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MOSER/ROGERS/MUNDAY MEMORIES OF ROSEBUD, VIC., AUST.

3 comment(s), latest 3 years, 3 months ago

MELBOURNE BRINDLE, FERRIER, LACCO AND McLEAR SAVE ERNIE RUDDUCK'S LIFE, DROMANA, VIC., AUST.

It's not often that I base a new journal on just one incident. There are six people mentioned in this story, an Australia-wide hero in 1905, a renowned wooden boat builder, an un-named Greek fisherman, the son of a circa 1871 Dromana pioneer, a boy who saved a life shortly before leaving for America (1918) and achieving fame and the son of one of the PIONEERING NEIGHBOURS NEAR CARRIGG ST,DROMANA.

The funny thing is that I would never have found this story if I had not been contacted by Shah about her ancestors who arrived in Rosebud in about 1938. Her father had not known Bill Chatfield of Rosebud West to be a fisherman and I told her that Bill's fishing operation was taken over by a Swede,but like Vin Burnham in his memoirs of life in early Rosebud,I couldn't remember his name. (I just remembered that it was Axel Vincent!)

In the hope of finding it,I did a search for "Rosebud, fisherman" on trove.

DRIFTING TOWARDS HEADS

MOTOR BOAT IN DIFFICULTIES.
DROMANA, Saturday.
A strong easterly wind, a choppy sea, A motor engine in need of repair, and a lucky escape were the chief features of an unpleasant experience which befell Mr Ernest Rudduck, a well-known grocer of Dromana, on the Bay last evening. Intending to have the engine repaired at Rosebud Mr Rudduck arranged with an elderly Greek fisherman to tow the boat, but he started from the Dromana pier alone shortly before 6 p.m., presumably
through a misunderstanding. The Greek failed to overtake the boat, and as the wind increased in force, Mr Rudduck was soon in difficulties. A return to Dromana was impossible, and to continue to drift meant increasing the danger of his already perilous position.

Observing Mr Rudduck's plight from the pier, Ewart Brindle, a lad of about 12, rode to Rosebud on a bicycle to seek assistance. A few minute after his arrival William Ferrier and Mitchell Lacco, well-known fishermen, John McLear, grocer, and Brindle were facing the gale in a fishing boat, and being drenched to the skin as the waves dashed over the vessel.

When the motor boat was reached it was drifting rapidly in the direction ofthe Heads, and had the rescue been delayed the incident might have been attended by still more unpleasant effects. The fishing boat, however, towed it safely to the Rosebud jetty, where the little group of watchers congratulated Mr Rudduck on his escape, and warmly commended the rescuers on their skilful handling of the boat in the trying circumstances.

Ferrier and Lacco are noted for their fearlessness at sea. Some years ago when the barque La Bella was wrecked offWarrnambool, and when all others considered it suicidal to attempt a rescue, Ferrier rowed to the scene of the disaster in a dinghy saving three of those on board. For his courage the citizens presented him with a purse of sovereigns.
(P.4,The Ballarat Courier, 24-1-1916.)

THE CHARACTERS.
MELBOURNE BRINDLE.
Ewart Brindle was more likely on the pier to sketch vessels sailing past rather than fishing. It hardly seems to have been a day for fishing. Twenty or so years after leaving Dromana,he produced a fabulous map of Dromana that is a history on its own. This map is available from the Dromana Historical Society. With such fabulous recall,his omission of his heroic deed from his recollections of his days as a schoolboy at Dromana, must have been due to modesty. See my journal THE FAMED MELBOURNE BRINDLE.

FREDERICK VINE (VEAN)THE UN-NAMED GREEK FISHERMAN.
Much information about Fred and his stepdaughter Mary B.Stone (a.k.a. Polly Vine)is given in Peter Wilson's ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD. Fred was one of the original grantees in the Rosebud Fishing Village but was associated with Dromana from early days,Vine being one of the original names on the Dromana State School roll in 1873,the Rosebud school opening a decade later. Fred later lived in a hut on the Dromana foreshore,roughly opposite Seacombe St. How would I know this? Melbourne Brindle's map,of course! There is a photo of Mary in Peter's book and one of Fred on page 73 of Colin McLear's A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.

ERNIE RUDDUCK.
Son of Nelson and Jane Sophia Rudduck, Ernie expanded the family business to Rosebud and when the shop was burnt in a bushfire, he soon replaced it. He leased the shop to Rosebud residents. Nelson was the grantee of two Rosebud Fishing Village blocks and donated one of them for the Methodist Church. Three reminders of the Rudduck family in Dromana are the beautiful two-storey Piawola, on the highway just east of Arthur St, Karadoc St on "Karadoc" (as is also the vacant paddock donated by the family for the Dromana Bush Nursing Hospital) and Ruddock Square on the foreshorejust east of the Pier.

WILLIAM FERRIER.
See my journal WILLIAM FERRIER: AUSTRALIA-WIDE HERO IN 1905. William sailed out to the wreck with his disabled arm strapped to the mast. Despite this error,the article does credit to the journalist.

