Lot 1.--Homestead & about 166acres. Lot 2.-154 acres, 80 flats. Both with frontage to main road (etc.) (P.2, Mornington Standard, 27-5-1916.)


Dr. V. J. Woinarski Passes
Dr V. J. E. Zichy Woinarski died suddenly on Friday last, at his home in Mornington, as a result of a heart seizure which overcame him while he was returning from a sick call. Dr Woinarski, who was a brother to Judge Woinarski, gained his medical degree at Melbourne University after receiving his education at Melbourne Grammar School, and prior to the war he practiced for several years at North Melbourne. He served in the war as a captain in the Army Medical Corps, and on returning to Australia he conducted his practice at Mornington. He was 56 years of age, and he has left a widow, two sons and a daughter.
(P.3, Frankston and Somerville Standard, 3-6-1921.)

A COLONIST who well illustrates what was said some time ago in those columns as regards the importance of the foreign element in the foundation, progress and prosperity of Australia, passed away last Friday, January 30, Mr. George Gustave Zichy-Winarsrski was a Pole of high family, and came to Victoria soon after the gold discoveries. He was born at Teschen, Silisia, in 1824. His father, Count Zichy, had married the Countess Woinarski, of Woyna, and the second son of this marriage, the subject of this notice, took by agreement the conjoint name of Zichy- Woinarski. In the local gymnasium he was noted for his great abilities and he studied law with such success that, at the ago of 21 years he had reached the status of Magistrate, and proceeded then to the University of Lemberg. Fired with the universal desire for freedom which permeated Europe when ho was a young man, ho joined the PolishLegion which went to the relief of Hungary in her struggle with Austria in 1818, and became one of the commanding officers of that Legion, and at one time aide de camp to His Excellency, General Prince Woinarski. (etc.) (P.1, Table Talk, 6-2-1891.)


]
4. ZICHY genealogy 04.01 Overview All Zichy-s are one ...
www.zichyfamily.com/tartalom/oldalak/genealogy.pdf

The Zichy - Woinarski line table I
The point of the exact linkage of the Zichy-Woinarski line to the main Zichy trunk is yet to be found. Therefore the numbering of the Zichy-Woinarskis is provisional.
ZW-0 X.Y. the father of only son Jnos below (possibly from the Zichy-Palota line), who emigrated from Hungary to Teschen (Silesia), probably in the 18th

century)
ZW- 1 JNOS ( - ), x. 1st countess (?) Jane Susan Woynarski de Woyna
x. 2nd
.
[1:] ZW-11 JOHANN (-)

ZW-111 JOSEPH (CICHY) (-) x. Ella
ZW-1111 HANS (.)
ZW-1112 MAX (.)
ZW-1113 JOSEPHINE (.)
ZW-1114 KURT (.)
ZW-112 PAUL (CICHY) (-) x.

ZW-12 PAUL (-)
ZW-13 GEORGE-GUSTAVE (Cieszyn/Teschen, 1825.01.23 Melbourne 1891.01.30), x. , 1856.06.28. Henriette Zukerman (1836.01.19 1906.02.27)
ZW-131 STANISLAUS Emil (Ballaarat, 1857.04.25 Wood Points 1920.04.05), x.Mortlake 1883.07.26, Flora Dundas Robertson (1860.11.30.-
Kew 1890)
ZW-1311 ALEXANDRINA (Ballaarat 1884.10.20-Eastwood 1965.03.27)
x.Mornington 1912.12.18 Henry Dundas Macartney (Waverley 1880.02.01-Toowong 1932.10.24)
ZW-1312 VALERIE Henrietta (Ballaarat 1886.06.24.-Kew 1959.09.21)
ZW-1313 ANIELLA (Ballaarat 1888.02-07-Southport 1968.08.18) x.Mornington, 1913.02.11., Arthur Youl Nankivell (Melbourne
1883.11.28.-Kerang 1936.10.21)
51 ZW-1314 GEORGE Alexander (1890.07.10.-1957.08.09)
x.1911. .... Hlne Turnball (1891-1943) (i)
x.1944 ......Joan Finney (...-1993) (ii)

CHAMPION FOOTBALLER KILLED. ROSEBUD, VIC., AUST.

The Dryden family pioneered the area near Hanging Rock before Tom Wills thought of the game that became known as Aussie Rules. When surveys had been completed, leases on squatting runs were cancelled, and as with most pioneering families, the next generation sought opportunities elsewhere.

Bill Dryden had been a champion footballer with the Kyneton Football Club. Unfortunately Rosalind Peatey did not explain how Bill came to meet Mary Peatey. Mary, born in 1890 in Gippsland, was the eldest daughter of Jack and Mary Peatey, who returned to Rosebud in 1894 and established their produce business on "Beachside" on the east side of Peatey's Creek.

When Bill was killed, the elder of his boys, Jim and Bill, was six years old so it can be assumed that they had married by 1926,
three years before the Rosebud Football Club played its first season.

Whatever job Bill had worked at probably disappeared soon after the 1930's depression started and he was probably offered a job at the Seaford sandpits if he played for Seaford. Another inducement may have been that his brother, E. (Edward?) Dryden,was living in the backblocks of Seaford and also starring for the team.

Just before the tragedy, he'd been offered a job at Tom Maw's sand pit at Rosebud. Bill stepped onto a wheel to get off the tray of the truck just as it started reversing and was crushed by the truck.

