itellya on Family Tree Circles

sort: Date Alphabetical
view: full | list

Journals and Posts


WILLIAM SMITH OF GLENROY AND BOTH SIDES OF THE PASCOE VALE BRIDGE, VIC., AUST. (and "Lebanon")

SEE COMMENT 1. WOULD NOT SUBMIT HERE AS AN EDIT. SEE THE OTHER JOURNAL RE THE PASCOE VILLA ADVERTISEMENT.



I suspect that the above Pascoe Villa, was the former Young Queen Inn, on a small block on the west side of Pascoe Vale Rd, just north of the Pascoe Vale bridge. It could also have been on a part of Brewster's grant, crown allotment 15 Doutta Galla. As Smith owned the Young Queen, he would have had no need to build a dwelling on his small farm which was in a different parish but only across the creek from the hotel.

EXTRACTS FROM "EARLY LANDOWNERS:PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA".
SIR JOHN FRANKLIN.
On 15-2- 1847, Sir John Franklin bought the northern 12 acres of section 15. From Brewster memorials it has been established that the northern boundary of section 15 is indicated by the intersection of Esmale, Lebanon and Amar Sts. From this line, Franklins land went 295 links south to the e-w section of Lebanon St (D 847).

WILLIAM SMITH.
The E.J.Brewster 1st and 2nd series do not refer to a memorial concerning the land extending the next 8 chains (roughly) south to Peck Ave. If Andrew Lemon was right, it was purchased by William Smith.

(Luckily Doutta Galla microfiche 85 gave the title application number 13 676. The Sketch of Title under this number contained the following information. The blocks western boundary started 295 links south from the north west corner of section 15 (see frontage of Sir John Franklins purchase) and went another 709 1/4 links further south. Its northern and southern boundaries went east 41 chains and 5425 links respectively to the Moonee Moonee Ponds. On 4-2-1848, the same day that McCord, Jackson, Dunn and Callaghan bought their blocks to the south, Brewster sold this block to William Smith, a farmer of Glenroy.
The memorial recording this conveyance (G 460) was not listed in the Brewer index so luckily it appeared in this document. It revealed that William Smith paid L114/0/6. William Smith finally sold it to William Henry Fletcher, yoeman of Yan Yean, on 1-2-1872. The memorial listed for this conveyance (217 310) was consulted. The description of the land was perfectly copied from G 460, which failed to specify the blocks area. Fletcher paid 940 pounds, 8.25 times the price Smith had paid 24 years earlier.)

Using notes from title documents, I transposed all the purchased blocks onto my Melway. This was fortunate because, thinking these scribbled notes,(also rates transcriptions etc) would be completely meaningless to anybody else, I threw them away. I used one sketch of title together to cross-check the next as in the case of Franklin's and Smith's above; see bold type.


Sir John Franklin bought a large area of land in section 23 north of his 12 acre block bought from Brewster. The 12 acre block was combined with some of St John's grant to the north as what became known as Dunn's Farm. Because of Sir John's absence and the lease ending,or various title transfers on St John's grant, the 12 acres in section 15 was not occupied. From about 1882 John Murray Peck fenced and paid rates on it.About 30 years later, John English claimed title on the 12 acre block because of Peck's adverse possession.

The Lands Department had no idea about this, so we can't be too critical of Andrew Lemon's map showing the subdivision of section 15 on page 21 of BROADMEADOWS: A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.His map does not show Franklin's purchase. Another error made is logical. One would assume that crown allotment boundaries in Doutta Galla and Jika Jika would line up but they don't. That's why there are dog legs at creek crossings at Woodland/Reynard, Albion, Ormond/Brunswick etc. Lemon has drawn the northern boundary of 15 Doutta Galla as being on the same line as Gaffney St, but it's actually the line of Spence St in Keilor Park, continued east to the Moonee Ponds Creek.

Andrew Lemon states on page 75 "..,in 1871, The Young Queen Inn had closed for good . William Smith,its owner had bought adjoining blocks in the abortive Pascoe Vale Village over the intervening years until he owned 21acres on the north side of the creek and a similar area on the south. William Jones, who had worked land in the Essendon district for 30 years bought Smith's properties in 1874...."

Maybe north of the creek Andrew, but Smith's land on 15, Doutta Galla was sold to William Fletcher as documented in bold type above. I have Peck Avenue as Smith's southern boundary, where it adjoined McCord's purchase and Peck Avenue was the Drive for Peck's Lebanon,so let's check on Fletcher and McCord.

Having done this check,I assume that PeckS Rd (being the boundary between the Smith and McCord purchases) was a driveway shared by the owners of each. Here's how Lebanon's 34 acres came into existence.

FRANKLINS 12 ACRES. This obviously became, with William Smiths purchase, part of John Murray Pecks Lebanon. The total of the two, which comprised lot 4 of Brewsters post-partition subdivision, was about the 34 acres that Lebanons owners were assessed on over the years. Neither the 1st nor 2nd series index for Sir John Franklin mentions any sale of his 12 acres. I checked the index for Archibald McLachlan and Frederick Armand Powlett, who acted as his agents at various times. I checked the index for Dame Jane Franklin. There was no mention of this part of section 15, Doutta Galla! In desperation, I returned to the ground floor and consulted Doutta Galla microfiche 85 again.
There I saw 46645s and was partly rewarded when I raced up to the 6th floor to try application 46645. The search certificate referred to Sir Johns purchase of the northern 295 links of section 15 but there was no sketch of title. The search certificate referred to the land being fenced in 1882. This was probably done by John Murray Peck, who had bought William Smiths original purchase and established Lebanon. I think Peck noticed that nobody used the land between his 22? acres and section 23, so he just started using it as if he owned it. Broadmeadows Shire was receiving rates on his whole 34 acres so there would have been no question of his right to use Franklins land. Indeed, in 1879-80, Hugh Peck may have been occupying Franklin and Smiths purchases when he was assessed on 34 acres; names were listed alphabetically and Pecks name appears where the name of W.H.Fletcher would be expected to be. J.M. Peck died on 19-11-1903 and he does not seem to have been listed in Broadmeadows 1899-1900 rate book. It was probably at this time that the Pecks realised that their lack of title to the 12 acre block would be discovered. Did they just abandon it?
In 1879, John Morgan English, had bought Belle Vue ( renamed Oak Park and separated from Franklins land only by the creek and Lebanon Reserve) after the death of Fawkners widow, Eliza, and (converted Fawkners single storey weatherboard house into the double storey mansion still standing at the top of Oak Park Court-YET TO BE PROVED TO MY KNOWLEDGE, 26-10-2013.) He leased out the farm to his relatives, the Morgans and Mrs Morgans mother, Mary Knight but was still involved in the area, purchasing the 200 acre eastern part of section 23, which adjoined Franklins 12 acres. He seems to have done the same as I suspect Peck did earlier and, in 1902, just squatted on the land and paid the rates. In 1926, J.M.English applied for the title to Franklins land.. (Application 46645, Broadmeadows Rates.)
In 1920-1, Louisa Ellen, the widow of J.M.Peck had 38 acres, which probably consisted of lot 4 (Franklin and Smiths purchases from Brewster) plus about 4 acres of subdivision lots in the Byron Vale Estate or another estate nearby.
Why didnt Franklin sell the 12 acres when the section 23 land was sold? My guess is that he and his heirs (and the titles office) forgot that this land was on a separate title to the St Johns Estate. If hed left his land to his wife, Dame Jane Franklin, she might have been aware that the 12 acres existed. However he seems to have punished Jane for not bearing him a son. He left her only her clothes and gave the rest of his estate to a daughter from a previous marriage. This daughter had probably never been to Australia.
The confusion seems to have set in when a man named Dunn leased a 123 acre farm from Sir John. He was followed by Elizabeth Guest prior to 1862 but the 123 acre farm was still called Dunns Farm. As explained in bold type under section 23, Dunns Farm must have included the 12 acres (adjoining section 23) at the northern end of section 15. This lessee could have been Thomas Dunn of section 15 or Edmund Dunn of Viewpoint in Tullamarine.
When the 123 acre Dunns Farm was leased to Henry Mawbey for 5 years on 17-2-1862, it was wrongly described as being entirely in section 23. Significantly no boundaries of the farm were described in the memorial! (121 455).
I had intended to include a copy of Sketch of Title 46645 but the clerks scribble is so illegible that readers would not be able to make head or tail of it. Heres what it says.
46645. John M.English.
Part allotment 15 Doutta Galla.
1080 pounds.
Claim by possession.
L.R.O. Sir John Franklin
(see D 847* set out on ??) also see 11578 from which it appears that his widow Jane Franklin is interested.
John Morgan English, the registered proprietor of abutting land in 9 T? Vol. 2209 Fol 441708 (records available only go to volume 999) from which the land applied for was with other land excised **thus necessitating this present application
(* D 847 records the sale of the 12 acres to Franklin by Brewster.)
(** Broadmeadows Rate books show that in 1900 Alex Robertson had just replaced dairyman, Robert G.Bryant as lessee of 200 acres Doutta Galla owned by the Hodgson executors. It is known that this was Thomas Kellys former eastern portion of section 23, which was roughly between the Strathaird/Menarra St corner and Lebanon Reserve.
His application states (inter alia)
That Crown Grantee was Edward Jones Brewster- But he conveyed
That he has never acknowledged ownership or been called on to do so and no rent or payment has been made by or claimed from him except rent under lease from Land Investment Coy to whom he has sold under contract of sale dated 4 Dec 1923
He occupies under Co lease-
That from 1902 or sometime prior unto: up to 26 June 1918 land was occupied by himself and his brother (probably Joseph English) for grazing purposes and since that date by himself as owner? or lessee as ###? for same purposes:
All rates paid by him or his brother till 1918 and from 1918 to 1923 by him since then by Co. ?? Coy.
Since 1902 a fence has always stood on south boundary of land on south of land applied for- red on survey plan (survey plan not enclosed) and was erected on line upon which an old fence had stood for at least 15 years prior to 1902.
19 Dec 1925 Staty Decl of Harry Huntington Peck
456830 He well knows land in survey plan ???A
(Of course the future author of Memoirs of a Stockman should have known the land; his father had squatted on it for about 20 years.)
He is joint owner of land abutting (on portion of south side ) of red and blue and first became acquainted with (said?) land in 1882 when such land was enclosed by fences on south, west and north west sides shown on plan and land has been enclosed by fences from 1882 (to date?) except that about 1902 a new fence was erected on south on line on which original fence stood since 1882.

WILLIAM SMITHS PURCHASE. (Lebanon).
Andrew Lemon states that, in 1874, William Jones bought William Smiths properties, about 21 acres on the north of the creek and a similar area on the south. (P.75.) The 1879-80 Broadmeadows rate book lists William Jones as the owner and occupier of 20 acres at Pascoe Vale, but as this was in the Campbellfield riding it would have been north of the bridge. This was probably the land he bought from Mr Heron in about 1865, and on which he was harvesting 2 tons of hay per acre in 1888 (Victoria & Its Metropolis P.704). The rate collector made no mention of Jones having about 20 acres south of the creek, unless my transcription was faulty.


The owners of Smiths purchase.
William Smith (not the man associated with Flemington and Moonee Ponds, P.697 Vic. & Its Metrop.) bought the Young Queen Inn from John Watson in December 1842. The inn, being on the most popular of the three routes to Sydney until the Broadmeadows Township bridge was built in 1854(Lemon P.17.) This was on lot 3 of Pascoeville, consisting of 1 acre 2 roods and 5 perches, on the s/w side of the government (Pascoe Vale) road. Lot 4 was s/e of it, probably fronting the creek and lot 2 was n/w of it. The south west boundary was a lane leading from Sparke St to the Moonee Moonee Ponds (Sydney 1523). This memorial, detailing the sale of lot 3 by the hotels builder, Edward Butler, to Watson on 29 and 31 May 1841, unfortunately gives no measurements but I think Sparke St would have been near Marks St if all blocks were about 1 acres. Fate might have decreed that Smith would never purchase his block from Brewster in 1848. He was charged with the manslaughter of his servant, Joseph Plant, in 1847 but he was acquitted. (Between Two Creeks Richard Broome.)
William Henry Fletcher.
It is unknown whether this was the same man after whom Fletcher St in Essendon was named. The latter was granted land including the Target store at Highpoint (Maribyrnong: Action in Tranquility), 260 acres between Maribyrnong-Ormond Rd and a line indicated by Gladstone St- stretching from Scotia St to the Moonee Ponds Creek, and south of this the 320 acre triangle bounded by Epsom and Ascot Vale Rds. Surely he would describe himself as a gentleman rather than a yoeman.

John Murray Peck.
Arriving in 1854, at the age of 21, with three other young Yanks (Freeman Cobb etc.), Peck was the action man who could drive huge teams of horses on the Cobb & Co line that soon opened to Castlemaine. His powerful voice and commanding presence later established him as Australias foremost auctioneer of fat cattle. Before moving to section 15, Peck lived at Mascoma in Ascot Vale. (See volume 2.) His family pioneered the area in New Hampshire, U.S.A. near the Mascoma River where the town of Lebanon sprang up. Peck, his London-born wife and their son, Harry Huntinton Peck were buried at the Will Will Rook cemetery.

In the Essendon Conservation Study (Call No. 720.288099 BUT), Graeme Butler confirms some of the title information I have supplied, apart from calling William Smith John. In his entry for Lebanon, Butler states that Smith lost the property surrounding the house to William Fletcher via a series of mortgages in 1872. Fletcher converted the title to Torrens in 1881 and J,M.Peck bought 40 acres soon afterwards*.
John Murray Peck built Lebanon (still standing in Wendora St ) in about 1882.
*As Lebanon consisted of 34 acres, it must have included Sir John Franklins 12 acres between Smiths land and section 23. The Broadmeadows rate book did not state that Peck was leasing the 12 acres so I can only assume that the co-founder of Cobb and Co had just squatted on it and paid the rates, as J.M.English did from 1902. (See details under Franklins 12 Acres.)

This land includes the Red Rooster site, where stood the illegally demolished Cooks Homestead. This name was bestowed on the house by Pascoe Vale kids of the 1930s, such as the late Jim McKenzie and his future wife Peggy, because it was owned by Broadmeadows Shire Secretary Albert Cook. (See Kilts and Cow Dung Flats by R.Gibb.) Its name was actually Wanganui (IT WAS WANNAEUE- GOOGLE "WANNAEUE, PASCOE VALE"), and it was said to have been built by J.M.Peck of Lebanon. (Sam Merrifields House Names Index P.37.) Peggy McKenzie told me that a Miss Roberts owned the Wanganui land (south to the garage site); she was probably related to J.M.Peck, whose wife, born in Bond St, London on 6-6-1840, was Louisa Ellen Roberts. (Gravestone, Will Will Rook cemetery.)


Now back to PASCOE VILLA, but first we'll look for William Smith's trial. "smith, plant, manslaughter" Refine to 1847. Make a cup of coffee at this point; it's a longy! (I'm having a coffee before I adjust the layout!)

MANSLAUGHTER.(N.B. Paragraphing is mine.)
William Smith was charged with the manslaughter, by committing a violent assault, of one Joseph Plant, on the 26th June last. The prisoner pleaded not guilty, and was defended by Messrs. Stephen and Stawell.