MITCH LACCO.
I've written a journal about the Laccos. Fort Lacco married a King girl whose sister married a Greek fisherman who probably died after their son, Tony, was born. His mother, Emily, later became Mrs Durham and Tony adopted this surname. Emily later owned Fort's Rosebud Fishing Village block on the east side of Durham Place. Tony's grand daughter was Judith Mavis Cock,better known as Judith Durham of The Seekers. The Laccos are revered as builders of wooden boats and the Rosebud Chamber of Commerce has installed a wooden statue of Mitch Lacco on the Murray-Anderson Rd corner, just across that road from thesite of his boat building premises. Mitchell St may have been named after Mitch.

JOHN MCLEAR.
John McLear married Janet Cairns of Boneo and settled just east of the Dromana Hotel. With Harry Copp and Dohn Griffith,he was one of Dromana's professional fishermen. As he was about 70 at the time of this incident,and died in 1918,it was more likely his son, John (Nip), aged 32, who took part in the rescue. I quote from page 104 of A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.

John (Nip) lived out his life at his father's home.He was Ern Rudduck's right-hand man in the (Dromana) Jetty Store for forty years or more and roved to him in the local football team.... In earlier days he had fished with his father. At one stage he drove Rudduck's grocery cart around the mountain bringing supplies to customers.

As Ernie Rudduck's wife's family seems to have arrived in Dromana not long before W.W.1, the four heroes probably also ensured the lives of Ernie's three children: Rene (Mrs King)who died at Mt Martha in 1988, Grenfell, a very prominent architect honoured by a plaque near Lake Burley Griffin in Canberra, and Jack, who starred in sport and academics at Wesley College and was the school captain before becoming a pioneer of the great Australian outback. Jack was killed in 1956 while accompanying his sick youngest daughter on a Flying Doctor plane; it crashed in a violent storm and all aboard were killed.(A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.)

7 comment(s), latest 1 year, 3 months ago

WILLIAM BAYNE,PIONEER OF RED HILL SOUTH AND SHOREHAM.

1 comment(s), latest 3 years, 3 months ago

THE ORIGINAL NAME OF SEAFORD, NEAR FRANKSTON, VIC., AUST.

Mornington News 10-9-2013. "100 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK."
A meeting of the Beachdale Progress Association was held at Latimer's store etc.

Where the hell was Beachdale? Beachdale was the original name of Seaford!

Moved by Mr Hall, and seconded by Mr Erwin, " that the name of the
Association be changed from Beachdale to Seaford, which is the name of the new station." Carried.
(P.3, Mornington Standard, 8-11-1913.)

How long had residents called the area "Beachdale" and who were they? This was the article reproduced in the Mornington News,which would have been useless for family historians researching Seaford pioneers unless they knew the area's original name.

Beachdale Progress Association.
A meeting of the above association was held at Mrs Latimer's store on the 6th inst, when there was a large
attendance of members, and the following business was transacted:
Mr Martin moved that the secretary (Mr Wilson) interview Cr Ritchie, and point out that the Government reserve between the railway line and Kananook Creek may be suitable for an approach to the new railway station, from Martin's road, instead of a road to the east of the line; also to urge the opening up at once of the entrance to the station from Broughton's road. Mr McInnis seconded the motion, which was carried.
Mr Hall moved that the Hon. A. Downward. M.L A., be asked to assist in securing a school for the district. Mr McInnis seconded the motion, which was carried.

Mr Klauer moved, and Mr Martin seconded, that the secretary write to the secretary of the Carrum Downs Progress Association, requesting a delegate to attend next meeting, to confer to Abbott's road, which is a new outlet to the new station.Carried.

Mr Klauer moved, and Mr Roche seconded, that the secretary write to the proper authorities, and ask that a
quantity of scrub cut and stacked on the Government reserve, between the creek and railway line, near the new
station, be removed, as it is a harbour for fires.-Carried. Mr Wilson drew attention to what he considered a criminal neglect on the part of the authorities in allowing such a quantity of dry wood and rubbish to gather on the foreshore, between Frankston and Carrum. Should a fire start through some careless person there would be no possible chance of saving the whole of the reserve. Houses are now being erected on the opposite side of the road to the reserve, and the owners are in constant dread for fear of a fire starting in the reserve and sweeping all before it. Other members spoke, supporting Mr Wilson's contention.
Mr Wilson then moved that the Frankston Council be urged to form a deputation and wait on the proper authorities, with the view of having what is now a wilderness transformed into a beautiful seaside park of Mel-
bourne, of which thousands of city people would gladly take advantage of during the summer months. Mr M'Innes seconded the motion, which was carried.
(P.3,Mornington Standard, 13-9-1913.)

Beachdale Progress Association.
On the 2nd inst the Beachdale Progress Association again met at Mrs Latimer's store. The President, Mr.H. Broughton, occupied the chair. Mr Martin moved that the secretary write to the Frankston council and ask that their officers pay a visit of inspection to roads leading to the new station between Carrum and Frankston.-Mr McInnis seconded the motion, which was carried. The President (Mr Broughton) moved that the Railway Commissioners be asked to erect a milk dock at the new station.--Mr Martin seconded the motion, which was carried. Mr Wilson (secretary) moved that a letter of thanks from the association be forwarded to the-Hon. A. Downward, M.LA., for the great amount of work and trouble he had to secure the erection of the new station between Frankston and Carrum.-Mr McInnes seconded the motion, which was carried. Mr Wilson (secretary) moved that the Frankston Council be written to with the view of urging the Government to clear all dead timber and
rubbish from the Government Reserve, which extends along the beach between Carrum and Frankston, and thereby make it a beautiful seaside park, which would be visited by thousands from the city every summer. Also to have notices posted cautioning persons from lighting fires. The cost of clearing the dead timber would be paid for by selling the timber gathered for firewood. Also, it would give employment to numbers of persons.-Mr Klauer seconded the motion, which was carried. Mr Martin moved that the Education Department be again written to,
with the view of obtaining land for a school -Mrs Latimer seconded the motion, which was carried.
(P.3, Mornington Standard, 9-8-1913.)