ROSEBUD v. RED HILL. Red Hill turned out in full force last Saturday when their team visited Rosebud and were rewarded by a win. Both sides were very anxious to win this match, particularly Rosebud, who had their previous beating by Red Hill to repay. However, after quite the best game that has been played in Rosebud this season, Red Hill won by two points - a very unfortunate state of affairs for Rosebud. A large crowd of Rosebud supporters watched the match and the excitement was intense.
Dryden, Anderson and Wong Bros. showed up well for Rosebud; H.Liversidge was handicapped by his fingers being still tied and not yet right.The final scores were Red Hill 9.5; Rosebud 7.14. Frankston and Somerville Standard (Vic. : 1921 - 1939) Saturday 27 July 1929 p 7 Article

SEAFORD OBITUARY . Regret was expressed on the Peninsula, last Saturday when it was learned that Mr. W. Dryden had met his death by accident at Rosebud. The deceased was a well-known footballer around the district, having played with the Rosebud team a year or two ago, and last year captained the Seaford club. He had just recently left Seaford to accept employment at Rosebud. He leaves a widow and two young children. Deepest sympathy is extended to his parents, widow and children. SEAFORD OBITUARY
Frankston and Somerville Standard (Vic. : 1921 - 1939) Saturday 25 November 1933 p 4 Article.

A CHRONOLOGY OF GOWRIE PARK, CAMPBELLFIELD, VIC., AUST. AND ITS OWNERS, OCCUPANTS.

Gowrie or Gowrie Park was the southern half (320 acres) of section 5,Will Will Rook.

It fronted Hilton St, a government road,which the Oaklands Hunt apparently called Glenroy road.* The Morley St house blocks are just within the western boundary and the house blocks in Andrew and John Streets just within the northern boundary. Fairleigh St houses indicate the eastern boundary of section 5 and Gowrie Park. (Melway 17 B1 and F2, north to 7 B11 and the midpoint of the western boundary of the Melbourne Water Retarding Basin in 7 F12.)

(* Being set going again the pack continued north over the Glenroy-lane into Mr Robertson's, thence through Mr A Gibb's property on to the Broadmeadows-road**. Sunbury News and Bulla and Melton Advertiser (Vic. : 1892 - 1900) Saturday 1 September 1894 p 2 Article.) **If in Broadmeadows, today's Camp Rd was called Campbellfield road but if in Campbellfield,it would be called the Broadmeadows road.

REAL ESTATE.COM.
63-65 Gowrie Street Glenroy

BUY INTO HISTORY
A precious piece of Glenroys history awaits the buyer of Gowrie House, one of oldest surviving homes in the district.Built in 1855, the property with a heritage overlay is closely related to the earlier constructed Meadowbank, now known as the manner(SIC) house in Campbellfield. Standing tall behind a circular driveway on a large 1495sqm block approx, the house makes an eye-catching statement in this suburban street of late 20th century homes. Impressive,it would not look out of place in Scotlands lowlands because its architecture is based on the traditional house of a Scottish laird (landowner).

The solid blue stone house features a slate roof, tall chimneys, prominent gable dormer windows and dressed stonework quoins and copings. It was constructed for Scottish migrant and noted pastoralist James Robertson on one of two homestead lots that were part of a Crown pre-emptive right acquired in 1848 by Robertson and his cousin Alexander Gibb. Gowrie House is on the northern section of the divided allotment.

The exterior is in the original condition and comes complete with a foundation stone inscribed with the date of its formation. Over the years, the stables and outbuildings have been demolished while the interior has been extensively renovated to meet modern lifestyle needs.(etc.)


Circa 1841.
James Gibb and James Robertson,both of whom had married Coupar sisters set up a coach building/blacksmith business and at about the time leased 640 acres from the Crown. Although prizes were won with Gibb and Robertson ploughs in 1850, James Robertson seemed to have had another Campbellfield blacksmith by the name of Myers as a business partner by 1845. It is presumed that the land leased in 1841 (of which nothing has been found on trove)was crown allotment 5, which was sold to Gibb and Robertson in 1848 for a pound per acre*. Nothing more was heard of James Gibb (the blacksmith)and the co-grantee was his brother,Alexander.

1848.
*The article about crown land sales (P.2, The Melbourne Argus, 3-3-1848) states that Gibb and Robertson had paid a pound per acre for lot 32, 640 acres, which was wrongly described as portion 12,Will Will Rook. Section 12 of 1189 acres (today's Northcorp Industry Park and east to Merri Creek) was granted to Neil Campbell.The Will Will Rook parish map (google WILL WILL ROOK, COUNTY OF BOURKE)names AndrewGibb as the co-grantee with J.Robertson,not James Gibb.

1863. James Robertson,320 acres, "Gowrie Park", net annual value 144 pounds- as for Gibb's. (Broady rates.)

1872.
ROBERTSON.-On the 17th inst., at Gowrie-park, Campbellfield, Ann, the beloved wife of James Robertson,
aged 58 years.(P.4, Argus,18-12-1872.)

THE Friends of JAMES ROBERTSON, of Gowrie Park, Campbellfield, are respectfully requested to follow the remains of his late wife to the Campbellfield* General Cemetery on Thursday, the 10th inst., at 2 o'clock p.m. The funeral to move from his residence, Gowrie Park.(P.8, Argus, 18-12-1872.) *Will Will Rook Cemetery.

