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Category: EATON family

Some Ups and Downs of an old Richmondite (june 1910)

Mr Alfred Smith.
Chronicled by Robert Farlow.
[For the Gazette:]
"As we have spoken of Hobartville,
will pick up the track there and go along
the Yarramundi road, where I knew
several old hands of the good old type.
Where Mr Matthew Nowland is living
was, in my earliest days, occupied by the
Dight family. The old Mr Dight I don't
remember, but his wife was living there
with the family when I first recollect it.
I knew three of the boys before they were
married Sam, George and Arthur.
There were two more, John and Charles.
It was a flour mill worked by horses when
I was a lad, and I used to go there with
Mr James to get flour, and often saw the
mill at work. Mr and Mrs Douglas,
parents of George, James, Robert, &c,
lived there for a long time. When they
left they went to live where they resided
for so many years, and where George,
Robert and Mary died. Mr Bowman
Douglas still occupies the home where
they died. While the Douglas family
were living in Dight's old home Mr. Nowland
purchased the property, and after they left
went there to live and has been
there ever since. The place has been
known for many years as 'Mountain View.' The
hill hard by the front which leads to the lowlands
has been known as Dight's Hill many years, and the
lane along the lowlands in that spot known as Dight's lane.
While Mr and Mrs Douglas were living there I often put
sheep in the little orchard alongside, in which there
used to be good grass.
Not far from the front of 'Mountain View' is a piece
of land bounded on one side by the late Albert Cornwell's
old home, now occupied by Mr Nathan Mitchell, and on the
other by a piece of land belonging to Mr Nowland, and
the front faces the reserve.
There was a house there many years ago, and Daniel Eaton
lived in it for many years. He rented Bowman's farm down
under the hill, and was a big farmer. He also had a
station property on the Big river. Mentioning Mr Dan Eaton
and his station reminds'me of one trip I made from there.
I was on the station this trip for about a fortnight.
Most of the family were there, and as they were homely people,
it was a pleasant time. I remember Johnny, George, Tom, Billy,
and Mrs James William's were there.
Aiex. Gough, father of Johnny Gough, fattened the sheep I
brought down that trip. I went, to school with the Eaton boys;
also with Jane, the eldest girl. The old house above-mentioned
near Nowland's I don't remember anyone else living in after
old Mr. Dan Eaton, and it has gone the way of old places, many years.
Where the Douglas home is still to be found belonged to Mr William Small,
father of Ben, the wheelwright, and Bill, the blacksmith, who carried
on together a wheel wrighting business in Lennox-street, Richmond, for
a very fair lifetime; father also of Susan, who now lives in Richmond in
the skillion on the site of the old business. He sold the property to
one of the Bowmans, and it passed on to the Douglas family.
The piece between the last named and Albert Cornwell's old
home belonged to Thomas Small, who managed to stick to his
little lump of land. On this property his son, Ned,
lives, near the reserve. Ned married a Miss Baldwin, sister
to George, Dick, Janey and Betsy. Mrs Ned Small used
to be a great raiser of geese and when I would be crossing the
old common with stock you could see her feathered stock
about in all directions. Arthur, Charley and Ada still live
in the old home, handed down to them by their father and mother.
Where 'Cracker' Cornwell's (as he was nearly always known) old home
is I remember when there was no house on it. The original house
was built by Mr Isaac Cornwell, who purchased the property
from one of the Small family we have been speaking about.
Mr Isaac Cornwell had the house built and went there to live
after he left the shop in Richmond.
Albert Cornwell's old home has also been occupied by such men
as the late Mr Cleeve, at one time stock inspector, the
late Edward Robinson ; and the present squire of Hobartville
put in a few years there.
Farther along the Yarramundi road we have the home of the
Faithful family on our right, standing some considerable distance
back from the road. The old home seems to be tumbling to
pieces and looks much the worse for wear.
The first I knew living at 'Lakeville' were Mr Faithful and
his first wife. She died there. I remember Jane, a daughter
of the first wife, who married a Mr Wilshire. Mr George Faithful,
a son, was a tall, nice young fellow' and I knew him very well;
but another son, William, I didn't know much about, although I have
often seen him. I knew old Mr Faithful's second wife, who was
Miss Maria Bell, of 'Belmont.' She died at 'Lakeville' also, and
Mr Faithful ended his days here.
I remember a little accident Mr. Faithful had out on the former
common, close to the old top entrance gate of the Hobartville big paddock.
Mr James and I were coming home from the bush at Londonderry with a load
of wood and when we got about where I have stated he was out of his gig
and gigs were aristocratic turnouts, in those days. James made enquiries
and Mr Faithful told him he had lost one of the lynch pins out of
the axle and the wheel came off.' Mr Faithful wanted to go to Sydney
urgently couldn't catch three trains a day. from Richmond then and
was in a great way about the pin. Without a pin he couldn't go on, and
he couldn't find it. His servant, who we knew as 'Red Bill,' was
with him so he came in to our place and managed to get one to fit the axle.
This was really the first time I got
to know Mr Faithful. Miss Jane was a good living young woman, and one
Sunday going home there happened to be a row on at the old 'pub' at the
corner of Bosworth and March streets. There were no police watching
the pubs on Sundays in those times. On this occasion there
was an extra big row aboard. Miss Faithful came up at night
to make a complaint to George James, then a constable, about the noise
and row. Mr James went down and soon settled the disturbance.
Going along towards Yarramundi we have old 'Bronte' the home of the
Pitts. The old house still stands, but years ago a fine modern cottage
was built for Mr Edwin Pitt, and he removed into it. Since then the
old home has been occupied at different times by men who have worked on
the place. Old Mr George Pitt was the first I remember at 'Bronte.' I
knew him very well and a grand old man he was. He was my boss
for three years at the punt, and during that time I always found it
a pleasure to have anything to do with him. He once stood for Parliament
against the late Hon. William Walker, for Windsor and Richmond, and was
only beaten by some eight or ten votes.
But about 'Bronte.' Dan Carter could tell a lot more
than most of us, as he lived with old Mr. Pitt for a long while,
and Mr Pitt thought there was no one like Dan.
In the corner of Bronte estate at the junction of Crowley's lane
and the main Yarramundi road, there was a house which has only been
pulled down a few months, and the first person I remember living in it
was Bob Johnson, or, as he was generally called, 'Hominy Bob.' He was
a poultry dealer.
Then I knew and remember Ned Harper, who was a blacksmith living
in this house and had his shop there for many years. The late
John Madden had a wheelwright shop there, and lived in a
little three roomed place with a kitchen which stood between
Harpur's house and Pitt's gate, where the men's house stands.
He also lived in the house where Mr. Charles Davis lived, and
which is still occupied by Miss Eliza Davis and her brother Ted.
At the time John Madden lived in it, it was owned by John Markwell.
I will content myself with mentioning some of the-Old hands of Yarramundi
who come to my mind. Among them were my old friend John Crowiey ;
Mr Isaac Pearce, who lived for years in a house just inside the
road fence, and near the entrance gate ; Thomas Kirk, where
William Pearce lived ; Bill Paris, Andy Farrel, who married the widow
of Bill Paris; Greenhalgh, who kept a pub;
Krochnert and Low, who kept shop ;