The first witness examined was Shadrach Williams, in the employ of the defendant, who gave precisely the same
evidence as that which was adduced at the Coroner's Inquest, and which has already appeared at length in this journal ; his evidence was in effect that the deceased, who was also in the employ of Mr, Smith, came home very drunk on the 26th June last, and commenced quarrelling with his wife ; Mr. Smith desired him to be quiet, when the deceased applied some insolent language, when Mr.Smith proceeded to turn him out of the kitchen ; in doing which they both fell, deceased having hold of his master's waistcoat, and breaking the guard-chain of Mr. Smith's watch ; he did not see Plant receive any blows or kicks, and had such been given he must have seen
them ; he was aware that Plant had for some time suffered from a hurt which he had frequently seen Mrs. Plant poultice ; the arm was so bad that upon the day on which the alleged assault occurred, deceased was unable to load his dray whenhe was going into town in the morning.

(The conversation which the witness had had with the deceased subsequent to the alleged assault, shewing the animus of Plant, and which was given at the Coroner's Inquest, his Honor would not permit to be given.)

Sarah Plant, widow of the deceased,being sworn, also gave similar testimony to that which she gave at the inquest, and swearing positively that Mr. Smith came into the kitchen, seized the deceased by the throat, threw him down on the verandah, and kicked him on the right wrist, which until this occurrence was uninjured ; she also swore that Mr. Smith threw himself upon the deceased whilst he was upon the ground, and placed his knee upon his right side ; that subsequently the deceased got up, when Mr.Smith again knocked him down, upon which Mrs. Smith came out with a rake, with which she was about to strike deceased when witness prevented her.

On cross-examination this woman ad-mitted she had been transported for manslaughter, but rigidly adhered to her former statement so far as it implicated Mr.Smith, strenuously alleging that her husband had not the slightest injury on either of his arms until this occurrence ; she also denied that any provocation was given by the deceased to Mr. Smith.

Arthur O'Mullane, M. D., sworn-I knew Joseph Plant ; he was a patient of mine; I first saw him on the 1st July;I saw him in a shop at Collins-street; he brought me a note from Mr. Belcher, requesting me to examine his arm and give him a certificate of the state of his health ; I attended the deceased, Plant, until the period of his death, on the 20th July ; deceased was a man of remarkably weak and feeble constitution. I should say his constitution was at least ten years older than himself; he told me he was fifty-nine years of age ; he had
suffered from epilepsy for years, and when attacked had several times fallen in the fire ; he had a wound or bruise on his right wrist, about three inches in length, and about two inches wide ; he died of gangrene ; I treated the deceased according to the most approved mode of surgical practice ; his death resulted from a bruise on his right fore arm, destroying the vitality of the soft parts so far as the bruise extended ; this bruise would not have affected any man but one of a very bad constitution ; treatment such as the female witness has sworn deceased received from Mr. Smith, would have a tendency to accelerate his death; amputation was performed upon the deceased's right arm on the Friday previous to his death ; he lived till the morning succeeding that on which the operation was performed.

By his Honor-If the operation had been performed the day after the injury had taken place, the same result would have attended the operation.
By Mr. Stawell-The deceased had a very shattered constitution, the result of epilepsy, intemperance, and old age; he told me he had been a hard drinker ; the bruise I speak of was between the bones of the right fore arm.
By his Honor-Ordinarily speaking, a kick on that part would not cause death.

Examination continued-The wound was about three inches in depth, and about half the width, when I first saw
him ; nature had not set up the process for the removal of the dead flesh ; had the deceased fallen down and broken his leg, it is probable, from the general state of his health, he would not have recovered ; the skin of
the arm was not broken; if the arm were not fixed, a violent blow or kick might have been given without breaking the skin.

By, his Honor-I don't think this bruise upon the arm could have been caused by anything but a kick with a
narrow blunt instrument.

Examination continued-On examining deceased there was an old mark on his hip, but no appearance of a recent
wound there ; there were also some marks on his left wrist, which deceased said he got in the bush ; I was a fellow passenger of Mr. Smith's to this colony, and a more respectable orderly quiet man was not on board.

Henry Moor - (Deceased's affidavit produced) the signature attached to this is mine ; this is merely the deposition made upon which to ground the application for a summons against Mr. Smith.

William Hull, Esq., J. P., sworn (Deceased's dying deposition produced)I knew Joseph Plant ; this is his dying
deposition, which was taken down by Mr. Belcher in my presence ; at the time this was taken Plant was sinking fast, and he was conscious that he was about to submit to an operation which might cause his death ; deceased was at a lodging house in Collins-street ; I said to deceased, " you're now about to have your arm taken off, it will probably cause your death : I tell you this, that you may regard what you now say as your dying declaration, and I hope you'll speak the truth ;" he wept, and said " it's hard to be murdered at my age."
I said, " how old are you ?" he said "59;" deceased then said, "I owe my death to Mr. Smith ," I said, " I hope you're at peace with all mankind, and particularly with Mr. Smith?" he then repeated his observation that Mr. Smith had murdered him ; I then said, " I'll send you a clergyman ;" and I believe the Rev. Mr. Thomson visited him.

His Honor-Is that all that passed ? Mr. Hull-It is, your Honor. His Honor-Then that won't do : in dying declarations, there must be evidence that the party making it was conscious that he was past all hope.
The counsel for the prisoner stated they had no objection to the deposition being read.
His Honor-That may be, but I have a duty to perform ; and, so far as the evidence goes, that deposition is clearly not admissible.

Examined by Mr. Stephen.-I have known the defendant some years and always considered him a highly respectable man ; I never heard a report to his prejudice till this unfortunate case.

W. R. Belcher, clerk of the Bench,sworn.-I recollect going to where Plant was, with Mr. Hull ; I went there by
order of the magistrates, in consequence of information received from Dr. O'Mullane ; deceased appeared in a very feeble state, and said he thought he had not long to live, and accordingly his deposition was taken.
His Honor.-Is that all ?
Mr. Belcher.-Yes, your Honor.

His Honor, having read the deposition, said that he thought more injustice would be done to the prisoner by withholding the deposition than by allowing it to be put in in evidence, and the counsel for the defendant having consented, the deposition was put in and read, in which the deceased attributed the injuries he had received on the right arm to an attack made upon him by Mr. Smith, the defendant.

Mr. Croke here referred to the evidence of the man Williams, and Sarah Plant, upon which His Honor remarked, that there could be no doubt one or the other of them was perjured.

W, B. Wilmot, Esq., coroner, sworn. -(Deposition of Sarah Plant read, as taken at the inquest.) This was read
over to her before she signed it ; this is the substance of what I considered to be material at the time. His Honor questioned the coroner as to whether Mrs. Plant said anything more than what was contained in the
deposition read. The Coroner had some recollection of her having said something about a second assault, but she gave her evidence so extremely loose that he had great difficulty in collecting the substance.

His Honor remarked that it was especially desirable, for the future, that in cases of this nature the verbatim testimony of witnesses should be taken, as what might be deemed unimportant at the time might ultimately turn out to bemost important.
By Mr. Stephen.-When I read the deposition over to Mrs. Plant she did not object to it, nor did she say that
anything was omitted.

(Deposition made at the police-office by Joseph Plant read, the groundwork of an application for a summons for an assault against Mr. Smith, in which the deponent swore that Mr. Smith, at thetime of the assault, made use of theexpression-"I'll kill the old b-." This closed the case for the prosecution.

Mr. Stephen, at the commencement of his address to the jury, remarked upon the discrepancy in the witness' statements.
His Honor.-Where two witnesses for the crown are called and contradict each other, I shall certainly desire the jury to acquit the prisoner.
After some few observations from Mr.Croke, His Honor said, there were no circumstances to enable the jury to prefer one evidence to another. Mr. Stephen said, he would at once place a witness in the box who would
settle the matter.

Stephen Bunistead, a fellow servant of the deceased, sworn.-The night before the deceased went into town on the
Saturday he complained to me of his right arm being very bad, having hurt it in the bush ; on Saturday the deceased was unable to load his dray ; for three weeks before this I have seen the deceased with his right wrist bandaged up, and deceased once asked me to bring out some ointment for his arm, but I have forgotten the name.

His Honor, in summing up, said, that the evidence of the last witness tended in a great measure to confirm Williams' statement. The woman Plant's statement was contradictory and unsatisfactory in many points, and differed materially in some parts from what the deceased had himself stated ; the jury he thoughtwould have no difficulty in acquitting the prisoner.

The jury retired for a few minutes and then returned a verdict of not guilty, accompanied with a remark, in which his Honor the Judge coincided, that there was not the slightest imputation upon the character of Mr. Smith, who was immediately discharged.

His Honor, addressing himself to the jury, said, that he presumed they discredited the testimony of the woman
Plant, and on being informed that they did, his Honor directed her to be recalled and after telling her that neither he nor the jury, and he should imagine but very few in court, believed her, committed her for perjury, telling the Crown Prosecutor that he could act as he pleased in the matter.
Mr. Croke.-From a circumstance which has been communicated to me since the jury retired I am disposed to
think that what the woman stated was the truth.
His Honor.-Well, I have done my duty in committing her, you must use your own discretion whether you indict
her or not. ((P.4, The Melbourne Argus, 3-8-1847.)


One of the people involved in this case had a connection with CUMBERLAND and SPRING FARM.But before I get onto that, I've just realised that I've made a mistake, and as I think it's in comments, I can't fix it there.The wife of William Pomeroy was Anne, not Mary. There's a clue!
This person married, if I've got my facts right, a daughter of William and Anne Greene and wrote a book, which can be perused at the historic Woodlands Homestead; I think the title is Lady --a-e--'s Memoirs. The Cumberland Estate included a fair bit of Woodlands.This person became the Chief Justice and with his cousin "Alphabetical" Foster,the Colonial Secretary, wrote Victoria's (very conservative) constitution.

NO THINK MUSIC,JUST A FEW WOODLANDS FACTS AND ONE OF MY CORNY JOKES AND THEN TIME'S UP.
Two Bulla township streets were named after the Greenes, the diagonal part of Somerton Rd that led to the east-west section and Lochton, and Rawdon St, named after William and Ann's son. It made my blood boil every time I saw GREEN ST in Melway; such historical ignorance!

Some of the pioneers retained the speech traits of their native countries. This fellow wanted his young farmhand to put the horse into the stable and as he was a nice chap,he said,"Take horse to stall,please." There was concern when the lad didn't join them for the evening meal and when they heard thundering hooves at night.
Rushing out, they saw the lad on the horse he was supposed to have put away, and on the other horse that they had frequently seen in the Oaklands point to point- the Chief Justice.

Family Notices
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 11 January 1856 p 4 Family Notices
... William Foster Stawell, barrister-at-law, to Mary Frances Elizabeth, only daughter of the late William Pomeroy Greene, of Woodlands, Esq.

4 comment(s), latest 10 months ago

ADDITIONAL SURNAMES IN "1888 geography with the Melbourne Hunt."

ADDITIONAL SURNAMES.
CONNOR, MCNAB, WILLIAMS, HEAPS, LLOYD, BLACKWELL, REDDAN, NASH, LEWIS, PARR, WALDOCK, SMITH, SNOWBALL, SWAN, TAYLOR,BOYD, ROBINSON, BEALE, FULLARTON, MORRIS, FAWKNER,DUHY, CURRY, CROOKE, MILLAR, McINTYRE, DUTTON,MORAN, HENDERSON,COX, COLLIER, MORGAN,STEELE,JOHNSON, THOMAS,McNAMARA, LAVERTY, McCORMACK,BRANNIGAN, REDDAN,GRIST, COCK, LOFT, O'NIAL,RIDDELL,HAMILTON,HOWSE,McDOUGALL,BUTLER,GREEN,KILBURN, RORKE,BEAMAN,MOUNSEY,BLANCHE, CAMPBELL, DENHAM, MILBURN,HURREN,GILBERTSON, DOYLE,MURPHY,FOX,GERAGHTY, HENDRY, MANSFIELD,DONOVAN, SPIERS, ELLIS,LOCKHART,BREES,PETER, ROWE,HANDLEN,WILLIAMS,TENNIEL,SAGE,JUDD, GOODWIN,PURVIS,HOLLAND,SEELEY

TULIP WRIGHT'S OBITUARY (and biography / genealogy in comments.)

As usual,it's a case of look for one thing,find another. I was after an article about William Ford's famous cook who been involved in the second war between England and America.Found it quickly and then this caught my eye.It doesn't say anything about Bulla,the Lincolnshire Arms Hotel at North Essendon or the Sir John Franklin Hotel at Sunbury, instead concentrating on his official roles.

Death has carried off one of the oldest settlers in Victoria, Mr W. H. Wright, principal sheriff of the colony. Mr Wright died suddenly, of apoplexy, on the 1st inst, at the house of Mr George Higinbotham, Brighton,where he happened to be on a visit. The deceased gentleman was son of Captain Wright formerly Commandant of the military college at Sandhurst, and he came out to Norfolk Island as an ensign in a detachment of the 50th Regiment He landed in Sydney in 1838, and shortly afterwards quitted the army and joined the civil service.
He held the office of Crown Lands Commissioner in the Wimmera district, under the New South Wales Government from 1841 up to the time of the separation of Victoria from the parent colony. Then he filled successively the offices of chief gold commissioner, police magistrate, and secretary of railways. The last named position he was in from 1862 to 1871, when he was promoted to the office of sheriff, on the death of Mr Claud Fane. Mr Wright displayed at all times a strict conscientiousness in the discharge of his duties. He was greatly esteemed by a very large circle of private friends. He did not appear lately to be suffering from ill health, but it was known that he received a great blow in the death of his three children last year from scarlet fever, leaving only one young infant out of a promising family of four. At the time of his death Mr. Wright was about 63 years of age.
(P.1s, Argus, 21-2-1877.)

THE Friends of the late WILLIAM WRIGHT, Deep Creek, Bulla, are respectfully invited to follow the remains of his late elder son, Anthony William, to the place of Interment, Melbourne General Cemetery. The funeral to move from the Junction Hotel, St.Kilda, on Thursday, the 25 inst., at 11 o'clock a.m. J. STEWART, undertaker.
(P.8,Argus, 24-1-1866.)

BULLA.
DEATH BY THE FLOODDeep Creek, 28th November, 1849I beg to inform you that an accident, (h?)as occurred here yesterday, whereby two of my men (Francis Bruce and Thomas Harris) unfortunately lost their lives. The
bridge across the creek being flooded, the two men were employed preparing the punt for conveying passengers across, when they were swept away by the current. The bodies have not yet been found.Your's obediently
W. WRIGHT. (P.4, South Australian, 28-12-1849. PORT PHILLIP.)

6 comment(s), latest 10 months, 2 weeks ago

Farms near TULLAMARINE: SPRING FARM, CUMBERLAND, PASCOE VILLA, ARUNDEL, ABERFELDIE, BIG CLARKE,(VIC., AUST.)

CORRECTION OF TEXT AND MUCH BACKGROUND INFORMATION WILL CONTINUE.