1877.
ROBERTSONKIRKLAND.On the 17th January, at the residence of Robt. Kelly, Coburg, brother-in-law
of the bride, by the Rev. John Cooper, John Robertson, Superintendent Jika Reformatory, and eldest son
of James Robertson, Gowrie Park, Campbellfield, to Kate, fifth daughter of A. Kirkland, late Sub-inspector
of Constabulary, Lisbellaw, Fermanagh, Ireland. (Illustrated Australian News (Melbourne, Vic. : 1876 - 1889) Wednesday 21 February 1877 p 30 Family Notices.)

1879-80.
No 320 acre property at Campbellfield but a James Robertson had 217 acres at Somerton. (Broady rates.)

1888.
ROBERTSON. On the 28th inst., at Sunnyside, Waggarandall, the residence of his son-in-law, Mr.James Moodie, James Robertson, late of Gowrie-park, Campbellfield, and No. 6 Bridport-street, Albert-park, aged 80 years. A colonist of 47 years.(P.1, Argus,30-7-1888.)

1892.
The Gibb in-laws, the descendants of James Robertson,were supposed to have moved away from Gowrie Park in 1872, so who was the J.R.Robertson,of Gowrie Park, Campbellfield whose very fine cow sold for 11 pounds two decades later? (P.30, Argus,24-12-1892.)-digitisation near bottom but actual portion of newspaper can't be found.First-class milkers, 7 to 11,the latter price being given for a veiy fine cow. the property of Mr. J. R. Robertson, Gowrie park, Campbellfield.

1899-1900.
Thomas B.C.Robinson* leasing 317 acres, "Gowrie" at Campbellfield from James Robertson.(P.S.Perhaps the farm was leased in two parts,the house on 3 acres and the remaining 317 acres for grazing.) James Robertson of Somerton had two parcels,of 44 and 180 acres at SOMERTON. (Broady rates.)

1901.
ROBISON.-On the 27th May, Henry, eldest son of *T. B. C. Robison, "Laurieston," Church-square, St.Kilda. Interred St. Kilda Cemetery,Tuesday, 28th inst. (P.1, Argus,29-5-1901.)

1908.
P.S.ROBISON (nee Pye)-On the 5th January, at Brunswick, the wife of T. C. Robison, 'Gowrie,'Campbellfield- a son. (P.1, Argus,8-1-1908.)

1920-1.
Robert Lewis**,trainer,owns the 317 acre "Gowrie."
**It seems that,like Jim Pike (see KILTS AND COW DUNG FLATS), Robert Lewis combined riding and training.
Lewis and the Derby.
R. Lewis has a remarkable riding record in the Victorian Derby, having piloted seven winners. He won on Maltster in 1900, Hautvilliers in 1901, Sylvanite in 1904,Alawa in 1908, Wolowa in 1912, Carlita in 1914, and Furious last year. (P.6, Argus,3-11-1922.)



1930.
CAR ILLEGALLY USED. Charged with having illegally used a motorcar, Alexander Leslie Brothers, farm assistant of Gowrie Park Campbellfield appeared at the Essendon Court on Monday. (P.8, Argus, 8-4-1930.)

1 comment(s), latest 2 weeks, 5 days ago

A CHRONOLOGY OF MEADOWBANK, CAMPBELLFIELD,VIC., AUST. AND ITS OWNERS/OCCUPANTS.

N.B. Gibb family genealogy (plentiful on trove) is only included here where it affects the occupancy of Meadowbank.


1848.
P.2,The Melbourne Argus, 3-3-1848. At a sale of crown land on Wednesday 1st, Gibb and Robertson bought lot 32, portion 12* (sic) Will Will Rook of 640 acres at one pound per acre. (*Actually crown allotment 5.)

1850.
PLOUGHING MATCH AT CAMPBELLFIELD.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Monday 27 May 1850 p 2 Article
... . 5 2itd do to David Anderson, servant to Messrs Gibb and Robertson, Campbellfield . 3 3rd do to ... to Mr. John Cameron, Tober-mony, Deep Creek. 2 2nd do Messrs Gibb and Robertson, Campbellfield.
(EXTRACT: I was also informed that the ploughs by which the prizes were taken had been made by Messrs. Gibb and Robertson, Campbellfield, and Mr. Cook, Melbourne;)

Mr Gibb was James Gibb, blacksmith,who like James Robertson had married a Coupar girl. It was James Gibb who took out the crown lease of section 5, Will Will Rook with James Robertson circa 1841. Unlike his namesake nephew and his brother,Andrew, James Gibb had no taste for farming and -just disappeared from the scene, so that his brother and James Robertson were the co-grantees of section 5.

1860.
The following might account for the later marriage of Alexander Coupar Gibb and Margaret Ferguson Inglis (nee Dods.) The Dods family pioneered the Woodstock district which is west of Donnybrook and presumably near Upper Plenty. Did Alexander Gibb own "Glenvale*? Alexander was obviously adept at all branches of horticulture!

*The answer to the above question is NO! The owner of Glenvale was Henry Gibbs who married Margaret, the widow of Irishman,John Harlin,who with James Bowie Kirk (founder of Kirk's Bazaar)had pioneered the area in 1838.(Early Whittlesea HOW IT WAS SETTLED DETAILS OF THE PIONEERS
Advertiser (Hurstbridge, Vic. : 1922 - 1939) Friday 12 November 1937 p 1 Article and other trove results.)