Robert Aull kept the 'Governer Darling' hotel, and
John Wheeler's father kept the pub later on ; Dan Dickens, kept a pub
there and Tom Kirk also ; Johnny Tindale, William Heath, William Farlow,
who kept the 'Waggon and Four Horses' in the old two storey place ;
Tom Hornery and his wife. Poor old Tom was drowned in the lagoon, and
I have heard them say old Mr Pitt gave Ben Mortimer 5 for finding his body;
Gilbey the well sinker ; Cross lived near the lagoon in Crowley's paddock.
I remember there used to be great fights there. Some of
the battles fought there were between Ben Mortimer and Tom Saunders, a
Windsor chap ; and Joe Windred and Ben Mortimer.
I remember hearing Mr James talk about a fatal fight out there
somewhere about the waterhole just down from the Presbyterian church,
and I remember him telling me he arrested a man for it. But all these
old hands are gone the way of all flesh, and after all they
were friendly and good natured people. That was my experience, anyhow.
Yarramundi can claim to be the home of some people who have lived to
be great ages. Among them can be reckoned the Timmins family of the
older generations. I knew 'Granny'Timmins, as she was known in later years,
and her husband very well. I think she was over ioo years
old when she died. Mr and Mrs Timmins used to come round the back
bushtrack to Richmond no H.A. College, or thought of such in those days,
and cail at Mr James and take the old lady James into Windsor to attend
service in the Roman Catholic Church there on Sunday mornings. We had no
churches then so handy to up, yet the old hands thought nothing of going
miles to attend service. My wife has often walked to Penrith to attend
the Roman Catholic Church and thought nothing of it. But coming back to
this old couple Timmins. They had several children, some of whom lived
to be great ages.
I went to school with 'Betsy'Timmins, who married the late Mr. George Mortimer,
also with Agnes who became Mrs George Pearce. Betsy lived to be a very old
woman, and Agnes was an old woman when she died.
Then in my early days old Mr Markwell was living down on the flats on the
farm, which, I think was bought by Mr Klein, where he settled down
after leaving off school teaching, and now belongs to his daughter
Mrs Albert Smith.
I went to Mr Hogsflesh's school with Thomas Markwell, and
John, his brother. John was found dead in the bush near where
Sam Wood used to live at one time. He went out for a load of wood and had
it on, and made a pot of tea. He must have dropped dead,
or passed away very easily, for I believe he was found next morning resting
with his head on his arms near his billy. His horses were standing there with
the load on the dray, and must have had a rough time standing all that time.
Old Mr. Markwell had a man working for him I remember well. He used to bring
vegetables, mostly cabbage, turnips, and melons, to Richmond for sale. He had
an old white horse with one 'bumble' front foot and was much attached to the
old animal. The old man went by the name of Cheshire.
Then I knew old Mr William Stinson. He it was who married
the widow of Mr Wheeler, who kept a pub in Yarramundi.
I remember old Mr George Mortimer living out there. I remember George, Ben,
William, Alf, Tom and James of the boys. Among the girls I knew Annie,
who married John Lord, and another whose name I think was Sarah.
Then I can remember the founders of the Williams family out that way,
Mr Robert Williams and his wife lived where Wellington Freeman is
living. I remember old Mr Williams dying and being buried on a Sunday.
His widow married William Maloney.
Then I knew Mr Williams' son, Thomas, both before he was married and
after, when he lived in a weatherboard house which stood off the present
main road where Mr John Devlin is living.
I knew Thomas Howell who had the 'flour mills out there.
George Wood also had a house along the lane going down to the
present falls. His first wife was Miss Caroline Aston, and his second
Mary Collins. I went to school with Caroline Aston, and her sister,
the widow of the late John Wood, of the Grose, Annie Crowley,
sister of the late Mr John Crowley of 'Crowley Park,' was another schoolmate
of mine from out that way.
As 1 have I said, I went to school with John Markwell, and I remember
the sad accident which happened him many years before he died. I put
him over the river in the punt, one moonlight night about 9 o'clock
and when he got up on the bill after leaving the river he started
galloping the grey mare he was riding. When he got about in front of
where Mr Bowman Douglas lives there was a large stump along the track,
and he came to grief against the stump. The mare was killed, and he
was rendered unconscious, and was found very early next morning by
Joe Fletcher, who was going to work at Dight's. John was unconscious
for several days, and though he pulled through, it used to come against
him at times.
On the farm where Mr John Riley lives, I remember the old Mr.
Shields of all living. He would be grandfather of the present
Mr.George Shields, senr., of Bosworth-street Richmond. Old
Mr. Shields was a little man, but a worker.
On the adjoining farm I remember old Mr George Pearce living for
a great number of years. He had several sons and a daughter, Clarissa.
Among his sons with us to-day we have Sam, who has suffered two losses
with fire at the hands of some malicious persons; Edwin, who was for
many years working a part of 'Bronte' farm and now lives at
Agnes Banks, and William. The sister I belive still lives at the
old home on the farm.
One time I was talking to old Mr Pearce about the price of corn
and telling him I knew old Mick Gavin to bring Mr James 25 bushels from
Little Kurrajong, as it was then known, at 9d a bushel
He told me he knew it to be sold for 8d a bushel.
Mr George Pearce had a brother Charlie who lived down the lane
going to the river falls. He was a boot maker by trade, I
think. His wife was a great nurse. They reared a large family
of boys and girls. Some of the boys are still in the district.
George lives in Richmond. Edward in the old home, and works
for Mr P. Charley, of Belmont Park ; and Arthur also works for
Mr Charley, and looks after the Clarendon property
Among the daughters of Mr Charles Pearce we have with us
Mrs. John Riley, of Yarramundi, Mrs William Parker,
Agnes Banks, and Charlotte, who lives at North Richmond with
the Pitt's, of 'Sunnyside,' I think.
While speaking of Mr and Mrs Pearce living down the
lane near the falls, reminds me that behind Mr Howell's place
near the river old Jack Timmins lived a long time while he
was droving.
Old Mr. William Scott lived on the property where old
Mr.Michael Waters is living, only nearer the river.
Many a time I have been on the farm when Mr Scott lived there.
Mr James and I used to go down, generally on Saturday, and get
a bag or two of chaff for the horse, and some marsh mallows
and wild mustard out of the wheat for the cows. The wild
mustard was very plentiful in those times. I went to school
with two of Mr Scott's children John, who died in Kurrajong I
think, and Betsey, who married Jack Timmins. There were two other girls.
Fred Thomson had the next farm to Scott's before he took the
farm near Parnell's.
The adjoining farm to this I remember the late Peter Hough
occupying for some time.
Somewhere about there a man named 'Jacky' Green owned a farm and
lived on it for many years. I remember Fred Thomson had a farm near
Parnell's old place. Parnell's was a weatherboard piace and I have
heard them speak about him keeping a pub there. I knew the Parnell
family very well. There was Edward, who died only a short time ago,
William, Thomas, Charles, John and Matthew. The eldest
girl, Mary, married a Mr Joseph Cope, of Windsor, and I believe
the solicitor of the name in Sydney is a son of his;
Elizabeth' married a Mr Baker ; and Sarah, Mr. Theo Cooper. Agnes was
unmarried and there were two more younger ones I knew very well, but
I forget their names, as the time I speak of is so long ago.
Thomas Parnell, the father of the children mentioned, and wife, and
some of the family, after leaving this district, went to
