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Religious Smokers

At one period of its history smoking was so common that it
was actually practised in church.
Previous to the visit of James I. to the University of
Cambridge, in 1615, the Vice Chancellor issued a notice
to the students, which enjoined that "No graduate, scholer, or
student of this universitie presume to take tobacco in
Saint Maries Church, upon payne of finall expellinge the universitie."
The Rev. Dr. Parr, when perpetual curate of Hatton, Warwickshire,
which living he held from 1783 to 1790, regularly smoked in the
vestry while the congregation were singing long hymns, chosen for
the purpose, immediately before the sermon. The doctor was wont to
exclaim : " My people like long hymns, but I prefer a long pipe."
The Rev. Robert Hall, of Leicester, the well known Baptist minister,
regularly indulged in smoking during the intervals of Divine worship.
Sir Walter Scott, in his " Heart of Midlothian," refers to one
Duncan, of Knockdunder, an important personage, who smoked during the
whole of the sermon, from an iron pipe, tobacco borrowed from other
worshippers. We are told that, "at tbe end of the discourse he knocked
the ashes out of his pipe, replaced it in his sporran, returned the
tobacco pouch to its owner, and joined in the prayer with decency and
attention."
The Puritan Fathers, who settled in America, were greatly addicted
to smoking, indeed, the practice became so common that even these
strait-laced observers of time and seasons actually smoked in church.
The custom soon caused very considerable annoyance, as the religious
exercises were greatly disturbed by the clinking of steels and flints
and the clouds of the smoke in church.
Hence, in the year 1669, the colony passed this law :
"It is enacted that any person or persons that shall be
found smoking of tobacco on the Lord's Day, going to or
coming from the meetings, within two miles of the meeting
house, shall pay twelve pence for every such default."
Under this law several persons were actually fined, but
the punishment failed to secure the carrying out of the
arbitrary second portion of the enactment.
The custom of smoking during church service was not confined
to the laity and minor clergy, for it is recorded that an
Archbishop of York was once reproved by the Vicar of St.
Mary's, Nottingham, for attempting to smoke in the church vestry.
The Rev. John Disney, of Swinderly, in Lincolnshire, writing on the
13th of December, 1773, to James Grainger, says :
"The affair happened in St. Mary's Church,
Nottingham, when Archbishop Blackburn was
there on a visitation. The archbishop had ordered
some of the apparitors or other attendants to
bring him pipes and tobacco and some liquor
into the vestry for his refreshment after the
fatigue of confirmation. And this coming to
Mr. Disney's ears, he forbade their being
brought thither, and with a becoming spirit
remonstrated with the archbishop upon the
impropriety of his conduct, at the same time
telling his Grace that his vestry should not be
converted into a smoking-room

SOURCE
Dungog Chronicle
Friday 4 November 1898
Bowral Free Press
The Gundagai Independent


The Sale of Wives In England.


1 comment(s), latest 3 years, 7 months ago

Volunteering can be rewarding


3 comment(s), latest 1 year, 6 months ago

Itellya's Watson's of Sorrento and Portsea.


2 comment(s), latest 3 years, 3 months ago

Australians as America saw us in 1942

Nothing like coming here prepared!

AUSTRALIANS AS AMERICANS SEE THEM
"An Outdoors People;Breezy, Democratic"
WASHINGTON, Sunday, 25 October 1942 AAP


["You will find Australians an outdoors people, breezy, very democratic, with no respect for stuffed shirts their own or anyone else's," says a pocket guide on Australia which is being distributed among American troops.

Issued by US War and Navy departments, the booklet states that Australians have much in common with Americans. They are a pioneer people, they believe in personal freedom, and they love sports.

"There is one thing to get straight right off the bat," the booklet says. "You are not in Australia to save a helpless people from the savage Japanese. Recently in a Sydney bar an American soldier turned to an Australian and said, 'Well, Aussie, you can go home now. We've come over to save you.' The Aussie cracked back, 'Have you? I thought you were a refugee from Pearl Harbour.'
Being simple, direct and tough, the Digger is often confused and nonplussed by the manners of Americans' in mixed company; or even in camp. To him those many 'Thank you's" Americans use are a bit too dignifled.

You might get annoyed, at the blue laws which make Australian cities pretty dull places on Sundays.
For all their breezieness Australians do not go in for drinking or woopitching in public, especially on Sunday.

In Australia, the national game is cricket, but they, have another game called Australian rules football.
It is rough, tough, and exciting. There are a lot of rules, which the referee carries in a rule book the size of Webster's dictionary. The game creates the desire on the part of the crowd to tear someone apart. The referees in some parks have runways covered over so that they can escape intact after a game.