On Friday week next, the 18th, the Whittlesea branch of tho Victoria Society purpose holding their annual ploughing match on Mr. Gibb's farm, Glenvale, Upper Plenty. ......

There was some doubt last year whether the pear grown by Mr. Gibb, at Campbellfield, was the largest produced that season or not, but this year, we imagine, there can be no doubt on the subject, unless the fruit of the colony generally has taken to growing much beyond its accustomed size. (P.1s, Argus, 11-5-1860.)

1866.
The Gazette.
The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 20 October 1866 p 23 Article
... roll of magistrates for the colony of Victoria, viz., David Laidlaw, Esq., Hamilton; Alexander Gibb, Esq., Campbellfield ; (etc.)

1870's.
Alexander Gibb was the Campbellfield correspondent for The Australasian with his articles mainly concerned with farming details.One piece of information on 26-4-1873 (see below), that there were few sheep in the Campbellfield area is of interest. The coming of the north eastern railway in 1872 provided easy access to Melbourne markets and dairy farms became more common. I would presume that the milk was "carted" to the Broadmeadows Station, not all the way to Melbourne.

EXTRACT ONLY. Jaii/%ming-Tfts% cai^e^tTa gSt (OOPS!)Dairy Farming- This is carried on to a great extent, in fact, it is increasing year by year, and numbers who have not got sufficient pasture of their own purchase milk from their neighbours; the whole of this is carted to Melbourne, and they come and go twice a day. A few, who do not dispose of their milk in this way, make butter and cheese the greater portion of which is disposed of in Melbourne. Sheep Farming-No sheep kept in this district.
(The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 26 April 1873 p 1 Article)


1882.
Gibb. On the 23rd ult. at his residence, Meadowbank, Campbellfield, Alexander Gibb, aged 71 years,a colonist of 41 years. ( The Australasian Sketcher with Pen and Pencil (Melbourne, Vic. : 1873 - 1889) Saturday 8 April 1882 p 111 Family Notices)

1886.
GIBB.On the 3rd inst., at Meadowbank, Campbellfield, John Coupar, second son of the late Alexander Gibb, aged 37. (P.1, Argus,4-2-1886.)

1890.
I have written about the contrasting fates of Alex Coupar Gibb,who is supposed to have had a windfall of two thousand pounds (most likely a forfeited deposit or part-payment from a speculator) and John Coupar Robertson.The following indicates that but for the bust, circa 1892, that followed the land boom of the late 1880's, Meadowbank would have ceased to be a farm. It is probable that the company had taken possession of the farm and leased it to George Crinnion.

Mr. PURVES.-The draft is dated-1888,and it shows an agreement between Mr. J. E.Gourlay, Mr. James Mirams, and Mr. William Doherty. It recites that whereas the said J.E. Gourlay has entered into a contract, bearing date January 18, with Elizabeth Gibb, for the purchase of all that portion of land in the parish of Will Will-Rook, in the county of Bourke, being the northern moiety of Section No. 5 mentioned in a certain conveyance made between Alexander Gibb and the said Elizabeth Gibb, for the sum of 42,515, of which sum 9,110 has been paid, and the balance is to be paid by three bills of 10,628 4s., 11 134 7s., and 11,640 9s. 6d.; and whereas the sum of 6,075, being part of the said sum of 9,110,was paid by the said J. E. Gourlay, and was
in fact money belonging to the said James Mirams and William Doherty, and the purchase was made by the said J. E. Gourlay as a trustee for and on behalf of the said James Mirams and Win. Doherty,subject to the payment by them of two thirds of the sum falling due, it is hereby declared that they shall hold the land in partnership.
(PREMIER PERMANENT BUILDING ASSOCIATION THE LATEST DEVELOPMENTS. THE CHARGES AGAINST DIRECTORS. EVIDENCE FOR THE PROSECUTION.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 1 July 1890 p 10 Article)

1892. The Gibb in-laws, the descendants of James Robertson,were supposed to have moved away from Gowrie Park in 1872, so who was the J.R.Robertson,of Gowrie Park, Campbellfield whose very fine cow sold for 11 pounds two decades later? (P.30, Argus,24-12-1892.)-digitisation near bottom but actual portion of newspaper can't be found.First-class milkers, 7 to 11,the latter price being given for a veiy fine cow. the property of Mr. J. R. Robertson, Gowrie park, Campbellfield.

1893.
Clearing Sale - We held a successful clearing sale for Mr Geo Crinnion,Gibb's Farm, Campbellfield, when the whole of his cattle, horses, implements, hay and sundries were disposed of at very satisfactory prices.
(P.10, Argus, 30-3-1893.) George's lease had not expired; he had sold the lease.
(The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 18 March 1893 p 31 Advertising)
The Crinnions were prominent in Broadmeadows Shire at Crowe's Hill,formerly John Crowe's Mt Yuroke, (Melway 385 G5) and leased James Hearn's Thorn Grove until 1887. Family members took over William Eastwood's Hay and Corn Store on the north side of South St, Ascot Vale,east of East St. I think they also get a mention in my DICTIONARY HISTORY OF BULLA journal re Brannigan's "St Johns".

1895.
Alexander Coupar Gibb was back on Meadowbank but was not dairy farming yet. It takes time to build up a herd so he was fattening lambs on what the Oaklands Hunt referred to as the Meadowbank "sward".