live on the Hunter River, somewhere near Maitland, and Mrs Parnell
told me they gave 8,000 for the place. William married and stayed
at the Hawkesbury river, and it was for him I worked at the punt.
I shall never forget Mrs Parnell's kindness to me while at the river.
Mr. Parnell always made it a practice to give me a pound every Christmas,
as he used to say, "for your kindness to the daughters by obliging
them with the boat at different times." In the old place on the
opposite side, of the road to Parnell's and it is a ruin now I knew
a boy and girl by the name of Sam and Mary Glasseye when they lived there
and came to Hogsflesh's school. I have heard their father kept a pub there,
but have no recollection of it.
After them came two brothers, William and Edward Jeffrey.
William was married, but Edward wasn't. I remember them keeping a pub,
and it was these men Mr. Ben Richards bought out when he left the
house in March street, Richmond, where Mr. C. S. Guest has his saleyards
now. Mr Richards kept a pub there for some time, and lived in
this place for about 18 years. It was while he was living here he started
butchering at Blackwattle Swamp,Sydney.
Not far away from here, on the corner of Dight's lane and the lane which
runs along the farms to the river end of Crowley's lane, there was a slab
house of four rooms and a verandah. The first I remember living there was
John Edwards. Jerry Hansell lived in it for a long time, but this old house,
too, has been a thing of the past many years.
While Jerry Hansell was living there I put a man named Samuel Wickham
over the river in the punt one morning with his two horses and a load
of corn and potatoes. When he got about opposite Jerry's house there
was a big mud hole, and while trying to steer the horses to miss it they
slewed and jammed him between the dray and the fence and killed him on
the spot. He married a widow, Elliot, grandmother to our present Jack,
and had his stepson, Simon, with him at the time.
And before I leave what we might call the Yarramundi block I must mention
that Andy Farrell lived on the farm adjoining
Mr Markwell's, and the late Abe Eather married his only daughter,
Ellen, while he was living there. Going down the river from where
Mr B. Richards kept the pub,
I'll say a little about some old hands I knew, and as near in the
order they came as my memory has them, which I think will not be far out.
The farm next to the old pub at Richmond bridge was owned by one of the
Rouses. I remember old Mr. and Mrs. Dempsey living on it for a long time.
I remember the three sons, James, Joseph, and George ; also two girls.
Liza married Henry Mills, and Betsy was single at this time and often
stayed with the Mills when they lived in Lennox street, Richmond, where
Harry Fong lives. This old place plays a big part in the early history
of Richmond. I believe Betsy Dempsey married after the family
left here. Mr. and Mrs. Rigney lived on the farm for a long time.
Mrs. Seymour bought this farm afterwards for 1350.
Mr. Guest, Charley's father, was the auctioneer and put it up for
sale at old Mr. John Town's while he was keeping pub over the river.
Mr Richard Watts (father of George, James and Henry
Watts, three well-known farmers and horsebreeders over North Richmond way
for many years) was empowered by Mrs. Seymour to bid for the property on
her behalf, and he managed to secure it for her. George Watts has passed
away. He was a wonderful man. Although he had lost his sight completely
he was a splendid judge of a horse, and a hard man to deceive in this respect.
His brother, Henry has also passed away. He, too,
was a good judge of horses, and can be reckoned among the Hawkesburyites
who have helped to make the district notable for good horses. Harry was
living at the time of his death at Yarramundi, but died, I believe, in one
of the hospitals in Sydney after an operation. James, the other brother, is,
I think, still alive.
The next farm belonged to Mrs Seymour, and Mr Richard Watts mentioned
lived there many years, and both he and his wife died there. Thus it
will be easily under stood how it was Mr Watts was empowered by Mrs Seymour
to purchase the adjoining place for her.
The next farm belonged to Mr Sam Thorley. Old Mr Thorley died there, and
his widow lived there for some time after. While Mr Thorley had it
Mr Edward Allen and his wife (parents of the late Charles Allen,
of North Richmond) lived near Thorley's house on a little piece of the
farm for a long time, and died there. Then I remember a man who had only
the use of one arm living on a part of Thorley's farm. This old man was a great
gardener, and grew a lot of peas. He used to bring them up to Richmond on
his shoulders in bags and sell them about the town. Then William Thorley's farm
came next, and on it he lived a long time.
Afterwards Mr Ben Richards got it from Thorley. William Thorley had one son,
a saddler, and the last time I saw him was at Narrabri, where he was in
business.
On what was William Thorley's farm I remember Mr Mills (father of old
Mrs Thomas Collison, who has not long left Windsor) keeping a school in a
weatherboard place. Afterwards Mr. Mills kept a school at Grose Vale somewhere
about the present post office.
Then we have the farm on which Mr Edward Inall (the present Albert's grandfather)
lived for many years, and I think he died there. At the time of his death he was
what can truly be called a very old man. Mrs Edward Inall, who was a sister, I
have heard, to William Scott, died down there. Some of Mr Inall's children
I remember, John, and another's name I am not certain of just now. There were
some daughters, but I knew very little about them.
Somewhere here Mr. William Ives lived. I think it was between Stevenson's farm
and the one owned by Edward Lewis. I remember some of the family. The
present Mrs. John Pearce, of Agnes Banks and she must be getting on in years now
was one of the girls. Then we have the farm on which Mr Edward Lewis lived for very
many years, and died there. I knew some of his family very well. The two
boys, Jack and Ned, I went to school with, and the daughters I can reckon
among my schoolmates were Mary Ann, the present Mrs William Tomkinson, of
Richmond, and another one who married Mr Henry Whitney. There were others
in the family. We come along to the old farm owned by Mr Thomas Griffiths,
father of the present Tom, senr., of Richmond, and our Tom is getting on
in years now. The old Mr Griffiths was the first I remember living there,
and was a big farmer. He kept a pub, 'The Richmond Inn' in York-street, Sydney,
at one time, and the wife and myself, have stayed there while he was keeping it.
Among his family I knew our present
Tom, Bob, of Penrith, Jack, who was a saddler, Jim, the great old-time foot
runner, and Bill, who was a great man among music. Mrs John Gough. who
was so well-known and popular in Windsor, was one of the daughters.
The old Mr Griffiths was a great horseman and could ride a buckjumper in
good style; also a good all round sport. He had two brothers who used to
stay with him down there, but went up country Richard and Jonathan.
The next farm was owned by the late Mr Edward Powell. I knew
him and his wife, and many bags of corn husks for the milking cows we brought
from there. Among Mr Powell's family were Edward, Richard, George, Sydney,
and Henry. Emma was the only girl I remember, and she married old Mr Joseph
Onus. I went to school with Richard, George, Sydney and Henry.
Then some where handy old Mr Joseph Stubbs, a great farmer, lived for many
years, and died there. The first wife died there.
Mr Stubbs married a second time - Paddy Kenny married his widow. Paddy died
there.
Then on the farm which belonged to Mr Ben Richards, and now occupied
by the H. A College, old ' Granny 'Hough lived for many years. It was she
who laid Mr Richards on to buy it and he secured it at 1200. He often told me
that was the price he gave for it. And speaking of 'Granny' Hough reminds
me I was speaking to the present Joseph Onus, of Richmond, a little while ago,
and Margaret Catchpole's name cropped up.
Mr Onus' mother was Annie Hough, and a sister to the late Peter, John and George,
