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NEW SOUTH WALES. AUCTIONEERS' LICENSES 1857

The following is a list of the persons to whom auctioneers' licenses have been granted
for the year 1857:
Charles Adrain,
Edward Agnew,
Joel H. Asher,
Thomas W. Bowden,
Frederick Bradley,
William G. Burgis,
Ewen W. Wallace,
Henry D. Cockburn.
John G. Cohen,
Richard Cowan,
William E. Day,
William Dean,
Octavius B. Ebsworth,
Charles Frith,
James Gannon.
Herbert Gibson,
James Gordon,
Henry A. Graves.
Francis Grose,
David B. Hughes,
John Isaacs.
George Kent,
William G. Lambert.
Thomas Lister,
Charles Martyn,
John H. Miller,
John C. Molloy,
Alexander Moore,
Robert Muriel,
William Newell,
Samuel Payten,
James Pearson,
John Purkis,
Francis E. Rishworth,
Edward Salomon,
Alfred Schröder,
Charles Teakle,
Launcelot E. Threlkeld,
John G. Valentine,
Samuel J. Wooller,

Source:
Empire (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875)
Friday 28 November 1856
Page 6
Transcription, janilye 2013


MAIL CONTRACTS New South Wales 1861

Particulars for the contracts entered into for the conveyance of Post Office Mails, from 1st January 1861.
The + symbol signifies Per Week.

WESTERN ROADS.
John Hilt, Parramatta, Baulkham Hills, Rouse Hill, and Windsor, six days per week, for £200.
James Connolly, Windsor, Pitt Town, Wiseman's Ferry, and St. Alban's, two days, +£90.
Edward Croft, Wiseman's Ferry, and Mangrove Creek, one day, + £16.
Thomas Crisford, Windsor and Richmond, six days, + for £55.
Charles Bowen, Windsor, Wilberforce, Sackville Reach, and Portland Head, via Ebenezer, three days, + for £70.
Thomas Crisford, Richmond, North Richmond, and Wheeny Creek (Lamrock's Inn), three days, + for £35.
H. J. Kirwan, Sackville Reach and Lower Portland,three days, + for £30.
Edward Crisford, Richmond and Camden, via Castlereagh, Penrith, Mulgoa, and Greendale, three days, + for £198.
William Crane and J. J. Roberts, Parramatta Railway Terminus, and Post Office and Penrith, twice a day; Penrith, Hartley, and Bathurst, six days; Bathurst and Sofala, three days; Hartley and Mudgee, six days; with branch Post from Kean's Swamp to Rylstone, three days, and Bathurst, Guyong, and Orange, six days, for £3250.
John Beard, Sofala and Tambaroora, one day, + for £190.
James Falconer, Mudgee, Cobbora, and Mundooran, one day, + for £175.
Edward Duckett, Mundooran and Coonamble, one day, + for £200.
David McCullough, Coonamble and Merri Merri by Bimbleyom, Bundy, Ningey, and Coanbone, one day, + for £99.
George O'Shea, Mudgee, Merrindee, and Wellington, one day, + for £180.
Edwin J. Greenwood, Mudgee and Cassilis, one day,+ for £200.
John Smith, Mudgee and Long Creek via Avisford, Grattai, Louisa Creek, Windeyer, and Campbell's Creek, two days, + for £275.
Hugh Wright, Orange and Wellington via Stoney Creek, Ironbarks, Moombla Hill, and Black Rock, three days, +for £795.
Edward Nicholls, Orange and Molong, three days, +for £285.
Thomas O'Brien, Molong and Black Rock, three days, + for £200.
Joseph Morris, Molong and South Wangan, one day, + for £115.
John Gardner, Molong and Obley, one day, + for £49.
D. L. Dalziell, Obley und Algullah, one day, + for £100.
Alexander White, Wellington and Dubbo, two days, + for £150.
James McCubbin, Dubbo and Cobbora, one day, + for £99.
Edward Duckett, Dubbo, Drungalee and Cannonbah, one day, + for £200.
John Minehan, Bathurst and Carcoar, three days, + for £348.
Thomas Walsh, Carcoar and Canowindra via Cliefden and Cowra, three days, + for £420.
Thomas Walsh, Cowra, South Wangan, Bundaburra, and Condobolin, one day, + for £360.
Thomas Grace, Condobolin and Lang's Crossing-place, one day, + for £560.
James James, Bathurst, Lagoons, and Rockley, two days; Rockley and Tuena, one day; Rockley and Swatchfield, one day ; Bathurst, Caloola, and Long Swamp, one day; Bathurst and O'Connell, two days; and O'Connell and Fish River Creek, via Mutton's Falls, one day, + for £400.