Due to faulty digitisation in trove, I often spend hours trying to find an article that I know perfectly well is there, because I have read it before. At the time I had found it by sheer chance because it was near another for which I was searching,and something caught my eye. On many occasions I have failed to rediscover the article so when I make such chance discoveries now I tend to do something about it immediately,no matter how many irons I have in the fire. It is rare to find three articles of such interest on one page of a newspaper and who knows,by the time I finish,there may be more. I found the page because of trove's irritating habit of producing results for just one, rather than all, of the words that are entered for the search. In this case the search was for: "grimes, ford,saltwater river" . I'll have to find whether Pascoe Villa was the original Young Queen Inn and locate the article about the murder charge. I'll have to find if it was Coghill selling Cumberland. Pascoe Villa may have been on the land that Smith bought on Brewster's grant (c/a 15 Doutta Galla, now Strathmore) that I think became John Murray Peck's Lebanon, so I'll have to consult Lemon's Broady history and my title information in EARLY LANDOWNERS.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 30 November 1867 p 2 Advertising.

SPRING FARM
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6.
At Twelve O'clock.
MAGNIFICENT FREEHOLD PROPERTY,
Known as Springs Farm, Adjoining the Keilor Village Reserve, Fronting the Saltwater River, the Deep Creek, and other Government Roads.
To Squatters, Graziers, Agriculturists, Capitalists, and Others.
GEMMELL, TUCKETT, and Co. have received instructions from tho Hon. John Foster Vesey Fitzgerald* (previous to that gentleman's departure for Europe) to SELL by AUCTION, at their rooms, 49 Collins street west, on Friday, December 6, at twelve o'clock,
Those two contiguous sections of land, being Nos.20 and 21 parish of Doutta Galla, containing 710 and 640 acres respectively, facing three** Government roads, and having one mile and a half frontage to the Saltwater River.
The auctioneers beg to call the special attention of parties in search of really good investments to this
valuable estate, being within an easy distance of Melbourne. The land is of the richest quality, clear of all
obstructions, and is abundantly grassed and watered by the Saltwater River. It is well worthy the attention of graziers and sheep farmers, from its close proximity to town, as grazing paddocks. The property is all securely fenced and subdivided into convenient paddocks. The improvements consist of cottage*** and sheep-yards, which with a small outlay may be made a comfortable homestead. It is approached from Melbourne by either the Keilor, the Deep Creek, or Broadmeadows roads. The Government having purchased the Essendon Railway, which is now opened for traffic, considerably enhances the value of the property. The situation of this property can scarcely be equalled for richness of soil, scenery, or easy access to the Melbourne markets, and the district is noted for its productive qualities. Coaches pass the property six times a day.
Title perfect, for particulars of which apply to Messrs. Nutt and Murphy, solicitors, William street.


* This proves the claim made in a Victoria-wide source (possibly SETTLING)that J.F.L.V.(Alphabetical) Foster had changed his name and returned home to claim an inheritance. He would have needed to transfer the titles of all his property to himself (old name to new name!)
** 1.Today's Mickleham/Broadmeadows Rd, 2.Today's Sharp Rd, 3. Fosters Rd, today's Keilor Park Drive south to Spence St.
*** Foster didn't consider it grand but the Crottys called it The Governor's House. Maurice Crotty had been leasing Spring Farm for most of the decade so far and his wife (nee McCormack)wrote a letter in 1867 stating that part of their farm had been sold. The buyer was James Sharp (Volume C folio 979, says my Melway.)




CUMBERLAND ESTATE
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6
At Twelve O'clock.
Beautiful Freehold Property,
Moonee Ponds,
CUMBERLAND ESTATE.
Handsome villa Residence and 1301 Acres of Land.
To Capitalists In Search of First-class Suburban Property.
GEMMELL, TUCKETT, and Co. have received Instructions to SELL by AUCTION, at their rooms, 40 Collins-street west, on Friday, December ?,at twelve o'clock, Cumberland Estate, on the Moonee Ponds, 12 miles from Melbourne, containing 1304a. 3r. lp., partly bounded by tho Deep Creek and Bulla roads, at Oaklands Junction, and intersected by the Moonee Ponds, which b]???????hore????? contain an abundant supply of water in the driest season. About 700 acres are well wooded. The whole is divided into three paddocks by substantial post-and-rail fencing.

The buildings, erected only six years ago, are a handsome villa residence of eight large and well
proportioned rooms, substantially built of bluestone ; a building adjoining, also of bluestone, divided into
storeroom, pantry, kitchen, laundry, and servants' room ; huts, stable, &c., of wood.There is a garden well stocked with both fruit and ornamental trees, shrubs, &c., fowlhouse, stockyard.

There are 1103 acres of the land let for twelve months for grazing purposes. This very desirable property is bounded by the beautiful estates of the late Hon. Donald Kennedy, of Dundonald, and Andrew Sutherland, Esq., of Woodlands.
Particulars as to title can bo obtained from Mr.Wyburn, solicitor, 40 Ellzabeth-street.

The reason for the timing of the sale become obvious.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 8 June 1867 p 8 Family Notices
Funeral Notices. FRIENDS are respectfully invited to attend the funeral of the late Mrs. COGHILL (relict of the late William Coghill, Esq.),to move from her late residence, Cumberland, Moonee Ponds,THIS DAY, (Saturday), at 9, and pass across the Flemington-bridge about 12 ...
.
N.B. MOONEE PONDS (earlier,Moonee Moonee Chain of Ponds) meant NEAR THE MOONEE PONDS CREEK, not the suburb.
Woodlands, and Stewarton (Gladstone Park) were also described as being at Moonee Ponds.)

William had died in 1860. His wife's name was Christian!

Excerpt from my EARLY LANDOWNERS:PARISH OF TULLAMARINE.(SEE COMMENTS-WON'T SUBMIT.)




CORRECT TEXT.


PASCOE VILLA
Sale bv Auction. ;PRELIMINARY NOTICE. To Farmers and Country Families, Residing at Pascoevale, Essendon, Flemington, Deep Creek Road, Deep Creek, Broadmeadows, &c.
From the Celebrated House of Crossleys, Finsbury Pavement, London.
PASCOE-VILLA, PASCOEVALE, About Three Miles Northward of Flemington.
Magnificent Drawingroom, Diningroom, Bedroom, and Other Beautiful Articles of Household Furniture, Pianoforte, Paintings, Engravings. Plate, Plateware, Handsome Buggy and Mare, Harness,Ploughs. Harrows, Draught horses, Dray, Water cart, Milch Cows, Dairy Utensils, Stacks of New mown hay, &c.
STUBBS, OXTOBY, and Co. have been instructed by W. Smith, Esq., to hold a sale of the whole of the above valuable property, catalogues of which, with the day of sale, will appear in a few days.
House and Premises to Let.

As the information about William Smith (earlier leasing part of "Glenroy", probably from Donald Kennedy), and his land either side of the Pascoe Vale Rd bridge, would not submit here or in comments, I put it into a new journal called WILLIAM SMITH OF GLENROY AND BOTH SIDES OF THE PASCOE VALE BRIDGE,which fortunately did submit. There is also a reference to CUMBERLAND and SPRING FARM regarding a lawyer involved in William Smith's trial.

Because so much information about WILLIAM SMITH (the 1847 trial, which affected the reputation of the hotel,the 1850 advertisement seeking to restore it and attract customers,who may have started taking the new (present) Sydney Road when the (Pascoe Vale) road bridge was swept away (pointing out that a new bridge was only about a week from completion and the Old Sydney road was linked with the new one near Somerton Inn), is in the WILLIAM SMITH journal, any findings regarding whether Pascoe Villa was the ORIGINAL Young Queen will be reported in that journal.


ARUNDEL, EDWARD WILSON'S "MODEL" FARM.
FOR SALE, the following STOCK, bred by Mr.Edward Wilson, at his Experimental Farms, at Keilor and Riddell's Creek :
1 entire Spanish ass, three years old, over 13 hands
1 do Egyptian ass, thrco years old, 13 hands
1 do French ass, two years old, 13 hands
2 puie-bred Alderney bull calves, two months old
12 pure-bred southdown rams, two and four tooth, bred from stock purchased from tho late Jonas Webb of England
Danubian and Toulouse geese, (ice?).
Silver grey or Chinchilla rabbits.
For particulars apply to
Mr. ANDERSON*, overseer, Arundel, Keilor.

*James Anderson who later farmed James Wilson's Spring Farm after managing Arundel for Wilson is discussed in my journal 1888 GEOGRAPHY WITH THE MELBOURNE HUNT.


EDWARD WILSON.
Information about Edward Wilson and his model farm can be found in my journal about him. He was an editor/co-owner of The Argus and Tullamarine pioneer. He left money in a Trust* which supported Cr Jack's establishment of a motor ambulance service on the Mornington Peninsula.

*EXTRACTS FROM WILSON'S BIOGRAPHY IN AUSTRALIAN DICTIONARY OF BIOGRAPHY.In the late 1850s Wilson travelled widely among the Australasian colonies. His travel-jottings were published as Rambles at the Antipodes (Melbourne, 1859). His sight was now beginning to fail and in 1859-60 he visited England for advice, travelled on the Continent and served on the committee of the General Association for the Australian Colonies. In 1862 he again went to England; on the homeward voyage his sight deteriorated so badly that he returned immediately, and late in 1864 he had an operation for cataract; he regained good vision in one eye, but decided to remain in England close to the best medical aid. He lived at Addiscombe near Croydon, but in 1867 bought Hayes Place, Kent, the eighteenth-century home of the Pitts. Surrounded by nephews and nieces, he dispensed endless hospitality aided by a small army of servants; the amenities included a small zoo which contained emus, kangaroos and monkeys. Colonial visitors were always welcome; he was on close terms with the Darwins, Archbishop Tait, Edward Lear and Hugh Childers; children adored him.


After several heart attacks, Wilson died peacefully on 10 January 1878. His remains were taken to Melbourne and interred on 7 July according to the rites of the Church of England. He was unmarried. In his will he made twenty-six legacies of 100 a year to old female friends in the colonies, but the bulk of his estate was used to form the Edward Wilson Trust which since his death has distributed several million dollars to Victorian charities, especially hospitals. A bust by Thomas Woolner is in the State Library of Victoria.)


DISTRICT LICENSING BENCH.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 21 April 1852 p 4 Article
... William Boucher, Gold Diggers Retreat, Deep Creek: Edward Wilson, the Lincolnshire Arms, from Mr Wright.

The above entry from Trove is puzzling in two ways. Was the Argus Editor juggling two jobs? Why would the pub be described as being at Deep Creek,when Tulip Wright had leased his Deep Creek or Bridge Inn (where Bulla's mail was left until 1851-see PETER YOUNG in my journal JOHN THOMAS SMITH AND HIS ELECTORS) to Donohue and built the Linc on its present site, corner of Keilor and Lincoln Rd at "Essendon Crossroads"? (BULLA BULLA, I.W.Symonds, P.8, THE ANNALS OF ESSENDON, R.W.Chalmers.)

The answer to the first question is that Wilson probably needed the second job to pay off loans; see the extract (in italics) from the editor's biography. There is no proof found yet that the editor was the short term publican; the publican may have been one of the editor's nephews. Later that year Johnston* persuaded him to buy the Argus from William Kerr for 300; Wilson had to borrow money and Johnston became joint-proprietor in 1849. The issue of 15 September 1848 was Wilson's first; from 18 June 1849 the paper became a daily. Circulation declined to about 250, but by the close of 1850 equalled the combined circulation of rivals and by late 1851 had risen to 1500. Wilson successfully met the challenge of the gold rushes. The Argus absorbed the Melbourne Daily News from 1 January 1852 and only the Herald and the Geelong Advertiser survived as competitors for the goldfield market. He brought out forty compositors from England and in mid-1852 doubled the paper's size and reduced its price from 3d. to 2d. Circulation rose from 5000 in May 1852 to almost 20,000 late in 1853, advertisements snowballed and the number of employees grew to about 140. But costs were outrageous and Wilson was almost ruined.
(*Politician and founder of the Craiglee vineyard at Sunbury.)

Deep Creek Road, or THE GREAT ROAD TO THE DIGGINGS might have been a better way of describing the location of the Linc. The term Essendon Crossroads seemed to be mainly used by the Oaklands Hunt after 1888. The popular route was through Deep Creek (Bulla) until Brees' bridge was built as part of the construction of the road to Mount Alexander (Castlemaine) in 1854. Edward Wilson must have heard a whisper about this huge project, to take a chance on running this hotel. I'm not sure whether he had bought Arundel by 1852 but the facts will emerge when I discuss the ownership of Arundel (courtesy of K.B.Keeley's architectural thesis circa 1960 and 1989 owner (Tony?) Cockram.)

My purpose here is to discuss Arundel, granted to Bunbury (possibly acting as a dummy for the next owner who called it Glengyle), Bunbury's right arm, Bertram's Ford and Closer Settlement etc.
Arundel was section 1 of the parish of Tullamarine with a river frontage from just north of the bend in Melway 4 E9 to where Arundel Creek flows into the Maribryrnong at 14 J2 ACCORDING TO J.NOONE'S PARISH MAP OF THE PARISH DRAWN IN 1888. His map obviously satified his superiors, but 125 years later Mr Noone has been found out. If you extend Sharps Rd,the boundary between Tullamarine and Doutta Galla,east to the river,it meets the river at the point where its course changes from south to south east in the top half of 14 J.2,the line just touching the north end of the quarry in 14 K2. This is exactly where Noone had the southern boundary of the parish touching the river.

The creek is shown flowing in the right directions and crosses Grants Lane at exactly the right spot(bottom right corner of 4 G5)but it shows none of the creek's twists and turns, or the fork of the creek that crosses McNabs Rd and flows through Fawkner's lots 63,64, 65 and 66 before heading through the Mansfields' lots straddling Panton Rd (as shown on Melway.) Noone approximated the creek, drawing the general course but hitting the river at the wrong spot (with the creek, not the extension of Sharps Rd.)

I started my description of Arundel's boundaries again, gave some details about the grantee and Tony Cockram's information about the owners of Arundel/Arundel farm but it would not submit, so look in comments for that and much trove information including Donald McDonald's terrific article.(Donald grew up in Keilor.)

THE ARUNDEL CLOSER SETTLEMENT.

CLOSER SETTLEMENT
ARUNDEL ESTATE ACQUIRED.
As forecasted in "The Argus" yesterday,the Land Purchase and Management Board were(sic) successful in their negotiations with the agent for the purchase of 11,000 acres of land near Keilor, known as the Arundel Estate. This property in reality consists of three estates, the Overnewton, the Annandale and the Arundel Estate. The nearest part of the estate is only about 11 miles from Melbourne. The St. Albans, Sydenham and Deer Park railway stations adjoin it. (P.16, Argus, 27-5-1905.)
The article mentions excellent roads but fails to point out that the only access to Keilor for those on Arundel and the east part of Annandale was by means of Bertram's ford which was to take two lives not long after. The whole area was probably bought from the Estate of William Taylor who had obtained permission from the shire of Keilor to dam the creek that flows through Taylors Lakes. (I wonder if I can find that article!)