sons of 'Granny' Hough. He says he has heard 'Granny' speak of Margaret,
and that she was buried in that portion of the cemetery running parallel with the
present Sunday School ground.
Then old Mr James Huxley, who put in so many years on the Grose farm,
rented it from Mr Richards for many years. Afterwards Pat Casey lived
there a long, while, also Mr Hill, father of Jack, formerly of
Richmond, and our present Herb Hill.
Then we have the farm which was occupied by old Mr John Hough for a fair
lifetime, so to speak. He reared a large family there, and both he and his
wife died there he dying first.
Then there was a farm where Mr George Hough lived for so many years. The
first man I remember living on this farm was George Wilson, who, as I have
stated, lived at one time where Tom Miles lives in Lennox street. Richmond,
and had some fine stallions. While down there he was farming.
I went to school with Wilson's two sons George and William, and his
his daughter, Betsy. They used to come in a spring cart to school. Between
where George Wilson lived and the next place old Mr Pearson, father of Albert,
the elder, of Richmond Bottoms, lived for a good while. This farm then belonged
to Mr Thomas Tebbutt. I remember the two sons, Albert and Charley, pretty well,
also two girls who became Mrs M. Phillips, junr., and the late Mrs John Gosper,
of Windsor. I knew old Mr Pearson fairly well. He bought both bundle and
sheet stringy bark from me when I was at the punt. On another occasion while
I was at the punt he bought a hundred slabs from me. He told me one day it
was a wonder I didn't trade in this sort of things, and I told him I hadn't been asked
for any such, so he told me he wanted a hundred and they must be good and not
above the price he stated. I got the slabs and made twopence each on the deal,
which paid me well, as I had no trouble with them in the handling. Then came
Mr William Smith, who was a big farmer and lived there for many years.
I remember three of the boys James, William and Joseph, when they were young.
He also had some daughters. Later on in life I got to know them, among them
being the present Mrs Duncombe, of Richmond, the late Mrs Alf. Bailey,
Mrs. John Bailey, of Richmond Bottoms, and the late Mrs Charles Westall.
Mrs. Smith was a sister to the Mrs Bailey who died at Clarendon some time ago at
an advanced age, and also a sister to Mrs Single, mother of the late Joseph Single,
who was a prominent man in the Hawkesbury Race Club and Agricultural Association
for so many years.
The next farm to Mr William Smith's belonged to Mr. Thomas Bailey, who was also
a big farmer in those days. I knew his boys, John, William and Alfred. I have often
bought oaten hay and oats off Mr Bailey for the racehorses while I kept the pub on
the road at Clarendon.
Then adjoining each other were the three brothers, George, William and Thomas Eather,
who suffered so disastrously in the big flood of June, '67. Old Mr John Single of all
owned a farm near the Eather brothers on which Mr Charles Eather, father of the boys
mentioned, lived for many years in a big brick house. I knew Mr. John Hand,
who lived on a farm adjoining Charley Eather's. He was a farmer and had a run,
I am told, out in Long Wheeney.
Further along there were James Upton and "Grandfather" Hoskisson, who lived
there and owned farms George Freeman, though living in Windsor, worked a farm
down there.
We will take an imaginary walk back to the old crossing at the punt.
David Brown lived somewhere near the farm occupied by Charley Eather.
One time I met Mr Brown, who happened to see a good chance of making
a little money, but he hadn't any cash on him at the time. He asked
me to lend him some and I gave him what he wanted, and in
'no time' he returned me my money and some for interest.
Back at the punt again we will record a few little incidents I have
thought of since I started. There had been a fair flood and is was
the first day the punt got to work. Charley Eather was keeping
the pub at the time, and a flock of cattle came down. They were put into
the river to swim over, except one which they couldn't get into the water,
as he was very contrary. After a deal of galloping about they got him in
and be began to ring about and wouldn't steer for the other side.
The owner called out for me to bring the boat down and steer him over.
I had a lively half hour of it and nearly got capsized more than once.
The owner of the cattle and five or six others went up to
the pub to have drinks, and when they came back I was back at the
North Richmond side. They got into the punt to go over. When we
were nearly over, the man who owned the cattle put two coins into my hand
and closed it on them so as the others would not see what they were. I
didn't look at what they were just at the time as I was busy with the punt.
When they were all off the punt except a man namsd Davis, he said to
me 'Half a sovereign, Alf, I suppose.' I opened my hand and
showed him what the coins were six pence for the owner and his horse
coming over in the punt, and sixpence for my half hour's hard work
after his bullock in the river ! I took good care to let that
man do the best he could with his bullocks in the river after that.
Then I put Mr. James Martin he wasn't Sir James then
and "Grandfather" Hoskisson over two days when they were electioneering
the other side of the river the first time James Martin was
elected to Parliament. Mr Hoskisson took great interest in that contest,
and worked hard to get Mr Martin in.
Another day I had a lady overboard. I was putting her over on horseback
in the punt, and when about half way over and there was 18 or 20 feet of
water at the spot the horse began to plunge and wanted to make back to the
other side, with the result he got overboard, lady and all. The horse struck
out for the shore, and the woman stuck to him and managed to get out safely.
A young man once brought some horses to the punt one wet day and was putting
them in to swim them over to take them to Kurrajong. When the horse he was
riding got into the water he began to play up and unseated his rider. I happened
to be handy with the boat and pulled over to him quickly and he grabbed the
side and nearly swamped the boat. He begged me to lift him in, but as he had a
big overcoat on, and was a big chap, I hadn't a hope of getting him into the
boat. However, he clung to the side till I got over. He often remarked that
only for me he would have been drowned.
Thomas Carnell also nearly met his death in the river, while I was there. He had
been over to the races at the old course, near Charley Eather's pub, and I was
putting him across in the punt. When we got the best part of the way over he
wanted me to pull faster and I told him I couldn't. He was a little annoyed about
it, and said he wouldn't wait. He put his spurs into the horse and made him
jump off the flaps of the punt, and in he and horse went, and under they went.
When he came up the horse was plunging about and soon unseated him. I had the boat
alongside and went to his assistance. I wasn't strong enough to lift him into the
boat, so he clung to the side of it till I got ashore with him.
I had another experience, and a case of nearly drowning
-- a woman this time. An old lady had been to Richmond with her basket
of eggs 2/- a dozen then and I was putting her
back over the river in the boat. I cautioned her not to stand up as she
might overbalance, but she wouldn't take the advice and into the water she went.
I couldn't get her into the boat, so I had to hold her with one hand to help her
keep a good hold of the side of the boat, and work the oar with the other till I got
her over safely.
Mrs John Town was living in the cottage where Mr John Pitt
lives, and as the old lady I had saved knew Mrs Town very well,
she went up to her and got a change of clothes.
Mr Lockrey was a farmer up Kurrajong and was going into Windsor for loading for
Mr John Lamrock, senr., with his four bullocks and dray. When he got to the
river, and I was going to put him over in the punt, I could see the bullocks were
