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St Peters Church Richmond. NSW

AT A PUBLIC MEETING of the Inhabitants of Richmond,
held at the School House, on the 23d October, 1835,
the Rev. Samuel Marsden in the Chair,
It was proposed by Mr. Cox, sen.; seconded by
the Rev. H. T. Stiles ; and resolved unanimously ---
1st.... That it is expedient to erect a Church in
this Town, for the celebration of Divine Worship,
according to the Form of the Protestant Episcopal
Church of England, on the Ground at the end of
George-street, originally set apart for that purpose.
Proposed by Mr. W. Cox, jun.; seconded by Mr.
G. Bowman ; and resolved unanimously ---
2nd.... That, to carry this object into effect, a Committee
be formed, consisting ot the following Members, of whom any
seven be competent to despatch business : ---
Mr. Cox, sen., Fairfield,
Mr. Cox, jun., Hobartville,
Mr. Bell, Belmont,
Mr. George Bowman,
Mr. William Bowman,
Mr. Faithful,
Rev. H. T. Stiles,
Mr. Martin, sen.,
Mr. C. Palmer,
Mr. Dight,
Mr. C. Powell,
Mr. Parnell,
Mr. G. P. Wood.
Proposed by Mr. William Bowman ; seconded by
Mr. Faithful ; and resolved unanimously
3rd..... That, to forward the object of this Meeting,
Funds be immediately raised by voluntary Subscription ---
that the Members of the Committee do agree to use their best
exertions to this end ---
that Subscription Lists be opened at the several Banks ---
and that an Appeal be made to the Public through the medium
of the following Newspapers :---
Sydney Herald, Monitor, Colonist, Australian, and Sydney Gazette,
to be inserted three times in each Newspaper.
Proposed by Mr Martin ; seconded by Mr. William Bowman ;
and resolved unaminously ---
4th.... That William Cox senior, Esq., be requested to take the
office of Treasurer, and the Rev. H. T. Stiles that of Secretary.

THE Protestant Population of Richmond and its Neighbourhood, as shewn by
the last Census, is upwards of 1300. The present Building used as a
Church will barely accommodate one hundred Persons : and as the other
engagements of the Chaplain prevent him from having more than one service
on the Sunday, it is obvious that out of every thirteen Inhabitants who
may wish to participate in the ordinance of Divine Worship, twelve
must be deprived of that privilege, because there is no room for them.
This simple fact constitutes, in itself, a strong appeal to the
liberality of the Residents, not of Richmond only, but of the Colony
generally. It is earnestly hoped that the individual, domestic, and
social advantages to be derived from a due observance of the Public
Worship of Almighty God, will be so appreciated by the Colonists
universally, as to produce a corresponding willingness to contribute,
when, as at present, an opportunity is offered them towards an object
so fraught with benefits to our adopted country, our families, and ourselves.

Contributions will be thankfully received by William Cox, Esq., Hobartville ;
by the Rev. H. T. Stiles, Windsor; by the Rev. S. Marsden, Parramatta;
by the Members of the Committee ; and at either of the Banks in Sydney.

Subscriptions already promised :â
£. s. d.

The Archdeacon....... ...........200 0 0
Mr. Cox, senior, Fairfield.........35 0 0
Mr. Cox, junior..... .....................25 0 0
Mr. George Bowman ..............20 0 0
Mr. William Bowman .... ......... 20 0 0
Mr. Faithful .... ............. .......... 20 0 0
Mr. John Town, junior.......... ..20 0 0
Rev. H.T. Stiles............... ..10 0 0
Mr. Onus.... .................. ..........10 0 0
Mr. John Town, senior. ...........10 0 0
Mr. Martin..... .... ......................6 0 0
Mr. Martin, junior. ... ............ ......6 0 0
Mr. Seymour... ..... ... ..... .........5 0 0
Mr. Cross .... .............. .... .......5 0 0
Mr. Hughes...... . ......... ... .........5 0 0
Mr. Dight ..... ........... ....... .... ....5 0 0
Mr. George Pitt. ..... .......... ..... ..5 0 0
Mr. Robert Williams. ..... .... .....5 0 0
Mr. Price ...... ..... .............. .. ....5 0 0
Mr. G. P. Wood . .... ..... ..... ......2 0 0
Mr. J. Markwell ... ..... ......... ....1 0 0
Mr. Robert Aull ...... ..................1 0 0
Mr. William Farlow..... .............1 0 0
Mr. C. Palmer ...... ...................1 0 0
Mr. Benjamin Cawer.... ...........1 0 0
Mr. George Mortimer..... .........1 0 0
Mrs. Crawley. ... ..... ... ............1 0 0
Mr. John Brown. .... ..... ..........3 0 0
Mr. Thomas Eather..... ... .......2 0 0
Mr. P. M'Alpin...... ... ...............2 0 0

Collected by the Rev. S. Marsden.

Rev. Richard Hill.... ....... .....2 0 0
Mr. R. Jones, M C...... ...... .6 0 0
Mr. R. Smith. ... ..... .......... ..2 0 0
Mr. Thomas Marsden......... .2 0 0
Mr. Caleb Wilson..... ...........2 0 0
Mr. Richard Fitzgerald. &
Mr. Robert Fitzgerald ..... ...5 0 0
Mr. James Chisholm. ... .....5 0 0
Mr. Samuel Terry.... ..........10 0 0
Mr. Edward Terry..... ............2 0 0
Mr. John Terry.... .. ... ...........2 0 9
Mr. P. W. Flower...... ...........2 0 0
Mr. C. S. Marsden. .... .........1 0 0
Mr. John Connell...... .... .......2 0 0
Mr. William Walker...... .......3 0 0
Mr. Thomas Walker..... .......2 0 0

Source:-
The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser
Saturday 21 November 1835
Page 1
Transcription, janilye 2014.

Historical notes: The site of St Peter's church was nominated in Governor Lachlan Macquarie's planned layout for Richmond. He intended to have the church, schoolhouse and burial ground on a very beautiful elevated block immediately above Pugh's Lagoon, a fine basin of fresh water. The burial ground, then 1 hectare, was surveyed by James Meehan and consecrated by the Rev Samuel Marsden and fenced by William Cox. The first burial was George Rouse and contains the headstones of many early Hawkesbury settlers The first school/church opened in 1810. It played an important part in the early life of Richmond. It was situated in Francis Street near the northern corner of the cemetery. The lower floor was the residence of the schoolmaster whilst the upper room was used for school and church purposes.

This building soon became too small to meet the ever increasing congregation and at a meeting chaired by the Reverend Samuel Marsden on 26 November 1835 the inhabitants of Richmond resolved to erect a church for the celebration of divine worship. A notice calling for tenders to erect the church appeared in The Australian on 18 October 1836. The committee formed to forward the project included Mr Cox, Sen,"Fairfield', Mr Cox, Jnr 'Hobartville', Mr Bell, 'Belmont', Mr George Bowman, Mr William Bowman. Mr. Faithful, Rev H.T.Styles, Mr Martin, Snr., Mr. G Palmer, Mr. Digit, Mr C Powell, Mr Parnell and Mr CP Wood. By 1833 the sum of 570 pounds had been subscribed and 200 pounds had been donated by the English Church Society. Tenders were called for the erection of the church in 'The Australian' on October 1836.

Built as a result of the establishment of the Church Act of 1840 St Peter's church was one of four churches consecrated in 1841. The church was built on a site overlooking Ham Common and the Hawkesbury River flats. It was agreed 162 hectares of the common would be given as Glebe land for the church. It was opened by Bishop Broughton on 15 July and designed by Francis Clark and built by James Atkinson who also built St Bartholomew's, Prospect and St Thomas, Mulgoa at the same time. It was designed in the Georgian style in contrast to most of the other churches, except St Batholomew's, which have Gothic style detailing. Clarke was responsible for a number of Sydney houses and the church of St Mary Magdalene at St Marys. A simple rectangular building with a square tower topped with a timber spire the original layout of the pews was to face inwards to the centre of the church. In 1850 a porch designed by E Blackett was added to the northern side and not long after, in 1857, a chancel was added. Once the chancel had been added the internal pew layout was altered to face the chancel. William Woolls, a prominent late nineteenth century writer on the botany and flora of Australia was incumbent at St Peter's from 1873 and from 1877 to 1883, Rural Dean of Richmond. . In the churchyard a small obelisk was built of bricks from the old school church building. THE CEMETERY is older than the church and contains the graves of many early pioneers including John Bowman, Thomas Matcham Pitt and Lt Thomas Hobby of the NSW Corps. Chief Officer at Hawkesbury in 1800 and a supporter of Maquarie. It was the second cemetery dedicated in the Hawkesbury district, around 1814, four years after St Matthews. THE RECTORY was designed by Francis Clarke and completed in 1847 and is said to have been a copy of an English rectory known to Bishop Broughton in the mid 19th century vogue for picturesque rectories. It was added to in 1863 by Edmund Blacket. Later alterations have changed its quality.
Reference: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/heritageapp/ViewHeritageItemDetails.aspx?ID=3880010


LAND GRANTS NEW SOUTH WALES 1820

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,
Sydney, 18th September 1820.
By Command of His Excellency the Governor,
JOHN OXLEY, Surveyor General.

NOTICE is hereby given, that GRANTS to the undermentioned Persons are ready for Delivery
at this Office ; and Persons who do not apply for their Grants within one Month from this Date,
will be considered as having relinquished all Claim to the Lands measured to them
the Grants will consequently be cancelled and allotted to such Persons (having Orders for Land)
as may make Application for the same.

Thomas Acres, Thomas Adams, William Aspinall,
Robert Bostock, William Bateman, William Blackman,
Wiliam Burgen, Thomas Blackett, William Barnett,
James Byrne, George Carr, William Clark, William
Carter, George Cribb, Thomas Cosgrove, Colebee (Black Native),
George Core, John Coogan, George Collisse, John Donnelly,
Roger Doyle, Philip Devine, William Deane, James Duff, William Dye,
Rowland Edwards, William Fairburn, Richard Freeman, Sam. Freeman,
John Freeman, Thomas Gorman, Frederick Garling, Esq. Edward Gould,
John Grover, Thomas Green, John Goldsmith, Richard Hicks, John Harris,
Esq. John Harris, Esq. John Harris, Esq. John Harris, Hamilton Hume,
Edmund Hobson, Mr. William Johnston, John Kennedy, William Lawson, Esq.
Paul Loutherborough, Robert Lowe, Esq. Francis Lloyd,
John Lame, William Lane, Sarah Middleton, Edward M'Gee, Bernard Moran,
Dennis Molloy, Joseph McLaughlin Peter McAlpin , Giles William Moore,
Thomas M'Guire,Thomas M'Dongal, Matthew Pearce, George Percival,
Richard Partridge, jun. George Panton, Esq. William Pawson,
George Pashley, jun. John Palfrey, Stephen Richardson, Jacob Russell,
Richard Rouse, Richard Rouse, Richard Rouse, William Sykes,
John Smith, George Smith, Timothy Sheady, Robert Sherringam,
John Stephenson, James Smith, James Smith, George Stanbury,
James Sherrard, John Small, James Smith, John Smith, William Shelly,
Edward Tutty, Daniel Tindall, jun. Andrew Thompson, Doctor Townson,
John Tonks, Antonio Vitrio, James Wilshire, John White; William West,
George Wilson, Henry York, Charles York.

Source:
The Sydney Gazette
Saturday 7 October 1820
Transcription, janilye 2014

Land Grants for 1821


Inverell & district schools Qualifying Certificates 1919

INVERELL DISTRICT.New South Wales

Ashford School.
Robert Schmidt,
Thelma Donaldson,
Frederick Henderson.

Ashley Public
Arnold Hiscock.

Bingara Public
Reta Brown
Robert Brooks
Leslie Smart
Sidney Steel.

Bingara Upper Public.
Edith White,
Linda Macey

Boomi Public
Clarence McMaster,
Dorothy Butler,
John Newman.

Bonshaw Provisional.
Claude Bentley.

Brodie Plains Public
Lucy Marquart.

Bundarra Public
Allan Jones,
Kathleen Munro,
Joseph Baker,
Milton Chapman
Keith Carey,
Eric Doak,
John Grieve,
Jean Mulligan,
Allan Mallyon,
Clarence Smith.

Chellas Public
Constance Browning,
Bert Schuman,
Ernest Schuman,
Alfred Schuman.

Delungra Public.
Marjoric Arnold,
John Behl,
Charlotte Ewan,
Nicholas Lennon,
Ellis Wasson.

Elcombe Provisional.
Douglas Cook.

Elsmore Public
Robert Sinclair,
Charles Fuller.

Emmaville Public
Dorothy Schumacher,
Doris Barrett,
Jeffrey Bawlay,
Archibald Bailey,
Leslie Cussen,
Thomas Dwyer,
Myrtle Gay,
Leonard Hartnett,
Richard Lennon,
Vera O'Donnell,
Harold Sheridan,
Phyllis Smith,
Beatrice Schumacker.

Fernhill Public
Corinda Clarke,
Marion Abbott,
Frank Hunt,
Wm. Joseph Whitby.

Garah Public.
Dorothy Horder,
Stephen Ure.

Gilgai Public.
Lily Hines,
Athol Hunt.

Goonoowigal Public.
Clifford Ellicott,
Juanita Ellicott.

Gravesend Public
Roy Manuel,
Ethel Beard,
Eva Daly,
Frank Floyd.

Greylands Subsidised.
Stanley Batterham,
Georgina Codrington.
Haystack Subsidised. â
Gladys Jurd.

Horton Upper Public.
Frederick Carlos.

Howell Public
Amiel Sobb,
Edna Allwell,
August Berndt.

INVERELL DISTRICT SCHOOL.
Lance Armstrong,
Nina Blanch,
Mavis Campbell,
John Fuller,
Joseph Furniss,
Matthew Girle,
Margaret Halloran,
Vivienne Jones,
Harry Kee,
Malcolm Kilminster,
Stella McDonald,
Rita McLane,
Francis O'Lauchlin.

Keera Public.
James Sullivan,
Kelly Guss,
Una Hanscombe,
Samuel Robinson,
Vera Clay,
Marjorie Moore,
Thomas Smith.

Laura Provisional.
Elsie Ridgewell.

Little Plains Public.
William Killingbeck.

Maidenhead Public
Leslie Purvis,
Irving Thompson.

MOREE PUBLIC
John Hodge,
Leslie Meulman,
Charles H. Boughtou,
Moreton Benson,
Trevor Buxton,
Eileen Childs,
Eileen Conroy,
Norman Davis,
Clement Eather,
Walter Francis,
Neville Glennie,
Francis Girard
Wolsley Hyland,
Marjorie Hollis,
Zena Kimmorley,
Harold Lewis,
Agnes MacKenzie,
Jack McDonald,
Dorothy Nell,
Miriam Tomkinson,
Reginald Wright.

Mount Drummond Public
Enid Turner

Nullamanna Public
Eric Ireland,
Somerlad MacDonald,
Harold Smith.

Pallamallawa Publlc.
Hilston Oldham,
vera Maunder.

Ross Hill Public
Ernest Finlayson,
John Lydiard,
John Toohey,
Jessie Northcott,
Allene Fitzgerald,
Allan Reardon,
Jean MacDonald.