ACCESS TO ARUNDEL (FORDS AND BRIDGES.)
The road leading from Keilor to Arundel has had several names. By 1865, the Keilor council was calling it Bertram's road (P.4, Argus, 24-5-1865.) Bertram's ford seems to be first mentioned in 1866 (P.4, Argus, 30-1-1866.) The ramp leading to the ford from the Arundel side was still clearly visible circa 1989*.
BORRELL RD.
When the Calder freeway was built, a new link with the old highway and Green Gully was built. The south end of Arundel became a dead end and was named Borrell Rd.because emergency vehicles may have gone to the wrong side of the freeway,wasting precious time if both parts of the road had the same name. Jose Borrell, a Spaniard, came to Keilor after the 1916 flood and bought the Cahill's Gumm's Corner farm, after staying with relatives near Garden St, Essendon,by the Moonee Ponds Creek. As the farm had a gully running through it,he levelled the land with a horse and scoop, giving it the appearance of a gigantic dry dam, and it did become a dam during the 1974 flood. Jose switched to vegetable growing. He extended the Cahills' old house but only that original section,heritage-listed I presume, remains beside the bike track. Joe Borrell, his son, had retired by about 1990 when he provided me with the above information as well as letting me photocopy many of his photos*. Ironically Joe's new home behind the council offices was on the old market garden of another Spaniard,Jack Vert, indicated by Barcelona Ave and Vert St. Also in the Spanish Armarda (on wheels) was the Cuartero family.
(*These photocopies,very grainy, must be in the B volume of my DICTIONARY HISTORY OF TULLAMARINE AND MILES AROUND. If any members of the Borrell family have Joe's album(s),could they please contact the Keilor Historical Society so these priceless photos can be scanned, if this hasn't been already done.

(*PARDON THE INTERRUPTION.I'M GOING TO CONTACT THE BRIMBANK COUNCIL HERITAGE PLANNING OFFICER TO SEE IF THE FORD IS IN THEIR HERITAGE STUDY. Email sent 26 minutes after midnight. Reply received 9:04 a.m.
9:04 AM (6 hours ago) Good Morning Mr xxx
Thank you for taking the time to contact Brimbank City Council.
I have forwarded your request on to the Coordinator Strategic Planning and you will be responded to promptly.)

CLOSER SETTLEMENT.
---------------------#------------------------------
ARUNDEL ESTATE.
MINISTERIAL INSPECTION.
The construction of a bridge over the Saltwater River, which was to provide communication between the Arundel Estate and the township of Keilor, was in progress when the floods of last September came and washed away a considerable portion of the structure.After experiencing considerable difficulty,the Keilor Shire Council let
another contract, and this has now been satisfactorily settled to tin pr-il i.uiiu etc.
(P.18, Argus,14-7-1907.)

BERTRAM'S FORD SERVED FOR ANOTHER YEAR, AND MISS ROWE'S NEWS BROUGHT MANY A TEAR.

DEATH AT BERTRAM'S FORD.(Yours Truly, 1989.)
They were leading a horse that they'd sold to McRae
Who lived near St Albans, over Keilor way;
Will Mansfield was driving, his son sitting near;
Stephen Hill,leading the horse, sat in the rear.

Will Mansfield and Stephen were mates at the school,
Spent their free time together as a general rule,
So Will's dad let him come on the trip o'er the river;
But his wife wasn't happy and spoke with a quiver.

With a look at the sky and the storm clouds that loomed
She pleaded, "Bill, don't go now or you'll all be doomed!"
But he reassured her as they clambered on board,
"I've been through deeper water than you get at Bertram's Ford."

Halfway there the sun vanished- came a curious silence-
Then the sky opened up with murderous violence;
The clouds, basalt black,turned day into night
As the three reached Arundel and turned to the right.

"Young Hilly, don't wind that rein round your arm;"
His friend's father said, "'twill bring you to harm!"
Then they ceased their descent, to the right they curved;
The roar of river the horses un-nerved.

But Bill urged them on and into the current;
Soon a horse lost its footing, so swift was the torrent
And the jinker was swept like a leaf in a gale;
Mansfield grabbed for his son who had started to wail.

By lightning above, the ghoulish scene shown,
The three from the overturned jinker were thrown.
Sounds of whinnies and screaming and, "Where are you son?"
And the Grim Reaper's harvest had already begun.

While the Mansfield lad to the murky depths sank
The towed horse's reins dragged his mate to the bank.
The father, now desperate, with a weakening yelp
Gasped, "Stevie, please Stevie, go and get help!"

At first, due to shock, comprehension he lacked
But his friend's father's plea soon made him react;
He mounted and thundered away up the slope,
And Bill dived again; he'd ne'er give up hope.

With the last of his strength, Mansfield surfaced again:
That would have been it- for lesser men.
But for Bill Mansfield, that would not suffice;
His son was worth any sacrifice.

By the time that help came it was far too late;
The son and the father had shared the same fate.
Miss Rowe and her pupils on the morrow
Would share the grieving widow's sorrow.


With William Mansfield and his son,William, was Steven Hill of "Danby Farm" (Melway 5 B3 approximately) and I believe these Mansfields were on the triangular 80 acres of section 15, Tullamarine (the Payne pig farm called "Scone" when acquired for the jetport c 1960)now occupied by the airport terminal buildings and north of Melrose Dr/Grants Lane. This land was owned by John Mansfield (memorial 106 595.)
The building of the Arundel bridge in 1906, to improve access to grantees on the Arundel Closer Settlement had started but, partly built, it was swept away by a torrent, ruining the contractor. A new contractor was found and the bridge was built not long after the Mansfield drowning. Stephen Hill escaped because he disobeyed instructions but if my memory serves me correctly, he was killed in world war 1. The McRaes* were involved in the formation of the Oaklands Hunt while on Glenara and were related by marriage to the Mansfields. (*As I pointed out to Brimbank Council in my email re Bertram's ford, McCrae Boulevard at Green Gully (which I had a hand in naming)has the wrong spelling;not my fault.)

The story behind the poem was told to me in 1988-9 by Wally Mansfield, Colin Williams and Gordon Connor, all independently of each other. Somehow, I gained the impression that the father, William John Mansfield was known as John but I have changed his name in the poem to Bill, just in case that wasn't the case. He was the only surviving son of John Mansfield who owned the airport terminal area.

Miss Rowe, the teacher at S.S.2163 (on the north corner of the present Melrose Dr and Link Rd)married Frank Wright who had Strathconnan, if I remember correctly, and was followed by Mr Rogers who (possibly) was the teacher when all the pupils disappeared to the Bone Mill at the end of Wright St one lunchtime and certainly was in 1908 when Colin Williams' head was split open in a playground accident. In 1909, Alec Rasmussen arrived, Saint Alec as I call him.

There are two things in the poem that I am not going to change at the moment. The newspaper article mentioned below states that the lad leading the horse was Phillip Hill but I'm not sure that Phillip wasn't his father. If his name was Phillip, why was S.Hill a pallbearer for the son's coffin? Call the second thing poetic licence if you like. When I was writing the poem, I had The Ballad of The Drover (Fifth Book, i.e. Grade 5 Reader)in mind. The article said that there was no particular flood at the time but I love the bit about the inky black sky turning day into night etc.
N.B.The biggest floods in the Maribyrnong Valley occurred in 1906,1916 (after which the Borrells moved into Gumm's Corner) and 1974 (when the Borrells had to salvage their crop in a rowboat as in the photo.)

FATHER AND SON DROWNED.
A Victorian Tragedy. Melbourne, Monday.
William Mansfield, a farmer, of Keilor with his son, William, aged 7, and a lad named Phillip Hill, were
driving over a deep creek to-day when the vehicle was swept away by the floodwaters. Mansfield and his son
were both drowned, but the boy Hill managed to reach the bank. (P.1,Barrier Miner,16-10-1906.)

N.B. The tragedy was reported far and wide, probably received by editors in the form of a telegram. Kyneton's paper stated that Hill was rescued when an onlooker threw a rope to him. The paper at Parramatta got it right.

"Hill was seated in the back of tho buggy, leading a horse. When the buggy overturned the led horse swam steadily to shore, dragging after him Hill, who had clung to the rope."



CLOSER SETTLEMENT
ARUNDEL ESTATE.
Application for the 22 blocks on the Arundel Estate offered by the Lands Purchase and Management Board for closer settlement have closed. Every block has been applied for, and the special land board, on December 6, will have to decide between the claims of several persons in some cases, and in one case there are no fewer than eight applications. (P.4, Argus, 23-11-1905.)

CLOSER SETTLEMENT. ARUNDEL ESTATE. ALL THE BLOCKS SELECTED
As a result of the special land board, held at the Lands office yesterday, the whole of the Arundel and Annandale portions of the Overnewton Estate were allotted to settlers under the provisions of the Closer
Settlement Act, and not one half of the applicants for the blocks could be supplied. The land offered is about 1100 acres situated on the "Itu itir Huei ibiint .i mili' from Kulan'. etc.(P.5, Argus, 7-12-1905.)
The article, legible on the actual page, lists the successful applicants. I know for a fact that some of them were not granted, and probably not assessed on, their blocks. Alf Cock, my great Uncle, was not allocated lot 10 ("Glenview")but received the grant (in 1913 if I remember.) Alf's brother, Fred (my maternal grand father) had probably moved to Bunyip by this time, and Alf had probably met the Woods family of Longwarry (the next town)during a visit. Woods may have been Wood or visa versa. (IT WAS!)

Jean, younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Cock, of Glenview, Tullamarine,to Kenneth C., son of the late Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Wood, of Minyip.(P.5, Argus, 7-6-1938.)

COUNTRY.Vlit,.r V I Lil Min ami I report having sold,on behalf of Mr.G.E.Woods, his farm at Overnewton, Tullamarine, containing 114 acres,to Mr Alfred Cock, of Broadmeadows.(P.5, Argus, 17-10-1912.)

My hunch was right: Woods was Wood!
OBITUARY
Mrs. Charlotte Wood. The death occurred of Mrs. Charlotte Wood, of 'Inverness,' Barellan,at Heidelberg House, Melbourne, on Saturday, December 30.She was born at Birchip, Victoria, 64 years ago, and was a daughter of
the late Hugo Campbell, of Birchip. In 1 9M clip mnrrierf Mi* A .T.Wood and the young- couple lived in
Kupanyup and Melbourne for a few years before moving to Stawell to reside in 1905, where Mr. Wood was
manager of the Wimmera flour mill. During their 21 yeses' residence in that town, Mr. and Mrs. Wood both
played an active part. in the public life of the town. Mr. Wood was on the Borough Council for many yeare
and Mayor for several terms. He was also actively associated with the Stave}) Athletic Club in the running
of the famous Stawell Gift.In 1926 Mre. Wood came to Barellan with her husband, who had purchased the property known as 'Inverness,' at North Moombooldooi. Mrs. Wood was an active supporter of the C.W.A. Association Tfor some years, until ill-health compelled her to relinquish hei activities. Mr. Wood returned to Stawell in 1934 to take over the management of the Wimmera flour mill, at the request of the owners, but in August, 1934, he
died in the Stawell Hospital after a short illness. Mrs. Wood continued to reside on 'Inverness,' until increasing ill-health recently compelled ' her to seek medical attention in Melbourne.Her funeral took place on Tuesday,2nd January, at the Pleasant Creek cemetery Stawell, where the remains were laid to rest beside her husband. (Pardon,non correction of text.)

Sons and daughters of deceased are Messrs. A. Wood (Narandera), G.Wood (Longwarry, Victoria), and
Mesdames A. McCarron (Canowindra),G.Pomroy (Melbourne), A. Warrener (Sydney) and E. Abbott (Barellan.)
Surviving sisters are Mrs. A. Fletcher (Birchip) and Miss S. Campbell(Melbourne).
(P.2, Narandera Argus and Riverina Advertiser, 16-1-1945.)(Pardon,non correction of text.)
Was the move of the Gibb family to Bunyip influenced by the Wood family?

CLOSER SETTLEMENT PIONEERS (TULLAMARINE).
Google TULLAMARINE, COUNTY OF BOURKE to obtain maps showing that portion of the Arundel Closer Settlement.
The first two maps show Arundel and section 2 (Annandale) in their entirety but the third:
digital.slv.vic.gov.au/dtl_publish/simpleimages/30/1258115.html‎ shows the closer settlement blocks. Be warned that not all blocks name the original owners. Also,lots 7 and 8 are shown as one block,Butcher Thomas's "Tullamar" (1943 rates.)

A vital link in my becoming a local historian was Gordon Henwood, who handled the cleaning at Gladstone Park Primary School while I was teaching there. I was his mate, as with Paul Agar at Strathmore North, because I always made sure that my classroom* was clean and the furniture arranged to allow good access for the broom or vacuum, and that I was there late because my free time earlier had been used to take lunchtime gym, soccer practice (2nd in V.P.S.S.A. championship one year) and basketball (one boy set a record of 300 not out at one-bounce lay ups-staggering), recorder group and teaching C.P.R. to every child from Grade 2 up during my time release.

If I remember correctly, Gordon's mother was John Duncan McFarlane's daughter and Gordon had grown up on lot 12 (or perhaps lot 17 at the other end of Browns Rd.) I showed him the Tullamarine/Will Will Rook map (now at the Hume Global Learning Centre) that was produced by Broadmeadows Shire to sort out Stanley Korman's holdings, and given to me by the Broady rates officer (to keep me occupied while I could not access the Strongroom during the 1988 elections.)I pointed to A.Cock on the map and told Gordon that I'd found nothing about him at the Tullamarine Library, and since the Tullamarine history there consisted of one and a half foolscap pages, I had resolved to write a history. "You should speak to John Fenton;" he said, "he lives there."

John denied that he was a pioneer and wrote a list of contacts, which rapidly snowballed. And that's how my head became, very rapidly, crammed with history.


Extract from TULLAMARINE:BEFORE THE JETPORT.(1998) with some additions.
*=Not part of the closer settlement.
ANNANDALE AND ARUNDEL RDS (to MCNabs Rd.)
LEFT.Nash (Tom,then Arthur) 188+ 165 acres*, Glenview (Alf Cock, John Fenton's Dunnawalla)139 acres-part of Leslie Banks- + 115 acres, O'Donnell and then Frewen's lot 11, 32 acres,Arundel Farm (details given above.)

RIGHT. Bill Parr's Annandale, 165 acres*,Geraghty's Paddock ( Fox's FARM NAME???)121 acres, Closer settlement lots 7 and 8 (MaherA.Williamson on 8?)200 acres, Lot 6 (later, maybe still in 2013, Frewen), Elm Grove (Wallace) 71 acres, Arundel Farm creek frontage,lots 3 and 4, 113 acres.

McNABS RD.
WEST. Turner's (William Turner in 1861,McNab) 124 acres, Two Fox blocks, 128 acres -end of Closer Settlement.



ARUNDEL ESTATE. CLOSER SETTLEMENT HOLDING. Estate of EUPHEMIA BARR. Deceased.
Tenders are hereby invited by John Milburn and James Wallace, as Trustees for the purchase of Allotment 16,
Section One, Parish of Tullamarine, County of Bourke, containing 7 acres and 28 perches or thereabouts, on
which is erected a double-fronted four roomed weatherboard house, with front and back verandahs and outbuildings,consisting of dairy, man's room, buggy shed, stable (one-stalled) and fowl house. Amongst the improvements are an underground tank and a galvanised iron tank (300 gallons) connected with kitchen.
The property formed part of the Arundel Estate, and is situated one mile from the Keilor township, and
fronts the Saltwater River. Closer Settlement requirements etc.
(P.3, Essendon Gazette and Keilor,Bulla and Broadmesadows Reporter,.)