thirsty and I advised him to water them before he got on to the punt,' as there was
a good watering place there. He said he would water them when he got over to the
other side. When we got, over I wanted him to take them out for safety, but be
reckoned he could manage them alright and wouldn't take them out. When he
put them in they were very thirsty and began swimming about and tried to make
back to the other side. He soon found out he couldn't manage them, and saw
they stood a good chance of being drowned. I saw there was trouble and
got the boat and went to their assistance. I tried my best to get the pin out of the
pole. After a deal of trouble I got it out and managed to save one beast. The
poor old man was in a great way about losing three of his bullock, and reckoned
he was ruined. Another old friend of mine was going to Kurrajong and as I
was putting him over in the punt, and the river was rising very fast, I asked him to
be sure and get back very soon as we expected to be compelled to take the punt
off before very long. He was fond of a little drop and stayed away longer than
he should have. When he came back we had taken the punt off about an hour,
and had no chance of getting it on again. He wanted me to put the
punt on and put him over, but I told him it was impossible,
and offered to put him over in the boat. He said he wouldn't wait for the boat, and
would swim his horse over. I saw how he was and begged him not to attempt
such a thing. He put his horse into the water in spite of my pleadings.
The piebald horse he was riding was a great swimmer and struck out for the
other side. I expected something would happen to him going over, so I followed him
up in the boat. When he got about half way the horse began plunging and put
him off. He was no sooner off the horse in the water than he grabbed the horse's
tail and hung on for all he was worth. I wanted him to come to the boat but he
wouldn't, preferring to stick to the horse's tail, and the animal took him safely over
and landed him about where the cattle used to land. He got a change of clothes
at a friend's place up on the bank and a drop of something to warm him inside.
Another day I put Thomas Onus over in the punt about two o'clock as he was
going up to Freeman's, on the Comleroy Road, to, have a look at a lot of cattle
which had to be there that day. When I was putting him over the river was rising
and I wanted him to get back as soon as possible. After he left the river began to
rise very rapidly and we had to take the punt off. When he came back, well after
dark, and found the punt off he came and told me he had to get to Sydney next
morning the train was only running to Blacktown then and begged me to put
him over in the boat. It was very dark and the timber was coming down and I
didn't care about facing it. I explained to him the danger I was running, and that
I couldn't swim. He then asked whether, if he got Jim Merrick to come with me
with a lantern and keep the timber off the boat, I would put him over. He told
me he would give me a pound and Merrick ten shillings. After some persuasion
I agreed, but told him I was frightened of the job and that it was not
for the sake of the money I was doing it. Merrick came up and we chanced it, and
on our way over he pushed five or six lots of timber off the boat with a pole about
six feet long. When we got over I wanted to go up and stay at Parnell's, but
Merrick wasn't a bit afraid and persuaded me to come on back. On the way back
he pushed off several lots of timber.
That pitch dark night and dangerous trip I have never forgotten.
Dr. White, of Windsor, used to ride a fine black horse
and when he went to Kurrajong I always put him over in the punt. No matter
what late hour, or how cold the winter night might be when he was returning
and I had to put him over, he would never have the punt. I always had to use
the boat for him and swim his horse behind. When we got over I always had
an iron hoop scraper which I kept for the purpose, and gave his horse a good scrape
down and rub over. The old doctor used to say it was as good as a feed of corn to
the horse. Dr. White married a Kurrajong girl by the name of Miss Townsend, who
lived about opposite the old Church of England at the foot of the Big Hill.
I have heard it said he was a very clever doctor.
He always treated me well for the trouble I took with him
and his horse.
I had a mishap there one day. I was bringing a lot of sheep over for
Mr. Ben Richards. Old Mr Joseph Onus got his horse on to the flap of the punt just as we
were going to start and he didn't think it was safe and jumped off again. When
we got about half way over I had Harry Gibbs helping me that day the sheep
got fidgeting about and on top of one another in one corner, which knocked our
punt out of balance. The water began to flow in rapidly, and down it went in quick
sticks. When we saw she was sinking we got the sheep out. and were lucky
enough to lose none. We got Bill Carverdown he was a good hand at the work
to help us get the punt up, and it took us nearly two days to get it right. As a
rule we bad tbe boat with us, but this day we didn't, and it taught us never to
be without it in the future. As the river was up it meant a great inconvenience to
the people as they couldn't get over the Yarramundi falls. There were two lots of
sheep to come over and they meant easy earned money for us. I had got paid
beforehand for them and we got the first lot over and when the sheep on the other
side saw them feeding along the banks in they rushed and swam over. In one lot
one sheep was drowned, and in the other lot none were lost. I shall never forget
one little incident that happened while I was down there. Mrs Parker, who lived
in the house on the hill where Johnson Pay and William Fuller lived, used to
come over and work for Mrs Parnell. She was over there one Christmas eve, and
when she was going home they gave her a sucking pig for her Christmas dinner.
She put it in a bag and I put her over in the boat, and home she went delighted
to think they would have such a fine Christmas dinner ; but that night the pig
got out. Next morning Mr Parker was hunting all round among the neighbours
to see if they had seen the pig, but could not find any trace of it. A little
later he was telling me about their misfortune. I happened to be talking to
Mr Parnell and told him about Parker's pig being lost
when he 'told me the pig was up with its mother. I saw Parker and told him what
Parnell had said, but he could hardly believe the pig would swim the river, and
thought I was having a lark with him. He made up his mind to go and have a
look for himself, and when he got up it was there right enough. He bagged it
again and had the pleasure of tasting it for Christmas dinner after all.
Jack Turner was coming over from the other side and we had a stage outside of the
punt on the side the rope worked, and Jack set to work to help me over to make
it easier for me. It was a bit windy and made the punt lurch about a little and
the rope happened to come off the roller, and into the water Jack
went backwards and got a fine ducking. He was a jolly natured
fellow and took it in good part I shall always think of poor old Dr.
Wittaker as he was coming back from Kurrajong and over in the punt.
William Parnell and I were out on the stage pulling. It was windy and the rope came
off the roller on the end Parnell was working and in he went. We were about 40
yards from the shore when it happened and Parnell had to swim. As soon as he
went in I saw he made for the flap of the punt and got underneath it, and began
singing out he was drowning and for the doctor to catch hold of his hand. The old
doctor was in a great state of mind about William, as he used to call him, and
wanted me to catch hold of his hand. I told him William wanted his hand, not
mine, but the old doctor wouldn't catch hold of it. I didn't bother, as
I knew well enough Parnell was a good swimmer and that he could get out safely.
Mr. Parnell told me after he was on for a lark with the old doctor, and what
he wanted was to get hold of his hand so that he could pull him in and give him a ducking.