SOUTHERN ROADS.
William Crane and J. J. Roberts, Railway Terminus and Post Office, Campbelltown and Camden, via Narellan and Campbelltown and Goulburn, six days, + for £825.
W. B. Campbell, Campbelltown, Riversford, Douglass Park, and Picton, six days, + for £150.
Philip Reily, Camden and Oaks, via Brownlow Hill, and Lowe's Hill, six days; and Oaks and Burrogorang, three days, + for £145.
John Wallace, Berrima and Sutton Forest, six days, + for £70.
Charles Loseby, Berrima and Bong Bong, six days, + for £40.
James Waterworth, Bungonia and Marulan, three days, + for £50.
James Woods, Campbelltown, Appin, Woonona, Wollongong, and Dapto, six days, + for £600.
Edward Graham, Dapto and Shellharbour, two days, + for £30.
Joseph Howard, Dapto, Jamberoo, Kiama, Geringong and Shoalhaven, six days, £500.
Christopher and William Murray, Shoalhaven, Sassafras, Nerriga, and Braidwood, one day, + for £230.
William Murray, Shoalhaven and Nowra, via Greenhills, three days, + £25.
John Allen, Shoalhaven, Nowra, and Ulladulla, via Greenhills, two days, + for £133 6s. 8d.
Philip Murray, Shoalhaven, Nowra, and Ulladulla, via Greenhills, one day, + for £66 13s. 4d.
Alfred Moult, Ulladulla and Bateman's Bay, two days, + for £120.
Mary Coffee, Bateman's Bay and Moruya, two days, + for £68.
Thomas Moran, Goulburn and Braidwood, via Boro, six days; Boro, Bungendore, and Queanbeyan, six
days; and Queanbeyan and Cooma, six days, + for £900.
David Wilson, Braidwood and Major's Creek, via Bell's Creek and Bell's Paddock, three days, + for
£120.
David Wilson, Braidwood and Little or Mongarlowe River, two days, +for £75.
Thomas Moran, Bungendore and Molonglo, three days, + for £84.
Thomas McGee, Nelligen (Clyde River), and Braid- wood, two days, + for £250.
John Doughty, Major's Creek, Oranmore and Stoney Creek, via Ballalaba, two days, + for £58.
P. Heffernan, Braidwood, Araluen, Mullenderree, and Moruya, via Reidsdale, two days, + for £225.
C. J. McGregor, Moruya, Bodalla, Bega, Merimbula, and Pambula, one day, + for £160.
John Otton, jun., Moruya, Bodalla, Bega, Merimbula, and Pambula, one day, + for £180.
J. J. Roberts, Goulburn, Collector, Gundaroo, Gin- ninderra, and Queanbeyan, two days, + for £220.
Thomas Moran, Queanbeyan and Lanyon, two days, + for £68 12s.
Thomas Moran, Cooma, Adaminiby, Russell's and Kiandra, one day, + for £228 11s. 6d.
J. J. Roberts, Cooma, Adaminiby, Russell's and Kiandra, two days, + for £600.
William McGregor, Adaminiby and Cathcart, one day, + for £300.
William Roohan, Cooma and Buckley's Crossing Place, via Woolway and Jejizrick, one day, + for £138.
David Delves, Cooma and Bombala, two days, + for £350.
Edward Jones, Bombala and Delegate, two days, + for £110.
Charles Robertson, Bombala, Cathcart, Pambula, and Eden, via Big Jack's, one day, + for £210.
Charles Robertson, Pambula and Eden, two days, + for £55.
J. M. Munoz, Goulburn and Kenny's Point, via Bangalore, one day, + for £69.
James Martin, Goulburn, Tarlo, and Taralga, via Chatsbury, one day, + for £58.
Isaac Pratton, Goulburn, Laggan, and Tuena, one day, + for £160.
George Evans, Goulburn and Binda, via Mummell, Pomeroy, Gullen, and Wheo, two days, + for £160.
George Webster, Binda and Tuena, two days, for £80.
W. Henry Smith, Binda and Bigga, one day, + for £37. 10s.
James Maloney, Wheo, Reid's Flat, and Cowra, one day, + for £126 6s. 4d.
William Crane and J. J. Roberts, Goulburn, Gunning, and Yass, daily, + £531 4s.
James Garry, Yass, Binalong, and Burrowa, two days, for £240.
Patrick Forbes, Yass and Gundaroo, two days, + for £80.
Jacob Marks, Binalong, Murrumburrah, and Wagga Wagga, via Dacey's and the Levels, two days, + for £600.
Allan Hancock, Burrowa, and Reid's Flat, via Hovell's Creek and Phil's Creek, one day, for £60.
Daniel Crottay, Burrowa and Cowra, via Marengo, and Bumbaldrie, one day, + for £135.
Thomas West, Marengo and Morangarell, one day, + for £100.
John Sheehan and Laurence Garry, Yass and Albury, three days, + for £2,285 3s. 2d.
Robert Elliott, Yass and Albury, three days, + for £2,400.
Edward Doyle, Gundagai and Tumut, three days, + for £210.
Edward G. Brown, Tumut and Kiandra, one day, + for £480.
C. W. Crawley, Tumut and Adelong, three days, + for £100.
Frederick Abbott, Tarcutta and Adelong, three days, for £285.
Alexander Bruce, Adelong, Upper Adelong, Tumberumba, and Ten Mile Creek, with a branch post to and from Copabella, Jingillack, and Welaregane, one day, + for £350.
James Gormley, Tarcutta and Wagga Wagga, one day, + for £95.
James Gormley, Tarcutta and Wagga Wagga, two days; Wagga Wagga, Gillinbah, Lang's Crossing Place, and Balranald, one day, + for £852 12s. 8d
James Gormley, Wagga Wogga, Gillenbah, Lane's Crossing Place, and Balranald, one day, +for £685.
James Gormley, Wagga Wagga and Deniliquin, one day, + for £470.
James Gormley, Wagga Wagga and Deniliquin, one day, + for £487 1s. 2d.
James Clifford, Lang's Crossing Place and Deniliquin. one day, + for £228 11s. 6d.
Richard Bill, Lang's Crossing Place and Deniliquin, two days; and Deniliquin and Moama, three days, + for £925.
Ralph Powell, Albury and Deniliquin, one day, + for £220.
Bevan and Co,, Deniliquin and Moama, three days, + for £260.
William Burgess, Deniliquin, Moulamein, and Balranald, one day, +for £250.
Thomas Pain and Robert Driscoll, Wentworth and Mount Murchison, once a fortnight, for £600.

NORTHERN ROADS.
James Cole, Sydney, Lane Cove, and Gosford, via Peat's Ferry, one day, + for £129.
Peter Fagan, Sydney, Lane Cove, and Gosford, via Peat's Ferry, one day, + for £100.
Peter Fagan, Gosford and Kincumber, one day, + for £16.
Morris Magney, Newcastle Wharf, the Post-office, and Railway Terminus, twice or oftener daily, for £100.
Morris Magney, Newcastle Post-office, and Branch Office at Lake Macquarie Road and the Junction, twice or oftener, daily, for £48 11s. 6d.
Thomas Baker, Raymond Terrace and Stroud, four days, + for £178.
John Williams, Stroud and Tinonee, two days, + for £245.
Robert Summerville, Tinonee and Wingham, two days, + for £27.
G. M. Fitzpatrick, Tinonee and Redbank, two days, + for £32 10s.
Reuben Richards, Tinonee and Port Macquarie, two days, + for £210.
Thomas Carney, Port Macquarie and Huntingdon, one day, + for £28.
Henry McCabe, Tinonee, Taree, Candleton, and Jones' Island, two days, +for £35.
Christopher Felton, Port Macquarie, Rolland's Plains, and Kempsey, two days, + for £108.
Otho O. Dangar, Kempsey and Frederickton, one day, + for £36 11s. 6d.
Otho O. Dangar. Kempsey and Armidale, once a fortnight, for £73.
Robert Hyndes, Post Office and Railway Station, West Maitland, twice or oftener, daily, for £52.
Alexander McGilvray, West Maitland, East Maitland, and Morpeth, seven days, for £49.
Alexander McGilvray, Railway Station and Post Office, East Maitland, Morpeth, and Hinton, seven days, for £67.
Lawrence Arnold, Hinton, Seaham, Clarence Town, Brookfield, and Dungog, three days, + for £145.
Thomas Irwin, Dungog and Bandon Grove, three days, + for £28.
Robert Lloyd, East Maitland, Largs, and Paterson, seven days, for £125.
William Shearwood, Paterson and Gresford, three days, + for £35.
Francis Randall, Gresford and Eccleston, one day, + for £20.
Patrick McCloy, Gresford and Lostock, two days, + for £25.
Thomas Moore, East Maitland and Mount Vincent, one day, + for £24.
Thomas Moore, Maitland, Millfield, and Wollombi, three days. + for £180.
John Gill, Railway Terminus and Post Office, Lochinvar, and Singleton, seven days ; and Singleton and Murrurundi, four days. + for £1844 5s.
John Gill, Singleton and Murrurundi, two days; and Murrurundi Land Armidale, three days ; + for £3450.
Joseph Clark, Singleton and Fordwich, two days.+ for £85.
Thomas Howard, Singleton and Jerry's Plains, -via Cockfighter's Creek, and in time of flood via Thorley's, three days.+ for £77.
Patrick Ward, Muswellbrook, Merton, Merriwa, and Cassilis, three days.+ for £777.
William Acheson, Cassilis, Coolan, and Coonabarabran, one day.+ for £142.
James M'Cubbin, Coolah, Denison Town, and Cobbora, one day,+ for £90.
J. A. Johnstone, Coolah and Gulligal, one day. for £149.
Seymour Denman, Wallgett and Coonabarabran, via Kienlry, &c, one day.+ for £179.
John Gill, Murrurundi, Tamworth, Bendemeer, and Armidale, three days. + for £3980.
Joseph Taggart, Murrurundi and Oakey Creek, one day.+ for £120.
John Gill, Murrurundi, Breeza, and Gunnedah, one day, for £159.
John Gill, Murrurundi and Gunnedah, via Warra, Breeza, and Carroll, one day; and Gunnedah, Gulligal, and Wee Waa, one day. + for £550.
Abraham Johnstone, Gulligal and Warialda, one day.+ for £168.
William M'clelland, Goonoo Goonoo and Nundle, via Bowling Alley .Point, two days. + for £175.
A. S. Bourke, Goonoo Goonoo and Nundle, via Bowling Alley Point, one day, + for £71 8s. 7d.
John Gill, Armidale and Drayton, two days ; Tamworth, Warialda, and Calandoon, one day; Warialda and Wee Waa, one day ; Tamworth, Carroll, and Gulligal, one day: Wallgett. Caidmurra, and Callandoon, one day ; Wee Waa and Wallgett, one day; Warwick and Ipswich, via Cunningham's Gap. one day; Wallabadah and Quirindi, one day ; Uralla and Rocky River, three days ; + for £3900.
James Keating, Walgett and Fort Bourke, once a fortnight, for £350.
William Sly, Fort Bourke and Mount Murchison, travelling either side of the Darling, once a fortnight, for £275.
W. M. Stevenson and William Martin, Armidale and Grafton, and Bendemeer and Bundarra, one day, + for £390.
W. M. Stevenson, Armidale and Walcha, one day ; and Bendemeer and Walcha, two days, for £232.+
Gabriel Wardrope, Armidale, Byron, and Frazer's Creek, via Moredun, Paradise Creek, Newstead, Inverell, Buckalla, one day. for £150.
Edward M. Wright, Tenterfield and Frazer's Creek, one day, + for £144.
Charles Tuckwood, Tenterfield, Tabulan, and Grafton, one day, + for £288.
Ellen Thompson, Lawrence and Casino, one day ; Grafton and Casino, one day, + for £400.
Henry Sheldon, Lawrence Tabulam, and Tooloom, via Pretty Gully, one day + for £200.
James Duffy, Casino and Richmond River Heads, one day. + for £150.
John Brown, Casino and Brisbane, one day, for £265.