As one newspaper correspondent says, Americans and Australians are 2 of the greatest gambling people on earth. It has been said of Australians that if a couple in a bar have not anything else to bet on they will lay odds on which of 2 flies rise first from the bar.
Aussies do not fight out of textbooks. They are resourceful, inventive soldiers with plenty of intiative.
The Australian habit of pronouncing "a" as "I" is pointed out, and an example quoted: "The trine is lite to-di." The booklet includes "Waltzing Matilda" in full."]

I don't know about the too many thank-yous. It would seem that the Australian girls liked it, for 10,000 Aussie brides returned to America with these well heeled, well mannered and certainly well informed troops.


1 comment(s), latest 4 years, 8 months ago

INSTRUCTIVE CODE ...

FOR MARRIED LADIES.


1. Let every wife be persuaded that there are two ways of governing a family; the first is by the expression of that will which belongs to force; the second by the power of mildness, to which even strength will yield. One is the power of the husband; a wife should never employ any other arms than gentleness. When a woman accustoms herself to say I will, she deserves to lose her empire.

2. Avoid contradicting your husband. When we smell at a rose, it is to imbibe the sweetness of its odour: we likewise look for every thing that is amiable from women. Whoever is often contradicted feels insensibly an aversion for the person who contradicts, which gains strength by time, and, whatever be her good
qualities, is not easily destroyed.

3.Occupy yourself only with household affairs. Wait till your husband confides to you affairs of higher importance, and do not give your advice till he asks it.
'
4.Never take upon, yourself to be a censor of your husband's morals, and do not read lectures to him. Let your preaching be a good example, and practice virtue yourself to make him in love with it.

5.Command his attentions by being always attentive to him; never exact any thing,
and you will obtain much; appear always flattered by the little he does for you,
which will excite him to perform more.

6.All men are vain ; never wound his vanity, not even in the most trifling instances.
A wife may have more sense than her husband, but she' should never seem to know it.

7.When a man gives wrong counsel, never make him feel that, he has done so, but lead him on by degrees to what is rational, with mildness and gentleness; when he is convinced,
leave him all the merit of having found out what was just and reasonable.

8.When a husband is out of temper, behave obligingly to him; if he is abusive, never retort;
and never prevail over him to humble him.

9.Choose well your female friends: have but few, and be careful of following their advice in all matters.

10. Cherish neatness without luxury, and pleasure without excess; dress with taste,
and particularly with modesty; vary the fashions of your dress, especially in regard to colours.
It gives a change to the ideas, and recalls pleasing recollections. Such things may appear trifling, but they are of more importance than is imagined.

11.Never be, - curious to pry into your husband's concerns, but obtain his confidence
by that which, at all times, you repose in him. Always preserve order and economy;
avoid being out of temper, and be careful never to scold.
By these means he will find his own house more pleasant than any other.

12. Seem always to obtain information from him, especially before company,
though you may pass yourself for a simpleton. Never forget that a wife owes all her importance
to that of her husband; Leave him entirely master of his actions, to go or come whenever he thinks fit.
A wife ought to make her company so amiable to her husband that he could not exist without it;
then he will not seek for any pleasure abroad if she does not partake of it with him.


transcribed from The Australian (Sydney, NSW : 1824 - 1848) issue Friday 1 August 1828, by janilye on the 29 January 2012

Below;
Still happily living by the code in 1900 in Dungog, New South Wales just as her mother and grandmother did.


9 comment(s), latest 4 years, 10 months ago

All the kings and Queens since William 1st

Horrible Histories has found an easy way to remember all the Kings and Queens of England, just click on This song it's so much more fun!

Here are the lyrics:-
I'm William the Conqueror
My enemies stood no chance
They call me the first English king
Although I come from France

1066, the Domesday book
I gave to history
So fat, on death my body burst
But enough about me

To help remember all your kings
I've come up with this song
A simple rhyme and ditty
For you all to sing along!

Oh! William!
(Bit short, init? We need more kings. Who came next?)

William second, cheeks were red
Killed out hunting, so it's said
I took over, Henry one
That's my next eldest son

Then King Stephen, it's true, check it!
Hi, Henry two, killed Thomas Beckett
Richard Lionheart? That's right!
Always spoiling for a fight

Oh, King John! What a disaster!
Rule restrained by Magna Carta!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Time for my mate, King Henry eight
To take up this song

Henry three built the abbey
Ed one hated Scots
A red hot poker killed Ed two
That must have hurt him lots!

Edward third was a chivalry nerd
Began the hundred years war
Then Richard two was king, aged ten
Then Henry, yes one more!

King Henry four, plots galore
Not least from Henry five, moi
I killed ten score at Agincourt
Then Henry six arrived!