SOURCE:
Windsor and Richmond Gazette
Saturday 4 June 1910
Saturday 11 June 1910
Saturday 18 June 1910
Saturday 25 June 1910
Page 14
transcription, janilye 2012

LAND GRANTS NEW SOUTH WALES 1821

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, SYDNEY NEW SOUTH WALES
28 April 1821
JOHN OXLEY, Surveyor General.

THE following LIST of NAMES of NEW SETTLERS, who are to receive GRANTS of LAND, and of OLD SETTLERS, who are to have additional LANDS located for them in the Year 1821, is published for general Information:

James Atkinson, Thos. Arkell, Edward Alcorn, Robert Aull, James Arndell,
Thomas Allen, George Alleburn, Samuel Arndell, Richard Adams,
Francis Allen, Jos. Atkins, William Alsop, J. Aiken, Francis Able,
Michael Ansell, Edward Allen, Thos. Asplin, Thomas Ashford,
Charles Armitage, Pat. Allen, J. Andrew, J. Agland,
Alex Berry, George Barber, William Baker, David Brown,
Wm. Bradbury, Robert Bateman. Geo. Best, sen.
Bryan Byrne, Michael Bryan, J. Brown, Noah Bryan,
Charles Beasley, Timothy Brophy, J. Brown, John
Bryan, Wm. Bruce, Thos. Byrne, John Booth, N.
Boon, Wm. Beaumont, Thos. Bowers, Thos. Bates,
Wm. Beggs, Dennis Bigley, Jas. Bolsover, J. Brown,
J. Brackfield, George Bradley, Wm. Bannister, Thos.
Bowning, Sam. Barber, Thos. Bird, Michael Byrne,
Jas. Brackenry, J. Bent, Thos. Bates, Thos. Baker,
J. Barker, J. Byrne, Thos. Biggen, Andrew Biggen,
Jas. Beckett, J. Bell, Thos. Benson, Bursella Bensley,
Edw. Burke, Brien Bagnall, Jos. Bullock, Jas. Badgery,
H. Batman, Owen Byrne, Jas. Butler, Richard
Bryan, H. Butler, Aaron Burt, J. Burrell, Daniel
Brown, J. Bentley, Stephen Burr, Wm. Britain, J.
Bradford, Jon. Broker, J. Bowman, Wm. Barron,
Jas. Byrne, Martin Burke, Geo Best, jun. James Barker,
Jas. Brailey, Jas. Burgess, H. Bray, Thomas Byrne,
Robert Brodie, Jas. Burke, Thos. Brown, J. Brown, Thos Brian,
Wm. Burridge, D. Burne, Wm. Briant, Eber. Bunker, James Butler,
Silvester Butler, Owen Boyne, J. Bennett, D. Brown, John Bayley,
Edward Bailes, John Bull, John Bailes, jun.
Daniel Bisex, Michael Boland, Thos. Cowper, James Cobb,
Donald Cameron, George Cutter, Adam Clink, Isaac Cornwall,
William Chadworth, Timothy Connor, James Carroll, John Cahill,
John Cheers, Benj. Carver, Owen Connor, Peter Cooney, John Crawley,
Thomas Campbell, Richard Cavanagh, Jas. Cavanagh,
James Cox, George Clarke, Samuel Craft, Thomas Cross, John Cribb,
Peter Carrol, Roger Connor, John Cowley, John Craft, John Colcroft,
William Craig, Farrell Cuffe, John Cromen, Dennis Connolly,
James Connell, Michael Cartwell, Peter Carroll, John Collins,
Hugh Crabtree, Abraham Champray, Thos. Cowling, John D. Campbell.
Richard Carr, Dennis Conway, John Cummins, William Cheshire, Thos. Clarke,
Edward Churchill, John Chaseling, James Connelly, Thomas Cheshire,
John Day, John Dight, Andrew Doyle, William Davis, Edward Doyle,
Thos. Dutton, Jas. Donnelly, James Duffey, Wm. Douglas, Jas. Devlin,
Jas. Daly, Jas. Dempsey, Pat. Downey, Thos. Davy, Peter Dunn, Edmund Doyle,
Cyrus Doyle, Jas. Donahar, Stephen Dunn, Pat. Devoy, Pat Dacey, Michael Doran,
Nicholas Dukes, Thos. Downes, Charles Dodding, Geo. Dowling, J. Dell,
Francis Dalton, Jas. Dearing, Wm Dockrell, Michael Duggin, Richard Donelly,
J. Darrah, Isaac Dowse, Garrett Donally, John Dewhurst, Christopher Downes,
John Dogharty, Walter Duggan, Joseph Dargon, George Davis,
Shady Davey, Samuel Davis, John Davis, Thomas Davis, William Davis,
John Dalton, Patrick Downey, Edward Dillon, John Dunn, John Eyre,
John England, James Eldridge, Eliker Everitt, Joseph Eades,
Charles Eather ,Thomas Eather, Thomas Eather sen.
Joseph Emm, Joseph Earles, Daniel Eaton, Joseph Eyles, Henry Early,
William Edney, John Edney, Wm. Edwards, Wm. Eagleton, Wm. Etsell,
John Ellison, John Wm. Fulton, Wm. John Fitz, Henry Fleming,
Bernard Fitzpatick, John Frazier, Samuel Fry, George Freeman,
Wm. Field, Bernard Fitzpatrick, Robert Farlow, James Frazier,
Edward Field, sen. John Finch, Wm. Fulford, John Freebody,
S. Foley; James Freeman, Thomas Frost, Geo. Fieldhouse,
Francis Frendard, John Floyd, and J. Forster.
Robert Forrester, Wm. Forrester, John Farrell,
John Fowler, Richard Friar, John Foley, Edward Franks,
Edward Fletcher, William Flynn, Thomas Francis, jun.,
Patrick Flynn, Peter Fitzpatrick, John Ferguson, J. Golledge,
Wm. Guise, J. Galvin, Jas. Gooding, jun., James Goddard, Benjamin Grimshaw,
P. Garey, J. Grono, George Graves, James Greenslade,
J. Grant, Mich. Geary, Robt. Gray, Henry Gaskin,
Mich. Gavagan, Robt. Garratt, Benjamin Goddard,
Wm. Gwillim, Jas. Griffiths, Dennis Green, Wm.Goodere,
Wm. Galvin, Dennis Guinny, John Glade, Val. Goodwin, Richard Guise,
J. Goodwin, Thomas Galvin, Thos. Gilbert, J. Gosport, Joseph Gosport,
J. Gardner, Joseph Gilbert, Isaac Gorrick, John Higgins, George Howe,
J. Howe, Wm. Holmes, Wm. Hayes, Wm. Hardman, Joseph Hately,
Pat. Harper, Francis Hainsworth, William Hearn, Henry Howell,
Mich. Hogan, Richard Haviland, Philip Hogan, J. Harris, J. Harris,
William Hawkins, John Hanabus, Charles Herbert, Thomas Hinton,
Pat. Hand, Lawrence Harvey, David Horton, jun., J. Hope,
Thomas Hall, Wm. Hill, Peter Hough, Joseph Hunt, Henry Hunt,
Samuel Harding, D. Hawkins, George Hambridge, James Henry,
Maurice Hallihan, Edward Harrigan, Thomas Howell, George Hill,
Christopher Harris, Joshua Holt, Tim. Hoy, Wm. Harrington,
John Hodges, Mich. Hughes, John Hoile, Henry Hoile, Joshua Heap,
Abraham Herne, Lawrence Halfpenny, James Harper, John Herbert, jun.,
J. Hazard, Jas. Higgins. Robt. Higgins, Enoch Hutchinson,
Thos. Higgins, Peter Hibbs, jun., J. Holden, Wm. Hewitt, Edw. Hobbs,
J. Hearn, Thos. Hansey, Hugh Hughes, jun., Jas. Hall, Henry Huff,
George Hughes, J. Holt, George Higginson, Peter Hibbs, J. Holden,
Thos. Hooton, Wm. Howell, Francis R. Hume, J. Hendle, Jas. Hayden,
Jesse Hudson, David Horton, sen., Robt. Johnston, George James,
John Johnston, John Jacklin, Thomas John, George Johnstone, Wm. Jones,
Wm. Ikin, Joseph Inch, Wm. Jacklyn, Charles Ivory, Edward Jones,