No wonder the progress association was willing to change its name. Beachdale was not a traditional name for the area and was only used for about two months. It would seem that the council was allowed to choose the name of the new council and decided on the one which recalled Assistant Aboriginal Protector, William Thomas, wading waist deep across the Kannanook Creek, at the north end of Long Island, in 1839 on the way to his protectorate at Kangerong.

BEACHDALE PROGRESS ASSOCIATION.
TO THE EDITOR.
Sir,-As secretary of our newly formed Beachdale Progress Association between Frankston and Carrum I have been instructed to furnish you with a few particulars. The new railway station between Frankston and Carrum will be completed in about 6 weeks. It will be the means of opening up without exception the finest beach in the Commonwealth. The public during the summer months will find the benefit of 2 miles of beautiful shelter, the ti-tree being all Government reserve. No such advantages are to be had at other watering places. Therefore, this new station should be one of the busiest on this seaside line. I might state that a name has not yet been selected for the new station, but several names are at present being considered by the Frankston council.

A very large gathering of residents met on the 11th last at Mr Latimer's store and a progress association was quietly formed, Mr Harry Broughton being elected first President and Mr W. Wilson secretary and treasurer. The name of Beachdale was selected as the name of the progress association,pending the naming of the station. Business was gone into and the Education Department is to be urged to open a school. Aspendale, Chelsea and Carrum Progress Associations have done a great deal for those parts, and before very long our Beachdale Association should be one of power.
Yours, etc., W. WILSON, Secretary of Progress Association.

(P.2, Mornington Standard, 19-7-1913.)

The Seaford Post Office opened on 6 March 1914.[3] (Wikipedia.)

5 comment(s), latest 3 years, 4 months ago

THE EAST COAST OF PORT PHILLIP BAY, CHAPTER 4, TOOTGAROOK STATION AND THE 1859 PETITION.

We continue our journey to The Heads.

CHAPTER 4.
TOOTGAROOK STATION.
James Purves' contribution to Mornington Peninsula history.
1.He was one of the two most important horse breeders in the colony's early days, his prime interest being business activity in Melbourne and his stud near Kilmore, but the horse business was also a major focus at Tootgarook.
2.Being a successful businessman he was able to purchase in 1850, the lease of the Tootgarook Run from Edward Hobson, incorporate the Wooloowoolooboolook Run (which was probably between Boneo Rd and Truemans Rd as it fronted Capel Sound according to I SUCCEEDED ONCE) and buy the Tootgarook pre-emptive right soon after.
3. He owned the Rosebud when it was stranded in May 1855 and had it insured for 700 pounds. Edward Hobson moved to Gippsland in about 1843,managing and naming his brother Edmund's Run and naming it by the aboriginal term for river of little fish,corrupted to Traralgon. It is possible that Tootgarook was managed by the Purves brothers, mainly Peter, with James paying the occasional visit. Edward Hobson got into financial difficulties and James Purves may have bought the Run and the schooner as a favour to help him out.

Charles Hollinshed, author of LIME LAND LEISURE (history of the shire of Flinders) was an architect and devoted many pages to James Purves and Edward Latrobe Bateman who followed the same profession. I don't recall him mentioning Peter Purves.

If you enter PURVES on trove and choose the decade 1850-1859,you'll find that James Purves did indeed spend much of his time in Melbourne, much of it in the courts.

Come on itellya, how can you say that James Purves spent little time at Tootgarook? A search for PURVES,TOOTGAROOK on trove produced these results.


The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 4 July 1862 p 4 Family Notices
...ohn Corboy, hotelkeeper, of Nenega, Ireland. PURVES -QUINAN-On the 16th ult, at the residence of the brides father, Dromana, by the Rev. James Glover, of Schnapper Point, James Purves, of Tootgarook,

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Monday 11 November 1867 p 4 Family Notices
PURVES.-On the 3rd inst., at Broomielaw, Tootgarook, Mrs. James Purves of a daughter.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 13 June 1878 p 4 Article
... Purves was born in Berwick-on-Twccd, and carno out to Tasmania at tho ugo of 21. He arrived at Hobart ... \oyago occupied over a week, and the sheep were nearly famished on their ar- rival. Mr. Purves took up ... the Chintin station, at Deep Creek, and was also owner of Tootgarook station, near Dromana,