SUBURBAN.
Peter Fagan. Sydney, St. Mark's, Waverley, and Watson's Bay, six days for £99.
G. H. Stevens, Sydney and St. Leonard's, twice a day, + for £40.
Robert Gannon, Sydney and St. Peter's, twice a day, for £12.
John Grice, Sydney and Randwick, twice a day, for £20.

SHIP NORMAN MORRISON.1865

Norman Morrison, a barque 529 tons, Captain Edward Owens, departed London 23 April, Plymouth 5 May, 1865 arrived at Port Adelaide, South Australia 21 August 1865.
(NOTE this passenger list published before the ship docked in Port Adelaide. see Trove or the Ships List for later passenger lists, (links below) janilye )
PASSENGERS
Robert and Mary Creeton.
Charles, Elizabeth, Matta, Mary, John, Andrew, and Elizabeth Currie.
Hugh, Betsy, Hugh, Jane, Annie, and Mary Harrigan.
Richard and Mary Sager. Denis Healy. Daniel Murphy. Charles Short.
Harriet Roddis. Elizabeth Norris. Wm. D. Morris.
William, Jane, Joshua, Thomas, and William Allen,
William and Elizabeth Andrews. George, Mary, Mary, and
Henry Burgess. William, Betsy, and Mary A. Chapman.
William and Margaret Curnow. James and Ellen Clark.
William, Ellen, and Michael Cenose.
Stepben, Sarah, and Caroline Coleman. Daniel, Mary, and Wlnnifred Davies.
Alfred and Ann Day. James, Hannah, Robert, and Hannah Dickson.
John, Elizabeth, John, William, Elizabeth, and Eliza Dyson.
Jacob, Mary and Jacob Evans. James and Sarah Edwards. Thomas Sweeny.
Josiah, Mary and Thomas Edwards. Thomas, Catherine and Emily Edwards.
James, Mary, George, Louisa, and Hannah Ernest.
Adam, Helen, Henry. Agnes, and Archibald Erskine.
Robert, Hannah, and Lucy French. Henry, Jane, Lucy, and Henry Ferris.
John, Sarah, Rosa, and Edward French. Wm. S. and Nancy Grey.
James, Mary, and Matilda Green.
Thomas, Helen, Thomas. Barbara, and Alexander Gillies.
William T., Clarina, and Clarina Hicks. William, Elizabeth and William Harvey.
George, and Mary Harris. John, Ann, Emily, Ellen, and Edith Haines.
Henry, Ellen, Patrick, and Joshua Hardy. William, Eliza, Eliza, and William Halse.
William, Emma, Alfred, Nimrod and Mary Jones. Samuel and Ann Lawrence.
George, Jane, Amelia and George Maddon. John and Elizabeth Matthews.
William, Agnes. Emily, Elizabeth, William, Charles, and Esther Samuel, Edgar, Mary, and Eliza Smith.
Richard and Emma Thomas. John and Mary A. Tohivell
Philip, Jane, and Alfred Toithy. John Cunnear. Robert Brown, John Burgess.
Edward Cludgey. John Connell. Oliver Clark, William Campbell, John Collins. Robert Duncan.
Joseph Dowling. Solomon Downer. Albert Dyson. John Eustes. Francis Ford. Robert Fothergill.
William Goode, Edward Harvey. William Reddy, Richard Higman. Charles Haslock.
Michael Hallett. Job Hughes. James Haslake, James Wing. Eli Lethbuck,
John Lindsay.Daniel Luer, Samuel Morgan, James Martin, John Martin. Donald McKenzie.
George Maggs. John Moy. Isaac and George Napper. Charles and David Rennage.
James Rowe, Andrew Scott, William Sharp, Joshua Sanders. George Starks, Allan Smith.
Henry Stincombe, John Spencer, Edward Thomas, William Trembath, Wm. Warren.
Selina Andrews. Jemima Atkins. B. Barker. Fanny Brown, Ann and Harriet Dyson.
Elizabeth Edwards. Ellen Salt, Mary C. Jones. Hannah Jones. Emma Knight.
Ellen, Emily, Jane. and Magarey Martin. Margaret McDonald. Fanny Nicholls.
Caroline Neale, Mary C. Watt. Thomas Revil. Mary Madden.
Summary..
English : adults, 132;
children between 1 and 12, 33;
Infants 6.
Scotch: adults,34;
children between 1 and 12, 15;
infants, 4.
Irish: adults, 2.
Total, 226 - - equal to 192 statute adults.
Sources: TROVE
The South Australian Advertiser
Thursday 13 July 1865
page 4
Transcription janilye
See also
The Ships List
Norman Morrison


John Woodhall arrived South Australia 1849

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.
ARRIVED.