Sinclair Public
Ray Allan.

Stanborough Public
Reginald Gray,
Gladys Nielsen.

Stannifer Public
Ernest Costello,
Veronica McCann,
Harvey Osborne.

The Glen Public.
Laura Russell.

Tingha Public.
Royal Deasey,
Ronald Dunstan,
Ivy Greg,
Aubrey Osborne,
Maude Wilson,
Marjoric Eggins,
Geoffrey Hay,
Henry Jones,
Dorothy Piper,
John Price,
William Tetong.

Topwater Subsidised.
Thelma Daley.

Warialda Public.
Owen Ryan,
Joan Scutt,
Bertha Graham,
Lucy Marshall,
Charles McGee,
Grace McGregor,
Roger Stewart,
Aubrey Young.

INVERELL PUBLIC SCHOOL.
Ernest Armstrong,
Walter Baker,
Ivy Burtenshaw,
Frederick Delbridge,
Jessie Fraser,
Ellen Gilhome,
Olive Irwin,
Ida Jurd,
Elsie Trump,
Doris Williams,
Ronald Williams,
Alexander McRae,
H. Lawry.

St. Joseph's, Bundarra.
Eileen Smith.

Convent school, Emmaville.
James Callaghan,
Ellen Crowley,
Madge Collins,
Gregory Elsworthy,
Reginald Jennings.

Sacred Heart, Inverell.
Florence Carney,
Ada Curtis,
Peter Doyle,
Sybil Elbra,
Robert Esling,
Daisy Facer,
Marjorie Henderson,
Rebeccah Kersey,
Elsie Kelleher,
John Walshe,
Vera Judge.

St. Philomenas, Moree.
Mary McCarthy,
Heather Munro,
Doris Wilson,
Marion Webster.

Inverell Grammar.
Ethel Stucky,
Ida Wilson.

Downs Public
Dora Hurst.

LAND GRANTS NEW SOUTH WALES 1821

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, SYDNEY NEW SOUTH WALES
28 April 1821
JOHN OXLEY, Surveyor General.

THE following LIST of NAMES of NEW SETTLERS, who are to receive GRANTS of LAND, and of OLD SETTLERS, who are to have additional LANDS located for them in the Year 1821, is published for general Information:

James Atkinson, Thos. Arkell, Edward Alcorn, Robert Aull, James Arndell,
Thomas Allen, George Alleburn, Samuel Arndell, Richard Adams,
Francis Allen, Jos. Atkins, William Alsop, J. Aiken, Francis Able,
Michael Ansell, Edward Allen, Thos. Asplin, Thomas Ashford,
Charles Armitage, Pat. Allen, J. Andrew, J. Agland,
Alex Berry, George Barber, William Baker, David Brown,
Wm. Bradbury, Robert Bateman. Geo. Best, sen.
Bryan Byrne, Michael Bryan, J. Brown, Noah Bryan,
Charles Beasley, Timothy Brophy, J. Brown, John
Bryan, Wm. Bruce, Thos. Byrne, John Booth, N.
Boon, Wm. Beaumont, Thos. Bowers, Thos. Bates,
Wm. Beggs, Dennis Bigley, Jas. Bolsover, J. Brown,
J. Brackfield, George Bradley, Wm. Bannister, Thos.
Bowning, Sam. Barber, Thos. Bird, Michael Byrne,
Jas. Brackenry, J. Bent, Thos. Bates, Thos. Baker,
J. Barker, J. Byrne, Thos. Biggen, Andrew Biggen,
Jas. Beckett, J. Bell, Thos. Benson, Bursella Bensley,
Edw. Burke, Brien Bagnall, Jos. Bullock, Jas. Badgery,
H. Batman, Owen Byrne, Jas. Butler, Richard
Bryan, H. Butler, Aaron Burt, J. Burrell, Daniel
Brown, J. Bentley, Stephen Burr, Wm. Britain, J.
Bradford, Jon. Broker, J. Bowman, Wm. Barron,
Jas. Byrne, Martin Burke, Geo Best, jun. James Barker,
Jas. Brailey, Jas. Burgess, H. Bray, Thomas Byrne,
Robert Brodie, Jas. Burke, Thos. Brown, J. Brown, Thos Brian,
Wm. Burridge, D. Burne, Wm. Briant, Eber. Bunker, James Butler,
Silvester Butler, Owen Boyne, J. Bennett, D. Brown, John Bayley,
Edward Bailes, John Bull, John Bailes, jun.
Daniel Bisex, Michael Boland, Thos. Cowper, James Cobb,
Donald Cameron, George Cutter, Adam Clink, Isaac Cornwall,
William Chadworth, Timothy Connor, James Carroll, John Cahill,
John Cheers, Benj. Carver, Owen Connor, Peter Cooney, John Crawley,
Thomas Campbell, Richard Cavanagh, Jas. Cavanagh,
James Cox, George Clarke, Samuel Craft, Thomas Cross, John Cribb,
Peter Carrol, Roger Connor, John Cowley, John Craft, John Colcroft,
William Craig, Farrell Cuffe, John Cromen, Dennis Connolly,
James Connell, Michael Cartwell, Peter Carroll, John Collins,
Hugh Crabtree, Abraham Champray, Thos. Cowling, John D. Campbell.
Richard Carr, Dennis Conway, John Cummins, William Cheshire, Thos. Clarke,
Edward Churchill, John Chaseling, James Connelly, Thomas Cheshire,
John Day, John Dight, Andrew Doyle, William Davis, Edward Doyle,
Thos. Dutton, Jas. Donnelly, James Duffey, Wm. Douglas, Jas. Devlin,
Jas. Daly, Jas. Dempsey, Pat. Downey, Thos. Davy, Peter Dunn, Edmund Doyle,
Cyrus Doyle, Jas. Donahar, Stephen Dunn, Pat. Devoy, Pat Dacey, Michael Doran,
Nicholas Dukes, Thos. Downes, Charles Dodding, Geo. Dowling, J. Dell,
Francis Dalton, Jas. Dearing, Wm Dockrell, Michael Duggin, Richard Donelly,
J. Darrah, Isaac Dowse, Garrett Donally, John Dewhurst, Christopher Downes,
John Dogharty, Walter Duggan, Joseph Dargon, George Davis,
Shady Davey, Samuel Davis, John Davis, Thomas Davis, William Davis,
John Dalton, Patrick Downey, Edward Dillon, John Dunn, John Eyre,
John England, James Eldridge, Eliker Everitt, Joseph Eades,
Charles Eather ,Thomas Eather, Thomas Eather sen.
Joseph Emm, Joseph Earles, Daniel Eaton, Joseph Eyles, Henry Early,
William Edney, John Edney, Wm. Edwards, Wm. Eagleton, Wm. Etsell,
John Ellison, John Wm. Fulton, Wm. John Fitz, Henry Fleming,
Bernard Fitzpatick, John Frazier, Samuel Fry, George Freeman,
Wm. Field, Bernard Fitzpatrick, Robert Farlow, James Frazier,
Edward Field, sen. John Finch, Wm. Fulford, John Freebody,
S. Foley; James Freeman, Thomas Frost, Geo. Fieldhouse,
Francis Frendard, John Floyd, and J. Forster.
Robert Forrester, Wm. Forrester, John Farrell,
John Fowler, Richard Friar, John Foley, Edward Franks,
Edward Fletcher, William Flynn, Thomas Francis, jun.,
Patrick Flynn, Peter Fitzpatrick, John Ferguson, J. Golledge,
Wm. Guise, J. Galvin, Jas. Gooding, jun., James Goddard, Benjamin Grimshaw,
P. Garey, J. Grono, George Graves, James Greenslade,
J. Grant, Mich. Geary, Robt. Gray, Henry Gaskin,
Mich. Gavagan, Robt. Garratt, Benjamin Goddard,
Wm. Gwillim, Jas. Griffiths, Dennis Green, Wm.Goodere,
Wm. Galvin, Dennis Guinny, John Glade, Val. Goodwin, Richard Guise,
J. Goodwin, Thomas Galvin, Thos. Gilbert, J. Gosport, Joseph Gosport,
J. Gardner, Joseph Gilbert, Isaac Gorrick, John Higgins, George Howe,
J. Howe, Wm. Holmes, Wm. Hayes, Wm. Hardman, Joseph Hately,
Pat. Harper, Francis Hainsworth, William Hearn, Henry Howell,
Mich. Hogan, Richard Haviland, Philip Hogan, J. Harris, J. Harris,
William Hawkins, John Hanabus, Charles Herbert, Thomas Hinton,
Pat. Hand, Lawrence Harvey, David Horton, jun., J. Hope,
Thomas Hall, Wm. Hill, Peter Hough, Joseph Hunt, Henry Hunt,
Samuel Harding, D. Hawkins, George Hambridge, James Henry,
Maurice Hallihan, Edward Harrigan, Thomas Howell, George Hill,
Christopher Harris, Joshua Holt, Tim. Hoy, Wm. Harrington,
John Hodges, Mich. Hughes, John Hoile, Henry Hoile, Joshua Heap,
Abraham Herne, Lawrence Halfpenny, James Harper, John Herbert, jun.,
J. Hazard, Jas. Higgins. Robt. Higgins, Enoch Hutchinson,
Thos. Higgins, Peter Hibbs, jun., J. Holden, Wm. Hewitt, Edw. Hobbs,
J. Hearn, Thos. Hansey, Hugh Hughes, jun., Jas. Hall, Henry Huff,
George Hughes, J. Holt, George Higginson, Peter Hibbs, J. Holden,
Thos. Hooton, Wm. Howell, Francis R. Hume, J. Hendle, Jas. Hayden,
Jesse Hudson, David Horton, sen., Robt. Johnston, George James,
John Johnston, John Jacklin, Thomas John, George Johnstone, Wm. Jones,
Wm. Ikin, Joseph Inch, Wm. Jacklyn, Charles Ivory, Edward Jones,
Mich. Joyce, Thos. Jones, George Jubb, jun., Thos. Jones,
John Innes, John Johnson, Richard Johnson, Charles Jackson, John Joyce,
James Kay, William Klen endorlff, Pat. Kirk, John Kennedy,
Wm. Kearns, J. Keighran, Thos. Keane, J. Kirlaghan, R. Kibble,
Cornelius Keoe, Donald Kennedy, jun., John Kelly,
Joseph Lendall, Jas. Kavannagh, Duncan Kennedy,
John Kennedy, Wm. Kellow, Wm. Kenney, Thomas Kelly, Archibald Kane,
Daniel Kelly, Thomas Kelly, D. Knowland, Thos. Kendall, James Kelly,
James Kenney, J. H. Lawson, Walker Lawry, William Lilly,
Francis Lawless, Samuel Leverton, Henry Lendon.
J. Holmes, J. Lynch, Samuel Leverton, jun. Jas. Lewis,
Richard Lillis, Thos. Lawrence, J. Leadbeater, sen.
J. Larken, Peter Lawry, George Lilley, James Lyons,
Wm. Landron, Miles Leary, John Lavis, James Layton,
Nicholas Lacy, William Lees, Peter Lillis,
Elijah Lane, Wm. Lawrence, J. Lapish, Mich. Lamb,
J. Lees, J. Lacey, Owen Lenaghan, John Longford,
Wm. Lovegrove, H. Lamb, J. Lyons, Hannibal M'Arthur,
James M'Arthur, William M'Arthur, Charles M'Arthur, Andrew M'Dougal,
J. M'Henry, Henry Marr, Wm. Minchin, William Mobbs, J. Mobbs,
George Mobbs, Isaac Mobbs, J. M'Loughlin, Fred. Meurant,
Joseph Meyrick, Tristram Moore, Cornelius M'Arthy,
P.Moore, Pat. Mernan, J. Madden, Mich. Maloney,
Wm. Morgan, John Mills, Jas. M'Arty, jun.
Thomas Martin, jun. Jas. M'Arty, J. Mackey, Thos. Miller,
Christopher M'Guire, Thos Mortimer, J. May, Pat. Mason, Pat. Moore,
Thos. Maloney, Jas. M'Guire, Matthias Miller, Jas. M'Arty.
John M'Arty, William Makepiece, Thos. Moran, Fred. Murphy,
Patrick Mulhall, Thos. M'Caffery, George Maginnis, Edw. Merrick,
Thos. M'Kenna, Robert Maxwell, Henry M'Allister, James M'Manis,
John Murphy, George Marley, Kennedy Murphy, Patrick M'Hall,
George Murphy, Thos. Mustagh, Owen Martin, jun. George Mortimer,
Thos Murray, Charles M'Carty, William Mobbs jun. Jas. Mosely,
H. Morton, J. Merzagora, J. M'Peake, Isaac Mills, Jas. Macdonald,
Jas. Milson, Dennis M'Neary, Jas. M'Aloney, Brian M'Cormic,
John Moss Wm. Mannix, Michael Macdonald, John M'Donald, Joseph Mason,
John. M'Guigan, Joseph Mackinley, Thos. M'Guire, Jas. Marshall,
Thomas Moakson, Andrew' M'Dougall, Jame M'Dougall, J. M'Dougall,
J. Moss, Alexander M'Guigan, Patrick Mahar, Thomas McVitie,
Simon Moulds, Edward Meurant, jun, J. Matthews, Robt. Marshall,
William M'Haslan, Alexander M'Donald, Hugh M'Avoy,
J. Murphy, Mich. Minton, Jas. M'Donald, Patrick
Naughton, Richard Norris, J. Nash, Thomas Nugent,
Thos. Newman, Andrew Nash, Jas. Nugent, James Nowlan,
William Newport, John Norris, John Nowland, George Nash. J. Neil,
J. Nicholds, Walter Noy, F. O'Meara, J. O'Meara, p. Oakes,
James O'Brian, Charles O'Brien, James Owen, Thomas Owens, William Osburne,
Samuel Owen, James O'Harra, William Olds, Mark Opong,
Brien O'Brien, Wm. Oliver, Joseph Onus, Terence O'Brien,
Chas. Pennon, G. T. Palmer, George Panton,
Wm. Pithers, Mr. Parmeter, J. Price, Wm. Parkins
F. Pendergrast, J. Pike, J. Pike, Morgan Poor, N. Payton,
J. Pitcher, Saml. Paine, Wm. Page, John J. Peacock,
Robt. Plumb, J. Patfield, Thos. Prentice, J. Phillips,
Mich. Parker, George Pinkerton, F. Peisley,
George Phillips, J Pendergrast, Wm. Paris, J. Pye,jun.
Wm. Pritchard, Daniel Pegg, Saml. Perkins George Plummer,
H. Pullen, R. Partridge, Joseph Pashley, Mich. Power, J Pugh,
Deison Post, Tim Poor, F. Piper, Wm. Piper, H. Paul, J. Pender,
Jas. Pender, Edwin Rouse, Edw. Riley, Thos. Rose, Edw. Redmond,
J. Robinson, Chas. Rushton, John Riley, Malachi Ryan, Thos Riley,
J. Ready, J. Redmond, Wm. Reynolds, J. Ross, Barnabas Rix,
Wm Rafter, Mark Russell, Wm. Rose, Wm. Roberts, Joseph Rye, jun.
Mich. Rourke, Alex. Routledge, J. Riley, Nich. Ryan,
Wm. Rixon, Robt. Ray, Owen Riley, Thos. Rudd, J. Rudd,
Moses Rosetta, H. Rose, J. Roberts, Jas. Roberts, J. Ruby,
J.Robb, Edw. Redfern, Wm. Radley, Wm. Redfern, J. Rentwell,
Richard Ruff. H. Rochester, Barnabas Rix, Chas. Smith, Wm. Smith.
Mich. Stack, Jas. Stack, Jas. Shepherd, sen. G. Smith,
Wm. Scott, Jas. Shepherd, jun. F. Spencer, Andrew Scott,
J. Sunderland, Martin Sweeney, Dennis Shield,
Dan. Smallwood, George Sewell, Edw. Stinton, Jos. Smith,
H. Styles, Jas. Smithers, Wm. Skinn, Joseph Smith, jun. Wm. Smith,
Wm. Stenson, Jas. Smith, Edw. Shipley, Wm. Speers, Hugh Scott,
W. Scott, Wm. Smith, J. Smith, Jas. Smallwood, Roger Shea,
J. Scully, J. Stone, Thos. Stevens, Jos. Stubbs, Jas. Speers,
Wm. Stubbs, Wm Simms, Thos. Stone, Thos. Stack, Jos. Smith, Jas. Smith,
F. Stafford, James Smith, Dennis Stacey, Chas, Summerell, Stephen Smith,
J. Smith, Edw. Stowers, Daniel Step, Thos. Smith, Dan. Sweeney,
Thos. Sanders, jun. J. Smith, J. Stanbury, jun.
Robt. Smith, George Scott, Murty Shields, Wm. Sherries,
J. Sewell, Wm. Stabler, Chas. Throsby, jun.
Robt. Turnbull, Chas. Thompson, Wm. Tuckwell, J. Tindell,
J. Tarlington, Edw. Tompson, J. Turnbull, Jas. Thompson,
Chas. Thomas, Bishop Thompson, Thos. Thompson, J.Tague, J.Taylor,
H. Fretheway, Jas. Toucher, S. Tuckman, Chas. Tunks, H. Thorn, jun.
J. Thorm, jun. Jos. Tuzo, Jean Francois Theon,
J. Town, Jas. Turner, Wm Thorn, jun. Jas. Thomas,
D.Thompson, J. Taylor, Thos. Trotter, Jas. Turner,
George Tuckwell, Wm. Tyson, Philip Tully, George
Trace, Owen Tierney, Wm. Tompson, Thos. Turner,
James Vaughan, J. Vardy, R. Virgin, Thos. Vardy, J.Voildes,
Thos. Upton, Edw. Wollstonecraft, Wm.Walker,
George Woodhouse, G. P. Wood, George Ward, J. Whalan,
Wm. Welsh, Thos. Woolley, J.Williams, Edmund Wright,
Robt. Wilkinson, Daniel Wellings, J. Wright, J. Walker,
Jas. Williams, Wm. Wright, Chas. Wilson, Thos. Warner, P. Workman
Aaron Walkers, Job Wilson, Wm. Williams, Robert Wells, Thos. Wilson,
Thos. Wood, J. K. Williamson J. D. Wood, Wm. White, Chas. Watson,
J. Williams, Jas. Walbourn, J,. Weevers, Chris. Ward, H. Wells,
Wm. Walker, J. Warby, J. Warby, jun. J. Wood, James Wright.
Wm. White, Wm. Wakeman, James Whalan, James Were, J. Wright,
William Wall, Joseph Walker and Charles Yorke.