My first answer is that only the obituary concerns the architect and that it refers to Tootgarook only as an after-thought. The marriage and birth concern his nephew, the son of Peter Purves. This James Purves was born to Peter Purves and his wife Barbara(nee Scott)on 29-9-1835 in Newcastle-on-Tyne, England. A month later, Barbara died and heartbroken, Peter left the babe in the care of an aunt, and sailed to Van Diemans Land to join his brother James. Their expertise as architect and mason won them many bridge building contracts. At 18, young James had a burning desire to get to know his father and arrived at Tootgarook in 1852. Father and son had 8 years together before Peter died in 1860.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 31 March 1860 p 4 Family Notices
... daughter of Mr. Charles Cumming, farmer, Bacchus Marsh. DEATHS. On the 16th inst., at Tootgarook, Point Nepean, formerly of Berwick-on-Tweed, Mr. Peter Purves, aged 58 years, deeply regretted

If you were looking for James Purves, the architect and owner of Tootgarook,the following results for James Purves, Tootgarook, give a fair indication where to look.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 16 October 1856 p 8 Advertising
... Tom o'Lincoln. These will stand at Tootgarook, fifty miles from Melbourne, and near Arthur's Seat. _ For further particular seo Circulnrs, or in- quire of JAMES PURVES, 74 Collins-street west,

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 23 June 1863 p 8 Advertising
... tho Breodiug Establishment at Tootgarook, consisting of impoittd thoroughbred mares, colonial do, ... For further particulars apply to J. PURVES, Scott's | Hotel, Collins stroot.

The clincher,if further proof is needed that the architect spent little time at Tootgarook,cannot be found on trove but is available in Peter Wilson's ON THE ROAD TO ROSEBUD and Jennifer Nixon's FAMILY, CONNECTIONS, SORRENTO AND PORTSEA. (P.S.I have pasted a commentary about the petition at the end of the TOOTGAROOK entry.) It involves a dodgy petition opposing a plan to build a fence from White Cliff, circa 1859, to enclose the police paddock. Investigation by a government official found that many who signed the petition did not really oppose the fence, many actually wanting it. They had been persuaded to sign by James Ford and Peter Purves, who between them had something like 600 bullocks obtaining free grazing on the police paddock. It would have taken some time to get all the signatures and they don't seem to have missed anybody except James Purves, Peter's brother, the owner of Tootgarook!

The Tootgarook pre-emptive right started 833 metres west of Truemans Rd (Keith/Morris St midline), extending west to Government Rd, Rye. The southern boundary is indicated by the ends of streets heading south off Brights Drive. The architect had also purchased crown allotments 1, 2, 3 of the parish of Nepean, 174 acres between the pre-emptive right and the township of Rye (originally called Tootgarook.)

The following commentary about the 1859 petition comes from my journal about the WHITES OF SORRENTO AND RYE.
THE 1859 PETITION.
At this time, there was no township of Rye, and according to LIME LAND LEISURE, the Rye Hotel was in Dromana! When the Township was declared in 1861, it was called Tootgarook, probably because it had been part of the Tootgarook run. John Campbell apparently had built a jetty in 1860 and this probably prompted lime burners to erect houses near the pier so they would be close to home when they brought the day's production for shipping. One house, occupied by John Berry, and later by the Sullivans when they moved from the Heads in 1852, is said to have been the first house in the township area. In 1869, almost all of the suburban blocks south of the cemetery and west of Dundas St were bought by limeburners ( more truly lime merchants such as W.A Blair. It has not been definitely established whether Thomas Monahan was connected with the lime industry or just a land speculator.)
James Purves bought his square mile pre-emptive right on 22-10-1855. Ford's land was mainly near Portsea. The Wannbaeue parish map does not indicate when the Fords acquired Wannaeue Station bounded by Eastbourne Rd, Boneo Rd, an eastern extension of Hiscock Rd and Jetty/Old Cape Schank Rd. O'Shannassy reported that Purves and Ford were the only landowners.

Many of the limeburners would have been illiterate. Their names would have been printed (by Peter Purves or James Sandle Ford) and followed by "their mark", usually a cross (X). The names on the petition opposing construction of the fence were: James Ford, Peter Purves, Robert Rainey, James Patterson, George Mitchell, Robert Quinan, George White, Robert White, Richard White, Jeremiah White , James Swan,
Arthur Robinson MATCD (presumably the other Melbourne resident), Alfred Evans, Nathan Page, John Dillon, Edward Russell, Patrick Sullivan, Edward M.Williams, Richard White, George White, Isaac Prout, Owen Cain, Mrs John Devine, Ben Stennigan (Stenniken), Timothy Sullivan, Thomas Clancy, George Baker, Charles Dean, Mrs Edward Skelton, Samuel Clark, Samuel Williams, Richard Kenna (Melbourne resident!)

Snr Constable O'Shannassy was asked to ascertain why the settlers and limeburners had signed the petition. He found that Clark, Williams, Nathan Page, Mrs Skelton and Jeremiah White had not signed and weren't even asked to sign. George White senior and Robert Quinan, both limeburners, had signed, not wanting to offend their old neighbours,even though they actually wanted the fence. Thomas White and 15 other limeburners wanted the fence to prevent Ford and Purves overgrazing the area with their combined 800 head of cattle. They complained that their own bullocks (obviously used for ploughing and hauling lime)were dying from starvation.
Robert, George and Richard White, Ford, Purves, Cain, Stennigan (sic), and Patrick and Timothy Sullivan feared that their cattle would be turned out of the area.