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 8 May 1895 p 3 Article
... ., Raven stone, (I, Ss to fss. Od , J T Kindellan, Bav Flat, Gippsland, 0 bonnidowns, at los ed, A C Gibb, Meadow Bank, Campbellfield.

Alexander may have been back on Meadowbank by August 1894 when he stood for council.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 11 August 1894 p 9 Article
... Shire of Broadmeadows -DAVIS, JAMES; GIBB, ALEXANDER COUPAR.

1906.
VANDERZEE ( Alexander). - On the 20th August,George, the beloved husband of Annie A. Vanderzee, aged 36, late of Victoria parade, East Melbourne. Interred privately, 1st September. (P.1, Argus, 3-9-1906.)


1909.
GIBB - INGLIS -On the 16th March, at the E.S. and A. Bank House, Malvern, by the Rev. W. G. Maconochie, M.A., Alex. H.Gibb, Meadow Bank, Campbellfield, to Margaret Ferguson Inglis, William street, Hawthorn. At home at the E.S. and A. Bank House, Malvern (Armadale station), Friday, April 30th. ( P.13, Argus, 24-4-1909.)

The above obviously has a misprint,the groom being Alex.C.Gibb. If so Alex. was about 49 years old.


1913. MEADOWBANK, CAMPBELLFIELD.
By HICKORY.
THE HOMESTEAD.
The quaintness and charm which characterise many old-world farmsteads, and at which the so-called Queen Anne villaaims, but seldom reaches, may occasionally be found in the homes raised by thepioneers in Victoria, and more often in the older State of Tasmania, whose temperate climate makes this style of house suitable to every part of the State. To the observersuch a house as Meadowbank carries the feeling of "'home" in contradistinction to"dwelling," and this is emphasised with closer inspection. Built in 1856, of stone quarried in the neighbourhood, with walls two feet thick, chimneys and cupboards contained in the thickness of the walls, high eaves, a steeply-pitched slate roof, from which project quaint dormer-windows, and surrounded by stately plantation trees with garden and lawns in front, it stands a fitting monument of a family which has earned such high respect among the landed proprietors of Victoria. Mr. A. C. Gibb, the present owner and occupier of the house built by his father, can look with pride around him, as the trees surrounding his old home were planted by himself when a schoolboy, and he has watched them grow from slender plants into forest monarchs. Nor need he fear the reproach that the "big house,"-for so it was called by the country-side in the early days- is not as it was. The neatness of surroundings, convenience of arrangements, and the abundance of shelter for animals and implements, all indicate farming on sound lines.
STABLES, MILKING-SHED, AND SHEDDING.
The stables, and milking-shed are of stone, with thick walls and stone-paved floors, well drained, and substantially built throughout. The partitions in the former are of thick, wide planking, laid horizontally, high at the head, and curving down to the rear post, and are as sound as the day they were built, nearly sixty years ago. The stalls-eight, and a loose box-are 6ft. 3in.wide, which gives ample room for grooming and harnessing the biggest draught horses. A 10ft. passage gives room for backing out and turning round, while lattice work along the rear wall provides the ventilation. Several of the draught horses were in the stable, and showed not only activity and strength, but careful feeding and grooming. A gelding, 25 years of age, but sound as a bell through good treatment, is capable of working for many years. The milking-shed was formerly an old type threshing-barn,the machinery being installed on the upperfloor and driven by horse-works below, with exits above for the various products from the thresher. In the creek was a mill, where the grain was converted into flour for the diggings. The place is well equipped with implements, an oil engine heading the list; and for every implement shed room is provided. A carpenter's shop and a tool-house, furnished with shelves and racks for implements, are in keeping with their surroundings. When it is remembered that stonemasons were paid 1 per day in those days, and other workmen in proportion, the cheap sneer that the holdings cost the pioneers nothing can be passed over with contempt. Detached from the milking-shed is the milkroom, a pattern of cleanliness. The water for the cooler is raised by a windmill, close by, and afterwards runs to a brick-in cement trough, of 1,200gals. capacity, which waters two paddocks. The well is 40ft.deep, and inexhaustible.
THE DAIRY HERD.
Milk is supplied wholesale for the Melbourne market, so that there is no offseason, but about 65 cows are in milk all the year round. The herd is kept up by picked calves from the best milkers and by purchases of in-calf heifers from outside, a business requiring keen judgment. The sloping shoulders, fine withers, and light forequarters, broad, straight hind-quarters,
deep, broad thighs, capacious udders, well developed teats and milk veins, give the whole
herd a family likeness, which is further accentuated by the brown and white colouring of many of them. .Constitution is not forgotten, if one may judge from the depth of chest, while the clear eyes and bright coats indicate that pitch of health only obtained by liberal and judicious, feeding. The rule is never to let the cow get down in condition, so they are hand-fed at least nine months in the year. A milker is employed for every twenty cows milked, and this leaves them time to get in green maize or other fodder, the cows being bailed up and fed for them.
FODDER CROPS.
The pasture is usually the mainstay of the stock, but here so liberal is the feeding that one is almost tempted to take the fodder crops first. However, considerable care is shown in sowing various grasses, and these must be considered, when studying the ration. After a paddock has been cropped in a certain rotation for about six years, it is sown down, as a rule, with a mixture of rye grass, cocksfoot, and clover. The proportion used is about three parts rye grass to one part cocksfoot and clover. Two bushels to the acre of the mixture are sown, of which the rye grass responds at once, and affords good pasture, while the cocksfoot does not show up till the following season. Both Alsike and white clover are used. Timothy and paspalum dilatatum
have been tried, but have not proved a success so far. The clovers do remarkably well, and spread naturally, especially where artificial manures have been used with the preceding crops. From 30 to 40 acres are sown with wheat and oats mixed for hay. Mr. Gibb reckons that the wheat and oats mixed "make" better in the sheaf. The oats when alone go yellow in wet weather. The wheat not only helps it to cure better but holds it up. Algerian oats and Frampton wheat or College Purple Straw are the varieties employed, the proportion being 2 bushels oats to 1.5 wheat, and sowing in at the rate of 1.25 bushels per acre. A hayshed saves thatching, and the sample onhand under cover is well coloured, sweet smelling, and with a good proportion of grain. Maize is relied on for a great bulk of the fodder, the variety mentioned previously under "Farm and Dairy" {a variety of Red Horse Tooth, known locally as Sydney 120-day) having been proved to give the best returns. Sowings are made in October, November, December, and sometimes as late as January, if December has, been unfavourable. Sowing through every second hoe of the drill, 1 bushel to the acre of seed is used; and, on ground that has been cropped for several years from 70lb. to 80lb. of superphosphate.
CULTIVATION AND FEEDING.
In preparing the ground for cropping, it is usually ploughed early, worked up well with the disc cultivator, or spring-tooth and given two strokes of the harrows before sowing. If the ground is lumpy, and in a wet season, the spring-tooth cultivator is used again before sowing. The roller comes into play after sowing before the crop is up. Both cultivators do good work. As a rule two crops of hay are taken off, and then two or three of maize on rich ground; but on medium soil, one crop of hay only. The horse hoe is used between the rows of maize, and with good results for every working. After the hay is off, some of the stubble ground is turned under and sown with peas, which comes in for feed in the winter. A maize crop following the peas always makes great growth. The cost of putting in a crop of maize figures out at about 1 per acre. The yield of green stuff or ensilage is seldom under 10 tons per acre, so that the cost of raising this fodder crop per ton is very small. The ration for the cows just now is 30lb. maize, 10 lb. chaff and 4 lb. bran. When this is added to the grass they can eat in grazing, and this mainly clover, those interested will find that a well-balanced ration is provided, and at a low cost. Straw is used in poor seasons to supplement the feed, and with this in view the grain is threshed slightly on the green side. Oaten straw cut at this stage is found to give particularly good feed. The difference between town and country life is well exemplified in the household. In town the average family knows little and takes less interest in the breadwinner's occupation; but at Meadowbank farm operations and results are keenly followed.( P.8, The Australasian, 28-6-1913.)