Mich. Joyce, Thos. Jones, George Jubb, jun., Thos. Jones,
John Innes, John Johnson, Richard Johnson, Charles Jackson, John Joyce,
James Kay, William Klen endorlff, Pat. Kirk, John Kennedy,
Wm. Kearns, J. Keighran, Thos. Keane, J. Kirlaghan, R. Kibble,
Cornelius Keoe, Donald Kennedy, jun., John Kelly,
Joseph Lendall, Jas. Kavannagh, Duncan Kennedy,
John Kennedy, Wm. Kellow, Wm. Kenney, Thomas Kelly, Archibald Kane,
Daniel Kelly, Thomas Kelly, D. Knowland, Thos. Kendall, James Kelly,
James Kenney, J. H. Lawson, Walker Lawry, William Lilly,
Francis Lawless, Samuel Leverton, Henry Lendon.
J. Holmes, J. Lynch, Samuel Leverton, jun. Jas. Lewis,
Richard Lillis, Thos. Lawrence, J. Leadbeater, sen.
J. Larken, Peter Lawry, George Lilley, James Lyons,
Wm. Landron, Miles Leary, John Lavis, James Layton,
Nicholas Lacy, William Lees, Peter Lillis,
Elijah Lane, Wm. Lawrence, J. Lapish, Mich. Lamb,
J. Lees, J. Lacey, Owen Lenaghan, John Longford,
Wm. Lovegrove, H. Lamb, J. Lyons, Hannibal M'Arthur,
James M'Arthur, William M'Arthur, Charles M'Arthur, Andrew M'Dougal,
J. M'Henry, Henry Marr, Wm. Minchin, William Mobbs, J. Mobbs,
George Mobbs, Isaac Mobbs, J. M'Loughlin, Fred. Meurant,
Joseph Meyrick, Tristram Moore, Cornelius M'Arthy,
P.Moore, Pat. Mernan, J. Madden, Mich. Maloney,
Wm. Morgan, John Mills, Jas. M'Arty, jun.
Thomas Martin, jun. Jas. M'Arty, J. Mackey, Thos. Miller,
Christopher M'Guire, Thos Mortimer, J. May, Pat. Mason, Pat. Moore,
Thos. Maloney, Jas. M'Guire, Matthias Miller, Jas. M'Arty.
John M'Arty, William Makepiece, Thos. Moran, Fred. Murphy,
Patrick Mulhall, Thos. M'Caffery, George Maginnis, Edw. Merrick,
Thos. M'Kenna, Robert Maxwell, Henry M'Allister, James M'Manis,
John Murphy, George Marley, Kennedy Murphy, Patrick M'Hall,
George Murphy, Thos. Mustagh, Owen Martin, jun. George Mortimer,
Thos Murray, Charles M'Carty, William Mobbs jun. Jas. Mosely,
H. Morton, J. Merzagora, J. M'Peake, Isaac Mills, Jas. Macdonald,
Jas. Milson, Dennis M'Neary, Jas. M'Aloney, Brian M'Cormic,
John Moss Wm. Mannix, Michael Macdonald, John M'Donald, Joseph Mason,
John. M'Guigan, Joseph Mackinley, Thos. M'Guire, Jas. Marshall,
Thomas Moakson, Andrew' M'Dougall, Jame M'Dougall, J. M'Dougall,
J. Moss, Alexander M'Guigan, Patrick Mahar, Thomas McVitie,
Simon Moulds, Edward Meurant, jun, J. Matthews, Robt. Marshall,
William M'Haslan, Alexander M'Donald, Hugh M'Avoy,
J. Murphy, Mich. Minton, Jas. M'Donald, Patrick
Naughton, Richard Norris, J. Nash, Thomas Nugent,
Thos. Newman, Andrew Nash, Jas. Nugent, James Nowlan,
William Newport, John Norris, John Nowland, George Nash. J. Neil,
J. Nicholds, Walter Noy, F. O'Meara, J. O'Meara, p. Oakes,
James O'Brian, Charles O'Brien, James Owen, Thomas Owens, William Osburne,
Samuel Owen, James O'Harra, William Olds, Mark Opong,
Brien O'Brien, Wm. Oliver, Joseph Onus, Terence O'Brien,
Chas. Pennon, G. T. Palmer, George Panton,
Wm. Pithers, Mr. Parmeter, J. Price, Wm. Parkins
F. Pendergrast, J. Pike, J. Pike, Morgan Poor, N. Payton,
J. Pitcher, Saml. Paine, Wm. Page, John J. Peacock,
Robt. Plumb, J. Patfield, Thos. Prentice, J. Phillips,
Mich. Parker, George Pinkerton, F. Peisley,
George Phillips, J Pendergrast, Wm. Paris, J. Pye,jun.
Wm. Pritchard, Daniel Pegg, Saml. Perkins George Plummer,
H. Pullen, R. Partridge, Joseph Pashley, Mich. Power, J Pugh,
Deison Post, Tim Poor, F. Piper, Wm. Piper, H. Paul, J. Pender,
Jas. Pender, Edwin Rouse, Edw. Riley, Thos. Rose, Edw. Redmond,
J. Robinson, Chas. Rushton, John Riley, Malachi Ryan, Thos Riley,
J. Ready, J. Redmond, Wm. Reynolds, J. Ross, Barnabas Rix,
Wm Rafter, Mark Russell, Wm. Rose, Wm. Roberts, Joseph Rye, jun.
Mich. Rourke, Alex. Routledge, J. Riley, Nich. Ryan,
Wm. Rixon, Robt. Ray, Owen Riley, Thos. Rudd, J. Rudd,
Moses Rosetta, H. Rose, J. Roberts, Jas. Roberts, J. Ruby,
J.Robb, Edw. Redfern, Wm. Radley, Wm. Redfern, J. Rentwell,
Richard Ruff. H. Rochester, Barnabas Rix, Chas. Smith, Wm. Smith.
Mich. Stack, Jas. Stack, Jas. Shepherd, sen. G. Smith,
Wm. Scott, Jas. Shepherd, jun. F. Spencer, Andrew Scott,
J. Sunderland, Martin Sweeney, Dennis Shield,
Dan. Smallwood, George Sewell, Edw. Stinton, Jos. Smith,
H. Styles, Jas. Smithers, Wm. Skinn, Joseph Smith, jun. Wm. Smith,
Wm. Stenson, Jas. Smith, Edw. Shipley, Wm. Speers, Hugh Scott,
W. Scott, Wm. Smith, J. Smith, Jas. Smallwood, Roger Shea,
J. Scully, J. Stone, Thos. Stevens, Jos. Stubbs, Jas. Speers,
Wm. Stubbs, Wm Simms, Thos. Stone, Thos. Stack, Jos. Smith, Jas. Smith,
F. Stafford, James Smith, Dennis Stacey, Chas, Summerell, Stephen Smith,
J. Smith, Edw. Stowers, Daniel Step, Thos. Smith, Dan. Sweeney,
Thos. Sanders, jun. J. Smith, J. Stanbury, jun.
Robt. Smith, George Scott, Murty Shields, Wm. Sherries,
J. Sewell, Wm. Stabler, Chas. Throsby, jun.
Robt. Turnbull, Chas. Thompson, Wm. Tuckwell, J. Tindell,
J. Tarlington, Edw. Tompson, J. Turnbull, Jas. Thompson,
Chas. Thomas, Bishop Thompson, Thos. Thompson, J.Tague, J.Taylor,
H. Fretheway, Jas. Toucher, S. Tuckman, Chas. Tunks, H. Thorn, jun.
J. Thorm, jun. Jos. Tuzo, Jean Francois Theon,
J. Town, Jas. Turner, Wm Thorn, jun. Jas. Thomas,
D.Thompson, J. Taylor, Thos. Trotter, Jas. Turner,
George Tuckwell, Wm. Tyson, Philip Tully, George
Trace, Owen Tierney, Wm. Tompson, Thos. Turner,
James Vaughan, J. Vardy, R. Virgin, Thos. Vardy, J.Voildes,
Thos. Upton, Edw. Wollstonecraft, Wm.Walker,
George Woodhouse, G. P. Wood, George Ward, J. Whalan,
Wm. Welsh, Thos. Woolley, J.Williams, Edmund Wright,
Robt. Wilkinson, Daniel Wellings, J. Wright, J. Walker,
Jas. Williams, Wm. Wright, Chas. Wilson, Thos. Warner, P. Workman
Aaron Walkers, Job Wilson, Wm. Williams, Robert Wells, Thos. Wilson,
Thos. Wood, J. K. Williamson J. D. Wood, Wm. White, Chas. Watson,
J. Williams, Jas. Walbourn, J,. Weevers, Chris. Ward, H. Wells,
Wm. Walker, J. Warby, J. Warby, jun. J. Wood, James Wright.
Wm. White, Wm. Wakeman, James Whalan, James Were, J. Wright,
William Wall, Joseph Walker and Charles Yorke.