N.B.Much genealogical information regarding Peter Purves and the descendants of his son, James, are available in Hec. Hanson's MEMOIRS OF A LARRIKIN. Send a private message if you would like this information.

THE EAST COAST OF PORT PHILLIP BAY, CHAPTER 3, DROMANA TO ROSEBUD.

We continue our journey to The Heads.

CHAPTER 3.
DROMANA.
Having just lost 150 minutes worth of text through careless clicking, I will have to abbreviate this entry. Dromana celebrated its 150th in 2011 but 18-8-2006 would seem to have been a more appropriate date. The township of Dromana was proclaimed in 1861 but many township blocks were sold on 18-8-1856. The buyers on that date included Commander Ross, William Dixon Scurfield and W.McRea*.

The township map can be accessed online:
Township of Dromana, Parish of Kangerong, County of Mornington ...
digital.slv.vic.gov.au/dtl_publish/simpleimages/9/2647775.html‎
Township of Dromana, Parish of Kangerong, County of Mornington [cartographic material] / drawn and reproduced at the Department of Lands and Survey, ...

Note the suburban blocks accessed by way of Tower Hill Rd. Captain Adams (discussed later) owned 36 acres near the summit.

The township of Dromana stretched west from McCulloch St to Burrell Rd. The section of Dromana east of McCulloch St was part of section 1,parish of Kangerong. The coastal blocks in section 1 extended south to the "main road",Palmerton Ave. William Grace, who established Gracefield in 1857, bought most of these coastal blocks, with Samuel Rudduck, Nelson's father, buying Karadoc in 1858.

Commander Ross is the subject of one of my journals. William Dixon Scurfield built Scurfield's Hotel(later the Arthurs Seat Hotel) between Permien and Foote Sts. In 1864 it was described as having 9 rooms. Dromana's other hotel, the Dromana had 12 rooms by 1864. The latter was built by Richard Watkin*** on the western half of crown allotment 5, section 1, Kangerong, the other half being owned by Peter Pidoto.

Dromana's growth was caused by timber-getting on Arthurs Seat. Peter Pidoto** carried timber (piles, beams, sleepers) around the bay on his vessels with the assistance of employees such as Robert Rowley (who will be discussed later.) When Mornington got its pier, Dromana residents (who claimed they had a bigger population)were most irate but were told that without a municipality, they would have to raise the money themselves.Robert Caldwell,(subject of one of my journals) who established "Dromana Hill" in 1859, never gave up and was eventually successful.

* W.McRea was Victoria's first chief medical officer.
Biography - William McCrea - Australian Dictionary of ...
adb.anu.edu.au/biography/mccrea-william-4072
William McCrea (1814-1899), medical administrator and naval surgeon, was born on 14 October 1814 in County Tyrone, Ireland. His father died before William

** Peter Pidoto did not ply only in the bay and was known to sail as far as Warrnambool, taking his chances with the Rip. The Phoenician probably replaced Peter's first vessel. Little Angelina most likely replaced the Phoenician;it was wrecked as the Woolamai after he had sold it. Peter's wife,living in Clifton Hill,was still rated on the 17 acres west of Carrick Drive in 1910 as well as unsold lots in Dromana's Railway Estate. Mrs Frances Pidoto of Queens Pde, Clifton Hill, was assessed in 1919 on the Railway Estate land and c/a 2,3 section 16, c/a 2 section 18 of Dromana Township; Peter had bought several township lots in 1864 and soon afterwards.

04/03/1881 Phoenician (+1881) wreck
PHOENICIAN; Ketch; Length: 16.4 m.; Owned by P. Pidoto, Dromana; Built at Benjamin Fairhall in 1852. Registered at Melbourne. Registration no. Melbourne 32/1865. On 04 March 1881, PHOENICIAN (Peter Pidoto) with a cargo of not known, was lost after capsizing. see wreck
(PHOENICIAN KETCH 1852-1881 - WRECK WRAK EPAVE WRACK PECIO www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?57256)

*** I must confess to supplying Ray Stella of the Dromana Hotel with incorrect information. The place mats that Ray had printed must now be in hundreds of homes as very few are left. What Colin McLear actually stated in A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA was that the Dromana Hotel was built in the 1850's and that Richard Watkin was credited with building the first house in Dromana, as distinct from Kangerong,in 1857. I had taken this,in my early days of research, to mean that the Dromana Hotel was built in 1857. The following article shows that Scurfield's was the first hotel in Dromana and that Richard Watkin was running it.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 21 April 1858 p 6 Article
... George Williams, Fletcher's Hotel, Haw- thorne. Granted. Richard Watkin, Scurfield Hotel, Dromana. ..

As mentioned at the start of this entry, it was Arthurs Seat and its timber that was responsible for Dromana's rapid growth. Unfortunately, only Colin McLear has written much about the timber getters and those who hauled it to vessels. He hints that many of these men were Irish, accounting for the township's name. John Bryan lived in a hut just east of Gracefield near the summit and the track through the town common was called Bryan's Cutting.(See Melbourne Brindle's map.) He was known to have been in the area by 1860 because when Mary Ann McLear moved into Maryfield in that year, Bryan moved into The Willow (on the Survey just west of the drive-in site.) He later moved closer to his work. John Bryan cut piles, slabs,sleepers,beams and firewood.