1914.
BROADMEADOWS SHIRE. PETITION TO CR. GIBB.
A number of gentlemen, including Cr.McLean, Ex-Cr. Robertson, Messrs. Porter,Pearson, Hawkins, Maltzahn and Gibson, presented a numerously signed petition to Cr. Gibb, at that gentleman's residence,on Monday evening, praying that he would submit himself for re-election as the representative for the Campbellfield Riding in
the Broadmeadows Council.

Mr. Gibson, in formally presenting the petition, said he was not familiar with the practice of presenting petitions, but he felt honoured in being asked to present and support the one in question, and hoped that his feeble efforts would result satisfactorily. There was no desire to disparage the attainments or qualifications
of other aspirants for the seat, but it was felt that the proposed retirement of Cr, Gibb, at a period when a number of very important matters affecting the welfare of the district, as also the finances of the Council, were shortly to be dealt with, would be most unfortunate. The ratepayers could not afford to lose the services of Cr. Gibb, whoso ripe experience and intimate acquaintance with the entire affairs of the Council rendered his retention of the seat almost imperative.The petition would, under any circumstances, prove very gratifying to Cr. Gibb inasmuch as it contained the names and the signatures of a very large number of ratepayers in the riding so ably represented by Cr. Gibb, and also exhibited genuine appreciation of his conduct as a councillor.

The preparation and completion of the petition was due entirely to the enthusiastic efforts of Cr. McLean, whose native modesty alone prevented him from formally presenting it.In conclusion, Mr. Gibson said that as
the mouthpiece of the gentlemen present as also of the signatories, he sincerely hoped that Cr. Gibb would accede to the request of its humble petitioners. Ex-Cr. Robertson supplemented the former speaker's remarks, and referred to Cr.Gibb's untarnished career, and felt that it would be a calamity to lose his services at the present juncture.

Cr. Gibb spoke feelingly in reply, and acknowledged the honour in being so generously requisitioned. He had made a resolution not to seek re-election not because of the work involved-indeed, he liked the wholesome side of municipal work, and felt dignified in performing it but, as he had stated 3 years ago he would retire at end of his term, and felt, under the circumstances, he had to adhere to his statement. However, in view of the
handsome manner in which he had been approached, he felt it very difficult to refuse, and would yield to the wishes of the deputation.(P.6, Flemington Spectator, 6-8-1914.)