Wednesday, January 17th, 1849, The barque John Woodhall, 380 tons, Hill, master, from London.
CABIN PASSENGERS:
Mr George Greig, Mr Rowe (surgeon), Mrs Taylor and two children, Miss Powis
INTERMEDIATE:
Mr F. W. Mitchell, Mr R. Kelly wife and daughter, Mr T. A. Coates, Mr R. Smythe, Mr Buckley, Mr J. M. Green, Mr Simpson wife and three children, Mr H. Haywood, Mr J. Cruik and wife.
STEERAGE:
C. Ladds, G. Sebo and wife, G. Crisp, C. Betteredge, J. Sharp, G. Cole and wife, R. Cole wife and four children, A. Hurst, J. Johnston, G. Bartlett and wife, J. Robotton, W. Lowe, W. Weedon wife and three children, J. O. Hitch and wife, W. Gudd, J. Porter and wife, G. Hudson, J. Bower, W. D, Grant, C. Kimbee, R. J. Hawes, W. Cole. R. Clagne and wife, T. Kneale, D. Farragher, Joseph Kelly, R. Kelly, John Cowley, H. Christian, W. Kelly, G. Robinson, T. Thomas, E. James, H. Jurman, John Moss, Matthew Moss, John Moss, Eliza Trail, Henry Wilson wife and seven children, H. F. Wilson wife and two children, R. Wilson, John Goodridge, W. C. Allom, James Storr wife and six children, W. Seuser wife and child, E. J. Evans, T. Grey and four children, T. Gale, S. Mudden and wife, John Ellis, W. Hichman, James Hollins wife and child, Amelia Horton and four children, T. Gengard, Elizabeth Hughes and two children, J. Brown and wife, John Turrent, S. Usher and wife, G. Partridge, J. W. Presant, S. Johnson, Wm. Jonson, J. Woofender, J. Sumper, J. Burgoyne wife and two children, Jane Lock, H. J. Watson and wife, F. Martin, Mrs Peters and two children, Henry Groves, John Greir, Margaret Wudmore and two children, J. M. K. Aitken wife and four children, John Cushman, Wm. Poynter wife and six children, Ellen Lee, Henry Hitchen, Robert Thompson, Thos. Tarrance, Robert Johnson, Ed. Prickering, John DeWit, Wm. Wilding.

Cargo of the John Woodhall 11 cases drapery and clothing, S. Hart; 472 bars 196 bundles iron, Beck & Co; 1 case, Shadgett ; 2 cases, J. Small ; 10,600 bricks, 121 tons coals, 4 tons clay. 20 pipes lead, 2 boxes. 86 pkgs. castings, 8 crates, G. S. Walters ; 5 pkgr., Government ; 4 bales, A. L. Elder; 15 pkgs., Order; 8 cases, 3 casks, J. Roberts ; 1 ease. Rev. J. Long; 2 cases, Acraman & Co.; 1 case, J. Richmond; 2 bales, J. Gilbert; 1 case, T. Wilson; 110 cases, P. D. Valrent; 12 bales, 1 box, A. Scott; 1 box, Dutton ; 20 crates, 1 case, Montefiore & Co. Cargo of the Champion I donkey, Lord Bishop of Ade laide; 7 pkgs. sundries, Mr Turner Augusta, W.A. ; 6 liqueur cases, Samson.
Source:
South Australian Register
(Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900)
Saturday 20 January 1849
Page 4
Transcription, janilye, 2013

Trafalgar arrived South Australia 1849

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.
ARRIVED.

Wednesday, January 17th 1849 The barque Trafalgar, 718 tons, Richardson, master, from London and Plymouth.
Passengers; Mr and Mrs S. G. Dorday and five children, and Tweedale. Esq., Surgeon Superintendent in the cabin.
the following Government emigrants in the steerage :
James Allen, Wm. Henry Brown wife and child, Sarah Babbs, Robert Babbs, Mary Ann Baker, Emma Bacon, Caroline Bacon, Sophia Bailey and infant (Mrs Bailey's husband died at sea on the 16th December, aged 26), John Tallant Bee wife and three children (one, a girl, born at sea 4th January), Wm. Beesley and wife, Henry Bevan, John Bullock and wife, H. W. Burrall, James Childs, Thomas Clarke, Henry J. Congreve, Wm. Congreve, Maria Connor, Robert Cook wife and six children, Joseph Cross, Simon Clark wife and five children, James Davidson, Ann Davis, Charlotte Dodd, Thomas Dyke wife and two children, Bennett Dunstan wife and five children, Richard Dunstan and wife, Thomas Davey wife and four children, John Dewey wife and six children, Eliz. Fitch, John Forby wife and three children. James Foster and wife, Robert Fox, Peter Fox wife and five children, Edward Frost wife and four children, George Frost wife and two children, Mary Ann Gibson, Caroline Goldring, Richard Greaves, Henry Green, Jacob Green, Mary S. Hall, John Harrison wife and three children, Jane Hunt, Emma Hyams, Elizabeth Hyams, John Jones wife and child, John Julian wife and four children (one, a daughter, died at sea 10th January), Ann Kelly, Jane Kitts, Wm. Lanyon, Jane Lock, Louisa Lord, Walter Long wife and child, James Lawson wife and two children, Robert Mactaggart wife and three children, Martha Mawditt, Wm Morton, Thomas May and wife, Samuel Olley and wife, Ann Peatfield, Hezekiah Painter, Mary Ann Pash and child, Mary Ann Payne, Thos. Peacock and four children, Robert Pilbeam, Wm Pointon and wife, James Pollard wife and eight children, Edward Poulton and wife, Wm. Prestidge, Thos. Penny wife and four children, Peter Perring wife and four children. Wm. Rowe wife and two children, Richard Roads wife and eight children, Sarah Shore, Catherine Shuttleworth, Augusta Shuttleworth, John Spencer wife and child, Wm. Spriggs and wife (their infant daughter died at sea on the 9th November), Emily Stapleford, Susannah Stone, Sarah Summers, Joseph Taylor wife and two children, Emma Thacker, Thos. Tucker, John Thompson, Wm.Thomas wife and two children, Wm. Vince wife and four children, Samuel Webb and wife, Maria Welch, Sarah Wheatley, Ann Whitfield, Catherine Whitfield, John Whittle wife and five children (one, a son, born at sea on the 23d of December), James Wigley wife and three children, Charles Winchester wife and four children, James Wright wife and six children, Elizabeth Walters, John Walters, Joseph White, Thomas Williams, Mary Woolf.

IMPORTS.
Cargo of the Trafalgar 69 cases, Order; 40 packages, M. & S. Marks ; 1 bale, 7 cases, R. Miller & Co. ; 5 cases, M'Nicol & Young; 1 ditto, John Calder ; 3706 bars, 268 bundles, 451 deals, 30 hhds, 180 casks bottled beer, 20 cases wine, 39 hhds rum, 10 ditto brandy, 5 qr.-casks ditto 1 case, 20 barrels tar, 10 ditto pitch, C. & F. J. Beck ; 200 - packages luggage.
SOURCE:
South Australian Register
Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900
Saturday 20 January 1849
Page 4
Transcription, janilye 2012.