No saw mills have been mentioned before Alexander Shand's at Main Ridge, decades later, so those early timber- getters used the splitting wedge, pit saw and perhaps the adze to square their timbers, just as Henry Tuck had done for the Arthurs Seat homestead in about 1843. Thomas and Charles Rymer,recalled by a Safety Beach street name,were probably involved in the early timber-getting but mainly worked at building fences, such as at Maryfield for Charles Graves before the McLears bought it and Arthurs Seat Park in the 1870's. Jonah (Doan) Griffith, Charles Brown,Thomas Tyler (perhaps an ancestor of Rye's Vic Tyler)and Jose Reman were other involved in supplying timber, some also supplying wattle bark for tanning leather.

George McLear, Henry William Wilson and Charles Dyson were three bullockies known to be operating by 1864. McLear and his brothers were Dromana's first butchers until they gave it away and were replaced by Wilson, whose son Godfrey hugely expanded the business. Their work was not easy either. Tracks to the coast through the forest would have had to be blazed and you can't drive a dray over stumps.Loading was another problem with no pier available. I quote from page 89 of A DREAMTIME OF DROMANA.

PETER PIDOTA. (This is how the surname appeared in rate books from 1864 until 1919, so we can hardly blame Colin! I didn't twig until I failed to find mention of Pidota in trove.)
Peter seems to have had a thriving water transport business operating from the Dromana beach,his craft carrying the varied forest products to Melbourne and other shores of the bay. These craft, of very shallow draught, came almost to the shoreline for loading. Bullock teams waded out to them to effect the transfer of fire-wood,post,rails, shingles, slabs, sleepers, piles and wattle bark. On October 16,1864, George McLear supplied Peter with 94 feet of blackwood,the timber so prized for the manufacture of fine furniture.


While looking for Captain Adams' advertisement re his 36 acres fronting Arthurs Seat Rd near the summit, I discovered another Captain who carried Arthurs Seat firewood from Dromana to Melbourne. It seems that his ship suffered the same fate as Captain Billy Moore's vessel, co-owned by William Henry Blakeley of Red Hill, but with no survivors.

Three weeks or a month ago, a small schooner, the Cousins, Captain Irving, left Dromana with a cargo of firewood for Melbourne, two young lads being on board with him. The trip should have been made in one or two days, but nothing has been seen or heard of schooner, captain, or boys since. Captain Irving was one of the oldest and most experienced captains in the port. He leaves behind him a widow in distressed circumstances and two young children. An appeal has been made to the public in this case, and has met with some response.
(P.1s, Argus, 18-8-1873.)

ARTHURS SEAT RUN.
This run was taken up by Andrew McCrae in 1843 and was taken over by the Burrells who purchased the pre-emptive Right in 1851. The following description of the boundaries was given when McCrae renewed his lease.

On the north by Mr Jamiesons special survey 4 miles, on the west by
the coast line of the bay to the nose of the mountain called St Anthonys
Nose, from thence along the Cape Schanck road to the Drumdunnuallock
creek being the boundary line with Mr Barker, and on the south by
the creek to its source, thence by a line bearing east to a point where
the continuation of the eastern boundary of the said special survey
meets the said line, the large waterhole below the bald hill being in
common with the Mt Martha run; also that piece of land between the
Cape Schanck road and the sea, commencing near the rocks or the Point
known as St Anthonys Nose, and ending at the creek* at the junction of
the Point Nepean and Cape Schanck roads, nearly opposite the end of
the paddock fence. (Pages 311-312, I SUCCEEDED ONCE.)

*Adams Creek which approached the bay shore where The Avenue is today.

If you can make sense of the above, you've left me for dead. Determining the southern and eastern boundaries rely on the "source of the Drum Drum Alloc Creek". I believe that the creek which flows over Kings Falls has been confused with the Drum Drum Alloc. This creek starts in "Sea Winds" and the line east from the "source" may have been approximately Arthurs Seat Rd which met a "continuation of the Eastern boundary of the Survey "(Bulldog Creek Rd.) This continuation today is Junction Rd and the n-s part of Red Hill Rd. The line east from the source and the continuation south of the Survey's eastern boundary later were used as the boundaries between the parishes of Kangerong and Balnarring, the latter separating the central and East Ridings of the Shire.

No wonder there were so many disputes about Run boundaries!

CAPTAIN HENRY EVEREST ADAMS.
The time of the old sea-dog's arrival is shrouded in mystery as is the "Village of Wannaeue" which was mentioned once, in 1877. Adams folklore maintains that he was granted 750 acres FOR CARRYING CONVICTS*, which he clearly wasn't but as he came into ownership of the majority of Crown Allotment 20, Wannaeue, this may have been some sort of pre-emptive right. An Adams family historian maintains that he must have arrived after the Burrells bought the Arthurs Seat pre-emptive right in 1851 but the Run description above does not seem to include 20 Waanaeue. The Captain was supposed to have beached his ship in 1841 or thereabouts and used its timbers to build his house (on the McCrae car wash site.) Today's Wattle Place became known to all as Adams' Corner.
*Ticket of leave men were brought from Van Diemans Land in about 1841 to solve a severe labour shortage.