Campbellfield Riding Election. Cr. Alexander C. Gibb, who has represented the Campbellfield Riding of the Shire of Broadmeadows for many years past with distinction, notifies that in response to a largely signed petition
he has decided to stand for re-election.(The Essendon Gazette and Keilor, Bulla and Broadmeadows Reporter (Moonee Ponds, Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Thursday 13 August 1914 p 2 Article)

Miss Inglis, daughter of Mrs. A. C. Gibb,"Meadow Bank," Campbellfield, writes of her safe arrival in England from Switzerland. After visiting the Isle of Wight and Devonshire, she proposed leaving for Scotland.
(P.29, Table Talk,12-11-1914.)

1915.
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Gibb, of Meadowbank, Campbellfield, are spending a holiday in Sydney.
(The Essendon Gazette and Keilor, Bulla and Broadmeadows Reporter (Moonee Ponds, Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Thursday 8 April 1915 p 3 Article)


1918.
CAMPBELLFIELD RED CROSS FETE By- FALAISE.
Meadow Bank, the old picturesque bluestone residence of Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Gibb,of Campbellfield, was the scene of a Red Cross fete on Saturday, April 20. Some few months ago Mrs. Gibb inaugurated a Red Cross branch in this part of the countryone of the earliest settlements in Victoriaand as funds are now required for the purchase of material to work upon, she, as president of the branch, arranged to hold this fete with a view to raising the money and bringing together the residents of this scattered farming district.Meadow Bank was built over 60 years ago for Mr. Gibbs's father, and the grounds surrounding the house are ideally laid out for the purpose of a fete.........Among those who had charge of the stalls,&c., were Mesdames R. Jones, Percy Oliver,and John Coldwell (produce). Miss Shepherd (flowers), Mrs.F.Olsen (sweets andice cream), Mesdames E.A.Porter,A.Austin, and F. Sheahan (work), Miss Oliver(cakes), Miss Kitty Ingles, Miss Dodds, and Mr. Wilshire (spinning tables), and Mr.Pearson (motor rides). (P.32, The Australasian, 27-4-1918.)

1919.
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Gibb are staying at the George Hotel for a while, having leased their property, Meadowbank, Campbellfield, for a year, to Captain and Mrs.Donald Mackinnon. Mrs. Gibb's only son,,Lieut. Jack Ingles,
returned this week from active service. He was away for nearly five years. He also is staying at the George
Hotel.(P.44, The Australasian, 20-12-1919.)

1920-1. Broadmeadows rates. In about August 1920, John Ingles was assessed on 264 acres of Meadowbank and A.C.Gibb the house and 30 acres.

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Gibb return this week to their property, Meadow Bank,Campbellfield, after having spent 12 months at St. Kilda. Captain and Mrs, D.Mackinnon have been renting Meadow Bank, and have taken an active part in hunting.(P.47,The Australasian,4-12-1920.)

The marriage of Miss Rene Alexander Vanderzee, younger daughter of Mrs. A. Alexander Vanderzee, of Vanda House, Chelsea, and Mr. Frank S. Treadwell of Fairby, York street, St.Kilda, will take place at All Saints Church, Chapel street,East St Kilda, on Thursday, March 11, at 1.30 p.m. (P.39, The Australasian,6-3-1920.)

1923.

1925.
At a meeting of the council of the Royal Agricultural Society of Victoria yesterday, Mr. A. C. Gibb, of Meadowbank, Campbellfield, was granted leave of absence for 12 months. Mr. Gibb proposes making a holiday trip to Britain.(P.18, Argus, 13-5-1925.)

1926.
APPLICATION for TRANSFER of LICENCE.
I, Robert Strachan Farrell, being the holder of a victualler's licence for the Imperial Hotel,Bourke and Spring streets, Melbourne in the Melbourne Licensing District, and I, Annie Alexander, of Meadowbank, Campbellfield hereby give notice, that we will APPLY to the Licensing Court at Melbourne on Monday, the thirty first day of May, one thousand nine hundred and twenty six for the TRANSFER of the LICENCE to the said Annie Alexander.
Dated this 21st day of May, 1926.R.S.FARRELL. A ALEXANDER.Leach and Thomson, solicitors, 191 Queen street.
Melbourne. (P.19, Argus, 22-5-1926.) SEE 1949.

1928.
From Meadowbank Pty Co. re water on Camp road. The secretary said the Council's solicitor advised they would be quite safe in taking over the guarantee of a company named. (P.2, Kilmore Free Press, 2-2-1928.)