Compagnoni

17 April 1880
Compagnoni Insolvent.
Those who have often partaken at public banquets of the menu provided by Compagnoni, will learn with regret that the excellent caterer's estate was placed in the Insolvency Court this morning.
5 August 1880
Compagnoni's Cafe.
ONE of the largest, and best appointed cafés in the Australian colonies is that known as Compagnoni's situated in Pitt Street, Sydney, which has been wholly
reconstructed and furnished in a most comfortable and elegant manner, reminding the visitor of the more famous establishments which line the Parisian Boulevards, and form one of the leading attractions of the French capital. At the inaugural dinner, there were present a large number of mercantile gentlemen and several members of Parliament and city aldermen. The members of the board of directors-namely, Mr. John Woods (in the chair), Messrs. Gorman, R. Nott, W. Carey, and W. Clarke, also attended. The business, which was formerly carried on by Mr. Compagnoni, is under the immediate direction of Mr. Samuel Packham, as manager. Those familiar with the old establishment will not easily be enabled to recognise it in its new guise, in consequence of the extensive alterations which have been made in the premises, including the exten- sion and fitting up of a gentlemen's dining hall, and a handsomely decorated ladies' dining hall, the erection of a new kitchen, fitting up of lavatories, &c. The kitchen contains the latest and most approved steam cooking apparatus, and will be under the management of M. Marriette, as chef de cuisine, in which capacity he had extensive experience at the Union Club, Melbourne, and at Ballarat. Judging from the opinions expressed by visitors, we should say the new café has a bright and prosperous future before it. The specialité of the establishment is oysters, served up in every style.
1 October 1883
By the improvements made in Compagnoni's restaurant, Pitt-street, a decided want has been supplied to the public of this city, which has been behind some of the large towns of the sister colonies in respect to
accommodation such as Compagnoni's is intended to supply. The old restaurant was well known, but the alterations that have been made are so extensive that the appearance of the place has been entirely changed, and the accommodation for the public is more than doubled. Beginning with the refreshment rooms, it may be stated that these apartments have not only been very much enlarged by throwing back the dividing wall's a considerable distance at the rear of the building, but they have been completely transformed. As yon enter, the ladies' luncheon room is on the right hand and the gentlemen's on the left there being communication between the two rooms by means of spacious doorways, so that with, other means of ven tilation the place will be pleasantly cool in the summer months. The roofs are arched and con structed so as to admit a flood of light, the general effect being pleasant and cheerful. The furniture is all that could be desired, and the lavatories in connection with these rooms are fitted up with the utmost care for cleanliness and comfort, there being a servant constantly in attendance in the lady's dressing-room. The culinary apparatus is most complete, and everything is kept wonderfully clean, notwithstanding the large amount of cooking and kitchen work generally in connection, with s0 large an establishment. At the rear of the premises is the bakery, where all the confectionery is turned out, and above this a store room, in which is kept the catering part, which is very extensive, as the company does a large catering trade. Also in this direction is a dry store. certain out-buildings and a poultry yard. Indeed it would scarcely be imagined from a front view of the restaurant in Pitt-street how extensive these premises really are. Returning to the main building by a passage at the side, we enter the luncheon bar, passing by the wine and dry goods stores on the way. The luncheon bar is not quite finished, but is being fitted up with every attention to comfort and convenience. It will not be a luncheon bar in the proper sense of the term, but more of a lounge. It may be stated that Mr. James, the manager, contemplates the excellent idea of establishing a grill or chop room in connection with this part of the restaurant, and there can be no doubt that if it were esta blished such an institution would be largely patron ised. In fact, it is a matter for wonder that a city like Sydney has not properly regulated chop rooms for the use of people engaged is the city. They are common in London and other large cities, and were successfully introduced in Auckland, N.Z., years ago. If Mr. James succeeds in carrying out his idea at Compagnoni's, there can be little doubt that it would meet with success. Upstairs there are the club rooms and other apartments : and, generally speaking, the institution as altered and improved is a credit to the city.

19 November 1884
Mr. Tollemache, the enterprising manager of the Compagnoni Catering Company in Pitt-street, has further provided for the comfort and pleasure of the public by adding music to the various other attractions of the popular catering establishment under his charge. Orchestral matinees will be held three times a week from three to five in the afternoon.
Selections from the latest and most popular comic operas, and all the newest and latest waltzes will be performed by a first-class, band, under the direction of Herr Gustav Kuster. There will not be any charge for admission. Ladies or gentlemen can sit and enjoy a cup of tea or an ice, and at the same time hear some good music. A preliminary performance took place yesterday afternoon in the presence of several gentlemen, who all expressed their appre ciation of the good music which was performed. The programme for each performance will be pub lished in the daily papers. The first matinee will be held on Friday afternoon next, from 3 to 5. A large number of ladies and gentlemen will no doubt take the opportunity of apending an enjoyable afternoon in one of the coolest cafes which can be found in the colony.
2 December 1885
Licensing Court
Ernest Tollemache to Angelo Viney, Compagnoni Cafe
4 August 1886
from Angelo Viney, of Compagnoni's Hotel, Pitt-street, to Henry Adams
Footnote:
Thomas Compagnoni who started it all shot himself in his backyard
at Rosa St., Oatley on the 27 January 1911.

2 comment(s), latest 9 months, 1 week ago

S.S. Seang Choon 1891-1917

Built 1891 as a first class passenger ship, by Harland & Wolff, in Belfast for the Bibby Line and named the CHESHIRE and later used during the Boer War as a troopship. In 1910, the Cheshire was sold to Lim Chin Tsong, of Rangoon and renamed SEANG CHOON.

In 1915 the Seang Choon became a British army troopship, afterwards a hospital ship and took part in the Dardanelles campaign.

On the 10th July 1917, in Bantry Bay on the South Coast of Ireland, whilst on a voyage from Sydney to London, she was torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-87.
Nineteen lives were lost.

On the 2 July 1915, two of the galley staff of the Seang Choon were at Fremantle on board the R.M.S. Malwa, passing through on their way to Sydney, where they expected to be called upon to prepare meals for more troops on the way to the front.
In conversation with a representative of the West Australian newspaper they told some of their experiences as non-combatants in the present struggle in Turkey.
This is their story:-

"To me the whole thing seemed magical. A huge transformation scene, or a tremendous drama, staged on the land and sea, with terrible guns roaring out realistic effects, and real wounded men, who went out in khaki, and returned in scarlet tunics, red with living blood! It was too realistic to be a dream, and yet too terrible to be true." Thus a cook off the transport Seang Choon, which had been engaged in performing emergency hospital work at the Dardanelles, described his reminiscences of a period of five weeks near Gallipoli.

"We went away from peaceful Australia early in the year with the 13th Battalion from Queensland, and after a calm, peaceful voyage. through the tropics by way of Torres Straits, Thursday Island, Colombo, and Aden, we found ourselves hurled into a whirlpool of struggling humanity; the opposing forces eager for each other's blood, and determined at all costs to wipe the other out, or be annihilated in the at tempt. And yet, amid all the pathos of strong men groaning in pain or falling dead in front of one, there was no lack of smiling faces, and those who seemed to be in most pain appeared to be filled with unlimited cheerfulness, and a desire for more fighting and more blood.

At times we laughed aloud and at other moments our eyes welled up with tears. Strong men cried to see the awfulness of man's inhumanity to man, and laughed when the practical joker told some story of the battlefield, that tasted of humour.
With shells falling in uncomfortable proximity to the ship, aeroplanes dropping bombs from above, and modern warships hurling tons of steel and lead into the lines and villages of the enemy, one was conscious of a paleness clouding one's face and of a desire for removal to a place of greater safety. We were anchored off the coast where the Australians landed, about two miles out. In front, on either side, were H.M.S. Triumph and H.M.S. Majestic. We had on board about 1,000 men of the 14th Battalion, and they were to be landed on the morning of April 26. On the previous evening, however, we commenced to take on board dozens of very seriously wounded men, who had been shot down during the first day's operations. The wounded were brought alongside in lighters and lifted on board on stretchers, hoisted by cranes. The next morning our reinforcements transhipped on to torpedo boats, and were taken close to the coast, where they were cast adhrift in smaller boats, and left to get on dry land as best they could.