Edward four, Edward five
Richard the third, he's bad
'Cause he fought wars with Henry seventh
First Tudor and my dad

So Henry eight, I was great
Six wives, two were beheaded
Edward the sixth came next, but he died young
And so my dreaded
Daughter Mary ruled, so scary
Then along came... me!
I'm Liz the first, I had no kids
So Tudors RIP!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen Liz
That's me! Time for more men!

James six of Scotland next
Is English James the first, he led
Then Stuarts ruled, so Charles the first
The one who lost his head

No monarchy until came me,
Charles two, I liked to party
King Jimmy two was scary, oooh!
Then Mary was a smarty

She ruled with Will, their shoes were filled
By sourpuss Queen Anne Gloria
And so from then, you were ruled by men
Till along came Queen Victoria!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen liz
Jimmy, Charles and Charles and then
Jim, Will, Mary, Anne Gloria
Still to come, it's Queen Victoria!

And so began the Hanover gang
George one and George two... grim!
Then George the third was quite absurd
Till I replaced old him

King George the fourth and known henceforth
As angry, fat and cross... hang on!
It's true you beat Napoleon
But were mostly a dead loss... bang on!

Old William four was a sailor... ahoy!
That's nearly the end of the storya
As onto the scene comes the best loved queen
Hail to Queen Victoria!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen Liz
Jimmy, Charles and Charles and then
Jim, Will, Mary, Anne Gloria
George, George, George, George
Will, Victoria!
Victoria!

(I ruled for sixty four years, you know!)

Ed seven, George five
Then Ed, George sixth
Liz two then reigned and how!
And so our famous monarch song
Is brought right up to now! Oh!

William, William, Henry, Stephen
Henry, Richard, John, oi!
Henry, Ed, Ed, Ed, Rich two
Then three more Henrys join our song!
Edward, Edward, Rich the third
Henry, Henry, Ed again
Mary one, good Queen Liz
Jimmy, Charles and Charles and then
Jim, Will, Mary, Anne Gloria
George, George, George, George
Will, Victoria!
Edward, George, Edward, George six
And Queen Liz two completes the mix!

That's all the English kings and queens
Since William first that there have been!




1066 King William the Conqueror 1066-1087

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1087 King William Rufus (son of William) 1087-1100

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1100 King Henry I (William Rufus brother) 1100-1135

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1135 King Stephen (nephew of Henry I) 1135-1154

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1154 King Henry II (grandson of Henry I) 1154-1189

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1189 King Richard I (third son of Henry II) 1189-1199

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1199 King John (fifth son of Henry II) 1199-1216

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1216 King Henry III (son of John) 1216-1272

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1272 King Edward I (son of Henry III) 1272-1307

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1307 King Edward II (son of Edward I) 1307-1327

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1327 King Edward III (son of Edward II) 1327-1377

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1377 King Richard II (grandson of Edward III, son of the Black Prince) 1377-1399

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1399 King Henry IV (grandson of Edward III, son of John of Gaunt) 1399-1413

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1413 King Henry V (son of Henry IV) 1413-1422

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1422 King Henry VI (son of Henry V) 1422-1461

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1461 King Edward IV ( youngest son of Edward III ) 1461-1483

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1483 King Richard III (uncle of Edward V) 1483-1485

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1485 Henry VII (grandson of Henry V) 1485-1509

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1509 Henry VIII ( son of Henry VII)
1509-1547

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1547 Edward V (Henry's son by Jane Seymour) 1547-1553

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1553 Mary (Henry's daughter by Queen Katherine of Aragon) 1553-1558

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1558 Elizabeth I (Henry's daughter by Anne Boleyn) 1558-1603

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1603 James I (great-great-grandson of Henry VII) 1603-1625

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1625 Charles I (second son of James) 1625-1649

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1649 The Commonwealth under the Cromwell rule 1649 - 1659

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1660 Charles II (oldest son of Charles I) 1660-1685

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1685 James II (brother of Charles II) 1685-1688

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1689 William of Orange (grandson of Charles I) and Mary (daughter of James II) 1689-1694

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1694 William III - Ruled alone after death of Mary 1694 - 1702

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1702 Anne (sister of Mary)
1702-1714

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1714 George I (great-grandson of James I) 1714-1727

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1727 George II (son of George I) 1727-1760

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1760 George III (grandson of George II) 1760-1820

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1820 George IV (son of George III)
1820-1830

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1830 William IV (brother of George IV)
1830-1837

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1837 Victoria (niece of William IV) 1837-1901

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1901 Edward VII (son of Victoria and Albert) 1901-1910

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1910 George V (second son of Edward VII) 1910-1936

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1936 Edward VIII (son of George V)

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1936 George VI (second son of George V) 1936-1952

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1952 Elizabeth II (daughter of George VI)




I love Horrible Histories