SOURCES:
The Sydney Gazette
(NSW : 1803 - 1842)
Saturday 28 April 1821
P.1
Saturday 5 May 1821
P.2
Saturday 12 May 1821
P.2
transcription, janilye
2012

Land Grants for 1820


The Hell-Ship Neptune 1790

THE name "Neptune" conjures up for, most people the
image of a, benevolent-looking old personageusually to be
seen depicted on the reverse of certain English coinswhose
main characteristic is the possession of a three-pronged fork
known in- mythology as a trident.
To others the term suggests the most distant of the planets, estimated
to be 2,780 million miles from the sun.
In Australian history, however, "Neptune" is identified with a convict
transport ship, a fine vessel of 792 tons, but a hell-ship if ever there-was
one, whose story, conjointly with that of her fellow transports, the Surprise
and the Scarborough, constituted one of the darkest and grimmest pages
in the establishment of the settlement of Port Jackson.
The tragic drama of the Neptune opens with a prologue, the leading
roles falling to John and Elizabeth Macarthur, with Captain John Gilbert
as the arch-villain, the chorus consisting of male and female convicts
and soldiers of the newly-raised N.S.W. Corps.
The scene is set, first at Gravesend, where-the ship lay for
a few days', and then at Plymouth. On board were 421 male and 78 female
convicts; two officersCaptain Nepean and Lieutenant Macarthurand
42 soldiers of the Corps, six convict wives, all free women, 13 children, and
a few passengers.
Amongst the crew was the surgeon, D'Arcy Wentworth, who was himself to be
distinguished in our early history and also in the person of his famous
son, William Charles. Just prior to embarkation, on December 9, 1783, he
had stood his trial at the Old Bailey Sessions for highway robbery, and
been acquitted on this and three later Indictments.
****
THE casus belli between Macarthur and John Gilbert, the captain of
the ship, arose from the former's complaints regarding the location and
fittings of his cabin, and "the stench of the buckets belonging to the
convict women of a morning." Hotter and hotter grew the language: Gilbert
threatened to write to the War Office and have Macarthur and his wife
turned out of the ship; Gilbert gave Macarthur a punch on the breast:
Nepean interfered and patched up the quarrel temporarily. This all happened
at Gravesend.
On the seven days trip round to Plymouth there was another flare-up.
Macarthur accusing the captain of ungentlemanly conduct towards, himself
and his wife, and calling him publicly on the quarter-deckhe had
a fine capacity for vituperation"a great scoundrel." In retaliation,
Gilbert told Macarthur that he had "settled many a greater man than
him," and that he was to be seen on shore, whereupon Macarthur named
4 o'clock at the Fountain Tavern, Plymouth Docks.
They met a duel was foughtapparently a bloodless one
honour was satisfied, and both parties agreed, to live in harmony thereafter.
The wranglings between Macarthur, Nepean, the officers, and Gilbert, not
only continued, but grew in violence, so that the authorities took action
and superseded Gilbert by Captain Donald Traill, who had formerly been a
Master in the Navy under Nelson.
The change, however, appeared to be much for the worse, so that after a
few weeks of misery on the Neptune, the
Macarthurs could stand the conditions no longer, and exchanged to the
Scarborough. The details still survive in Elizabeth Macarthur's Private
Diary.
So much for the Prologue. With the appointment of Traill opens the
main action of the tragedy. The ship was so shamefully overcrowded that
200 seamen deserted before she left England. Conceive the sardine-like
packing of the convicts on the orlop, that is the lowest of the three decks.
Within a space 75 feet long, 35 broad and six feet high, were built the
miserable apartments for housing 40 men, in four rows of cabins one-storey
high, one row on each side of the ship; and two rows down the centre.
These cabins were six feet square.
A simple calculation will show that to each convict was allotted about
36 cubic feet of air space, about the capacity of two coffins of ordinary size.
It was not, however, until February 15 1792, when the report of the
Commissioners of the Navy was published that the whole of the sordid details
relating to the treatment of these "unhappy sacrifices to the justice of their
country" was made public.
On the Neptune was Lieutenant John Shapcote, the naval agent, whose
duty it was to see that the convicts received their full rations and the best
possible treatment. Apparently he failed in his duty. The crew, too, was
very disorderly, and "inclined to be riotous" throughout the voyage.
Before the Neptune left London, Shapcote put all the male convicts into
ironshe was not risking an uprising.
Even while in the river many of them died, their bodies being thrown
overboard. When a search was made for concealed weapons nearly a hundred
knives were found, so overboard they too went, with many of the
convicts' personal belongings, though rumour hath it that Traill and his
officers, appropriated everything of value. To make congestion worse, the
ship was crammed with goods, "ventures" as they were called, being taken
out as speculations by officers of the N.S.W. Corps, with the connivance of
Traill and Shapcote.
The whole voyage was one long horror. Shapcote and the ship's officers
kept every man in irons the whole six months of the voyage, many of them
coupled together, though batches of 50 or 60 were allowed on deck for two
hours each per day. The convict women were better off, having, much
to Mrs. Macarthur's disgust, the full range of the quarter deck and the
poop. At night, however, the ship's company invaded the rooms of the
women, whom they carried off to their own quarters.
****
DEATH soon began to take its toll.
The supply of water, was very limited, washing facilities non-existent.
An outbreak of scurvy and "a violent epidemical fever" killed scores of the
poor unfortunates, some of whom actually died in irons. Sometimes the
deaths were concealed until the stench of the corpses revealed their
presence to the surgeon. By such concealment, the survivors were enabled
to draw and share the rations of the deceased.
Sometimes a living man was discovered chained to a putrefying corpse.
There were 46 deaths on the Neptune before arrival at Cape Town.
Captain Hill, who came out on the Surprise, complained bitterly of the
treatment of the convicts., "The slave trade." he said, "is merciful,
compared with what I have seen in this fleet."
As the contractors, and thc captain of the Neptune were being paid 17/7/6
per head, not for the number of convicts landed, but for the number
shipped, the greater the number of deaths the fewer were the mouths to
feed and the higher the total profit.
Captain Traill, of the Neptune, appears to have been a first-class rogue
and an inhuman monster. On his return to England three of his
quartermasters and seven others of his crew lodged a formal complaint
before Alderman Clark at the Guildhall, that during the voyage he and
William Elrington, the chief mate, had cut down the convicts' water to
half a-pint-a day: that 171,(the official number is 158) died on the
voyage; that many of them were so starved that they had been seen to
take the chews of tobacco from the mouths of corpses; that men stole
and ate the hogs' swill; that on arrival at Botany Bay the captain, and
mate ransacked the convicts' boxes for anything saleable, opened a
warehouse, and disposed of the goods at a high profit;
that the ships swarmed with vermin. To these and other charges the
contractors. Camden, Calvert, and King, replied seriatim, publishing also
Traill's defence, which is not convincing. According to a letter from one
Thomas Evans to Under-secretary King. Traill and Elrington were next
charged before Alderman Boydell with the murder of Andrew Anderson, sixth
mate of the Neptune, Jno. Joseph, the cook, and an unnamed convict. Traill,
however, vanished into smoke, and the case did not come to trial. I cannot
find any details of the allegations beyond the bare affidavit in the
records, though Governor Phillip himself stated that "an enquiry into the
conduct, of the master of the Neptune
will, I make no doubt, have a good
effect. . . . for the convicts were certainly very ill-treated."
****
AT Cape Town further disorders occurred, it being alleged that a
certain Dutch captain and a Major Delisle came on board, ostensibly
to visit Captain Nepean, but in reality, "on account of the female convicts."
Shortly after leaving the Cape, a female convict, "who had constantly,
attended Lieutenant Shapcote"whatever that phrase may implyone morning
between three and four o'clock, came and informed the chief mate that the
agent, was dead. This "untimely death" was never investigated, for as
Traill asserted that the body was very offensive it was cast overboard that,
very morning; To say the least, the circumstances were all very suspicious.
By the time the Neptune reached Sydney 147 men and ll women convicts had died;
another 269 were placed in hospital. "The Governor," wrote one-correspondent,
"was very angry', and scolded the captains a great deal, and I heard
intended to write to London-about it, for I heard him say it was murdering them."
We possess several eye-witnesses' accounts of the landing of this mass
of human misery from the three transports.
The Rev. Richard Johnson, who went aboard one of them, he couldn't face up to
the Neptune, said he found men lying "some half and others nearly quite
naked, without bed or bedding, unable to help themselves"; the stench was
intolerable, dead bodies had been thrown into the
harbour, had drifted ashore, and were lying naked on the rocks; "some
creeped on hands and knees." Some were carried ashore on the backs of
others; "their heads, bodies, clothes, blankets, all full of lice";
within three weeks he had buried "not less than eighty-six."
And so the terrible tale, substantiated to the last detail
by dependable witnesses, draws to its conclusion, and the curtain drops.
Though many months later. Mr.Secretary Dundas informed the
Governor that he had "thoroughly investigated" and "taken the necessary
steps to bring forward the conduct of the parties concerned in the
treatment of the convicts on board the Neptune." no active measures to
sheet home the crime ever took place.

Sources:
Sydney Morning Herald
Saturday 10 February 1945
page 8
Affair of the Neptune
George Mackaness
Transcription, janilye


Family of Jeremiah and Mary Brown New South Wales

Jeremiah BROWN born in Llanidloes, Wales in 1802 and died in Surrey Hills, Sydney on 18 December 1860.
Jeremiah married Mary Burns in Glasgow, Scotland in 1828. Mary died at Taree in New South Wales on the 8 May 1905; she was 96.
Jeremiah was a private with the 4th. Regiment of Foot.
The 4th. Regiment of Foot arrived in Van Diemans Land on the 19 October 1831 on the Larkins.
The couple had 12 children.
1. Mary Brown 1830 1913 never married
2. George Brown 1832 1923 m. Mary Ann GARRARD 1833 - 1891
3. Ellen Brown 1834 1879 m. 1. Thomas BYFORD 1830 - 1854 2. Thomas West DUGDALE 1830 - 1899
4. Benjamin Brown 1837 1878 m. Sarah TEECE 1842 - 1884
5. Grace Brown 1839 1931 m. Robert Cooper WALKER 1833 - 1897
6. Albert Brown 1841 1924 m. Mary Grace SHARE 1843 - 1926
7. Adelaide Brown 1843 1926 m. Henry Edward DENGATE 1841 - 1923
8. Emily Janet Brown 1846 1910 m. William LONGLEY 1841 - 1927
9. Robert Alexander Brown 1849 1911 m. Sarah Jane BUTTSWORTH 1850 - 1941
10. Frederick Wesley BROWN 1851 1935 m. Kate Milner EATHER 1864 - 1941
11. Sydney William Thomas Brown 1854 1934 m. Katherine LAW 1853 - 1913
12. Ann Eva Jessie Brown 1856 1938 m. Thomas West DUGDALE J.P. 1830 - 1899

1. Mary BROWN the 1st daughter eldest child
born around 1829 or 30 perhaps in Glasgow never married
The Sydney Morning Herald, Saturday 15 March 1913
BROWN.
March 10, 1913, at Chatswood, Mary (late Broughton-street, Paddington),
sister of Mrs. H. Dengate, Hopetoun-avenue, Chatswood
NSW.BDM DEATHS 1399/1913 BROWN MARY JEREMIAH MARY CHATSWOOD
The cemetery index shows details given by Nurse Pamenter
Australia Cemetery Index, 1808-2007 about Mary Brown
Name: Mary Brown
Death Age: 85
Birth Date: abt 1828
Death Date: 11 Mar 1913 (this is a burial date)
Death Location: A/c Nurse M Pamenter, Francis, Anderson St, Chatswood
Cemetery: Gore Hill Methodist First Division
Section: Section B Grave 41
Cemetery Location: New South Wales