The strange thing was that the house that Captain Adams built was on crown allotment 20 of the parish of Wannaeue, which must have been reserved in early days as the site for a village. It was between The Avenue and the line of Parkmore Rd. Yet it was not crown allotment 20 land on which he was assessed in the first Kangerong Roads Board assessment of 1864. He was the owner of 191 acres, which was crown allotment 19, between Parkmore Rd and Adams Avenue, the next block west. This was granted to Issac White who was involved in an indenture with Captain Adams regarding a property at Port Melbourne. (Document in the possession of Harvey Marshall, an Adams descendant.) The captain also owned 36 acres in the Township of Dromana (Melway 159 E-F11)fronting Arthurs Seat Rd, McLear Rd and Arthurs Seat Park and, for a shorter time, 56 acres in the parish of Nepean bounded by Diamond Bay Rd, Melbourne Rd, the ends of Tullyvallin Cres/ Hartley Crt, and the coastal reserve.

The 1877 advertisement (in italics below) seems to indicate that Captain Adams had settled on the peninsula in 1857 but it is possible that Isaac White, grantee of crown allotment 19, Wannaeue, had settled there in about 1850 to look after Eliza while Captain Adams traded to places such as Singapore where they couldn't get enough of his potent Vivyan Vineyard wine, which Robert Rowley Senior said would have you climbing telegraph poles after a glass or two. Eliza would not have been the only wife waiting for her seafaring husband to come home; Mrs Newby, housekeeper for Jamieson on his special survey, waited many times,but in 1845 accompanied her husband and three of her daughters perished. (See article under the SAFETY BEACH heading.)

IN the SUPREME COURT of the COLONY of VICTORIA : In its Probate Jurisdiction.-In the Will of JOHN COCKBILL, late of Little Bourke-street West, in the City of Melbourne, in the Colony of Victoria, Publican, Deceased.-Notice is hereby given,that, after the expiration of fourteen days from the publication of this notice, application will be made to this honourable Court, in its Probate Jurisdiction,that PROBATE of the LAST WILL and TESTAMENT of the said John Cockbill, deceased, may be granted to Henry Everist Adams, of Vivyan Vine-
yard, near Dromana, in the said colony, the sole executor named in and appointed by the said will.
Dated this twentieth day of March, 1873.WILLIAM HUGHES, 13 Bourke-street west, Melbourne, proctor for the said Henry Everist Adams. (P.7, Argus,21-3-1673.)

THIS DAY.
At Twelve O'Clock Noon At the Rooms, Corner of Swanston and Little Collins Streets.
VALUABLE COUNTRY PROPERTIES.
PARISH of WANNAEUE,
Near Dromana, Close to Arthur's Seat, on the Main Road to Sorrento, Farm, of 191 Acres, with Weatherboard House. Also,
PARISH of KANGERONG,
Adjoining Dromana park, and Close to tho Residence of Professor Hearn,
TWO GOVERNMENT ALLOTMENTS, Containing in All 36 Acres.
To Parties Requiring a Delightful Marine Residence, Squatters, Merchants, Capitalists, and Others.
BYRNE, VALE, and Co have received instructions from Captain Adams (who is retiring after a residence in the district of 20 years) to SELL by AUCTION, at their rooms, on Tuesday, March 20, at twelve o'clock noon,
The following valuable properties :
WANNAEUE, Near Dromana.
That valuable farm containing 191 acres, being Government lot No 19, subdivided into seven paddocks, partly laid down in English grasses, substantially fenced with post, rail, and wire, and having a bay frontage of nearly half a mile ; orchard, garden, and vineyard containing 2000 vines all in full bearing, with a comfortable weatherboard house containing 10 rooms, out-houses, &c.; brick tank holding 4000 gallons.
Crops to be removed or taken at a valuation. The auctioneers beg to call attention to tho above property, the land being good for cultivation, well timbered, and permanent water. Inspection invited.
Also,
KANGERONG, Adjoining Dromana-park.
Two Government allotments, being Allotment 5 of Section D and Allotment 6 of Section D, containing in all 36 acres, close to tho resldence of Professor Hearn.
Title, Crown grants.
(P.2, Argus, 20-3-1877.)

The 36 acres eventually passed into the ownership of Dromana's Nelson Rudduck but in 1879 Henry Everest Adams was assessed on both properties (as well as 61 acres in crown allotment 20, while his son, Robert, was assessed on 20 acres and a house*.)
* Crown allotment 20 had been alienated a year or so earlier, with the Adams family acquiring most of the land west of Wattle Rd. Robert had probably persuaded his father to leave the house as Robert's wife refused to live with the hard-drinking former mariner. Henry moved to live with his friends, the Mullens of South Melbourne.

NOTICE is hereby given, that after the expiration of fourteen days from the publication of this notice application will be made to the Supreme Court of the Colony of Victoria, in its Probate jurisdiction,
that PROBATE of the LAST WILL and TESTAMENT of HENRY EVEREST ADAMS, late of Vivyan Vineyard, near Dromana, in the colony of Victoria, land-owner, deceased, be granted to Eliza Adams,of Vivyan Vineyard, near Dromana aforesaid, the widow of the said deceased, and sole executrix named in and appointed by the sold will.
Dated this 7th day of November, 1881.HUGHES and MICHIE. 53 William-street, Melbourne, proctors for the said Eliza Adams. (P.3, Argus, 7-11-1881.)