Robert Brown,member of a very old Keilor family*,took over the crown lease of lot 16, at the end of Brown's Rd, and gained his grant in 1928. John Milburn, was not a Closer Settlement resident. He lived directly over the river near Milburn Rd.The Wallaces are longtime residents of the closer settlement and Don** of Elm Grove was heavily involved with the market gardeners' state body. **FIND ARTICLE.
*FIND ARTICLE ABOUT THIS.




ABERFELDIE, BIG CLARKE
PRIME FAT STOCK-DALMAHOY CAMPBELL and Co will have for SALE, at the Market yards, Flemington, on Wednesday, December 4, (selections only!)
........
SOO do do, for Mr W J T Clarke--SEE COMMENT OF 27-10-2013.

14 comment(s), latest 6 months ago

COBURG, MELBOURNE, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA.

Richard Broome's BETWEEN TWO CREEKS is an excellent history of the City of Coburg. I no longer have my notes but remaining memories of his information will guide my trove searches. I will not include family notices but pioneers will be mentioned in articles about events. This history was found when I was researching the new Young Queen Inn in Coburg, which I think Richard said was built by George Somerville (it was about 23 years ago that I read the book.) When Richard wrote his book, there was no TROVE, and he obviously didn't see this article. (P.S. When I was correcting the digitisation, I typed the headline and the author's name and discovered 6 or so installments which you can find by doing the same. B.Cooke was an auctioneer.)

Early History of Coburg
BY B. COOKE.
The trees which to-day form quite an avenue along the Sydney road from Bell street to the northern wall(i.e. of the jail), were planted about 1857 by the prisoners under supervision of a warder (who was paid by the Road Board), and taken from 'Thorp's (Thorpe's?)paddock, Newlands, by my father. who at the time was clearing part of the estate. In 1859 Colonel Champ was commissioned by the Government to start the volunteer movement, which was called the Pentridge Rifles. This he faithfully carried out, and with the aid of the warders and others connected with the (Penal)Department made the movement a great success.

The colonel was a man of fine soldierly appearance, who among his officers and men was greatly loved and respected. He stood for Parliament, being returned by a large majority for East Bourke. On the declaration of the poll the people took his horses from the carriage and pulled him all the way along the road from Pentridge to Brunswick.

Leaving the stone walls of Pentridge, going north, you cross a small lane that leads to the creek, and connected Newlands with our village. There was a rough stone ford, fairly passable when the creek was in normal state, but in winter was difficult and at times dangerous to use as a crossing. On the north of this lane was Morgan's* farm to the creek. One of the most picturesque places in the district is found here. In it you have the miniature landscape, with the ever-flowing brook, while the outlook to the east is a charmingly beautiful view right away to the Dividing Ranges. To-day strangers visiting the district stop and stare, delighted with the scene.

*Several Morgans appear in the area's history. Morgans and Knights who were related to each other, and through this to (John?) English who bought Belle Vue from Fawkner's widow in 1879, leased Belle Vue and (Fred?) Morgan's (The Pines?)was probably part of it. A Morgan owned Camp Hill at Tullamarine between the Gilligans and Scott (who called it Gowanbrae) and R.K.Morgan relocated his factory from Pascoe Vale Rd, Glenroy to Gowanbrae near the creek where Hannah Pascoe Drive** (named by me) now stands. His old factory,near the iron-sided bridge he built, was used for the genesis of the Broadmeadows Basketball Association in the 1980's.
**Named after the mother of John Fawkner who adopted Pascoe as a given name as a tribute to his mother following her death before he co-founded Melbourne. (The life and Times of John Pascoe Fawkner, (J.P.?)Billot.)


On the south-eastern portion of this farm the Council have decided to construct an embankment across the creek, forming a sheet of water that may be used for boating and other pleasures. Nature has given them this splendid opportunity to make this site one of the most attractive beauty spots around the City of Melbourne. I am pleased to know the Council and public have taken up the matter so earnestly, and I hope in the near future to see the work completed.

Then north of Morgan's farm stood the Young Queen, a well-built hotel, owned and managed by Mr. Baker, at the time quite a noted place of resort. The gardens were well laid out and beautifully kept and also had a large collection of birds and animals. Mr Baker being a splendid host and jovial landlord, the place was much frequented by pleasure seekers who drove out from the City to spend their holidays there. At one time the Brunswick coach stopped there, but later ran on to the Wheat Sheaf Hotel*, conducted by Mr Harry Marsh, where they changed horses. It is now the site of the Deanery, part of the old building being retained in the new.

Crossing Edgar's creek over a log bridge and ford, was Mr Treloar's farm, his house being built close
to the road of bluestone is still standing. Then Richards Bros., carriers, also Spry Brothers, one of whom was
shot at and wounded by one of the Gilbert gang of bushrangers, who bailed him up on the Sydney road near
Pretty Sally's Hill. Spry gave his horses the whip and -the team got into a gallop. The bushrangers fired at and wounded him, but the horses kept going and he got safely away with his money. In those days teamsters on
their return trips often had large sums of money in their possession, banking being a convenience quite out of the question and occasioning great risks.

Then the camping ground and general store of Mr. Bartlett, a wooden building still standing. It was no
uncommon thing to see six or eight teams there in company, it being desirable for safety and mutual help along the road to the diggings. Then there were paddocks to the boundary of Campbellfield.
(P.4, Brunswick and Coburg Leader, 31-7-1914.)

* From Andrew Lemon's BROADMEADOWS A FORGOTTEN HISTORY.
(* =Lemon; #= itellya, re text in brackets.)


P.30.* "Anywhere from the Wheatsheaf Hotel (site of today's First and Last at Fawkner) north for three or four miles tended to be called Campbellfield..."
P.43. Lemon mentions that Campbellfield had three hotels in the mid 1860's including the Wheatsheaf and the Plough Inn.
P.49. #"Even grander (than the races near Broadmeadows Township i.e. Westmeadows)were the Pentridge and Campbellfield Steeplechases held in July 1861,promoted in part by Harry Marsh,owner of the Wheat Sheaf Hotel, and staged on adjoining properties."
P.85.*"The Coburg Reserve Estate Co.---could promise two railway stations close by: the North Coburg (today's Merlynston)on Wheatsheaf Lane (Boundary Road) and ----."

N.B. Boundary Rd was the boundary between the parishes of Will Will Rook (north) and Jika Jika (south). Today, between two creeks from west to east,it is Victoria St,Glenroy; a line just north of Barina Rd and Rhodes Pde; Pascoe St; Boundary Rd; and a line just south of Queens Pde to Merri Creek.

The Wheat Sheaf was just within Pentridge Shire but a quick trove search revealedthat it wasdescribedasbeing at Pentridge AND at Campbellfield.


While doing a trove search for YOUNG QUEEN INN, PENTRIDGE,to find when the direct route (today's Sydney
Road )had been built, I found some more memories of early Coburg. As the print in the article was terribly hard to read and the digitisation would have looked like a foreign language- but is actually almost perfect- I can only think that somebody is writing a history of the City of Moreland. Therefore I will not paste the article here but I will list the names in it.

GREATER MELBOURNE. COBURG. FARTHEST NORTH.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 23 March 1910 p 6 Article

Surnames in the article- PRICE, HAIN (AUTHOR), O'HEA, FAWKNER, SPRINGHALL, DUNCAN, SANDFORD,WARWICK, BARDIN, MURRAY, LILBURNE, MAILER, O'SHANNASSY, PATTERSON, CUTTS.

Richard Broome wrote quite some detail about the Mailers (and their home if my memory is correct), (William?) Murray, Price,the Young Queen and Father O'Hea,Price, and Fawkner, but I don't remember mentions of the other names, especially O'Shannassy.

Mr Hain mentions Fawkner's two lots of land. They were in part of Jika Jika shire, between two creeks,as the name of Broome's book suggests. You can see this land for yourself by googling JIKA JIKA,COUNTY OF BOURKE.

Crown allotment 151,of 709 acres, was bounded on the north by Victoria St- Rhodes Pde (boundary with Will Will Rook parish and the Cameron's Glenroy run,which they named), Northumberland Rd., Gaffney St and the Moonee Ponds Creek. It is shown divided into several farms: Fawkner's Belle Vue Park of 253 acres(later owned by Glenroy flour miller Hutchinson, who renamed it Oak Park because of the English trees Fawkner had planted.)The part sold in 1842 to Henry George Ashurst (after whom part of Pascoe Vale Rd-north or south of Glass St, can't remember which- was once named), which became in 1856 John Kernan's "Merai Farm" of 147 acres and 11 perches,and smaller farms near/ north of Devon Rd. A map on P.78 of Andrew Lemon's BROADMEADOWS A FORGOTTEN HISTORY shows the owners in 1874 of the three properties fronting Rhodes Pde: Mr Bowring* (96a 2r 38p), Mr Murray (77 0 28)and Mr Peachy** (sic, lot 3-probably 26 acres.) The 15 acres would include Sefton St houses but I know nothing of owners.

* This was almost certainly a relative of Ed.Bowring of Red Hill near Dromana who cycled from Essendon to his new home there on the village settlement in record time. Bowring Rd -off McIlroys Rd,Red Hill- was near a later Bowring farm.
** Hadfield is another J.P,Fawkner grant.In the parish of Will Will Rook, east of the golf course,it was called Box Forest, but was known circa 1940 as Peachey-Kelly Town***,those two families consolidating many of Fawkner's Land Co-op.blocks. Stephen Peachey moved to a 6 acre farm at Tullamarine to run a dairy after swine fever broke out in the area (which never took on the school name coined by the district inspector: Westbreen.) Its present name honours Cr Rupert Hadfield of Broadmeadows Shire. Derby St, Tullamarine became known as Peachey's Lane.(Broadmeadows rates, Winnie Lewis, Olive Nash, Harry Heaps.)
*** Jim McKenzie's oral history in my KILTS AND COW DUNG FLATS.


Fawkner's crown allotment 140 of 569 acres was east of "La Rose" and bounded by Rose St, Bell St, Merri Creek and Reynard Rd. It is bisected by Munro and Harding Streets. The Hardings were prominent Coburg pioneers and I think their home was discussed by Richard Broome.

As the surname list has probably reached capacity,here endeth the lesson.


Question marks were used above when I wasn't 100% sure. Let's check.
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 30 April 1927 p 34 Article
.... WILLS AND ESTATES Frederick John Morgan, of The Pines Pascoevale.

OOPS, it wasn't J.P.-The life and times of John Pascoe Fawkner / C.P. Billot
Billot, C. P. (Cecil Philip)[Book : 1985 ]

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 1 February 1873 p 4 Family Notices
MURRAY.-On the 31st ult., at Balloan, Coburg, William Sutherland Fraser Murray (of the firm of Greig and Murray), in his fiftieth year. ... 218 words

It was Joseph English who bought Belle Vue in 1879,not John,who bought John Murray Peck's Lebanon at Strathmore and then had to claim title to Sir John Franklin's 12 acres that Peck had occupied for years.I couldn't find a notice about the purchase but this is interesting.

Students of the early history of Melbourne will be interested to know that the original house erected by the late Mr. John Pascoe Fawkner at Pascoevale, together with the modern mansion and 152 acres of Oak Park Estate nearest to the city, have been purchased by Dr. John Murphy, of Collins street;. The old house, which is built of wood, is in fairly good order, and will be preserved by Dr. Murphy. In the living-room, in which there are six doors, is an imported grate, probably one of the first brought to Victoria.
(ITEMS OF INTEREST. The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 12 November 1920 p 4 Article.)

When I spoke to the owner in the early 1990's, he thought the English manor might have incorporated the original house. I wonder what the heritage study says. Fawkner's stables remain, converted into a house,next door.

The large estate of Belle Vue Park was sold following Fawkner's death. In 1880, the part of the Estate containing the homestead and stables was acquired by Joseph English who constructed a new two storey residence that replaced (or possibly modified) Fawkner's homestead. The estate has since been subdivided and the house still exists at 7 Oak Park Court.

Despite extensive research, it has not been possible to prove who built the stables at 9 Oak Park Court (Fawkner, English or someone else). However, it is possibly the only surviving remnant of Fawkner's original Belle Vue complex. It was converted to a residence in the post war period.

2 comment(s), latest 8 months, 3 weeks ago

CAMPBELLS CREEK, BETWEEN CASTLEMAINE AND FRANKLINFORD, VIC., AUST.

On Saturday I had a lovely meal at the Five Flags Hotel in Campbells Creek after my ma-in-law's ashes had been buried at the cemetery. As I drove through Campbells Creek every school day in 1965-6, I have fond memories apart from the time I copped a broken half window in my old FX going up the hill to the Maine.

There wouldn't have been a FRANKLINFORD REPORTER without the assistance of Ron Champion, H.T. at the C.C. school who kindly let me run off copies on his duplicator. On hot days,I didn't care that the water in the swimming pool had been pumped out of the creek by the fire brigade.

The owner of the Five Flags Hotel was very busy but kindly spared a few moments for a chat.The hotel was established in 1854 with the bar near the car park being the original section.

There are some great photos of the "Creek's" heritage items, details of Ray Bradfield's history etc. available on trove. I also found a picture of the Five Flags Hotel.The reason I started this journal is that the history in wikipedia was as pathetic re Campbells Creek as for most other places. Fancy saying that Campbells Creek was named after a creek! Dur! How did the creek get its name?

Excerpt from my INVERNESS HOTEL AND FRANKLINFORD journal.

STATIONS - Bough Yards

The establishment of the Aboriginal Station not only displaced the Jumcra* run, but took a good portion of Mollison's Bough Yards run. Now effectively separated from the Coliban run by Holecombe and the Protectorate Mollison possibly found Bough Yards an imposition.

In 1840 Alex Kennedy (1801 - 1877) had arrived in the Guildford area. He was related to William Campbell. William Campbell and Donald Cameron had arrived on the "Wm Metcalfe" from Invernesshire in late 1838.

Kennedy and his wife Margaret, and five children arrived aboard the "S Boyne" in January 1839. The Kennedys made their way to Clunes where Donald Cameron had set up his run. Kennedy had selected a run near Newstead whist on route to Clunes. By the time he returned, Norman Simson had established the Charlotte Plains run on the site.

Fortunately, William Campbell had purchased the lease for Bough Yards which was adjacent to his run, Strathloddon. Campbell gave Kennedy the remains of the Bough Yards run and the Kennedys established a homestead on the Loddon River. The homestead was named Bowyards.

The Strathloddon run homestead was near Yapeen. The township of Campbell's creek was named after William Campbell.


SOME SNIPPETS. (From The Argus unless otherwise stated.)
Richard Hills, a storekeeper of Campbells Creek, had become insolvent. (P.6, 18-1-1859.)

On the 25th ult., at Campbell's Creek, Mount Alexander, by the Rev. J. Chene, Isabella Will, eldest daughter of William F. Preshaw, Esq., surgeon, to Mr.John Graham, of Belfast, Ireland.(P.4,3-6-1853.) Dr Preshaw was one of Castlemaine's most prominent citizens.