The whole scene was bristling with incident. One fine young fellow, when saying good bye to me, said that it would be no South African picnic, but a glorious homecoming. He had been all through the South African campaign, and held the rank of quarter master-sergeant. That was at 4 a.m., and at 6.30 he was brought back by the torpedo boat, shot through the heart, without having landed.
On the night the wounded began to come aboard, all hands were kept busy preparing food and beef tea, which we handed down to the men in the lighters.

A strong north-easterly gale made the transference of the wounded a very difficult feat, and some time was required to successfully accomplish it. Most of the men suffered from shrapnel wounds, and those who fell dead were the victims of snipers. When day broke on the 26th we could see the operations on land quite distinctly, and it was a treat to see our fellows get into the fray. So heavy were the casualties and the loss of officers that our men simply took individual action, and each rushed ahead with a gleaming bayonet, regardless of his own safety or of united action. They simply saw red. Some of them got two miles inland before they looked round and found out that they were cut off from ammunition and reserves, and while a lot of them went down many ultimately regained the lines.

The Turks had been so well entrenched that they took some shifting but we have heard that the casualties were not so heavy as was anticipated in official circles.
On board our ship were a large number of army medical men, who did their best to relieve the pain and make the men comfortable until they arrived at Alexandria, which was 48 hours run from the scene of the fighting. We made three trips with wounded, and carried about 2000 men all told to the various hospitals. On each return trip we brought reinforcments, and there was a continual stream of ships doing similar business to ourselves.

There were numerous instances of bravery and courageous acts to be witnessed on all hands. One Australian chaplain declined to remain in safety, and rushed into the trenches, where they were captured, and there rendered first aid to our men. On one occasion he was trying to bring two wounded men, one on each of his arms, behind the lines when both were killed, although he himself was unharmed.

We heard of cases of Turkish treachery, but we saw none that we could vouch for. We can, however, testify to the consideration our Jack Tars showed toward the religion of the enemy.
The 'Majestic' and 'Triumph' were both engaged shelling two villages, and by the time they had thrown in about 300 rounds there was little left but the minarets, which were sacredly avoided and spaired destruction.

The Turkish papers made great capital out of an official declaration that the Turks had driven the Australians into the sea a statement, no doubt, which gained credence by reason of the Australians partaking of sea bathing along the shore.
Our fellows were really devils let loose, and they seemed to have no fear. Once into the firing line those chaps threw off their packs and went right into the enemy, and more than often got off scot free.

We had many experienoes on board. On one occasion an enemy aeroplane hovered over us and dropped three bombs, all fortunately finding a resting place on the sea floor. A gun from the Triumph, however, soon brought the aircraft down, and put it completely out of action. On another occasion a huge, shell, thought to have come from the Goeben, dropped into the sea about ten yards astern of our ship. and I can tell you we were all glad when we upanchored and made off for Alexandria. It was, as things turned out, a very fortunate thing that we left when we did, as some two hours after we sailed, the Triumph was torpedoed, and a little later the Majestic suffered a similar fate.

On one of our trips to Egypt we took 60 Turkish prisoners, including one officer, and a German and a Syrian officer. We did learn that there were to have been 260 Turks, but somehow or other only 60 survived to make the journey with us. Some of them could speak a little English and they told us that the Turkish soldier was not at all fond of the fighting business, and very often officers had to jump into the trenches and hit some of the men with sticks to prevent them from turning tail. On the same journey we had several Gurkha wounded, and on the first evening at sea one of the Indians crept out of his bunk, and, seizing a knife, stole up behind the bunk of a Turk who was wounded. The latter was only saved from a sudden death through the timely action of an attendant, who had missed his patient. Needless to say, after that the Turks were all removed to quarters further away from the Indians.

A remarkable feature of our work was the entire absence of complaints, for, although the wounded suffered considerable inconvenience through the makeshifts which were provided, all bore their misfortunes with remarkable fortitude. It was pitiable in the extreme to see strong fellows who had left the ship to enter the` firing line, full of hope and ambition, come back absolutely helpless.
One poor, chap was assisted on board our ship by another wounded comrade. The former had lost both eyes and he was endeavouring to undo his belt, when he exclaimed with perfect resignation. 'Good heavens, I've lost all my fingers too.

Another officer came aboard with a terrible gash on his face, and when someone sympathised with him he replied: 'I wish that were all lad, but there are, three more inside.'
It was interesting to hear the officers speak of their men. The affection between them was remarkable and the men came back from the firing line loving them. The young officers acquitted themselves splendidly and with remarkable heroism and bravery. "

NOTES
Seang Choon SS was a 5,708 g.t., 445.5ft x 49.1ft, twin screw passenger ship, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 100-1st class passengers.
The chaplain mentioned, I believe is Father John Fahey 1883-1959
whose letters I will publish at a later date.

source: The West Australian
nsw.bd&m
The Ships List
Australian War Memorial
Transcribed and written by janilye, 2013


The portrait below is of Wireless Operator Angus Bartlett Clarence McGregor, 1894-1917, the son of Aeneas McGregor 1865-1937 and Adelaide Louise, nee Bartlett 1868-1959, who was aboard the Seang Choon and drowned when it was torpedoed.


The Sale of Wives In England.