--------------------------------------------
2. MR. GEORGE BROWN. 1832-1923 the 1st son
OBITUARY
George Brown was born on 21st September 1832,
at Emu Plains.
His father, Mr. Jeremiah Brown, was at
one time assistant superintendent at
Cockatoo Island Penal Settlement,
where there were between 400 and 500
prisoners. He was a very earnest Christian
man, and brought up his family in
close attachment to the church.
George joined the Sunday School at
York Street in his teens, becoming a teacher,
a church member, a member of
the choir. He was superintendent of
the Sunday School for many years.
About the time that Old York Street
Church was demolished (1886) to make
way for the Centenary Hall, Mr. Brown
removed to Ashfield. He at once threw
himself into the active work of the
church, in turn holding almost every
office a layman can fill.
From early years he also busied him
self in the promotion of temperance,
Protestant, and Friendly societies. His
record in connection with the Grand
United Order of Oddfellows is said to
constitute a world's record. He joined
this order on July 11, 1853; thus he
completed seventy years of membership
and office.
Not content with all these interests
and activities of a religious and philan
thropic nature, he offered himself as a
candidate for municipal honours. He
was accepted, and for many years was
an alderman in the Ashfield Council. He
rendered excellent service to the
borough as Mayor in 1909.
In his birth year, there were some
half dozen Methodist ministers, who
were ministering to some few hundreds
of our people in all Australia and Tas
mania. Now there are about 1,100 ministers,
nearly 600,000 worshipers, of whom 152,000 are
members of the Church. Sunday Schools have grown
from very small things, until to-day
there are 3,680 schools, 25,900 teachers,
and 204,000 scholars. Such men as Mr.
Brown have done, a worthy work in con
tributing to this great progress. .
He was an embodiment of the virtues
of industry, fidelity, honour, and kind
liness in all relations with his fellow
men. He loved the House of God, and
sacredly observed the duties of all the
offices to which the church called him.
He was specially interested in the
young people, and was never tired - of
inculcating the advantages of thrift,
sobriety, and faith in God. Until
memory failed, he kept up an intense
interest in the welfare of the church.
Right up to the last he would respond
to prayer or Bible reading. He went
back into a beautiful child-likeness as
the last days crept on. God was good
in giving him the tender care and ministry
which so lovingly surrounded him in age and
growing helplessness. And that was a fitting
reward for his own unselfish service of others.
SOURCE: The Methodist 1 September 1923
NSW.BDM DEATHS;
11157/1923 BROWN GEORGE JEREMIAH MARY ASHFIELD
George married Mary Ann GARRARD 1833-1891
------------------------
3. ELLEN BROWN 1834-1879 the second daughter
The Sydney Morning Herald,Wednesday 22 February 1854
By special license, at the Wesleyan Chapel, Prince-street, on
the 20th instant, by the Rev. J. Eggleston, Mr. T. W. Byford, of
George-street, Sydney, to Ellen, second daughter of Mr. J. Brown,
Assistant Superintendent Cockatoo Island.
Then in November the same year Thomas Byford drowns
Two years later Ellen marries Thomas West DUGDALE.
Ellen dies in 1879 and then Thomas West DUGDALE marries her youngest sister Jessie
NSW.BDM MARRIAGES
V1854425 85/1854 BYFORD THOMAS BROWN ELLEN IA Wesley Methodists
466/1856 DUGDALE THOMAS WEST BYFORD ELLEN SYDNEY
NSW.BDM DEATHS:
4676/1879 DUGDALE ELLEN AGE 45 YEARS DIED GOSFORD BRISBANE WATER

and GUESS WHAT!
She also drowned at sea. On 10 March in the The Bonnie Dundee disaster
The Sydney Morning Herald, Friday 14 March 1879
DUGDALE.Drowned at sea, off Newcastle, Ellen, the beloved wife of T. W. Dugdale, J.P., of the Manning River.
The Collision between the Barrabool and Bonnie Dundee more stories on TROVE

The Sydney Morning Herald, Friday 14 March 1879
FUNERAL NOTICES.

THE FRIENDS of Mr. T. W. DUGDALE, of the
Manning River, are respectfully invited to attend the Funeral
of his late dearly beloved WIFE, Ellen, to move from the residence ot her Brother,
George Brown, 262, Kent-street, between
King and Erskine streets, at half-past 8 o'clock, on SATURDAY
MORNING, the 15th instant.

THE FRIENDS of Mrs. MARY BROWN are respectfully invited to attend the
Funeral of her late beloved DAUGHTER, Mrs. T. W. Dugdale : to move from
the residence of her son, George, 202, Kent-street, at half-past 8 o'clock,
on SATURDAY MORNING, the 15th instant.

THE FRIENDS of Messrs. GEORGE, ALBERT,
and SYDNEY BROWN are respectfully invited to attend the
Funeral of their beloved SISTER, Mrs. T. W. Dugdale ; to move
from the residence of her brother. George. 262, Kent-street, at
half-past 8 o'clock, on SATURDAY MORNING, the 15th instant.

THE FRIENDS of Mr. H. DENGATE are respect fully invited to
attend the Funeral of his SISTER-IN-LAW,
Mrs. T. W. Dugdale ; to move from the residence of her brother,
George, 282, Kent-street, on SATURDAY MORNING, the 15th
instant, at half-past 8 o'clock.
----------------------------------------------------------
4. Benjamin BROWN the 2nd son born in 1837 Baptised at St.Phillips Church of England by Rev. William Cowper. Father states on certificate he was a Private with the 4th Regiment.
Benjamin married Sarah Teece at St Saviours Church of England in Goulburn.
Goulburn Herald Wednesday 23 April 1862
MARRIED

By special license, on 17th instant, by the Rev. W. Sowerby,
BENJAMIN, second son of the late Mr. JEREMIAH BROWN, of Sydney,
to SARAH, eldest daughter of Mr. WILLIAM TEECE, of Goulburn.

Benjamin and Sarah had seven children:-
1. Annie Eva Jessie Brown 1863 1935
2. Emily Adelaide Brown 1864 1953
3. George S. S. V Brown 1867 1945
4. Florence Brown 1869 1951
5. Blanche Maud Brown 1871 1940 (Matron Brown, Katoomba)
6. William Arthur Thomas Brown 1873 1877
7. Alfred Ernest Brown 1876 1949
In the same year Benjamin married he opened a shoe and boot store in Auburn street Goulburn called The Prince of Wales Boot and Shoe Warehouse; next door to the Royal hotel. All went well till September 1868 when he became insolvent. After that I've not found anything till September 1877 when this popped up:-
The Goulburn Herald and Chronicle Wednesday 26 September 1877
GOULBURN POLICE COURT.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22.
Before the police magistrate
Benjamin Brown was charged with threatening
to kill his daughter Eva Brown and others.
Constable Emerton deposed: I arrested defendant
last night in virtue of the warrant produced he
said he did not attempt to stab his daughter that
one of the other children was beating her mother,
and that he ran out to protect her, having a knife in
his hand; he said his wife was out of her mind, and
that they ill-treated her since she came home; I pro
duce a knife which I received from one of the children.
Eva Brown, aged fourteen years, deposed: For the
last month my father has been drinking to excess;
yesterday he was walking about in an excited state
with a knife in his hand he threatened if any
one came in he would find a way to use it; my
mother is quite out of her mind; the knife produced
is the one he had in his hand.
Adelaide Brown, aged twelve years, deposed: My
father has been drinking to excess for the last month
he is violent; yesterday he had a knife, in the sleeve
of his coat; I could see the handle in his hand; he
was not sober; he pushed me down and drew out the
knife; he caught me by the arm; he handed the
knife to my mother and asked her to stick it in him;
I am afraid of him, and so are all the family.
Defendant was ordered to find sureties to keep the
peace for two monthshimself in 50, and two
sureties in 25 each-or to be imprisoned for a like
period, or till such time as the sureties were found.]


Goulburn Herald, 28 September 1878
DEATHS

At Young, on the 24th September, Mr. Benjamin BROWN, late of Goulburn, aged forty-two years.
--------------------------------------

5 Grace BROWN the 3rd. daughter.
The Cumberland Argus, Thursday 3 December 1931
An old resident of Wentworthville, Mrs.
Grace Walker, of Stapleton-street, passed away last week. The late Mrs. Walker,
who was 93, was a widow of the late Mr. Robert Cooper Walker. The funeral took
place on Monday.
The Sydney Morning Herald, Monday 30 November 1931
WALKER.-November 28, 1931, Grace Walker, of
Nitchero, Wentworthville, widow of Robert Cooper
Walker, in her 93rd year.
Grace was born on the 29 March 1839 in Sydney and died on the 28 November 1931 at 'Nitchevo' Stapleton-street, Wentworthville, Sydney.
Her husband, Robert Cooper WALKER was the 6th. of 12 children born to the Rev. James WALKER M.A. 1794 - 1854 and Fanny, nee BILLINGSLEY, 1799 - 1897.
1. Fanny Hannah Waldo Walker 1825 1827
2. Billingsley Edmonds Walker D.A.C.G. 1827 1852
3. James Charles Walker 1829 1896
4. Samuel Billingsley Walker 1831 1916
5. Llyssye Walker 1833 1920
6. Robert Cooper Walker 1833 1897
7. Fanny Elizabeth Walker 1834 1879
8. Frederick Walker 1837 1864
9. Philip Billingsley Walker 1838 1900
10. Richard Cornelius Critchett Walker C.M.G. 1841 1903
The above family arrived in Launceston, Tasmania on the 27 August 1841 on the ship 'Arrabian' with their last child Richard Cornelius Critchett (known throughout his life as 'Critchett') being born at sea.
On New Years Day 1843 the family arrived in New South Wales.

The children of Grace Brown and Robert Cooper WALKER were :-

1. Eva Walker 1862 1863 died an infant
2. Paul Walker 1864 1927 m. Eleanor Claye 1870 1944. had 5 children
3. Alma Walker 1866 1867 died an infant
4. Mabel (May)Walker 1870 1958 never married
5. Edith Walker 1873 1945 m. Charles A.E. BANKS had 3 children Bettie, Ditha and Lodis
6. Arnold Walker 1876 1954 m. Jessie M. SLATTER
7. Ruth Walker xxxx 1973 never married

-------------------------------------------------

6. ALBERT BROWN 1841-1924The 3rd.son
OBITUARY. died 17 June 1924
Mr. Albert Brown, for many years alderman,
and an ex-Mayor of Ashfield, died suddenly on
Tuesday afternoon. He was 83 years of ago,
and was born in Norfolk Island, where his
father was a Government official He had
resided at Ashfield for about 45 years. For
many years he was In partnership with the
late Mr. H. Dengate, under the firm name of
Dengate and Brown, builders and contractors,
and when that partnership was dissolved
continued the business on his own account
Of late years, however, his health did not
permit of his active participation in the business,
which has been controlled by his son
During Mr. Browns long residence in Ashfield he
always took a deep Interest in its progress
and advancement. He was elected an alderman In 1882,
and sat continuously for 19 years, and occupied the
Mayoral chair for the 1881-2 term.
It was during his year of office
that he convened the public meeting at which
it was decided to establish the Western
Suburbs Cottage Hospital it was owing to his
determination that the hospital was erected
on the site it now occupies, and his fellow
committeemen recognise and showed their
appreciation of his efforts in bringing about
the foundation of the hospital by electing him
the first president. He held that position for
12 years, until falling health compelled the
committee reluctantly to accept his resignation
Mr. Brown was also instrumental in establishing
the Ashfield Municipal Library, one of
the first of the kind, but now merged into
the Ashfield School of Arts; the original
Ashfield Borough Band, the Ashfield Cricket
Club, and other local activities. In his
younger days he was an enthusiastic cricketer,
and when not playing himself never failed, while
his health permitted, to witness a match.
Deceased was an ardent Methodist, and was
a trustee of the Ashfield Methodist Church, a
position he held for many years. He suffered
greatly from asthma for the last 10 years,
and of recent years rarely left his home. The
bright sunshine of Tuesday, however, induced
him to go for a short walk, which proved to
be his last, as, at about 3 o'clock, he was
found unconscious in Elizabeth-street, Ashfield,
within a few hundred yards of his residence,
and when medical aid was obtained it
was found that he was dead.
Mr. Brown leaves a widow, three sons, and
five daughters. His brother, the late Mr.
George Brown, who was also an alderman of
Ashfield for many years, and ex-Mayor, died
in July last, at the age of 91 years.
The funeral took place yesterday afternoon,
the remains being interred in the Methodist
section of the Necropolis, after a service at
the house, conducted by the Rev. P. J. Stephen,
of the Ashfield Methodist Church, and the
Rev. Joseph Bryant, the former of whom also
officiated at the graveside. The principal
mourners were:-Messrs. K. and S. Brown
(sons), L. W. Brown (grandson), W. T. Moore
(son-in-law), S. Brown (brother), S. Brown,
Jun. (nephew). Among others present were
Alderman D. M'Donald (Mayor), Alderman
Lapiah, Mr. F. H. G. Hargreaves (town clerk),
and A. T. Kay (deputy town clerk), represent-
ing the Ashfield Council; Messrs. A. J. Brack
pool (circuit steward), and C. Clarke (church
steward), representing tho Ashfield Methodist
Church; J. F. M'Kimm, president of and re-
presenting the Ashfield Shopkeepers' Associ-
ation; W. H. Stool (vice-president), John
Dart, and John Laplsh, representing the West
ern Suburbs Hospital; R. J. Brown, J. L.
Caldwell, J. W. Mortley, A. Crane, F. Grant,
J. A. Somerville, C. Van Troight, F. W. Gissing,
T. Lumler, L. Walkin (Watkin and Watkln),
H. Parkes. A. Dance, A. H. Chipperfield, L.
Neale, J. Chapman, H. G. Chlpperfleld, J. Bur-
ton, G. Smith, and W. Critchley, C. Weather
ill, A. Hedges, D. M'Nicol, H. Hodgkinson, W.
Rogers, N. Watkln (Strongman and Watkln),
H. Smith, H. Dengato, L. De Odel, R. J. Mar-
tin, J. W. Armstrong, G. Watson, S. E. Watts,
E. Smith.
At the meeting of the Ashfield Council it
was resolved that a letter, under the seal of
the council, be sent to the family of deceased,
expressing regret, and acknowledging the
valuable services rendered by him to the
municipality. The flag at the Ashfield Town
Hall was flown at half-mast during yesterday
as a mark of respect.
SOURCE: The Sydney Morning Herald 19 June 1924
NSW.BDM DEATHS:
5961/1924 BROWN ALBERT JEREMIAH MARY ASHFIELD
NSW.BDM Marriages:
419/1867 BROWN ALBERT SHARE MARY G SYDNEY
The Sydney Morning Herald, Saturday 11 May 1867
On the 2nd instant, by special license, at the residence of the bride's parent,
by the Rev. George Lane, ALBERT, third son of the late JEREMIAH BROWN,
to MARY GRACE, second daughter of the late THOMAS SHARE, both of Sydney.
Albert married Mary Grace SHARE 1843-1926
-------------------------------