MARRIED.
On the 15th inst., by special license, at the residence of Mrs. McLaughlin, Campbell's Creek, by the Rev. James Low, Mr. Robert Moorhead, store-keeper, to Anne, only surviving daughter of the late James McLaughlln, Esq., Kingston, Ireland.(P.4, 20-11-1854.)

DIED. On the 23rd ult., after a short illness, of rheumatic gout, Mr. Thos. Wightman, of the John o'Groat Hotel,Campbell's Creek, Castlemaine, aged 43 years. (P.4,5-3-1857.)

DIED. On the 26th ult., at his residence, Campbell's Creek, Castlemaine, Mr. William Frederick Wheeler, youngest son of the late Daniel Wheeler, Esq., of Chelmsford,Essex, England, aged twenty-six years.
(P.4, 4-14-1857.)

N.B. AS I HAVEN'T BEEN STUDYING THE AREA'S HISTORY FOR 25 YEARS,I AM PLAYING IT SAFE BY INCLUDING ITEMS ABOUT CAMPBELLS CREEK,CASTLEMAINE, BECAUSE I WOULD NOT KNOW WHETHER THE PIONEERS WERE IN CASTLEMAINE OR THE TOWNSHIP. I'M TREATING CAMPBELLS CREEK AS I WOULD ROSEBUD, DROMANA, WHERE THE LATTER IS GIVEN AS A CLUE TO THE LOCATION OF THE FORMER. WHEELER'S LOCATION WAS PROBABLY ON WHEELERS HILL IN CASTLEMAINE BUT I THOUGHT THE ABOVE MIGHT BE OF INTEREST.

-------
Baron Von Mueller the famed botanist who,if I remember correctly, designed the Castlemaine Botanical Gardens, organised the planting of trees at the Campbell Creek Reserve.
(CAMPBELL'S CREEK.
Mount. Alexander Mail (Vic. : 1914 - 1917) Tuesday 2 February 1915 p 2 Article.)
EDITS WON'T SUBMIT.

March 2014.
WELSH-ANNEAR.-On the 31st January, 1919, at
"Redbank," Rusden street, Elsternwick, John
Alexander Welsh (late A.I.F.), eldest son of
Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Welsh, Elwood, to Henrietta,
daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Annear,
"Five Flags," Campbell's Creek.
(P.11,Argus,8-3-1919.)

7 comment(s), latest 11 months, 2 weeks ago

THE EARLY ROADS TO SYDNEY FROM MELBOURNE,VIC., AUST.

Hay Lonie operated his dairying on a farm owned by James Hearn,15 B Will Will Rook, which fronted Pascoe Vale Rd, so how is it that when the farm was placed on sale in 1868,it was described as being on the old Sydney road?

EXCERPTS FROM THE HAY LONIE JOURNAL.(Only parts of the text have been corrected.)
TUESDAf, MARCH iiHi} esend. Agricultural inil Grazing Fjrni, ATill ff ill Rook, fronting the Old Sydney road ,Between Broadmeadows and Campbellfield 305 Acres Tlrat-elosa Land In tho Trust Estafo ofltho late Mr James Hearn.
M3 ROBERT BYRNE** ia favoured with Instruc. tiona to SELL bj AUCTION, ut his rooina, 2S Collins street east, on Tjesda}, March 24, at twelveo clock noon precise!}, {
That well known dairy and agricultural farm, adjoining Campbellfield, being Allotment B of Section 15 parish of Will Will Rook, containing 305.5 acres lately occupied by H Lonie, Esq.
(P.2, Argus, 16-3-1868.)



*The original Sydney Rd passed the Young Queen Inn at Melway 16 H9,near Bass St,turning left at 6 G9, veering right onto Johnstone (sic) St at 6 C8 (to avoid the creek) and left into Raleigh St, turning right again up the Ardlie St hill and then it was follow your nose (Mickleham Rd)to Wallan. The road is still called Old Sydney Rd north of Donnybrook Rd. This roundabout and very hilly route was necessary because of the Sydney road track being extremely boggy in wet weather. Later Pascoe Vale Road was made to the line of Somerton Rd, which was made toward Sydney Rd between Thorngrove and Cameron's Stony Fields/Roxburgh Park,with travellers possibly veering north east through the middle of the township where the Cliffords and Kernans were pioneers (Cliffords Rd.) Another route was along High St or Plenty Rd which also joined the Sydney road (and the road to the McIvor Diggings) near Wallan. When the direct route was made, the Young Queen and Broadmeadows Township went into limbo and a new Young Queen was built at Coburg.(Melway touring map 510 A10.)
SOURCES: BROADMEADOWS :A FORGOTTEN HISTORY,A.Lemon; BETWEEN TWO CREEKS (Coburg),R.Broome.

5 comment(s), latest 11 months, 1 week ago

HAY LONIE, OF PRESTON, CAMPBELLFIELD, TULLAMARINE, BULLA AND KILMORE, VIC., AUST. (and Peter Young.)

I will never forget the first time I saw Hay Lonie's name in a Broadmeadows Shire ratebook. I was having trouble deciphering some of the words because of terrible handwriting, sometimes taking five minutes to establish what a particular letter might be. "What sort of name is Hay?" I thought. It was not until nearly a year later, when I found his name in the Bulla shire ratebook re the assessment for Lochton, that I was reassured that he indeed had the same name as the area's principal crop.

I have included details (obituary, location etc. re Pasture Hill, Camp Hill and Lochton) about Hay in my journal 1888 GEOGRAPHY WITH THE MELBOURNE HUNT and having found the location of his Kilmore property, I decided that a separate journal might allow me to include that and other information I might discover.

TROVE SEARCH-"HAY LONIE, MILK".
Mr' Norman Bowers' Valleyfield estate was one of the very earliest settled farms in Kilmore district. It
is about four miles north-west of the town, with extensive frontages to Pyalong road, which runs through
the property. Some eighty years ago the original place was farmed, and later the home, which was right on
the roadway, was used as a hotel Harvest Home, the proprietor being Mr A. Downs. For a period the spot was a favorite locale for Kilmore picnics, which were numerous about 65 years ago. The property was added to considerably, and subsequently became an extensive dairy farm, conducted by the late Mr Hay Lonie.
About 250 cows were milked on the premises morning and evening, all by hand, and Mr Lonie himself despatched a waggon load of milk by the first train,' at 7 a.m., from Kilmore East, and again in the evening, six days a
week for Melbourne, and also a consignment on Sunday evenings, each trip meaning six miles from and to his farm. After Mr Lonie's death,the Valleyfield property changed hands, and Mr S. Bowers became owner.
(Present & Past WOOL v. MILK Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 24 October 1935 p 4. )

Golden Vein.
On Wednesday Messrs. Osborn and Hudson conducted a clearing out sale on account of Mr. J. H. McIvor at the Golden Vein estate in Moranding, when a large number of sheep, cattle, horses, plant, hay,furniture, and sundries came under the hammer to a big attendance of buyers and onlookers. A good clearance was effected at satisfactory prices.

In the late sixties and early seventies the Golden Vein property of 869 acres was owned by Mr.Laurence Bourke, M.L.A., and about 1872 the holding became the property of Mr. Hay Lonie, of Tullarmarine (sic), and from whom it was rented by Mr James McLeod at 5/- per acre. Fifty-seven cows were milked twice daily, giving an average of two and a half gallons, one gallon of milk making one pound of cheese.

Mr. McLeod introduced the Cheddar system into the district. (Details.....).

During Mr.Bourke's ownership, the Golden Vein was in a slovenly and untidy condition, owing to the fact that Mr.Bourke had to be absent a good deal on Parliamentary business, and the men he employed were careless and
slovenly, and the fences broken down and left there, because the men would not repair them. On the expiry of Mr. McLeod's lease, .Mr.Lonie went on to the farm and worked it for many years; principally in dairying. After Mr. Lonie's death the property was purchased by Mr.R. Fennelly,and leased to Mr.I W. Mclvor, who carried on a high class Ayrshire stud herd for some years. (etc.)
( Golden Vein.Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 16 January 1936 p 2 Article.)

This must be the article mentioned in his obituary (which debunked rumours that Hay had committed suicide.)

Mr Hay Lonie, well known in this district, has been missing since Wednesday, 14th instant. On the evening of that date he left Mr Grace's, South Melbourne, and since that time nothing has been heard of his movements. Much sympathy is felt for Mrs Lonie and family, whose state of anxiety can well be imagined. [Since writing above we learn with much regret that the remains were found in Melbourne yesterday, but up to the present we
have not been able to find further particulars than those conveyed in the following from the Herald of
yesterday :-"About 7 o'clock this morning a boy named William Bell, went to Constable T. Martin, who was on duty on Prince's Bridge, and informed him that the body of a man was floating in the River Yarra a short distance east of the bridge. Martin went to the spot indicated, recovered the body, and conveyed it to the City Morgue. The death has been reported to Dr Youl, and an inquest will be held, probably to-morrow." The remains
will be interred in the Kilmore Cemetery this (Thursday) evening.]
(P.3, Kilmore Free Press, 22-12-1892.)

HAY LONIE, PETER YOUNG SEARCH ON TROVE. (EH?)
The reason for this search will be explained later.

1884.October 23- The sudden death of Miss Barbara, oldest daughter of Mr Hay Lonie,and a most amiable girl, took place on 19th instant aged 19 years.
(Early Kilmore. PART LXI.
Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 10 June 1915 Edition: MORNING. p 1 Article.)

Not much else turned up except that Hay seems to have been awarded a government contact for the supply of milk while he was milking all those cows on Pasture Hill at Campbellfield.
(THE GAZETTE, P.6,Argus,8-12-1866.)

Let's try PETER YOUNG,KILMORE.
Oh dear,let's try JOHN THOMAS SMITH AND HIS ELECTORS on google.

No wonder, the above search did not produce clear results; I had the right area but the wrong town!

A website headed FREDERICK XAVIER TO ARTHUR ZOUCH has the following information.
The Melbourne Times of 23-4-1842 recorded that Peter Young had been granted a publican's licence for the "Bushman" in Sydney Road.The Port Phillip of 21-4-1843 shows that the hotel, once again described as being on Sydney Road was now called the Sugar Loaf Inn. The same paper, on 27-4-1844,stated that Peter had been granted his licence but the hotel was again called the Bushman.
(An alphabetical listing of squatters and their runs, from correspondence with the Governor, which is a different website, lists Peter Young of the Sugar Loaf Run.) Given Peter's purchase of land in Seymour at the first sales, his conducting the first sales in the township and the fact that Sugarloaf Creek intersects the Hume Highway in Seymour, it is reasonable to assume that the hotel was at Seymour and not in modern-day Carlton, Brunswick (or Plenty, Pascoeville near the Young Queen Inn, or Tullamarine near the Lady of the Lake- routes more likely to be called Sydney Road in the 1840's.)
Rev. Peter Gunn, who became the minister at Campbellfield's historic Scots Church (Melway 7 H6), had visited the Golburn (River?) area and Peter was among a large number who signed a letter of encouragement and contributed 50 pounds to support his ministry; another signatory was from Sunday Creek, which joins Sugarloaf Creek.(Port Phillip Herald 1-10-1844.)

Peter Young and Elizabeth christened John William in 1843.
Peter Young purchased allotments at the first sale of blocks at Seymour. (Melbourne Weekly Courier 23-3-1844.)
Peter Young was one of 469 voters who qualified by freehold in Seymour in the list of electors in the District of Bourke (Melbourne Courier 8-8-1845.)Peter Young was listed in the (1847?) Port Phillip directory as a settler, Seymour, Sydney Rd.

The website also lists newspaper reports showing that Peter Young was given depasturing licences in July 1843 and October 1844 in the Westernport District.Ah hah, I thought, perhaps Peter had been on Clyde Farm, Westernport before he went to Bulla. Then I remembered my search for a grant (or licence) that Captain Adams of Rosebud was supposed to have been given in about 1841. All such matters were dealt with in Sydney and the Public Records office gave me an index of correspondence. As Peninsula pioneers were referred to as late as 1888 in "Victoria and Its Metropolis" as being in the Westernport District, I concentrated on those entries.

Imagine my surprise to find Barker's Mt Alexander Run (near Castlemaine) described as being in the Westernport District! In view of what has been mentioned before, Peter Young's depasturing licences were almost certainly near Seymour.

Still none the wiser,about when Peter left Nairn, I returned to Trove and tried "Nairn, Bulla, Young, 1850-1867".
Argus 18-4-1853 page 12. Peter was offering Nairn for sale by private contract. He had probably only been there for about five years but how much he had accomplished! The advertisement describes the property in great detail, including the waterfall.For the sale of his furniture, library, stock, vehicles and so on, Peter employed prominent auctioneer, Dalmahoy Campbell (much discussed by Harry Peck in his "Memoirs of a Stockman.) (See Argus 20-5-1853 page 9.)

Argus 4-6-1853 page 8, column 1. Peter offered an incredible variety of grape vine cuttings for sale.


What does Peter Young have to do with the price of fish?

I have a theory that Peter Young influenced Hay Lonie's move to the Kilmore area and may have even been the land agent who handled the sale of Bourke's "Golden Vein" to Hay. Young would have been familiar with the Kilmore area, from very early days as he would pass through it on the way from Sunday Creek to Melbourne. As we all do,he'd return nostagically to his former haunt and perhaps visit relatives at Kilmore; James Young of Tabilk might have been a son (both having agricultural links with Tasmania.) With the eye of an expert agriculturalist and land agent,Peter may have noted the decrepit state of the "Golden Vein" and its potential as a dairy farm, and told Hay while making a nostalgic visit to Nairn at Bulla.

Hay Lonie's "Lochton" was 5a, Bulla, south of "Airey's" (through which Wildwood Rd zig-zags its way almost down to Deep Creek from the St John's Rd junction and which became part of David Patullo's "Craigbank estate)and Hay would have passed Lochton to reach Nairn, which he may have been leasing to McIntosh at the time, (7b-Melway 384 D-E11 and south half E10, and section 8-between St Johns and Oaklands Rds, 384 F-J, part 9-12.)