Now-a-days wives are occasionally treated with barbarity. When they are, however the husbands are severely dealt with by law. But at one time wives were considered as a mercenary commodity, and the disposal of them for a certain price was a not uncommon occurrence, being recorded in newspapers as " items of everyday news." During this period of dormant sympathy, it was generally considered as lawful for a husband to sell his spouse by auction to the highest bidder, "provided he delivered her over with a halter round her neck." Strange as it may seem, the wife was frequently found to be in favour of the transaction, probably agreeing with the adage that "changes are lightsome."
In July, 1797, The Times in reference to the price of wives, said "By some mistake in our report of the Smithfield Market, we had not learned the average price of wives for the last week. The increasing value of the fair sex is esteemed by several eminent writers as a certain criterion of increasing civilisation. Smithfield has, on this ground, strong pretensions to refined improvement, as the price of wives has risen in that market from half-a-guinea to three guineas and a-half."
Even in the early years of the 19th. century, cases of the sale of wives in public are recorded.
A few instances of such sales, which appeared in a recent number of "All the Year Round," will be read with considerable interest and amusement:-
In 1750 a man and his wife falling into discourse with a grazier, at Parham, in Norfolk, the husband offered him his wife in exchange for an ox, provided he would let him choose one out of his drove. The grazier accepted the proposal, and the wife readily agreed to it. Accordingly, they met the next day, when the woman was delivered to the grazier, with a new halter round her neck, and the husband received a bullock which he subsequently sold for six guineas.
The first recorded sale after the accession of George III., occurred in the month of March, 1766 in this case a carpenter of Southwark, named Higginson, went into an ale-house for his morning draught: there he met a fellow carpenter, and their conversation turned to wives. The carpenter, whose name, history has not recorded, lamented that he had no wife. Higginson, on the other hand, lamented that he had, and expressed regret there was no way except murder by which he could rid himself of her. The carpenter assured Higginson that there was a way, the old English custom had made it quite lawful for a husband to sell his own rib. " No one would be such a fool as to buy mine," sighed Higginson. "I would do so," the other promptly replied, "and would think I had made a good bargain, too."
"Done!" shouted the delighted husband, who clinched the bargain on the spot. Mrs. Higginson was duly claimed by her new lord, and went willingly enough and lived with him as his wife.
In a few days, however, Higginson either grew tired of his mateless home or suspected that he had not done right, and went to the other carpenter's house, demanding his wife back. Mrs. Higginson strenuously refused to leave her new lord. "A sale is a sale," said she, "and not a joke."
Higginson went again and again, but to no purpose, and after a week or two he ceased calling. His wife had just begun to conclude that he had at last quietly resigned his claim, when she was cited to appear before a coroner's jury and identify her husband who had settled the question by hanging himself. (The price paid for the woman is not recorded.)
Another sale occurred in the summer of 1767. In this case, however, the man selling the "chattel" had no legal right over it, she being simply a wife by courtesy. Her reputed husband was a bricklayer's labourer, residing at Marylebone, and the price at which she was valued was five shillings and three pence and a gallon of beer. Three weeks after the sale, when the lady was duly housed with her new lord, a wealthy uncle of hers, residing in Devonshire, died, and, quite unexpectedly, acknowledged the kinship by leaving her two hundred pounds and a quantity of plate. The new protector at once decided to sanctify the union by a ceremony of the Church, and so became her husband indeed, and of course, the possessor of the legacy, there being no Married Woman's Property
Act in those days.
Edgbaston, Birmingham, was the scene of the next sale of this character which had to be reeorded. It took place in the month of August, 1773, and the facts are these :Three men and three women went into the Bell Inn. Edgbaston-street, Birmingham, and called for the toll-book, which was kept there. In this they made the following extraordinary entry: "August, thirty first, 1773. Samuel Whitehouse, of the parish of Willenhill, in the county of Stafford, this day sold his wife, Mary Whitehouse, in open market, to Thomas Griffiths, of Birmingham. Value one shilling. To take her with all faults. (Signed) Samuel Whitehouse, Mary Whitehouse. (Voucher) Thomas Buckley,
of Birmingham." The parties were said to be well pleased, and the purchase-money and the market toll, demanded for the toll, were both cheerfully paid.
This Ipswich Journal, January 28, 1737, states that : "A farmer of the parish of Stownpland sold his wife to a neighbour for five guineas, and being happy to think he had made a good bargain, presented her with a guinea to buy a new gown. He then went to Stowmarket and gave orders for the bells to he rung on the occasion."
The London Chronicle for the 1st of December, 1787, reported that : "On Monday last a person named Goward led his wife to the market place at Nuneaton, and there sold and delivered her up, with a halter about her, to one White, for the sum of three guineas. On their way Goward asked his wife if she was not ashamed of being brought to open market to be sold ; she said she was not, and was happy to think she was going to have another husband, for she knew well who was going to be her purchaser. When they came to the place Goward embraced his wife and wished her well, upon which she returned the compliment. White declared himself extremely well satisfied, and paid down the money, assuring the quondam husband it was good and full weight. The purchase being completed, White gave the ringers a handsome treat to ring a peal, and they spent the remainder of the day with the greatest joy imaginable."
A Case which occurred in 1790 is slightly different to the foregoing, for it is the record of a girl who
actually bought her husband. She was an Oxfordshire lass, and was on the eve of marriage to a young man of the same county, when the bridegroom elect would not consent to name the day unless her friends would advance fifty pounds for her dowry. Her friends being two poor to comply with this demand, the lass, who evidently thought a mercenary husband better than no husband at all, went to London and sold her hair, which was deli- cately long and light, to a chapman in the Strand for three pounds per ounce. As it weighed just twenty ounces, she returned with joy to Oxfordshire with sufficient money to buy her exacting husband, and ten pounds to boot."
It was not just in England where we have recorded the sale of wives but in New South Wales as late as 1803 we have early settler, Israel Rayner, selling his wife Catherine Carpenter. She walked out on Israel and went to live with her lover, Henry Baldwin and refused to return. When Henry Baldwin paid no heed to Israel's threats of legal action, a deal was struck and Israel sold Catherine to Henry for six bushels of wheat and a pig.


source:
The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser
Tuesday 26 September 1893
Victoriavane Word Press
transcription, janilye 2012


1 comment(s), latest 2 years, 1 month ago

Dan Kennedy's Cement

A LOST SECRET.
Cement Like Iron.
LIVE OYSTER SHELL.
By Mary Gilmore.

The seepage from Burrinjuck Dam in New South Wales, brings up the subject of cement, and cement recalls to me a secret which has been lost to the world.
Daniel Kennedy was a genius born out of his time. He died a broken man. He was a distant connection of my father, and was married to a Croke.
I knew of this because I recollect hearing father say-and to him a beggar with a long pedigree was more Important than a king with a shorter one- that "though Kennedy had married into a family that was poor, it had
roots."
There were three brothers Croke. One was the great Archbishop Croke of Dublin, one that Lord Mayor after whom Croke Park (Dublin) was named, and the third one, apparently without the ability of these two, who was sent out to Australia with an allowance to make a start on his own account.
In Goulburn, about 1920, I met one of the most beautiful girls I have ever seen. Painters seeing her said she might well have been the original of the Sistine Madonna, as hers was so like the face in the picture. She was a daily seamstress, a granddaughter of the original Croke, and knew nothing of her ancestry in Ireland till I told her of it. But if ever beauty, spiritual as well as physical, was made manifest in the flesh, it was in this girl. It was her aunt whom Daniel Kennedy had married.

"Cold"' Bedsteads.
The secret of Daniel Kennedy's discovery was never told and never written. He carried his formula in his head, and certain parts of his work he did himself so that his workmen would not guess itor so he told my father when he came to Wagga Wagga in the middle seventies to ask father to go into partnership
with him.
In Goulburn in the 1920's I saw some of his machinery rusting on the ground at the side of his great Georgian mansion, Clarisville. This building had been erected on the site of and over what was said to be the original Marsden convict-built cottage at Goulburn, the cottage being the kitchen. In it is still the bath that was perhaps the first one over the mountains that was not a wooden one or a tin tub. It looked like an excavation ground out of solid rock.
Clarisville was built three stories high, and with a broad colonnade in front. At the side were the stables and the men's quarters. The men's rooms were furnished with an iron bedstead, a chest of drawers, and a floor mat for each man, "as good as those in his own house," it was said. Kennedy told father that he believed that any man doing his work should be well housed. The iron bedsteads he brought from the U.S.A., where he had gone to buy machinery that he could not then get in Australia.
As he had to bring the bedsteads back with him, they were probably the first iron ones to reach there. They were so alien to the times that people talking of them remarked that they would be cold to sleep in and not warm like cedar. Dan Kennedy's reply was that they might be cold, but that they could be kept free of vermin, for they could be scalded without destroying the polish.