7. ADELAIDE BROWN 1843 - 1926 4th daughter
The Sydney Morning Herald, Tuesday 21 December 1926

MRS. H. DENGATE.
The death of Mrs. H. Dengate, widow of the late Mr. Henry Dengate,
occurred on Wednesday at Calmsley, Hopetoun-avenue, Chatswood.
Mrs. Dengate, who was 83 years of age, was for many years
prominent among church workers, and had the respect and affection of
a large circle of friends. She leaves two daughters, Mrs. L. De Hodel and
Miss Mabel Dengate, and five sons, Archie,Leslie, Oswald, Harold, and Roy.
The funeral, which was largely attended by relatives,
and friends, took place on Thursday afternoon at the Methodist section of the Northern
Suburbs Cemetery, the Rev. G. E. Johnson,
the Rev. A. W. Parton, and the Rev. J. G. M. Taylor officiating.
NSW.BDM BIRTHS;
V18431512 44A/1843 BROWN ADELAIDE JEREMIAH MARY
NSW.BDM MARRIAGES:
433/1867 DENGATE HENRY BROWN ADELAIDE SYDNEY
NSW.BDM DEATHS:
19253/1926 DENGATE ADELAIDE (-BROWN) 84 YRS CHATSWOOD CHATSWOOD

The marriage notice in the Sydney Morning Herald 23 April 1867 picked up an 'E' ; also when Jeremiah was alive they were in 179 Campbell-street

DENGATE BROWNEMarch 27th, by special licence, by the
Rev. W. Curnow, at the residence of the bride's parent, 207,
Campbell-street, Surry Hills, Mr. Henry Dengate, second son
of Mr. E. Dengate, Liverpool, to Adelaide, fourth daughter
of the late Jeremiah Browne, late Assistant-Superintendent
of Cockatoo Island.
------------------------------------------------

8. EMILY JANET BROWN 1846-1910 5th daughter
Evening News (Sydney, NSW) Saturday 30 May 1874
MARRIAGE

On May 21, at the residence of the brides's mother, 4 Arthur-street, Surry Hills, by the Rev. J. Nolan, Wesleyan minister.
William, eldest son of James Longley, Orange Hill, Bringelly, to Emily Janet, fifth daughter of the late Jeremiah Brown, late assistant-superintendent of Cockatoo Island.
NSW BDM. MARRIAGES
468/1874 LONGLEY WILLIAM BROWN EMILY JANET SYDNEY
468/1874 LANGLEY WILLIAM BROWN EMILY JANET SYDNEY
The name is LONGLEY
NSW.BDM DEATHS: -
3264/1910 LONGLEY EMILY J JEREMIAH MARY ST MARYS
Nepean Times, Saturday 15 January 1910
Badgery's Creek.

Mrs. W. Longley, an old and respected resident of Badgery's Creek.
died on Monday last. The funeral took place at the Methodist Cemetery Luddenham,
on Tuesday, the Rev. J. Green conducting the funeral service.
-----------------------------------------
9. Robert Alexander Brown 1849-1911 The 4th. son
Robert Alexander Brown was the ninth of twelve children of
Jeremiah BROWN 1802-1860 and his wife Mary, nee BURNS 1809-1905.
Sub-Inspector Robert Alexander Brown was best known in the
Albury district, where he did duty in the police force for
over 33 years.
He went to Albury as a probationary constable in 1875, and
remained there until his retirement as a sub-Inspector in 1909.
He was promoted to the rank of first class constable three years
after he joined the force. Four years later he was made
a senior-constable. Three years afterwards he was raised to the
rank of sergeant, and six years later he got the crown, and
when he retired he was given the whip and was made a sub-Inspector.
He was one of those who helped in the capture of the Kelly gang.

Robert married Sarah Jane BUTTSWORTH 1850 1941 at Manning River in 1871
Sub-inspector Robert Alexander Brown died at Prince Alfred Hospital on Wednesday
the 5th. July 1911 at the age of 61 years.
The children of Robert Alexander and Sarah Jane , nee Buttsworth were.
Eva Brown
1872. 1961. m. Alfred EGGINS
Walter Burns Brown
1874.
Florence Priscilla Brown
1878. 1959. m. George READ
Ethel M Brown
1881.
-----------------------------------------------------

10. Fred Wesley BROWN 1851-1935 the 5th son

The Sydney Morning Herald, Tuesday 24 September 1935
BROWN.-September 22, 1935. Frederick Wesley
Brown, of 19 Ridge-street, North Sydney, husband
of Kate M. Brown, and father of Mary (Mollie),
Beatrice (Trixie), Fred (of Katoomba), and the late
Amy. aged 85 years. At rest. Privately Interred
at Waverley Cemetery, on 23rd Instant

Fred Wesley Brown was born 1 May 1851 on Cockatoo Island and died on the 22 Seprember 1935.
Married Kate Milner EATHER 1864-1931 the daughter of William EATHER 1832-1915 and Ann SENIOR 1835-1906
Fred was the postmaster at Narrabri I do have a photograph of him.
This story is on my tree:-
Kate Milner EATHER was born at "Henriendi" on 5 January 1864. She evidently received her second forename from the surname of Dr Robert MILNER, who had a hospital at his home at nearby Broadwater. Perhaps he or his wife had attended her mother at her birth. She was known throughout her life as Kate. In 1888, or perhaps late in 1887, Kate married Frederick Wesley BROWN in a wedding registered at Narrabri. He had been born at Cockatoo Island, Sydney on 1 May 1851, the tenth of the twelve children of Jeremiah BROWN and his wife Mary (nee BURNS). Born at Llanidloes in Wales in 1802, Jeremiah had enlisted in the 4th Regiment of Foot; had married Mary at Glasgow in 1828, and they had been sent out to Van Diemen's Land in 1831 on the ship "Larkins". Jeremiah was one of the guards of the convicts on board. In 1851, when Frederick had been born, he was Assistant Superintendent of convicts on Cockatoo Island. Frederick was usually known as Fred. At sometime in his early working life Fred BROWN joined the New South Wales Postal Department. In 1881 he was serving as assistant postmaster at Hay in the Riverina, and by 1887 he was postmaster at Narrabri. For the first fourteen years of their marriage, Kate and Fred lived in the one-storey residence attached to the brick post office at Narrabri. About 1902 Fred and his family left Narrabri when he was transferred back to the Riverina district as postmaster at Narrandera. The NSW Towns Directory for 1903 lists him as postmaster there. Kate and Fred had a family of eight children, the first seven of whom were born at Narrabri. At Christmas 1893 Kate had given her husband a bible as a gift and in it he recorded the dates and times of the birth of each of their children. Their three daughters all lived to adulthood, but their first four sons died in infancy; three of them under the age of one year. When Kate was expecting their eighth child in 1904, she went to Sydney for her confinement and their last son, Fred Ridge BROWN, was born at North Sydney on 15 January 1905. Fred BROWN registered the birth of his fifth son at Narrandera four weeks later. He remained postmaster there until at least 1909. At some date between 1909 and 1914 he retired and the family moved to Sydney. He turned 60 in 1911. A photograph taken about 1912 depicts him with Kate; two of their daughters and son Fred, seated on the beach at Manly. At that time Fred Brown had a grey well-trimmed beard and moustache. He was attired in a suit, complete with a waistcoat. By 1914 Frederick W BROWN was listed in the Sydney directory as living at 47 Reiby Street, Newtown. In 1915, their third daughter, Amy Emily, married a young soldier, Gunner James S HOME. He went off to war and Amy saw little of him until he returned at the end of the War in 1918. By 1917 the family had left Newtown and Mrs Kate M BROWN is listed in the Sands Directory for that year as residing at Heeley Street Paddington. A postcard shows that daughter Amy was living with her. Amy's husband had been discharged from the army for only a few months when she contracted influenza during the epidemic of the winter of 1919, and after being seriously ill for eleven days she died on 24 June. She was 26 years of age and there was no issue of her marriage. Her body was interred in the Anglican section of the Waverley Cemetery. Her two elder sisters, Mary Maud (who was known as Mollie) and Ann Beatrice (who was known as Trixie), were both still single and indeed remained spinsters throughout their lives. By 1922 the family had moved once more and in the Sands Directory for that year, Mrs Kate BROWN was listed as residing at Old South Head Road, North Bondi. In the late 1920's Kate's eldest sister, Sarah Ann COLEMAN, and her daughter Zilla, were residing at 1 Justice Street, Bondi. Sometimes Kate and her children Mollie, Trixie and Fred, would visit them. At some time in their later lives Kate and Fred seem to have separated. The electoral roll for the subdivision shows that Frederick Wesley BROWN and his daughter Ann Beatrice (Trixie) were residing at 19 Ridge Street, North Sydney in 1935. Trixie was a shop assistant. Kate was residing with her son, Fred Ridge, who had gone into business at Katoomba in 1933. Aged thirty, he was still single. Kate and Fred's eldest daughter Mollie was residing elsewhere in Sydney. On 22 September 1935 Frederick Wesley BROWN, age 85 years, died. The Sydney Morning Herald on 24 September carried the following death notice:-. BROWN - September 22 1935, Frederick Wesley BROWN of 19 Ridge Street, North Sydney, husband of Kate M BROWN, and father of Mary (Mollie), Beatrice (Trixie), Fred (of Katoomba) and the late Amy. Aged 85 years. At rest. Privately interred at Waverley Cemetery on 23rd instant. Fred's body had been interred in the family plot beside his daughter Amy. A Wesleyan by baptism, he was buried in the Anglican section of the Cemetery. By 1936 Trixie had moved to 25 Ridge Street, North Sydney. Kate survived her husband by nearly six years. She continued to reside with her son at Katoomba. In June 1941 she contracted bronchitis, which after a month turned into pneumonia and she passed away on 15 July at her son's home, "The Cosy Nook", 94 Lurline Street, Katoomba. She was aged 77. Her funeral service was held in the Chapel of Wood Coffil Ltd in George Street Sydney at 10.15 a.m. on 17 July and she was buried in the family plot in the Waverley Cemetery. Mary M (52), Anne B (51) and Fred R (36) survived her. Mary Maud BROWN, the eldest child of Kate and Frederick BROWN, died on or about 27 July 1965, age 76 years, and was buried on 29 July in the family plot in the Waverley Cemetery. Anne Beatrice, the second daughter of Kate and Frederick BROWN, lived with her brother Fred in her later years. She died on or about 25 September 1974 when she was 84. She was buried in the family plot in the Waverley Cemetery on 27 September. Fred Ridge BROWN, the only one of the five sons of Kate and Frederick BROWN to survive beyond infancy, joined the Australian Army soon after his mother's death during World War II. He was in Brisbane in October 1942 when he had a portrait taken of himself in military uniform at the Auto Studios in Adelaide Street. At that time he had a small moustache. After the end of the War he returned to Katoomba and resumed business as an estate agent. In 1952 he was a real estate agent at 94 Lurline Street. After a few years there he returned to Sydney and in 1960 was residing at 1 Harden Avenue, Northbridge with his sister Beatrice. He was a salesman then. After the death of his sister Beatrice in 1974, he was the only remaining member of the family of Kate and Frederick BROWN. He had never married and his nearest kin were some cousins. One of these, Patricia FOX, daughter of Zilla COLEMAN, took an interest in the plight of her cousin, and upon his death in the North Shore Hospital at the age of 93 on 26 February 1998, she attended to his funeral and the winding up of his affairs. His body was cremated and his ashes placed in an urn in the BROWN family plot in the Waverley Cemetery. He had been a smoker all of his life and he died from pneumonia and suspected lung cancer. As only one of the eight children of Kate and Frederick BROWN married and she died without issue, they had no descendants in the second generation.
-------------------------------------------------------
11. Sydney William Thomas BROWN
Sydney was born William Thomas
NSW.BDM BIRTHS: V18541765 56/1854 BROWN WILLIAM T JEREMIAH MARY
Married Katherine/Catherine LAW in Sydney in 1873
They had 5 Children :-
1. Sarah Jessie Brown 1874 1963 m. Alfred T Huggett
2. Katie May Brown 1878 1951
3. Frederick Sydney Thomas Brown 1879 1961 m. Anne Ellen BURCHER 1881 1957
4. Perc Brown 1880 XXXX
5. Albert George Brown 1885 1886
6. Alma Brown 1888 1917
7. Sydney Law Brown 1892 1962 m. Winifred Agnes WOOLF 1894. 1967.
NSW.BDM BIRTHS:
1798/1874 BROWN SARAH JESSIE SYDNEY CATHERINE SYDNEY
1911/1878 BROWN KATIE M SIDNEY W T CATHERINE SYDNEY
3517/1879 BROWN FREDERICK S T SYDNEY W T CATHERINE SYDNEY
27879/1885 BROWN ALBERT G SYDNEY W T KATHERINE NARRABRI
30271/1888 BROWN ALMA B SYDNEY W T KATHERINE NARRABRI
24256/1892 BROWN SYDNEY L SYDNEY W T KATHERINE NARRABRI
NSW.BDM DEATHS:
12160/1886 BROWN ALBERT G SYDNEY W P KATHERINE L NARRABRI
13445/1917 BROWN ALMA B SYDNEY W CATHERINE AUBURN
8266/1951 BROWN KATIE MAY SYDNEY THOMAS KATHERINE KOGARAH
20579/1962 BROWN SYDNEY LAW SYDNEY THOMAS KATHERINE ROCKDALE
10/1962 BROWN FREDERICK SYDNEY J SYDNEY WILLIAM T KATHERINE SYDNEY

NSW.BDM DEATHS: 6183/1934 BROWN SYDNEY N 8O YRS CHATSWOOD CHATSWOOD
The Sydney Morning Herald Saturday 30 June 1934

BROWN June 29 1934 at 21 Windsor road Wllloughy, Sydney William Brown
formerly of Narrabri and Newcastle and beloved father of
Jessie, May Fred, Perc, Alma and Syd In his
81st year.
21 Windsor road Willoughby just in case you want to buy this nice little California Bungalow, previously in the family
--------------------------------------
12. ANNE EVA JESSIE 1856-1938 the youngest
The Sydney Morning Herald Wednesday 13 October 1880
MARRIAGES

DUGDALE-BROWN.-September 27, at Ashfield, by the Rev.
G. Woolnough, M.A., T. W. Dugdale, Esq., J.P., of the Manning River, to Jessie,
youngest daughter of the late Jeremiah Brown, Esq., of Sydney
NSW.BDM MARRIAGES:
1744/1880 DUGDALE THOMAS WEST BROWN ANN EVA J CONCORD
NSW.BDM DEATHS:
22272/1938 DUGDALE ANNE EVA JESSIE JEREMIAH MARY PETERSHAM
The Sydney Morning Herald, Thursday 13 October 1938
DEATHS

DUGDALE October 12 1938 at her residence
Clairgarrow 183 Old Canterbury Road, Dulwich Hill.
Jessie, widow of the late T. W. Dugdale late
of Taree and dearly beloved mother of Ruby, Harry
and Aubrey.
FUNERAL
DUGDALE.The Relatives and Friends of Miss R. DUGDALE,
Mr. H. W. DUGDALE, and Mr. and Mrs. A. W. DUGDALE are
invited to attend the Funeral of their beloved MOTHER, Jessie
Dugdale: to leave the Methodist Church, Moonbie
Street. Summer Hill. THIS AFTERNOON, after a
service commencing at 3.15, for the Crematorium, Rookwood.
possible birth
NSW.BDM BIRTHS:
1530/1856 BROWN FEMALE JEREMIAH MARY SYDNEY
----------------------------------------
The photograph below is Frederick Wesley Brown and his wife Kate, nee Milner. This photograph was taken about 1931, in the backyard of their home at 42 Amhurst-street Camaray. One of their daughters is in the background.