Writing extensively in upper case is regarded as shouting,so please cover your ears while you read the following!
SALES BY AUCTION.
AUCTIONEER'S NOTICE.
A GREAT LAND SALE.
(By Private Treaty.)
Will Be Held on Delightful
MEADOWBANK ESTATE,
On
SATURDAY, 25th INSTANT. ,
(Please Note the Date.)
AFTERNOON TEA WILL BE PROVIDED ON THE ESTATE.
H OW TO GET TO MEADOWBANK ESTATE.
Take Electric Tram in SWANSTON STREET to NORTH COBURG Terminus in SYDNEY ROAD,
FREE MOTOR-CARS
Will Take Prospective Buyers from the NORTH COBURG TRAM TERMINUS (at Baker's Road,
in Sydney Road), to MEADOWBANK ESTATE. The Motor-cars will Run Between the Tram
Terminus and MEADOWBANK ESTATE During the Hours from 2.15 p.m. to 6 p.m.
NEW RAILWAY SERVICE OPENING.
WITHIN A FEW WEEKS, the Railway line to Campbellfield Will Be Opened for PASSENGER
TRAFFIC, and a RAILWAY STATION WILL BE ESTABLISHED Only a Few Hundred Feet
From MEADOWBANK ESTATE. The Opening of This NEW RAILWAY IS GOING TO INCREASE
THE VALUE OF MEADOWBANK BLOCKS VERY GREATLY.
BIG MONEY CAN STILL BE MADE. By BUYING BLOCKS IN FAVOURED AREAS. MEADOWBANK is a VERY FAVOURED VICINITY. It has a Splendid Elevation, BEING 400 ft. ABOVE SEA LEVEL, and has Glorious
Views of the Citv, the Bay, and the Surrounding Country. It is Only Eight Miles from
Melbourne. There Are Shops and Hotels Quite Close to the Estate. Within a Few Weeks
it Will Have a RAILWAY STATION WITHIN A FEW HUNDRED FEET OF IT. Already
L80 000 Has Been Spent in Water Supply System for Campbellfield and District. All Round
MEADOWBANK are the Signs of That Awakening Which Precedes the Establishment of a
SPLENDID NEW SUBURB. Now is the Time to BUY.
SEEING IS BELIEVING.
We INVITE YOU to Come Along to MEADOWBANK ESTATE on Saturday, February 25; Walk
Around, and Inspect the Land for Yourself, And If You Like It (Which We Know You
Will). Buy a Block or Two in This DELIGHTFUL NEW SUBURB.
RING, XXKITE, or CALL lor Illustrated ramphlcts and riana ol MEADOWBANK ESTATE.
The Solicitors to the Estate are Mesar. RIGBY and FIELDING, CO Market Slreet, Melbourne.
Sole Selling Agents. (P.2, Argus, 16-2-1928.)



1937.
Did Annie buy a tractor?
DRAUGHT HORSE and DRAY. Harness, suitable any work, good order, reasonable. Meadowbank, Campbellfield.
(P.3, Argus, 29-5-1937.)

1939.
Cup Stories
PURPLE AND GOLD
This story of a schoolboy's fondness for Flemington and its unpleasant consequences wins a prize of 5/ for Mr.
George Alexander, of Meadowbank, Campbellfield. This happened the year Poseidon won the Melbourne Cup carrying the colours "all purple." As I witnessed the race, contrary to the orders of my head master, the late Mr.L.A. Adamson, of Wesley, I decided to wear my purple school cap inside out to make myself less conspicuous to any master who might be enjoying the "sport of kings." But the ruse failed. I was on the mat next morning, and was taxed with the offence, which I admitted. Punishment-confined to barracks next week-end for "wearing wrong colours." The punishment was not as great as I feared, as "Dicky" was in his prime in those days with the birch, and Pure Gold would have swooned on the spot had he received a couple of his cuts where they hurt.
(P.9, Argus,27-9-1939.)

1948.
ALEXANDER. On June 18, at his residence, Campbellfield, Robert Walter (late 1st A.I.F. and Anzac), loving second son of Mrs. A. Alexander and late George Alexander, and brother of George, Gilbee, Eric, and
the late Mrs. Rene Treadwell.Sadly missed. An old soldier faded away. (P.2, Argus,21-6-1948.)#
#Also submitted under the surname VANDERZEE on page 8.

1949.
DEATHS
ALEXANDER - On August 31 at her residence Meadowbank, Camp road,Campbellfield, Anne, beloved wife of the late George Alexander and loved mother of George Robert (deceased*),Elizabeth (Mrs. Crocker-Smith), Irene
(Mrs Frank Treadwell deceased*) and Eric, and darling grandmother of Neville (deceased*), Verna, Valda, Ray,
Howard (deceased*), Valerie, Elizabeth and Alan -At rest. (P.12,Argus,1-9-1949.) *How sad!

ALEXANDER. - On August 31. at her residence, Meadowbank, Campbellfield, loving mother of Gil, and grandmother of Verna. -At rest. (P.12, Argus, 2-9-1949.)


ANNIE VANDERZEE (Otherwise Annie Alexander), Late of "Meadowbank," Campbellfield, Widow, Deceased. -
After 14 clear days. Eric Gordon Alexander Vanderzee, of 375 Barkers road, Kew, shopkeeper, and NATIONAL TRUSTEES EXECUTORS AND AGENCY COMPANY OF AUSTRALASIA LIMITED, whose registered office is situate at 95 Queen street. Melbourne, the executors appointed by deceased's will, dated 25th January, 1949,will APPLY to the Supreme Court for a grant of PROBATE of the said will.LEACH AND THOMSON, solicitors, 472 Bourke street. Melbourne. (P.17, Argus, 9-9-1949.)

ALEXANDER-VANDERZEE. - In loving memory of my son, Rob, passed away June l8, 1948, late 2nd Mobile Section. First A.I.F. -Sadly missed.(Mother.)
ALEXANDER-VANDERZEE. - In loving memory of my brother, passed away June l8. 1948, late 2nd Mobile Section, First A.I.F. -Sadly missed.(Gill and Verna.)(P.15, Argus, 18-6-1949.#

I presume somebody submitted Annie's notice for her!!! So who was Gil? Has to be Elizabeth!
# in 1948 shows that Gil was Elizabeth but her married name should have been in brackets to make this clear in the VANDERZEE death notice.

1950.

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