Solid as Iron.
The pillars on the front of Clarisville are of the cement Dan Kennedy made. They are enormously thick, and no ordinary tool will more than mark them; while Goulburn tells a story af a bolting cart that bumped into one, and, though the cart broke, the pillar it hit was not even marked. The flags that floor the colonnade, and also the courtyard between the kitchen and the house, are of the same material; and these flags are as smooth after over fifty years (and perhaps more) as when they were first put down.
I remember my father, about 1882, urging Kennedy to write the formula, as he might get a knock or a fall and forget what it was. "Even if I did," said Kennedy, "it ls so simple that I could rediscover it from the materials of which it is made."
Besides Clarisville, there is a villa in Sloan Street that once belonged to Dr. Sinclair, a well-known medical man of his day, It is a typical Dan Kennedy building of the opposite kind from Clarisville, being as light and graceful in design as the other is massive and heavy. A builder, whose name I have forgotten, bought it in later years. Being at the place one day, I told him that I recognised the style and the substance in the delicate and slender verandah pillars.
"But they are iron" exclaimed the builder-owner. "No cement could be as fine as they are; it would break."
"They are cement," I repeated, laying my hand on one for the reassuring feel of the material. "You get a file or a knife," I added, "and try if they are iron !"
He took out a knife. "You are right" he said, as he filed at an edge, and was as eager as the others to know how the composition was made.

Enduring Water-Way,
In the middle part of Goulburn, or near it, is a subterranean water-way above which was, or is, built one of the old inns of the early' days. When I was a little girl I heard Dan Kennedy describe how he made it; I heard another man describe it in July of this year. A cart can go through it, it is so big; but sixty years of creek water running through it has not made a mark on either the pavement or the walls.
In Sydney at Miller's Point there were slender fluted pillars in what in my young years were still doctors' residences. About 1887, father, wanting to renew his acquaintance with them, took me to have a look at them so that I would know them as Dan Kennedy's work. When, in some rebuilding or resumption, these places were pulled down, they were the wonder of the building trade, because it was not till wrecking took place that it was discovered that the pillars were
not iron.
The only thing that I know of the mixture is that Kennedy used live shell. But, as this was the custom then, this was not singular. I remember it was said that the oysters cried as they went into the furnace, a little thin sound like a wire might make. We drove out once to see the kilns and watched the sacks of oysters being emptied into the furnaces. The only sound I heard (and as a child certain sounds made music for me not apparent to others-frogs in a pond, for instance) was the rhythmic rattle of the shell as it poured in. There was a hiss of steam as the oysters suddenly evaporated in the heat.
"Were the oysters hurt?" I asked, and was not consoled by being told that they were dead before they had time to feel, for I was unable to see how they could not feel.
As I have said, all builders used live shell at one time. Advertisements for tenders always called for live shell to be used, and the makers of lime advertised "made of live shell." So it may be that in the proportion used lay the secret of Dan Kennedy's cement. But having in mind what analysis can do to-day, remembering that examples of his making can still be seen in Goulburn, and realising what cement means to Burrinjuck and other similar reservoirs, it might be well to investigate and perhaps find the secret.
Because anything that might be of national worth has always meant so much to me, it may be that I set too high a value on the Kennedy discovery; but at least the facts speak in the flags and pillars still to be found in Goulburn, and which have never been duplicated by anyone but the original maker.

Source:
The Sydney Morning Herald
Saturday 21 August 1937
Page 13
Transcription, janilye 2013


Cock-Fighting, New South Wales.

Any article or series of articles on the "Good Old Days" that
did not treat the sports of that-period would be like a
meat pie without, the meat. I have attempted to give a complete
and comprehensive digest of the manners and customs of the people
of the times of which I write, and as cock fighting was almost an
institution in those days, some attention must be given to it.

Not many will regret the fact this kind of sport is now a thing of
the past, so far as this district is concernedand has been allowed to
fall into oblivion along with other relics of barbarism.

From the 1840s cock-fighting was one of the most popular sports
in the Hawkesbury district of New South Wales, and in those days unless you had a
game rooster that could masacre twenty of your neighbours' domestic chooks in as
many minutes, you might as well be dead, for you were considered nobody.

But now things have changed, the cock-fighting instincts of the people
are dead, though the sleek bird still retains all the combative instincts
of the olden leaven, and would even now fight till he dropped on his own or
some other party's dung-hill. Many residents well remember the old rendezvous
of the enthusiasts of this branch of sportin Holland's paddock,(Windsor)
facing the banks, In this paddock, where there is now a large pond, a pit
existed for many years, and at the trysting-ground large crowds of people
assembled nearly every Saturday to witness a good encounter between two
game cocks.
An edifying spectacle it must have been, truly, yet amongst the votaries of
the sport were many men who were then leading lights of the district.

For years cock-fighting was carried on in public, and was reckoned a legitimate
sport. Then the State stepped in and dubbed it unlawful; yet it was carried on,
almost with impunity, for yearsbut those who participated in the sport met in
some sequestered nook to hold their meetings, the ti-tree swamp on Ham Common
(Richmond) being a favourite resort.

A man named " Jacky" Carr was among the first to introduce cock-fighting into
the Hawkesbury district. He was an Englishman, and always managed to get hold of
some fine imported birds.

Amongst those who followed the game also were Frank Norris, now residing on the
Brickfields,and one of the best pugilists of his day. Also his brothers Paddy and Jim, (sons of Richard NORRIS 1779-1843)
George Cupitt 1808-1875, Charlie Eather, The Charkers,
Gaudry's and Kable's. William Hopkins 1798-1862,
Joseph and William Onus, (sons of Joseph Onus 1782-1835). Ben Richards 1818-1898, and George Bushell were
also admirers of the game-cock, and they all owned good
fighting birds. The second-named is said to have had a magnificent button-comb
bird, which ended the career of many another good one.

The Dargins, Cornwells, Dan Mayne and Jack Cribb also followed the sport.
W. Hopkins was a great breeder of these birds, and he once owned a cookoo-game,
a very rare bird which was responsible for the death of more than one man's pet.

Jim Norris also had a bird which, after winning. fourteen or fifteen successive
battles met its doom when pitted against "Daddy" Baine's in the Richmond Lane,
close to the residence of Mrs. Onus. The birds always fought with steel spurs,
and a small black red bird weighing 6½ lbs, owned by George Cupitt, on one occasion
slaughtered three oponents without having his heels (as the spurs were termed) taken off.

James 'Jack' Cribb 1785-1841 always had a lot of birds, and used to spare no
expense in getting hold of good fighters to take his friends down.
He had been known to pay as much as £10 apiece for them, and once paid that
sum for a big light-grey bird, of which everybody was afraid.

Birds weighing from 6½lbs to 7lbs were always very strong and fast fighters, whilst
they varied in weight from 5½lbs to 8½lbs. The principal breeds were black red,
duck-wing, hen-feather, and the pile. The latter breed was the progeny of two good
distinct strains, and was considered one of the gamest of the game birds.

The fighting generally carried out in what was termed "mains," i.e.,
a number (say 5 or 7) birds of dififerent weights on either side.
The birds of the opposing forces were pitted on as equal terms as possible as
regards weight, and if the result of the " main" was equal, the contest would be
decided by a "turn-out"that is, a match between the heaviest bird of both sides.
The :mains" Comprised a party from Parramatta or Sydney on the one side, and
Windsor on the other.

Phil Williams (Sydney), the Waterhouses (Parramatta), and W. Sparks (Cook's River)
frequently brought their birds to Windsor, and were met in the fray by
Cupitt, Norris and Hopkins.
Matches for £50 or to £100 aside were often made, while a good deal of out
side money was also wagered

Sources:
Windsor and Richmond Gazette
(NSW : 1888 - 1954)
The Good Old Days
Yeldap.
Research and Transcription, Janilye
20 June 2012