5 comment(s), latest 7 months ago

Patrick Brennan 1824 - 1890

Mr. Patrick Brennan, late of Hollymount Station, Moonie River
one of the oldest pioneers of the district, passed over to the
great majority early on Saturday morning.
He had been suffering for many years from a chronic tumor
in the face, the result of an accident.
Surgical skill could do nothing but prolong life for a few
years, as the affecttion was unanimously pronounced by all
the doctors consulted, as incurable.
He was a strongly-made man of a very, robust physique, and
but for the complaint from which he suffered might have
lived for many years to come.
Although the day on which the funeral took place was wet,
a large number, of townspeople followed the remains to their
resting place.
The body was interred in the Roman Catholic portion of the
cemetery, the service, in the absence of a clergyman, being
read by Mr. L. B. Coughlan.
Mr. Brennan was born in Gaily House, Shannon View,
Roscommon county, Ireland, in the year 1824, and was therefore
about 66 years of age at the time of his decease, but in
life he did not look anything near that age.
In 1841 he emigrated to New South Wales and spent four years
as colonial experience on Mitkin station, Big river,
the property, of the Hon. R. FitzGerald, M.L.A.
In 1845 he came to the Balonne and formed Burgorah and
Warroo stations for his old employer and managed, them
until 1857.
In that year he resigned his position for the purpose of
looking after his own properties personally, on the Moonie.
On this river he had taken up the blocks known as Ballyndyne,
Hollymount, Durin Durin, Foxborough, Ula Ula, and Brushy Park,
and stocked them according to the requirements of the Act then in force.
He prospered well until the great flood of 1864, which wrought
such widespread destruction. Few of the squatters of that period
escaped loss, and amongst the greatest sufferers was Mr. Brennan.
A prolonged drought raged in 1865-67, and further losses were sustained.
For some years succeeding he had fair luck. 1885 was, however, a
most disastrous year, and in 1886 Mr.Brennan lost his stations.
What made that event still more sad was that after it
occurred Mr. Brennan's health rapidly declined, and during, the
last year he suffered at times great bodily pain, but
throughout he preserved a cheerful demeanour, and bore his lot with
a Christian fortitude. The deceased gentleman was the the son of the
late Mr, Michael Brennan, of Shannon View, Ireland, and was connected
by marriage to Colonel Eyre, of Eyre Court, Galway county.

Source:
Western Star and Roma Advertiser
Saturday 9 August 1890
Page 2
Transcription, janilye 2014.

NOTE:
Hollymount Station, comprised an area of
37,440 acres and is situated 40 miles from
Talwood and 70 miles from Mungindi

John Town's Diary

I will now give a brief sketch of
a most remarkable man, Mr. John
Town. Those who were not ac-
quainted with him may not think
so; but those who had dealings with
him will tell you even now that he
was one of the straightest men of
his time. His word was his bond,
in the most trifling transaction. I
knew him well myself, and had
many dealings with him, and can
bear testimony to his honesty of
purpose. But there were many
things in connection with his life
and character which I have learned
from others, and also from his diary
(kindly lent me), which I will re-
late, that I think will be highly in-
teresting, especially as they refer to
very old dates.
I may state that it was not often
you could catch him in a communi-
cative mood, therefore you could not
expect to hear him speak much of
himself. But there were occasions
when he would repeat some of his
experiences of the early days. Some
of the most interesting he has
written in his diary, which I will
quote as I proceed.
He was born in Parramatta. His
mother died there, and is buried in
the Episcopal burying-ground. After
his mother's death he came with his
father to Richmond, when he was
quite young. We have no further
record of him until he married, on
the 17th June, 1830.
He was among the earliest settlers on the
Goulburn river. Here he was once stuck up
by Bushrangers, tied to a tree, and robbed
They committed other atrocities for which they were hanged.
He came back to Richmond, and opened the
Woolpack hotel at North Richmond (now
the Travellers' Rest) which was
built for him. This is one of the oldest
hotels in the colony, and has a history.
It was here Mr, North, the Police,
Magistrate, used to hold his court,
and where many prisoners were sen-
tenced to the lash. It was also the
local post office for many years. I
remember it in the forties, when the
Thompsons, of Pitt Town, had the
contract for carrying the mails from
Windsor to Richmond, six times a
week, and from Richmond to North
Richmond, three times a week. It
was then the terminus for mails in
Kurrajong.
Mr. Town kept the hotel for over
20 years, when he retired from busi-
ness. But during that time he had
many trips over the mountains. His
principal delight seemed to be roam-
ing through the bush. I have already
stated he was among the first to
cross Bell's Line, with others, on a
slide, with four bullocks. A slide,
remember!-not a dray. But I
think I have explained that before.
He was a great friend of old Ben.
Singleton's : and if he did hot go
over the Bulga with Ben, and Mr.
Howe, of Windsor, who were the
first white men to cross the Bulga,
he was not long after them.
I do not suppose I will be contra-
dicted if I say that old Ben. Single-
ton was the first to build a mill on,the
banks of the Hunter river, at Single-
ton, and that town was named after
him. He was well known on the
Hawkesbury before he went to the
Hunter, and had to do with several
mills here. I have a recollection of
hearing it said he built those two
mills on Wheeny Greek, and another
on the Hawkesbury somewhere
below Wilberforce.
I have often seen the two mills at
Wheeny Creek. The upper one was
what is termed an overshot (I have
seen it at work), and the lower one
an undershot. They were both
owned by the Town family. I think
they are now down.
While speaking of Ben. Singleton,
I may mention that the oldest-dated
memo in Mr. Town's diary is in re-
ference to Mr. Singleton. It is as
follows -
"Yarraman Bar Creek, at Liver-
pool Plains, was first formed into a
station by Mr. Benjamin Singleton,
in the year 1826."
Mr. Town seems to have taken
great interest in explorers. Here is
another memo :
"(Capt. Charles Sturt explored the
Darling river, the Murrumbidgee,
and the Murray to its junction with
the Darling, in the year 1829. Died
16th June, 1869."
While speaking of Capt. Sturt, I
may mention that he tells us that
Mr. Cealey, a resident of Parramatta,
is said to be the first who attempted
to scale the Blue Mountains; but he
did not long persevere in struggling
with difficulties too great for or-
dinary resolution to overcome. It
appears that he retraced his steps,
after having penetrated sixteen miles
into their dark and precipitous re-
cesses, and a heap of stones, which
the traveller passes about that dis-
tance from Emu Ford, on the road
to Bathurst, marks the extreme
point reached by the expedition to
the westward of the Nepean river.
Another memo from Mr. Town's
diary states :
"Captain Howell died 9th Nov.,
1875, in the 90th year of his age.
He was one of the explorers with
Mr. Hamilton Hume."
And yet another, which shows he
still took an interest in the Singleton
family:
"Mary Singleton died the 12th
August, 1877, aged 84 years. Buried
at Singleton."
Mr. Town makes no mention, of
his own exploits in the way of ex
ploration. I have already mentioned
a few. He was also one of the first
on the Namoi and at Moree, where
he formed stations, and was among
the first gold diggers on the Turon
But I think his greatest exploit
was when he started alone from his
home on the Goulburn river, with
nothing to guide him except a small
pocket compass, and took a bee line
to the Bulga, over mountains where
no white man had ever been before
or since. He arrived safely at the
Bulga at a place called the Cap and
Bonnet. But when there he began
to doubt his compass, and was about
to retrace his steps when his brother
in-law, Billy McAlpin, met him, and
they came along together. This
journey must have taken weeks to
accomplish.
A few other extracts from Mr.
Town's Diary may be interesting
since it refers to the death of many
old residents, who in their time took
a part in the the early history of the
colony.
They are as follows:26 May,
1852, old Mrs. Mary Town died,
aged 80 years (Mr. Town's step-
mother.)
St. Philip's Church, North Rich-
mond, was consecrated 12th Nov.,
1861.The title was presented by
Mr. Town ; he also subscribed
liberally towards its erection.
Mrs. Ann Sharp died 7th April,
1865, aged 72 years. Mrs. Sharp
was Mr. Town's mother-in-law.
Robert Fitzgerald died, April 7th,
same year.
26th May. Judge Milford died.
1866, Feb. Mrs. Hail died.
Feb. 2. Mr. Thomas Tibbut died.
1867. The Rev. H. Stiles died,
23rd June. The same day that the
great flood was at its highest.

1868. Prince Alfred shot, 12th
March. .
29th March. The Rev. Thomas
Hassell died, aged 73. Mrs. Stiles
died.
21st April. O'Farrell executed
for shooting Prince Alfred. The
prince restored to health ; thank
God, and all's well.
5th May. William Town died ;
Mr. Town's brother.
Lord Brougham died, 7th May.
Born 19th September, 1779.
18th May. Mr. Edward Cox, of
Mulgoa, died.
21st July. Dr. Bland died, aged
78 years.
20th. August. George Cox died,
aged 75 years.
Red Bank Creek bridge finished,
31st July.
28th November. The sun heat
was 100 degrees.
29th. 107 in the shade.
30th Nov. St. Andrew's Cathedral
opened.
24th Dec. The heat was 115
deg. Fah. in the shade at 12.30 p.m.
25th. 107F
The Donally nugget found in
Melbourne, weighing 200lb. nett
pure gold.
1869, 10th March. Prince Al-
fred's second visit to Sydney.
3rd April. William Sharp's barn
was burned down. This was the
second barn Mr. Sharp lost by fire.
10th May. John Hubert Plunket
died.
4th June. George Forbes (bro-
ther to Sir Francis) died, aged 82
years.
27th September. William Kirk
died, aged 87 years. An old friend
of the Town family.
1869, 27th August. The heat was
105 deg. Fah.
1870, 11th January, the ther-
mometer registered 110 ; 12th Jan .
110 ; 13th Jan, 112 ; 14th Jan., 113
at 11 a.m. ; 18th February, 100 ; 19th
Feb , 108 ; 22nd Feb., 100.
12th June. First white frost,
38th August. Thomas Simpson
Hall died, aged 62 years.
17th. August. James Cuneen died
aged 62 years. A native of Wind
sor. Mr. Cuneen was a member
the Legislative Assembly, and for a
time was Postmaster-General.
18th November. William Lee
senr., of Bathurst, died, aged 76
years.
16th Nov. Prince Alfred left
Port Jackson, after his third visit to
Sydney.
John Tebbutt died, 20th December,
1870.
1871, 10th January. Charles
Thompson, of Clydesdale died, aged
87 years.
8th April. George' Filks died
aged 80 years. Upwards of 20 years
chief constable of Sydney.
23rd April. William Hall died,
aged 74 years.

1872, 4th January. William
Perry, tailor, of Windsor, died, aged
70 years.
15th Jan. John King (the sur-
vivor of Burke and Wills exploring
expedition) died.
18th Jan. Nicholls and Lester
hanged for the murder of Walker
and Bridges on the Parramatta river
William Charles Wentworth died
in, England, 20th March, 1872, aged
80 years.
28th July. Mary Ann Piper
wife of Capt. Piper, died, aged 81
years.
4th June. Sir Hercules Robinson
sworn in as Governor of N.S.W.
15th Oct. Sir Hercules Robinson
crossed the Richmond bridge, on his
way to Douglass Hill.

Charles Louis Napoleon Bonaparte
died in England, 9th Jan. 1873. He
was nearly 65 years old.
His son was born 16th March,
1856.
10th Feb., 1873. John Richard
Rouse died, aged 73.
Mr. John Benson was killed from
a fall from his horse on 3rd March
1873, aged 29 years.

19th April, 1873. Hamilton Hume
the explorer died, aged 76 years.
22nd June. Sir T. A. Murray
died. He was President of the
Legislative Council.
5th Sept. Laban White died, in
his 80th year. '
15th Sept. Alexander Berry died
at North Shore, Aged 91 years.
14th Sept. Mr. Heath, the tailor,
died.
13th December. Mr. John Win-
ters' two sons were drowned, while
bathing near the Richmond bridge.

1874, 20th January. Mr. John
Hoskinson died at ll p m., aged 79
years.
10th Sept. John Merrick died
aged 82 years.
11th Dec. William Bowman
died, aged 75 years.
23rd Dec. Great fire in Windsor,
About 40 houses burned down on
the south end side of George-street.

1875, 22nd March., Mrs. Elizabeth Armfield died, aged 84 years
and three months. A native of the
Hawkesbury, and first-born child
thereon' of European parents.
10th May. Old Mick the Russian
died, said to be 112 years old.

1875. Sir Charles Cowper died
in England, aged 69 years.
13th Sept. Thomas Kite, of Bathurst, died, aged 87 years.
William Long (Judge Martin's
father-in-law) died, aged 80 years.

1877, 28th Feb. Luke Stanford
died, aged 80 years.
16th March. Archbishop Polding
died, aged 83. He was 42 years in
Sydney.
28th August. William Price died,
aged 85 years.
6th Feb. Pope Pius the IX died,
aged 86 years

1878, 1st May. Mrs. Mary Chisholm died, aged 81.
8th Aug. Rev. J. Dunmore Lang
died, aged 79 years.

1878, 20th Aug. William John-
ston, of Pitt Town, died, aged 83,
Sir E. Deas Thomson died, aged 80
years.

1879,18th July. Mrs. Ann Dempsey died at Emu Plains, aged 100
years. She formerly lived on
Rouse's farm over the river (now
Walter Sly's).
5th Nov. Mrs Sarah Johns died,
aged 82 years. Mrs. Mary Hughes
died, aged 89 years.

1lst May, 1880. Mrs. Mary Hough
died, aged 87 years .
27th June. Richard Skuthorp
died, aged 90 years, only wanting
one month.

4th February, 1881. Mr. John
Cobcroft died, aged 84 years.
Mrs. Ann Hausell (formerly
Copper) died, aged 88 years.
Mr. John Henry Challis, an old
resident of Sydney, died in England
on 28th February, 1880, leaving
£100,000 to the Sydney University.
1st March, 1879. Captain Cook's
daughter died last week, aged 104,
so the paper says.
SOURCES:
Reminiscences of
Richmond;
FROM THE FORTIES DOWN,
[By "Coornmill."]
Nos. in part 47,48, 49
Hawkesbury Herald
Friday 19 February 1904
Page 16
Friday 26 February 1904
Page 16
Friday 4 March 1904
page 16.
transcription janilye 2012

Hawkesbury Volunteers for WW1

MILITARY.
AS early as June, 1797, Lieut. N. Mackellar was in charge of a military detachment at the Hawkesbury, being a portion of the 102nd Regiment, or New South Wales Corps. It was for this military officer's use that the old Government House at Windsor was built, about the year 1798. From this date up till 1842 Windsor was the centre of much military activity. The barracks erected especially for the use of the soldiers, about 1820, are still standing, and portion of the present hospital building was originally the military hospital.
In the early times the soldiers were called on to assist in harvesting the crops. Many of the old residents of the district are the descendants of soldiers, who, when their time expired, preferred to settle in the colony instead of returning to the old land.
A detachment of the 73rd Regiment, which came out with Governor Macquarie in 1809, was settled here for a few years. In 1825, the military at Windsor consisted of one sergeant, one corporal, and fifty-six privates. In 1835-37 a detachment of His Majesty's 50th Foot, under Lieut.-Colonel Woodhouse, were stationed at Windsor. They were succeeded in 1838-30 by the 80th Foot, formerly known as the Staffordshire. The regiment arrived in New South Wales in various ships from 1836 to 1840, and was removed to India in August, 1844. Among the officers were: Lieut.-Colonel N. Baker, and Adjutant Lightbody. (See Reminiscenses, by Wm. Walker, page 8). The bandmaster, Samuel Edgerton, settled in Windsor, and became a magistrate. He organised a local band, and took part in the formation of the local Volunteers in 1860. He died 16th August, 1878, aged seventy-eight years.