FOR SALE CHEAP 191 ACRES of LAND,
Wannaeue, near Dromana, all fenced, divided into six paddocks, good grass and permanent water, beach frontage 600 fruit trees, 2000 vines, all bearing. 10 roomed house, brick,* tank, stables, &c. Sold in consequence of death of Mr Adams. No reasonable offer refused. Apply Mrs. E ADAMS, Wannaeue, near Dromana.
(The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Tuesday 13 December 1881 p 12 )

The 191 acre block did not sell and passed into the ownership of the captain's son, Robert Adams, who sold it to a land developer circa 1889. The land bisected by Rosemore Rd was subdivided but the developer soon became insolvent,the land south of South Rd, and unsold blocks, reverting to Adams. Parkmore was built in about 1896 by Albert Holloway.

Much more information is available about the captain and his descendants. In 1860,it is probable that along the coast from Anthony's Nose to TOOTGAROOK STATION, the only houses were (today's)McCrae's Cottage, a four roomed house and workmen's huts on crown allotment 17* (bounded by the beach road, Jetty Rd, Eastbourne Rd and the linr of Norm Clark Walk)and perhaps huts on the foreshore erected by crewmen of The Rosebud who may have decided to use a boat from the stranded vessel in May 1855 to try their luck as fishermen.

*The advertisement doesn't say crown allotment 17 but I'll bet you any money that it is!

TUESDAY, 10th MARCH~
Parish of Wannaeue, Arthur's Seat.129 Acres.
Four-roomed Cottage, Men's Huts,fronting Hobson's Bay, and within Thirty Miles from Melbourne by Water, and Forty-five Miles by Road.H.A. COFFEY, for F. E. Beaver and Co., is instructed to sell by auction, at
their rooms, 30 Collins-street west, on Tuesday, 1oth inst., at eleven o'clock, 129 acres superior agricultural land, having a large frontage to Hobson's Bay, and described in the Government plan as having water at a short distance from tho surface ; together with a neat cottage containing four rooms and a garden ; fruit trees, fenced in. From the great rise in tho value of property in this locality, tho healthful air and the beautiful
scenery, there can be no doubt but that this opportunity offers a fair chance for profitable investment to
the small capitalist, or would be admirably adapted for a marine residence.
The water is sufficiently deep in shore to admit the landing of provisions and goods close to the frontage.
(P.2, Argus, 5-3-1857.)

In ROSEBUD:FLOWER OF THE PENINSULA, Isabelle Moresby mentioned Maori fishermen living at Rosebud and I thought she was mistaken,thinking of the Maori Farm at Rye. However, a year or so past, I found that she was right. Although this incident happened quite a while after 1850, I will include it here in case I never find the article again.

INQUESTS.
Mr. Candler held an inquest on Wednesday, at Tootgarook, on the body of Patrick Wee Wee, a Maori fisherman, living at Rosebud, aged 30 years. On the 27th inst., Senior-constable Lyons was directed to the body of
deceased on the beach, between Rye and Dromana, it having been taken thereby two young men who saw it in the water. There were no marks of violence, and from the froth and blood coming from deceased's nose he appeared to have been drowned. On Sunday evening, the 20th inst., deceased was heard to agree with four young men sup-
posed to be Richard Knott, Richard Barry, Richard Abbott, and Richard Betwright, stonemasons, employed by Mr. Muir, contractor, at the Quarantine, to convey them in his boat to the Quarantine-ground. All the young men were sober, but the deceased was not quite sober. Shortly afterwards the five left, and were never seen on shore again. About 10 minutes after they were last seen on shore, a gust of wind suddenly sprung up from
the westward, the weather having been quite calm previously. Deceased could manage a boat well and was a good swimmer. On the afternoon of the 20th, Christian Miller, a seaman who was on board the fore-and-aft schooner Result, anchored off the pier at Tootgarook, heard a voice calling, and about 150 yards to the westward saw a man whether white or coloured he could not tell, clinging on a boat which was upset and drifting towards Rosebud. Miller was attending to the schooner, there being a heavy squall, and could give no assistance, and the boat and man drifted out of sight. The schooner was about half a mile from the pier, and the storm had risen very suddenly. The deceased's boat had never turned up, but the oars had been washed ashore, and the four young men had never since been heard of. The jury stated that deceased was found drowned, and that they believed he was accidentally drowned during a squall while conveying passengers to the Quarantine-ground on Sunday, the 20th inst. (P.5, Argus, 31-12-1869.)

Richard Barry's body was later found and an inquest was held.

Mr. Candler held an inquest on the 6th inst. at Tootgarook, on the body of Richard Barry, aged 18 years. Deceased was a mason, employed at works on the Quarantine-ground, and on the 20th ult. he was last seen arranging with a Maori to sail across to the Quarantine. The boat went, and deceased and three others who went in her were never seen again, a storm having sprung up. The Maori's body was washed up shortly afterwards. The body of deceased was discovered on the 3rd inst., much bitten about the face, hands, and left thigh by fishes, but deceased was identified by his clothes. It was found about a mile from Rye, on the beach. A verdict of accidentally drowned was returned. (P.6, Argus, 11-1-1870.)