HAY LONIE GOOGLE SEARCH.
Born in Cupar, Fife, Scotland on 22 Nov 1842 to Andrew Lonie and Mary Fife. Hay married Jane McGregor and had 4 children. He passed away on 1892 in Melbourne East.
Family Members
Parents: Andrew Lonie 1804-1873; Mary Fife 1809-1877. Spouse(s) Jane McGregor
Children: Barbara Lonie 1865-1884; Mary Fife Lonie 1869-?; Andrew McGregor Lonie 1874-?;
Jean Elizabeth Lonie 1883-?
( Hay Lonie - Profiles and Historical Records - Ancestry.com
records.ancestry.com/Hay_Lonie_records.ashx?pid=48371049‎)

Hay was a brother of Henry Fife Lonie, one of whose children was William Hay Lonie. Good photos of W.H.Lonie and Henry's wife in:
William Hay Lonie - Profiles and Historical Records - Ancestry.com
records.ancestry.com/William_Hay_Lonie_records.ashx?pid=97465717‎

Given Names Hay
Surname / Family Name LONIE
Gender Male
Birth Date 22 NOV 1842
Birth Place Cupar, Fife, Scotland
Death Date 1892
Death Place Melbourne, Victoria, AUSTRALIA


Name at Birth: Hay LONIE
Birth: 22 NOV 1842 - Cupar, Fife, Scotland
Census: 1851 - Cupar, Fife, Scotland
Departure: 1854 - Liverpool, Lancashire, England
Arrival: Aboard the "Black Eagle". 19 OCT 1854 - Melbourne, Victoria, AUSTRALIA
Death: 1892 - Melbourne, Victoria, AUSTRALIA
Gender: Male
(www.familypursuit.com/genealogy/lonie_hay/hay-lonie-b.1842-d.1892-1‎)

TROVE SEARCH FOR HAY LONIE.
As the text in the following item has been corrected, obviously by a family historian, I do not wish to interfere with sales of the book that must be underway. Hay put 313 acres at Kilmore into the name of Henry's wife, Jane (Hay's sister-in-law),to avoid paying tax. The McGregors are mentioned.
(Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 11 October 1883 Edition: MORNING. p 3 Article)


OOPSEY!
Henry Lonie's wife was Jemima (nee Hall.) Hay had put the 313 acres into the name of his own wife,Jane (nee McGregor.) Henry obviously leased his farm at Kilmore to his cheese-making in-laws until he moved north.The text has not been corrected so I will post the following.


CORRESPONDENCE.
A CORRECTION.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE KILMORE FREE PRESS
Sir,-In your issue of the 11th inst. you gave a report in re Land Tax case wherein there appears to be a slight error in having used the name of "Henry" instead of "Hay." It should have been "Jane Lonie wife of Hay Lonie" not of "Henry Lonie," and the mistake is attributable to a clerical error for which you are not accountable.-.You will greatly oblige Mr Hay Lonie and myself by kindly giving this publication.
Yours faithfully, ALEX. GRANT.59 Temple Court, Melbourne, 23rd October, 1883.
(P.3,Kilmore Free Press, 25-10-1883.)

Family Notices
Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 23 October 1884 Edition: MORNING. p 2 Family Notices
... DEATH. LONIE.-On the 19th instant, suddenly, Barbara, daughter of Mr Hay Lonie, Valley field, aged 19 years.


I THINK I CAN LEAVE ANY OTHER TROVE INFORMATION TO THE TEXT-CORRECTOR TO COMPILE.
The following won't be found online apart from here. It comes from a general rundown on Tullamarine and surrounds circa 1860 on page 11 of my TULLAMARINE BEFORE THE JETPORT (1998.) The source for this excerpt has to be the Broadmeadows rate book of 1863.

Hay Lonie is renting land at Campbellfield with Brunton (possibly the flour miller and later owner of Roxburgh Park.) Not long after,he buys Camp Hill (16 B2) and Lochton (177 C4) to conduct his dairying.

Hay might have had outlets for his milk in Fitzroy and Hotham (North Melbourne.)
J ANTED, a good MILKER and DRIVER Apply Lonie s dalry, opposite Fltzroj Market.(P.1, Argus, 24-10-1867.)

If you think the digitisation above is bad, try this.
I've corrected the relevant bits. (REMEMBER TO SEARCH THORNGROVE)

TUESDAf, MARCH iiHi} esend. Agricultural inil Grazing Fjrni, ATill ff ill Rook, fronting the Old Sydney road *,Between Broadmeadows and Campbellfield 305 Acres Tlrat-elosa Land In tho Trust Estafo ofltho late Mr James Hearn.
M3 ROBERT BYRNE** ia favoured with Instruc. tiona to SELL bj AUCTION, ut his rooina, 2S Collins street east, on Tjesda}, March 24, at twelveo clock noon precise!}, {
That well known dairy and agricultural farm, adjoining Campbellfield, being Allotment B of Section 15 parish of Will Will Rook, containing 305.5 acres lately occupied by H Lonie, Esq.
(P.2, Argus, 16-3-1868.)

*The original Sydney Rd passed the Young Queen Inn at Melway 16 H9,near Bass St,turning left at 6 G9, veering right onto Johnstone (sic) St at 6 C8 (to avoid the creek) and left into Raleigh St, turning right again up the Ardlie St hill and then it was follow your nose (Mickleham Rd)to Wallan. The road is still called Old Sydney Rd north of Donnybrook Rd. This roundabout and very hilly route was necessary because of the Sydney road track being extremely boggy in wet weather. Later Pascoe Vale Road was made to the line of Somerton Rd, which was made toward Sydney Rd between Thorngrove and Cameron's Stony Fields/Roxburgh Park,with travellers possibly veering north east through the middle of the township where the Cliffords and Kernans were pioneers (Cliffords Rd.) Another route was along High St or Plenty Rd which also joined the Sydney road (and the road to the McIvor Diggings) near Wallan. When the direct route was made, the Young Queen and Broadmeadows Township went into limbo and a new Young Queen was built at Coburg.(Melway touring map 510 A10.)
SOURCES: BROADMEADOWS:A FORGOTTEN HISTORY,A.Lemon; BETWEEN TWO CREEKS (Coburg),R.Broome.

**James Hearn owned much land at Mt Martha, as did Robert Byrne.


SALE OF PROPERTY.
Messrs. Campbell and Sons, Kirk's Bazaar, report having sold, on account of Messrs. W. C. Hearn andThomas Wragge, trustees in the estate of the late James Hearn, their farm, situate at Somerton, and known as the Thorngrove Farm, and containing 338 acres. Mr. John Hearn was the purchaser, at a satisfactory price.
(P.5,Argus, 18-2-1892.)

I thought I knew the location of the farm on which Hay Lonie had been dairying prior to the 1868 advertisement. Big Clarke died at Roseneath in Woodland St, the residence of James Hearn, whom Lenore Frost said (in her book about Essendon's historic houses), was his son-in-law. Having done extensive research about the farms on Somerton Rd, I presumed Hay had been on Thorngrove (Melway 179 G-J9-11) but that was 4J of the parish of Yuroke and consisted of 338 acres.

The Will Will Rook map is also available online and it shows the 305 acres 2 roods 22 perches, 15B, Will Will Rook, described in the 1868 advertisement. Like Thorngrove,it had been granted to W.J.T. (Big) Clarke.


Crown allotment 15B, Will Will Rook, is indicated by Melway - I apologise for the delay. Before I could transpose this on my Melway, I had to plot the Yuroke/Will Will Rook boundary on maps 178,179, 6 and 7. As there is no road along the boundary,I had to start at Swain St (198 H12) and continue east through Dench's Lane
178 J-K12)so that my line met Merri Creek at exactly the same place as shown on the parish map,which it did. The parish boundary meets Merri Creek at the point where the Hume Freeway crosses the creek,which is also the north west corner of the Lalor Golf Course. (If you manage to transpose parish and crown allotment boundaries properly, there are always indications that you are right.)

The parish boundary is also the northern boundary of 15B, Will Will Rook. The corner of Berringa Court (6 J1) is at the north east corner and the boundary passes through the Kyabram St/Flynn Crescent corner ending at the top of 7 C2, 40 metres west of the Upfield railway line.

The southern boundary of 15B is Barry Rd,named after the pioneering family that lived on "Glenbarry".
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 24 April 1856 p 4 Family Notices
Campbellfield, Mr. William Barry, aged fifty-six years etc.
Garrett Barry married an Angel!


The western boundary of the 305.3875 acres is the original course of Pascoe Vale Rd,just west of the railway and the Barry Rd railway bridge. The eastern boundary is indicated by the line of King St (as it crosses Barry Rd) continued to meet (not quite) the Upfield line; if continued it would meet the western boundary of the Ford land just over the railway line (one of those welcome confirmations of accuracy I was talking about.)

WHICH FORD WAS SOLOMON'S FORD NEAR AVONDALE HEIGHTS,VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA?

Was it at the west end of Canning St, Avondale Heights (Melway 27 B8) or at the end of North Rd (27 B5)?
Does information about the Solomons help?

3 Settling on the land
3.1 Squatters
By the time Hoddle made his map of Cut-Paw-Paw, he could mark the location of one squatter's
station in the parish of Cut-Paw-Paw. This was 'Mr Solomon's Station', on the south side of the
Maribyrnong River where the Medway Golf Club is now located. Another station belonging to
Mr Solomon is on the same map, but outside of Cut-Paw-Paw parish, on the north side of the
river in what is now East Keilor(8)
. Squatters did not own their land. At first they held their
acreage under pastoral licenses. After 1847 they were able to lease land from the Crown for 14
years at a time, with the option of purchasing part of it when the lease had expired. Joseph
Solomon was the licensee of a run in Cut-Paw-Paw, which he held from 1836 to 1849. Michael
Solomon is said to have also been the licensee of a run at Solomon's Ford, 'Keilor' between 1835
and 1841(9). Eventually Judah Solomon purchased the land on which the golf course now stands(10).
It is said that the first clubhouse used by the Medway Golf Club was a relic of the 1850s,
belonging either to Judah Solomon or William Alison Blair who purchased the property from
Solomon in 1858(11).
8 See map Sydney C10, Parish of Cut-Paw-Paw, Hoddle, 1840
9 R.V. Billis and A.S.Kenyon, Pastoral Pioneers of Port Phillip, 1974: 142
10 Jones, 1983: 54Environmental History City of Maribyrnong
Jill Barnard Graeme Butler Francine Gilfedder & Gary Vines, 2000: Volume 2: 6
(
Maribyrnong Heritage Review Volume 2 Environmental History City ...
www.maribyrnong.vic.gov.au/Files/Vol_2_Hist_Final_sc.PDF‎)

That does little to help us decide because Joseph and Judah were near the site of Braybrook Township and Michael was near North Rd.

In a book entitled SOLOMON'S FORD, Valentine Jones presented a strong case for the ford at the west end of Canning St, and convinced me, so that I have written many times that the Canning St ford was Solomon's ford. Now I think I was wrong because of three words: TO SOLOMON'S FORD.

But firstly,let's see what Graeme, Gary and Co.say about the Canning St ford.

Ironically, the site most easily identifiable with the first white people to enter the area, the ford across the Maribyrnong found by Grimes and his party on the Maribyrnong in 1803, is said to be a fish trap and ford created by Woi-wurrung people.

The (Grimes) party rowed as far as some rocks that later became known as Solomon's Ford and were situated on the Maribyrnong just south of the western end of what is today called Canning Street, at the boundary of the Cities of Maribyrnong, Brimbank and Moonee Valley. Unable to get the boat across the rocks, they left it
and moved further up the river until they found that the salt water gave way to fresh.

The second excerpt shows that eminent historians placed their money on the same horse as I had. However the words in bold type bring us to the Township of Braybrook map. This township, like Keilor and Broadmeadows (now Westmeadows) was placed on a well-used route and straddled a stream. Braybrook Township was in the parish of Doutta Galla north of the river, and Cut Cut Paw to the south. The Canning St ford was on North Braybrook Township where Michael and Mary Clancy were granted land bounded by the river, Canning St, roughly Langham St,and Duke St. This ford could only be accessed through Clancy land. (Township map in Valentine Jones's book.)


Township of Braybrook - National Library of Australia
nla.gov.au/nla.map-nk2456-265‎
Victoria. Surveyor General's Office. Township of Braybrook [cartographic material] 1855. MAP NK 2456/265.

(A second Braybrook Township map is identical online,except that it was signed by assistant surveyor James Reid on 5-1-1855 and shows a dotted line from the south leading to the Rhonda St ford.)

The 1-5-1855 township map,prepared for the early sale of lots with only some parts having been subdivided, shows that Avondale Heights' Raglan St continued south to the river meeting Lacy St on the other side;perhaps a bridge was intended there. Canning St only went as far west as Raglan St but the present west end was called North St and ran between Brown St and the river. There was no ford at Melway 27 B8! Brown St continued to the river following the course of today's Woodbury Court,and the last two sections of Brentwood Drive, to the line of Rhonda Drive which led to a ford! (Melway,27 C9.)Despite the Rhonda St ford (there in 1855), the river is labelled salt water to about the line of Butler St with fresh water written on the part of the river in 27 B8. This accords with what Grimes and Co. found (Unable to get the boat across the rocks, they left it and moved further up the river until they found that the salt water gave way to fresh. The water in 27 B8 (just south of the west end of Canning St) was labelled "fresh" so it must have been the Rhonda St ford that stopped Grimes' party.

The Clancy ford must have been made by Michael to get to his other land in the Shire of Braybrook,for his children to get to Braybrook State School or so he could maintain contact with other members of his family on the other side of the river.
The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 - 1918) Saturday 19 October 1878 p 2 Advertising.
SHIRE OF BRAYBROOK.
Maidstone, 17th October, 1878..
IN accordance with Clause 265 of the Local Government Act 1874, the following Valuation of the Rateable Property in the Shire is published for the information of the parties rated.WILLIAM PULLAR.
Clancy, Michael, Hampstead nett annual value 2 pounds.

BRAYBROOK SHIRE COUNCIL. MONDAY, JAN. 5.
The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 - 1918) Saturday 10 January 1885 p 3 Article
... slaughtering licenses were granted:-R. Clancy, Braybrook;


Mr. Clancy offered to maintain the Braybrook ford, on the Keilor boundary, for 10 per annum.
(The Bacchus Marsh Express (Vic. : 1866 - 1918) Saturday 8 May 1880 p 2 Article)

From Clancy and Porter wanting Errol street, Braybrook cleared -Deferred for the attendance of the Eastern
Riding councillors. (Independent (Footscray, Vic. : 1883 - 1922) Saturday 8 December 1894 p 3 Article.)
You will remember that Errol St led to the Rhonda St ford via the riverside road.

The most startling piece of evidence in regard to Solomon's Ford is in the same map. On the west side of the river a road (JUST WEST OF BURKE ST) heads north from Raleigh St (now Cranwell St)to a point level with Clarendon Street (the northern boundary of the township) where it is labelled TO SOLOMON'S FORD. This would seem to be heading to the end of North St. but just to be sure, the Cut Cut Paw map was consulted.

Digital Collections - Maps - Cut Paw Paw, County of Bourke ...
nla.gov.au/nla.map-rm3014‎

This 1884 map seems to indicate that it was Burke St that headed north to Solomon's Ford from Raleigh St but it now extends south to High St (Western Highway.)After approaching close to the river opposite Clancy's it curved around the bend opposite Canning St and having reached the northern boundary of the township (eastern extension of Somers St), the road made a bee-line for Melway 27 C6 to cross SOLOMON'S FORD and link with the North Road ramp near the western boundary of today's Thompson St Reserve.

Although the Doutta Galla part of Braybrook Township is not shown, a fine line is apparent on a wider section
of the river where the 1855 (and 1803) Rhonda St ford would be,linking to a riverside road that is now a walking track,and from which could be accessed Errol St, leading to the Braybrook State School. I had never thought about where the Clancy, Munro etc. children from North Braybrook Township went to school but now it's painfully obvious.