Another Regiment stationed here was the 99th Duke of Edinburgh, daring 1842-43. The officers were Captain Reid and Lieutenant Beatty. At other times the 58th and 83rd Regiments were represented here. With the cessation of transportation to New South Wales in the early forties, the military were withdrawn from Windsor. The officers for many years occupied the building now known as the Royal Hotel.

Volunteers.
In the year 1854 the Government passed legislation which led to the formation of a number of local corps, but the movement did not catch on till 1860, when a large number of men enlisted in the various towns of New South Wales as volunteers. Windsor was early in the field, the Hawkesbury corps being formed on 5th October, 1860, the first officers being Captain S. Edgerton and Lieutenant Sydney Scarvell. The first meeting called to form the Windsor Volunteer Corps was held on 19th September, 1860, when a deputation was appointed to wait on the Government and offer the services of thirty-six loyal subjects. The deputation consisted of William Walker, M.L.A., James Ashcough, J.P., Robert Dick, J.P., and Sydney Scarvell, J.P. The movement went forward with enthusiasm. The Governor, Sir J. Young, came up to Windsor to present the colours, and a steamer conveyed over three hundred volunteers from Sydney right up to Windsor to assist in the local demonstration. The corps was known as the Hawkesbury Volunteer Rifles from 1862 to 1882. The name was then altered to the Hawkesbury Infantry. We give here only the early officers, with their promotions:

Samuel Edgerton, Captain, 1860-72. Retired 1872.
Sydney Scarvell, 1st Lieut, 1860-68.
Robert Dick, 2nd Lieut., 1865-68.
James A. Dick, 2nd Lieut., 1869-73. Captain, 1874-76.
W.F. Linsley, Ensign, 1870-76. Captain, 1876-92. Major, 1892-94.
C.S. Guest, 1st Lieut., 1874. Afterwards Lieut.-Colonel in Richmond,
but retired in 1910. Died 1915.
James Anderson, 2nd Lieut., 1883-88. 1st Lieut., 1888-94.
D.D. Pye, 2nd Lieut., 1888-92.
J.J. Paine, 2nd Lieut., 1892. 1st Lieut., 1892-94. Captain, 1895-1906.
Major, 1906-13. Lieut.-Colonel, 1913-15.

About the time of the outbreak of the Boer war, in the year 1899, the Hawkesbury Squadron of NEW SOUTH WALES LANCERS was formed, with half squadrons at Windsor and Richmond. The original officers were: Captain Brinsley Hall, Captain R.B. Walker and Lieut. N. Hall, for Windsor; Major Philip Charley, Captain W.T. Charley and Lieut. H. Skuthorp, for Richmond. The uniform was light brown with red facings, and a felt hat adorned with a plume. On retiring from the squadron, presentations were made to Captain Brinsley Hall, M.L.A., and Major Philip Charley.

About the year 1903 the name of the Lancers was changed to the AUSTRALIAN LIGHT HORSE. The Hawkesbury Squadron was successful in winning the Prince of Wales Cup, 1906-7, which was open for competition to all the mounted troops in Australia. Four teams competed, both Victoria and South Australia being represented. The competition was over a three mile course, with three firing competitions of five shots each at a target, and between each firing three hurdles had to be negotiated. The local team who brought this rare trophy to the district were: Captain Brinsley Hall (leader), S.Q.M. Sgt. Owens, Sgt. Hibbert, Sgt. Timmins, Sgt. Fallow, Sgt. Dunston, Far.-Sgt. Huxley, Corp. White, Corp. McMartin, Tpr. Aubrey, Tpr. J. Greentree, Tpr. A. Greentree, Tpr. Mason, and Tpr. Armstrong.

A number of mounted men went from the district to the Boer War, which was in progress from 1898 to 1902. A monument will be seen in Windsor Park to the memory of those who went, but "came not back." The artistic earring on the pedestal is the work of the late J. O'Kelly, and it will repay a little study. Unfortunately, it was not enclosed at first with a fence, and its proximity to the local school tempted some embryo iconoclasts whose marks remain. The inscriptions on the monument read:

In memory of soldiers from Windsor and District who lost their lives in the service of the Empire in South Africa.
This monument was erected as a token of respect by the residents of Windsor.
Trooper GEORGE ARCHIE MONTGOMERY, killed at Zeerust, South Africa, 27th October, 1900.
Trooper CHARLES JOHN GOSPER, accidentally drowned in the Vaal River, South Africa, 26th November, 1901.
Farrier Sergeant GEORGE JENNINGS DICKSON, who died of enteric fever at Standerton, South Africa, 9th January, 1902.

The following is a list of the Windsor and Riverstone district soldiers who have volunteered for the war. The list was closed early in December, 1915; many others will doubtless follow at a later date. The list it will be noted does not include the Richmond, McDonald, Colo, or St. Albans districts, nor a dozen immigrants from the Scheyville training farm:

Akins, Charles, Windsor | Bolton, Hy. H., Windsor (wounded)
Baird, Norman, Pitt Town | Bradshaw, R.N., Scheyville
Baker, W., Oakville | Brooks, John, Freeman's Reach
Bennett, W.H., Windsor | Buchanan, Donald, Windsor
Blacket, Ulric, Vineyard | Callaghan, Clive, Windsor
Blackmore, Walter, Wilberforce |
Callaghan, Reginald, Windsor | Hudson, Sid., Vineyard
Cambridge, K., Windsor | Hughes, Robert B., Windsor
Cambridge, Thomas, Windsor | Hulbert, William, Windsor
Clarke, B., Oakville | James, Henry, Windsor
Clarke, Manfred H., Windsor | Jennings, C.B.E., Windsor
Clout, Leslie, Windsor | Johnston, Staunton H., McGrath's Hill
Cobcroft, B.H., Windsor | Jones, Joshua, Ebenezer
Connelly, Fred., Windsor (killed) | Jones, Bert, Sackville
Davis, Eric, Wilberforce | Jones, Hilton, Windsor
Dickson, John, Windsor | Jones, Russell, Cattai
Dickson, P.A., Windsor | Kemp, Arthur, Ebenezer
Dickson, Walter, Windsor | Laraghy, Jack, Sackville
Dunn, Richmond, Windsor | Laraghy, Boy, Sackville
Dwyer, Gregory, Clarendon | Laraghy, Victor G., Sackville
Dwyer, John, Clarendon | Liddle, Edwin S., Windsor
Dwyer, William, Clarendon | Liddle, Fred., Windsor
Dyer, E.J., Windsor | Liddell, Sydney, Windsor
Eather, Cecil, Windsor (killed) | Lillis, Leo., Freeman's Reach
Eather, Frank, Windsor | Lindsay, A.J.H., Cattai
Farlow, Alwyn, Freeman's Reach | Lindsay, W.S.T., Cattai
Fiaschi, Dr. Thomas, Sackville | Maisey, Fred. T., Windsor
Ford, A.E., Windsor | Marshall, A. Campbell, Cattai
Fullerton, Dr. A.T., Windsor | Marshall, Stewart, Cattai (not accepted)
Gadsden, E. Jeffery, Windsor | Mitchell, Bently, Bullridge
Gibson, Geof. V., Windsor | Molloy, Jas. V., Windsor
Gibson, V.J.V., Windsor | Moses, Jas. Wm., Windsor
Gosper, Charles E., Windsor | Mullinger, Boy, Windsor
Gow, Harold, Windsor | Norris, Arthur, Windsor
Green, Mervyn, Magrath's Hill | O'Brien, V., Windsor
Greentree, C.A., Cattai | Ogden, Joseph, Oakville (wounded)
Greentree, D.S., Cattai | Paine, Lt.-Colonel J.J., Windsor
Hall, Ronald, Wilberforce (not accepted) | Parkin, B.T., Windsor
Hanchett, Samuel, Windsor | Phillips, Leslie, Windsor
Hanchett, James, Windsor | Pickup, Clive, Windsor
Haxby, E.C.H., Windsor (twice wounded) | Potts, Rowland, Windsor
Holden, Reginald, Windsor | Pye, Major Cecil B.A., Windsor
Honeman, Garnet, Windsor (not accepted) | Pye, Eric J.D., Windsor
Hough, Ernest, Windsor | Rees, Victor John, Windsor
Hoskisson, Samuel James, Clarendon |
Rhodes, William B., Wilberforce (not accepted) | Swords, B.E., Windsor
Rigg, William, Sackville | Taylor, Fred C., Windsor
Robertson, Wm., Windsor | Teals, Alex, Wilberforce
Robertson, F.J., Windsor (not accepted) | Thomson, F.S., Cattai
Sandoz, George E., Windsor | Toomey, Alfd., Windsor (killed)
Scholer, Richd., Windsor | Toomey, Edward, Windsor
Shadlow, Cecil D., Windsor (not accepted) | Turnbull, Cecil O.W., Wilberforce
Shirley, Wm., Windsor | Turnbull, Fred., Wilberforce (wounded)
Shimmels, Arthur, Scheyville | Turnbull, Harry N, Wilberforce
Sim, E., Windsor | Ulstrom, Charles, Windsor
Simpson, Cecil, Wilberforce | Uren, Dr. Cecil, Windsor
Simpson, Norman. Wilberforce (wounded) | Walker, Archibald G., Windsor
Smallwood, William, Cattai | Wall, Stanley, Windsor (wounded)
Smith, Robt., Freeman's Reach | Ward, Oscar D., Windsor
Smith, Albert Edward, Freeman's Reach | Ward, William, Windsor
Startin, Wm., Mulgrave | White, W. Frank, Vineyard (wounded)
Streeter, Frederick, Windsor (wounded) | White, Roland, Cattai
Streeter, Roy, Windsor (killed) | Woods, William H., Sackville
Sullivan, Regd., Windsor.

Riverstone List
Alcorn, Cecil, Riverstone | Davis, Herbert, Riverstone
Alcorn, S., Riverstone | Drake, Edward, Riverstone
Alderton, Robert, Schofields | Drayton, Stanley, Riverstone
Bambridge, Phil, Riverstone | Freeman, Herb., Riverstone
Bertie, J., Riverstone | Green, John, Riverstone
Bertie, Leo., Riverstone | Grenshaw, Cecil, Marsden Park (not accepted)
Brookes, Alfred, Marsden Park | Griffin, E.W., Marsden Park
Brookes, Ernest, Marsden Park | Hayward, F.A., Marsden Park
Carter, Fk., Marsden Park | Hayward, John, Riverstone
Case, G., Riverstone (not accepted) | Hayward, Robt., Riverstone
Cassidy, John, Marsden Park | Humphries, T., Riverstone
Clarke, Frank, Riverstone | Hurley, F., Riverstone
Clout, Cyrus, Riverstone | James, Matthew, Riverstone
Comyn, Frank, Riverstone | Johnston, Harold, Schofields (wounded)
Croft, G., Riverstone | Keegan, F., Riverstone
Davies, W., Annangrove |
Kenny, Herbert, Marsden Park (wounded) | Schofield, Edwin, Riverstone
Kenny, John, Marsden Park (wounded) | Schofield, Horace, Riverstone
Knight, C. C, Schofields | Schofield, S.R., Riverstone (not accepted)
Martin, Ernest, Riverstone (not accepted) | Showers, A.B., Riverstone (killed)
Mason, Ambrose, Vineyard | Smith, Albyn, Riverstone
Matthews, Rex, Marsden Park | Symonds, James, Riverstone
Matthews. Eric, Marsden Park | Sulivan, Eric, Riverstone
Morris, William McC., Marsden Park | Taylor, Frank W., Marsden Park
Pye, J.J., Schofields | Teale, George, Riverstone
Rimington, H.J., Marsden Park | Teale, William, Riverstone
Robbins, J., Riverstone | Towers, J., Riverstone
Schofield, Aubury, Riverstone | Wiggins, Frederick, Schofields

SOURCE:
* A Project Gutenberg Australia eBook *
eBook No.: 1302241h.html
The Early Days of Windsor N.S.Wales
J. Steele
Member Aust Historical Society
transcription, janilye