TWO SOLOMON'S FORDS?
The surveyors in 1855 and 1884 were in no doubt where Solomon's ford was but Clancy's Ford seemed to have been called Solomon's ford at times.
FIRE AT BRAYBROOK.
About 2 o'clock a.m. on Friday morning the look-out man at the Melbourne station gave the alarm of a fire at Braybrook. The local and Footscray brigades were soon on the ground, but as no water was available the premises were consumed. The locality was near Solomon's Ford on the Saltwater River, but at some distance up to the hill. The house was one of four rooms, built of wood, owned by P. Clancy, but let to Mr.Pridham*,butcher. It was not known whether any insurance was on the building or contents.
(The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 17 April 1897 p 9 Article.)

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 12 August 1870 p 4 Article
The body of the boy Clancy, who was drowned in the Saltwater River on Saturday last whilst crossing near Solomon's Ford, along with a man named Morris, was recovered

KEILOR COUNCIL
Independent (Footscray, Vic. : 1883 - 1922) Saturday 9 July 1910 p 1 Article
(The Braybrook shire had sent either a cheque or bill)for part cost of repairing Clancy's Ford and pointing out that it was an excellent piece of work and likely to require little maintenance in future. Cr Dodd thought the culvert had been put in higher than the old one and that the water at Solomon's Ford had thereby been raised and made less useful.

The Dodds and Delahey's would have known which ford was the right Solomon's Ford. What he meant (badly paraphrased by the reporter) is that if the water dammed up too much at Clancy's ford, Solomon's ford upstream would be covered with water, making the ford less useful,not the water.

*BRAYBROOK NORTH TOWNSHIP.
Michael Clancys evidence at an inquiry into closed roads in 1879 reveals that he had about 35 acres joining Mr.Porter and Mr. Fitzgeralds* properties and had arrived there in about 1856. Clancy and Munro, his neighbour in the township, were prevented from watering their cattle at the river by Derham, who also tore down 28 chains of Clancys 30 chain rock wall and threw the stones into his victims crops. Derham had Clancys lease of the river reserve cancelled. Harry Peck says that Derham, of fair complexion, as husky as a lumberjack, kept the pub at Braybrook and hunted others off hundreds of acres of land where he grazed about 200 horses for the Indian horse trade. Thomas B. Derham lived in Trinifour sometime after 1886 between the occupancies of W.G.Tulloch and E. Henderson.

(*M.Fitzgerald had 353 acres, between Balfour Ave. and Somers St., Sunshine, south of McIntyres Riversdale.)
In 1900, Daniel Munro had 21 acres, Thomas Derham (Jnr.) 44 acres, A. Pridham 89 acres and Walter Marshall possibly 50 acres. Harry Newman of Maidstone had 10 acres while James Holbery, James Moore and the Melbourne Orphan Asylum of Brighton had parcels of less than 3 acres each. By 1906 about 30 acres of the township had become part of McKennas closer settlement farm.(P.45, EARLY LANDOWNERS:PARISH OF DOUTTA GALLA.)



EVIDENCE.
"SOLOMON'S FORD" SEARCH ON TROVE.
DEATH.
SOLOMON. - On the 25th April, at his residence, No. 3 Moffatt street, South Yarra, Joseph Solomon, late of Solomon's Ford, Braybrook, aged seventy-one years. A colonist of fifty-two years.
(THE BACCHUS MARSH EXPRESS. ESTABLISHED 1866. SATURDAY, MAY 3rd. 1890.)


PUBLIC POUND.
NOTICE is hereby given that, the Public Pound at Footscray, in the County of Bourke, will be removed from
its present site to Braybrook, near Solomon's Ford in the said County, and that the same shall be henceforth called the Braybrook Pound. By order of the Bench of Magistrates, ROBERT CADDEN, Clerk Petty Sessions,County Bourke. Police Office,Melbourne, March 27th, 1849.(P.1, Argus, 3-4-1849.)

The 1855 Township of Braybrook map shows "Pound Yards" near the bottom right hand corner of Melway 27 D9. This indicates that the ford that stopped the progress of Grimes' boat, where the water was still salty, (at the south end of today's Rhonda St), was the ORIGINAL SOLOMON'S FORD and the one used by early squatters.


DEMPSTER.
DEATH BY DROWNING,
John Dempster, aged 15 years, was accidentally drowned at Solomon's Ford, in the Saltwater River, at Braybrook yesterday. He was bathing with other lads about 4 o'clock when he suddenly sank, and the water being muddy it was a quarter of an hour before the body was found. Every means WAS used for restoring (inlnintion?), and Dr. M'Carthy was quickly on the spot, but all efforts at resuscitation proved futile. (P.6, Argus, 21-1-1897.)

("John Dempster, Drowned" search on trove.)
- On the 6th April (suddenly), at his residence, "Edinburgh," Northumberland Rd., Sunshine, ex-Cr.William Robert Dempster, J.P., the dearly beloved husband of Florence Marion Dempster, the devoted father of John (dec.),William (ex-A.I.F.), Henry, 'Martin (dec.), Mavis, Archie (dec.),Flora, Bert (A.I.F.), the devoted
foster-father of Ron (A.I.F.), Harold (A.I.F.), age 60 years on the 14th April.(P.4,Sunshine Advocate, 13-4-1945.)

("Dr McCarthy, Footscray" search on trove.)
Independent (Footscray, Vic. : 1883 - 1922) Saturday 29 July 1916 p 3 Article Illustrated.
SOCIAL AND PERSONAL DEATH OF DR. McCARTHY.
Footscray and district lost one the worthiest of its citizens, this week when Dr. Chas. L. McCarthy passed away at his residence, Paisley street, Footscray,etc.

A trove search for "Dr McCarthy, Keilor" and "Dr McCarthy, James McIntyre", which produced no real results, indicates that John Dempster drowned at the ford between Rhonda and Errol St rather than the one at North Rd.
(It may also have been Clancy's ford.)


Messrs. Dodd and Derham, members of the Braybrook Road District, as a deputation from that board, requested the co-operation of the Keilor Board in erecting a bridge over the Saltwater River, at Solomon's Ford, on the
boundary line between both districts. The cost was estimated at 170. After some discussion on tho matter, its further consideration was postponed until tho 9th prox.(P.5, Argus, 29-1-1867.) Cr Dodd of Keilor Shire chaired the meeting. The Cr Dodd of Braybrook was certainly a member of the same family and was probably farming land near Ballarat Rd in the parish of Maribyrnong granted to Mary Delahey.

A bridge eh! If it was built, some relics of timber piles might be found,proving which of the three fords was being called Solomon's ford in 1867.

I just noticed a photo at the right of the newspaper result:1976, English, Photograph edition:
Solomon's Ford, end of Canning St, Avondale Heights [picture].Collins, John T., 1907-2001, (photographer.)
Solomon's Ford, end of Canning St, Avondale Heights. It shows a surface on the top of the rocks at Clancy's ford that appears to be concrete. It clearly shows the zig-zag ramp (like the one at Bertram's ford, Arundel Rd.)

INTERLUDE.
As I was ready to resume but trove wasn't, I had a sudden thought; what does Braybrook mean? The meaning of Bray seems to have no connection with the naming of the locality and then I thought of Robbie Burns' song about the banks and braes of Bonnie Doon. Brae means "a hill, especially along a river". The river, being tidal, would be little more than a brook at low tide during the drier weather.

Three squatters who probably used the original ford at Braybrook were all Scottish; George Russell and his brother,Phillip born at Fife , Niel Black in Argyleshire and John Aitken also being a Scot. One of these three, or a fellow Scot, may have coined the name.

ANOTHER NON-TROVE SOURCE.
[PDF]
50 Creek.95 In 1839 James Patrick Main, who was transporting ...
mvcc.vic.gov.au/.../MVCC%20TEH%20FINAL%202012%20%20with%...‎(i.e. Moonee Valley Thematic Environmental History.)
PAGE 80.
Establishing Victorias dairy industry
While the Moonee Valley area was not a well-known dairying district, in the nineteenth century many farmers would have kept at least a small herd for milking. An early dairy farm in the Moonee Valley area was located at what is now Avondale Heights in 1871. The First Class Agricultural and Dairy Farm of 282 acres was located near Solomons Ford, with a frontage to the Saltwater River.216
(216 Heritage Alliance, City of Moonee Valley Gap Heritage Study Vol. 1, p. 21 .)

This dairy farm (1871)had to be near Avondale Heights and Solomon's Ford and have a river frontage. Even without looking, I knew where it was! It was crown allotment C of section 9, parish of Doutta Galla,consisting of 281 acres 3 roods 0 perches (281.75 acres.) This was bounded by North Road and the ramp leading down to Solomon's Ford, a northern boundary indicated by the east-west part of Thackeray Quadrant,Riverview Street and a continuation north to include Weyburn Place houses, and on the south by Medfield Avenue and a continuation west (just north of Clarendon Street)to the river, forming the southern boundary of the present Thompson St. Reserve. This dairy farm adjoined North Braybrook Township!

([Parish maps of Victoria]. Parish of Doutta Galla - National Library of ...
nla.gov.au/nla.map-rm2741-90‎
Victoria. Dept. of Crown Lands and Survey. [Parish maps of Victoria]. Parish of Doutta Galla [cartographic material] 1860 - 1880. MAP RM 2741/90.)


The vendor of this dairy farm,(whose location and acreage fulfil all the requirements noted above)like George Dodd's family would have known exactly where Solomon's Ford was. Even if it was not the original ford, the North Rd ford was certainly known (by those who knew, not reporters) as Solomon's Ford by 1871. Crs Dodd (of Braybrook and Keilor Shires) and their colleagues were discussing building a bridge here in 1867 (see above.)


N.B. The vendor of the dairy farm, Crs. Dodd and the surveyors (Braybrook Township 1855 and Cut Cut Paw parish
1884)are united in agreement about the site of Solomon's ford,that is, the west end of North St.

I still can't access trove, but will try to find the advertisement* later. Crown allotment 9B of 222 acres, between the dairy farm and Buckley St was granted to,and partitioned by, Davis, Robinson and O'Neil who are discussed in my journal 1888 GEOGRAPHY WITH THE MELBOURNE HUNT.

I stated previously that surveyors made few mistakes but the chap who drew the above Doutta Galla map was guilty of one (John Hall's "Southwaite") and I've discovered another on the same map. He shows Maribyrnong west of Doutta Galla near the North St ford, but seems to be unaware that Cut Cut Paw separates the parish of Maribynong from the river at the line of McIntyre Rd (extended north to the river.) This is where Bruce Rd ran north to link with North Rd via Solomon's ford.

*PRELIMINARY NOTICE.
For Absolute Sale at on Early Day.
FIRST-CLASS AGRICULTURAL and DAIRY FARM.
282 Acres, Parish of Doutta Galla,
Nine Miles from Melbourne, Large Frontage to Saltwater River. To New Arrivals, Agriculturists, Investors of Capital,and Others.
GEMMELL, TUCKETT, and Co. have received instructions from the proprietor to SELL by AUCTION, at their rooms, 40 Collins-street west, on an early day, unless previously disposed of privately, A capital agricultural and dairy farm of about 282 acres of excellent land, in the parish of Doutta Galla, having a large frontage to the
Saltwater River, and distant only nine miles from Melbourne.
The Improvements consist of comfortable bluestone cottage, &c, two enclosed cultivation paddocks.
The farm adjoins the properties of Messrs. Dodds and Delahay#. (P.2, Argus, 22-3-1871.)

#The intermarried Dodd and Delahey families received the grants for all of Brimbank Park south of the entrance or transmission towers as well as much of 11A, between there and North Pole Rd. Young John Dodd later owned the northern part (Keilor Binn Farm)which his wife (nee Goudie)insisted should be called "Brimbank".

CAN YOU SEE WHY THERE IS SUCH CONFUSION ABOUT THE LOCATION OF SOLOMON'S FORD? THE ADVERTISEMENT DOES NOT MENTION SOLOMON'S FORD AND IT WAS PURE LUCK THAT THE FORD WAS ON THE FARM'S RIVER FRONTAGE. SEE WHAT THE HERITAGE STUDY STATED. The First Class Agricultural and Dairy Farm of 282 acres was located near Solomons Ford, with a frontage to the Saltwater River.







RESUME AT RESULT 10,(1894 SUICIDE.)

3 comment(s), latest 10 months, 2 weeks ago

THE MARRIOTT AND JONES FAMILIES OF MOOROODUC, VIC., AUST.

Hi XXX,

Can you help me, we are at the moment cataloguing photos given to us by the Wells Family of Derril Road, where the Butter factory used to be.

Leslie Moorhead says in her book that the house there when Keith Wells lived there was Penbank but we have photos showing that the name of the property was Bungower Park.

The property was originally owned by Keiths grandfather Bob Marriott and in the Electoral Rolls the property is sometimes called Shandon

XXX, would appreciate your help if you do know anything about the property or any extra on the Butter factory.

REPLY.
The Marriotts owned two properties or used two names for the same property. Shirley Walter (nee Bourne, grand daughter of Peter White, who lived at the east end of White's Lane-renamed Range Rd during W.W.2) gave the location of Shandon as the south east corner of Three Chain (Moorooduc) Rd and Bungower Rd. It is possible that Shandon also fronted Derril Rd; Shirley was focussing on Three Chain Rd as we discussed the residents and farms she recalled. Robert Marriott's son and executor, Robert, (of Bungower Park) was described in the legal notice re application for probate of the will of Robert Marriott (of Shandon.)

As far as I know there was only one Penbank in the parish of Moorooduc. This was crown allotment 5 of section A, consisting of 266 acres, granted to A.McKay and later purchased with money that Edward Jones of Spring Farm earned with his carpentry skills during a short stay in Adelaide. Penbank was at the south east corner of Moorooduc and Mornington-Tyabb, extending south about 586 metres and west to Derril Rd where the store was built at Jones' Corner.

The Spring Farm Heritage Study done for Mornington Peninsula Shire confused Penbank with Spring Farm, which was Edward Jones' residence and was in the parish of Bittern, as was Criccieth, a third Jones property. I alerted Simon Lloyd of the facts during the time I was writing THE FEMALE DROVER: A HISTORY OF MOOROODUC ( a copy of which your group should have. It has an index.)

Shirley Walters (the female drover) and David Shepherd (descendant of Edward Jones and a fountain of Moorooduc history, who with his brother relocated the historic Shepherd "Perfection Nursery" from Somerville to the Moorooduc Rd frontage of Penbank, and gave the Penbank School its name) should be able to help you.

Hope you don't mind me using our conversation as an itellya journal, minus our personal details, of course.

Mornington Butter Factory Picnic.
Mornington Standard (Vic. : 1889 - 1908) Thursday 8 March 1900 Edition: MORNING. p 3 Article
... Mornington `Butter - Factory Picnic. This annual event came off most successfully on Wednesday last at the property of Mr E. Jones "Penbank" opposite the Moorooduc State School. The day gave promise of extreme warmth which kept some who would otherwise have been there from being present, ...

Advertising
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 8 May 1953 p 10 Advertising
... ROBERT HILL MARRIOTT, Late of Shandon, Moorooduc In the State of Victoria Farmer Deceased - After fourteen clear days Robert John Marrott of Bungower Park Moorooduc

AFTERTHOUGHT.(SECOND REPLY.)
Leslie Moorhead's mistake was probably caused by Penbank being the habitual venue for the butter factory sports. Almost every trove result for Penbank involves the sports.