Photograph below Cecil George Eather 1893 - 1915


Windsor, Richmond and surrounding Hawkesbury Villages 1871

WINDSOR claims to be one of the oldest towns in Australia, and some of
its venerable buildings appear to justify the assertion. There are upwards
of 2000 inhabitants in the town, or rather borough as it ought now to be
called. The two principal streets run parallel to each other, they are George
and Macquarie streets, and in these the greater part of the business is transacted.
Religion and education are well represented as to buildings ; for I noticed
five churches and about the same number of school-houses.
For many years, in the early days of the colony, Windsor was a most flourishing place :
and the glorious fertility of the soil in the immediate neighbourhood was a source of
almost unlimited wealth; but the floods and rust came, and their consequent miseries
followed, so that the struggle of the surrounding settlers has been very great for
the past ten years. They are now beginning, although but slowly, to raise their heads
again, and it is to be hoped that years will pass away before such another series of
disasters affects them.
To begin with the places of worship : The Church of England is a large brick structure
of considerable antiquity, as colonial antiquity is reckoned. It is by no means an
inelegant structure and has a tower and belfry. The first objects which strike the eye
on entering it are the very beautiful stained glass windows, erected by the Rouse family
and others. They are objects generally admired by all visitors. The Rev. C. F. Garnsey is
the incumbent.
The Roman Catholic Church is also of brick, but stuccoed ; the architecture is gothic,
and the shape cruciform. The building is evidently capable of holding a very large
congregation; Dean Hallinan is the resident clergyman.
The Wesleyans are pretty strong in the district, and their church, like all others in
Windsor, is of brick. The Rev. Mr. Brentnall conducts the services.
The newest and prettiest place of worship is the Congregational Church, of which the
Rev. F. H. Browne is the pastor. An ornamental gallery has been lately added to the
structure, it is the work of Mr. Thomasa Collison, of Windsor, and was designed by
Mr. T. Rowe, architect, Sydney.
The Presbyterian Church is really going to decay, and requires renovating. These are
all thc churches, and it will be seen that all the leading denominations are represented.
The pleasure I experience in visiting educational establiaments induced me to have a look
at almost every school in Windsor.
The Public School is a really fine building, and cost nearly 1000. The length of the
principal class-room is 54 feet, by 20 feet wide. It is entered by a castellated porch.
Off this class-room there is another room 15 feet by 15 feet, with a verandah
6 feet wide, to give entrance to an infant's schoolroom 21 feet by 11 feet-making
the school accommodation sufficient for 236 pupils. There is also a teacher's
residence attached, containing four rooms.
The following gentlemen comprise the local board :-Mr. Ascough, J.P., Mr. Beard,
Mr. Dean, Messrs. J. and R. Dick, Mr. J. H. Mills, Mr. Richards, J.P., and
Mr. W. Walker, chairman.
The head-master is Mr. C. Anderson, assisted by Mrs. Anderson ; Miss Thornton
over the infants, and Miss Goldsmith. Two hundred scholars are now on the roll,
and the average attendance is 170.
I was particularly struck on entering with the very attractive look of the rooms,
and the well-dressed appearance, and l was almost going to say polished deportment
of the pupils in attendance.
I was favoured with a general examination of the scholars ; and their proficiency
in arithmetic, grammar (including analysis and parsing) is of the highest order.
Their writing is also very good, and their drawing and scroll-work show that much
attention must have been paid to their instruction in that branch. I might also
state that, in discipline as well as general attainments, it is my opinion that
the school will compare favourably with any in the colony.
The Church of England school has an average attendance of about eighty, there
being 115 on the roll. The teacher is Mr. W. H. Bailey, assisted by Miss Fairland.
The children were tolerably clean and orderly; the copy-books shown us were,
on the whole, well written, and the elementary drawings very fair.
The Roman Catholio school is under the care of Mr. and Mrs. Langton, and had
148 children on the roll, and 110 in attendance. The school-room is well
ventilated, and the children were moderately clean and tidy in appearance.
They were writing and taking drawing lessons from the blackboard on
the occasion of my visit, but my time being limited, I could not examine
very fully their performances.
There is a private school, in a very fine building, the property of Dr. Dowe,
and kept by Mrs. Nealds as a ladies boarding school. This establishment is very
highly-spoken of ; but I had no opportunity of visiting it, and so must refrain
from entering into details.
There is a very substantial bridge crossing the South Creek, called the Fitzroy Bridge,
and just on the western side is the old military barracks, now used as a police station.
The care of the town is in the hands of a jolly good follow, in the person of
senior-sergeant Fitzpatrick.
Among the relics of the past, or "Macquarie's time," is the Hospital and Benevolent
Asylum.
It is an old building, bearing the inscription "G. R, 1820. L. Macquarie, Esq., Governor."
It appears to have been a faithfully built structure. It is ninety-six feet long,
and twenty-five feet wide, two stories high, and though fifty-one years have
elapsed since it was erected, it is still in good condition. Mr. T. Paul is the
superintendent; There were forty-seven patients or infirm inmates at the time of
my visit.
Another ancient building is the old Government House. It is in a most
dilapidated condition, and the premises appear to be in the last stages of
ruin and decay.
The next place pointed out to me was a large pile of buildings in which half
the ale drunk in the country was once manufactured. It is known as Cadell's brewery,
and the demand twenty-five or thirty years ago was very expansive ; but the plant
and machinery are now lying idle, except that the engine pumps up water for
the supply of the town.
There was one flour mill at work ; it is known as the "Old Endeavour," and was
built many years ago by Mr. Teale, and is now in the hands of an old resident,
Mr.Hoskisson, more generally and kindly known as old grandfather."
The School of Arts and library (of 700 volumes), are located in a very nice
looking building, and I believe the institution is popular.
The branch Bank of New South Wales (N. Nugent,Esq., manager) is the only institution
of the kind in Windsor. Mr. James Dick is post and telegraph master.
In private residences, I noticed that of B. Richards, Esq.,J.P., which looks
very attractive amidst the trees; that of Richard Ridge, Esq., J.P., also a
very neat structure ; and in the distance, the residence of Mr, Tebbutt, the
well-known astronomer, who has an observatory attached,
I might add, to the benefit and honour of the colony. I regret that I had no
opportunity of visiting so interesting a place.
There are some good hotels in Windsor, and the principal are Holmes's Fitzroy,
Harris's Commercial, and Bushell's Sir John Young.
In general stores, Messrs. R. Dick, Robinson and Grenwell, Moses, Beard, Dawson,
Dean, and Jones take the lead.
I was much surprised on visiting Mr. J. H. Mills's boot store, to find all the
machinery and appliances of a first-class boot factory. Mr. Lane also does a
good boot trade.
I must wind up this short sketch with a notice of two grievances of the town.
The first is the crying want of a bridge over the Hawkesbury. Many efforts
have been made to remedy this defect, but without success as yet ; and the punt,
and a boat, when in repair (the Latter is now lying bottom
out on the sand), conveys passengers and produce across.
The second complaint is the state of the streets, which are almost impassable
in wet weather, and the side streets so neglected that a good crop of grass is
growing in the middle of them.
The municipal council just formed will find more than they can well do for
some time to come in dealing with these matters.
Forgive ! I have been ungallant enough to have left to the last the most
important and pleasurable portion of my information-viz , that I noticed many
very pretty, nay, beautiful, young ladies in the good old town of Windsor.
In this the inhabitants have something at all events to boast of.

RICHMOND
Richmond is a small, though attractive-looking little township, containing
about 1000 inhabitants.
It is four miles from Windsor, and by train thirty eight miles from Sydney.
Many of the buildings are old, although in good repair ; and there are a few
fine residences.
There are three principal streets, but most business is transacted in that known
as the Windsor road.
Among the institutions they have three or four schools, four churches, a school
of arts and library, a mutual improvement society, a volunteer company,
a cricket club, and last, though not least, a bank (branch Bank of New South Wales,
C. Hole, Esq , manager).
There is no court-house, and but two policeman stationed in the town,
senior-constable Tiernan being in charge.
The Public School is a compact and neat structure of the gothic style of architecture.
It is of brick with slated roof, and has recently received additions
costing 240, making it now about fifty-four feet long and twenty feet broad,
besides an infant class-room eighteen feet by fourteen. The number of pupils on
the roll is 120, with an average daily attendance of 100.
The head master is Mr. W. H. Wilson, assisted by Miss Brown and Miss Douglas,
the former in charge of the infants, and the latter a pupil teacher.
I have had occasion to visit this school before, and the examination the
children underwent during my visit only confirmed my opinion that
it is one of the best conducted in the colony. The children presented a
clean and pleasing appearance, and were remarkably well behaved-the
discipline being excellent.
The pupils evidenced considerable proficiency in reading, parsing, and analysis,
and the copy-books shown were neat and clean. Several of the elder pupils
exhibited remarkable skill in landscape drawing and scroll-work. Several songs
were sung by the children with a sweetness of expression and harmony of
voice gratifying to the ear.
Without doubt the Richmond public school is a credit to the town.
From the Public School I proceeded to the Church of England Denominational school,
which is held in an upstairs room of a brick structure, built, I am informed,
fifty years ago.
The room is much too small, besides being otherwise quite unsuitable, and
the furniture is bad.
There were seventy-four children in attendance. The discipline and method of
instruction were as good as could be expected under the circumstances.
The odour from dinner, rising from the rooms beneath, prevailed, while an
examination in arithmetic and geography was going on, in which latter moderate
attainments were manifested. The dictation was indifferent, but the
writing very fair. In simple justice I may state that the present master,
Mr. C. M. Chapman had only been a few days in charge of the school.
The Roman Catholic school is held in a small brick building, and is conducted
by Miss. Purcell and her sister, who have had charge for over six years.
The children to the number of forty in attendance are mostly very young.
They seemed to be well conducted and orderly during my short stay.
The girls were doing some plain and some fancy work in wool, such as belts,
slippers, &c, in a very creditable manner.
The Church of England congregation, under the pastorship of a venerable
clergyman the Rev. J. Elder is a fine large brick building at the west
end of the town.
The Presbyterian Church is nearly opposite the public school, and is a neat
stone structure. The Rev. Mr. Cameron officiates.
The Wesleyan Church is in Windsor-road, built of brick in a plain manner,
and is almost concealed by trees. A minister from Windsor conducts service
in the Wesleyan Church; and in the Roman Catholic Church a very small building,
Dean Hallinan officiates.
Opposite the Church of England is the Richmond cemetery, containing many
beautiful monuments of departed members of the leading families, such as
the Bowmans, Coxs, Towns, Bensons, Rouses, Pitts, &c.
In private residences, that of Mr. William Bowman, near the railway station,
is worthy of more than a passing notice. It is a splendid structure,
surrounded by fine trees. The residence of his brother. Mr. George Bowman
(the Peabody of Richmond), is on the opposite side of the street,
lower down, and though not so fine, has an air of comfort, and, if I
may use the term, countenence, very pleasing to look at.
The residences of Mr. Andrew Town, Mrs. Benson, and Mr. Onus are also worthy
of mention.
The volunteer rifle corps, under the command of Captain Holborow, now
numbers fifty-eight members. There are some crack shots among them,
and it is made a boast that the Richmond rifles have never yet been beaten
in any of the numerous contests they have been engaged in.
Among the Richmond cricketers there are many good bats, but they have
not done much this season.
In hotels, the principal are Mrs. Seymour's Black Horse, Reid's Royal,
Eather'a Union Inn, and Bate's Old House at Home.
The principal stores are Holborow's, King's, Ducker's, Harris's,
Turner's, and Price's (chemist) ;
and among the saddlers. Mr. G. Mills does a good business.
There is a fine park, six acres in extent, in the centre of the town,
around which are planted some fine trees, which will afford shade to the
inhabitants in a few years,
I may take the liberty of adding, that the Richmondites are an exceedingly
social and hospitable people. As in most small towns, there are, of course,
occasionally local jealousies and heart-burnings which, though often arising
from over zeal, occasionally prevent good being done.
The great drawback of Richmond, like Windsor, is the want of a bridge over
the Hawkesbury.
The method of crossing at present is very novel half punt and half bridge,
one half of the latter having been washed away some time since.
For days and days together traffic is entirely suspended, causing serious
inconvenience to the inhabitants across the river.
Petitions have been repeatedly sent in without avail. It is to be hoped
that the matter will no longer be allowed to rest in abeyance.

THE HAWKESBURY VILLAGES.
Leaving Windsor I crossed the Hawkesbury by old punt, which was, as usual,
undergoing repairs.
The afternoon being fine, and the road good, I cantered pleasantly along
past farm-houses and corn-fields. The side-fences were in places covered
with monthly-roses and sweet-briars, giving a pleasing appearance to the road.
At the end of four miles I came to the little village of Wilberforce,
containing about one hundred houses, two churches, one school-house,
a store and post-office, and a solitary policeman.
Wilberforce is a very old place, and, I believe I am correct in stating,
that so far back as the time of Governor King that is about the commencement
of the present century two-acre grants of land were given in the village
to the settlers who wished to avoid the floods. The Church of
England is a nice stone building on the brow of the hill, and is under
the care of an energetic pastor, the Rev. W. Wood. At the service, which I
attended, I was very much pleased with the singing of the choir, assisted by
a well-toned' harmonium, the gift of Mrs. Burdekin.
The Church of England schoolhouse is a brick building, and has an attendance
of about sixty, the number on the roll being seventy four. Mr. J. F. Nash,
assisted by Mm. Nash, are in charge.
The children presented in clean appearance, and tolerable discipline was maintained.
The copy-books exhibited were creditably written, and the whole were neat and clean.
The singing of the children was really good, showing that much pains were taken with them.
The aspect of the village is very pleasing. To almost every house in the
village a garden is attached, and some of them are nicely kept. There is a
vast common, 6,000 acres in extent, adjoining the township, for the use of
the farmers, and it is well supplied with timber.
A canter of a couple of miles further along a capital road, or I should rather
be inclined to call it an avenue (the country in most places resembling a park),
brought me to the country residence of Mrs. Burdekin, called Stonehouse. It is
an elegant structure, and has a tower at one end. The grounds comprise about
400 acres, having a frontage of nearly half-a-mile to the noble and
winding Hawkesbury. The house is about 300 yards from the river. A large
flower-garden, luxuriant with-camellias, chrysanthemums, and other choice
flowers surrounds the house ; and among the trees I noticed a large and
flourishing Spanish chestnut. A hedge of the Osage orange is in course of
formation, and promises great things. The view from the verandah of Stonehouse
is one of the finest on the river, embracing miles of country on three sides,
including views of Windsor and Pitt Town. Thousands upon thousands of bushels
of corn were growing within sight, and hopes were entertained that the
weather would keep up a few weeks longer to give the struggling farmers an
opportunity of getting in this season's harvest.
One acquainted with the district could not help recalling to mind the fact
that the whole of the country on which the eye was then resting had been
the scene of direful floods, which had brought ruin to many a home ;
and that for the past ten years scarcely a full crop had been obtained.
Without repeating an oft-told story, it must strike one as extraordinary
that the affection of the people for their dear old homes acts so powerfully
as an incentive to their remaining that they again begin to cultivate so
soon as the waters subside.
It speaks volumes in favour of the large number of poor farmers on the river,
that, not withstanding their privations and their sufferings, not a single act
of dishonesty can be laid to their charge.
It is but seldom that the Windsor court is troubled with their presence, at
least so far as relates to criminal matters.
On the day after my arrival at Mrs. Burdekin's, I accompanied Mr. Marshall Burdekin
down the river to Ebenezer, &c., about four miles from Wilberforce.
The reason for giving a name so strange to such a place I could not ascertain.
The village has a stone building used as a Presbyterian Church and schoolhouse.
The Rev. Mr. Moore conducts service ; and a teacher of some ability, Mr. M'Fetridge,
has charge of the school, numbering thirty-five pupils. A good view of the
river was obtained a little lower down, and I was pointed out the ruins of
an old mill on the opposite side ; and on the Ebenezer side the well-kept farms
of Messrs. Cross and Davidson.
Sackville Reach is about three miles from Ebenezer, and contains a pretty
little Church of England, in which the Rev. W. Wood officiates ; and a
schoolhouse. Mr. Chatterton being the teacher.
The Wesleyans have also a church on the opposite side. All these are attended
and supported by the farmers in the vicinity.
On my return I passed by Pitt Town, in place of going through Wilberforce,
crossing at the punt lower down. Pitt Town may be described as a village, of one
long street or lane, and to nearly all the houses are attached small farms.
The first place pointed out to me was the residence of Mr. Chaseling, who may
be remembered for the active measures he adopts and the risk he runs in
saving life and property during flood-times. We rode past many pretty
homesteads and cottages, also a few orangeries as we continued.
The Church of England in Pitt Town is of stone, and at the one side is
the residence of the incumbent, the Rev. W. Wood ; and at the other, the
brick schoolhouse, which has an average attendance of about
sixty pupils; Mr. Lambert is the head-master.
The Presbyterian Church on the opposite side is constructed of stone,
and is a neat building. The Rev. W. Moore conducts the services.
"The Maid of Australia" was the title given to the only inn I could see
in Pitt Town.
After leaving the village, the residences of Mr. McDonald and Mrs. Sewell,
and the Killarney Racecourse were pointed out, along the good road and charming
scenery which led back to Windsor.
April 18 1871


SOURCE:
Empire
(Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1875)
Tuesday 9 May 1871
Page 4
Transcription, janilye 2014

Australiaâs oldest church, est. 1809 at Ebenezer, NSW
Was the first non-conformist then Presbyterian Church in Australia, amd a
pioneer in education in the colony, beginning a school in 1810.
he church is the oldest extant school building in Australia.
The boys are with the Rural Camp School.
Photograph taken in 1909