SOURCES:
The Sydney Gazette
(NSW : 1803 - 1842)
Saturday 28 April 1821
P.1
Saturday 5 May 1821
P.2
Saturday 12 May 1821
P.2
transcription, janilye
2012

Land Grants for 1820


Licensed Publicans Hawkesbury District 1834-1837

The following is a correct list of licensed publicans,
compiled from the records of persons holding licenses
in the Hawkesbury District of New South Wales:

RICHMOND
General Darling (Upper Richmond), Robert Aull 1789-1817
Union Inn, Thomas Eather 1800-1886
Plough. Thomas Mortimer xxxx-1875
Welcome Inn, Christopher Moniz 1809-1865
Packhorse, (Ferry), Thomas Parnell 1765-1853
Black Horse, Paul Randall 1752-1834
Woolpack, (North Richmond), John Town junr. 1806-1883
George the 4th, John Town, senr. 1769-1846

RICHMOND ROAD
Bird-in-Hand, William Thomas Bayliss 1794-1849
Settlers' Hall (Windsor), Richard Lynch
Governor's Arms, (Windsor), Alfred Smith

PITT TOWN
Macquarie Arms, William Johnstone
Bird-in-Hand, Daniel Smallwood 1761-1839

WINDSOR-ROAD
Bird-in-Hand, Hugh Kelly 1770-1835
Lamb and Lark, John Pye 1809-1892
George and Dragon, John Cobcroft 1797-1881
Union Inn, James Connolly
Steam Packet, Joseph Fleming
Cottage of Content, Anne Leeson.

WINDSOR
Australian, Henry Beasley
White Heart, John Baker
Currency Lass, Thomas Cullen
Windsor Hotel, William Cross
Red Lion, Mary Dargin 1798-1881 nee Howe
St. Patrick, Joseph Delandre 1799-1853
Cross Keys, Daniel Dickens 1792-1852
White Swan, George Freeman 1806-1867
Currency Lad, Charles Gaundry
William the 4th, Thomas Greaves
King's Arms, Andrew Johnstone.
Plough, Edward Robinson
Barley Mow, Robert Smith.

Upper Nelson
White Heart, Daniel Coulton xxx-1864

Wollombi
Travellers' Inn, John Eaton 1811-1904

Blacktown
Macquarie Arms, James Roberts 1805-1874

Lower Branch Hawkesbury
Industrious Settler, Aaron Walters

Prospect
Fox under the Hill, Francis Peisler
King's Head, Adam Taylor.

Source:
Windsor and Richmond Gazette
Transcription, janilye


The Photograph below taken in 1908 is The Black Horse Hotel. The licence was first issued on 15 February 1819 to Paul Randall to keep an inn at his dwelling. For many years the sign of the black horse in full gallop announced its services.
This sign is now on exhibition in the Hawkesbury Historical Society's Museum at Windsor, New South Wales.
It closed in 1927 when the licence was transferred to the Kurrajong Heights Hotel.


2 comment(s), latest 3 years, 11 months ago

St Matthew's Catholic Burial Register 1845 - 1854

S/name. F/names. Abode. deathdate. burialdate. Age. Ship. Occupation. Clergyman.

247 Bourke John Windsor 9 Jan 1845 40 Labourer Thos Slattery
248 Fitzgerald Michl Windsor 23 Jan 1845 67 Pauper Thos Slattery
249 Pendergast Mary Cornwallis 16 Feb 1845 10 weeks Native of the Colony Thos Slattery
250 Breach George Windsor 20 Feb 1845 12 months Native of the Colony John Kenny
251 White James Richmond 21 Mar 1845 50 Farmer Thos Slattery
252 Turner Ann Wilberforce 26 Mar 1845 42 John Kenny
253 Cullen Edward Vinegar Hill 4 Apr 1845 Farmer Thos Slattery
254 Norris James Cornwallis 10 May 1845 5 Native of the Colony Thos Slattery
255 Dempsey John Richmond 11 May 1845 69 Farmer Thos Slattery
256 Slater or Donohoe Mary Clarendon 11 May 1845 22 Margaret 2 Servant Thos Slattery
257 Fogerty Michl Currajong 24 May 1845 37 Labourer Thos Slattery
258 Kenna Patk Currajong 30 May 1845 80 Tilly Sherry Labourer Thos Slattery
259 Kough William Windsor 8 Jun 1845 Labourer Thos Slattery
260 Tighe Anne Windsor 4 Jul 1845 58 Elizabeth Servant Thos Slattery
261 Holt William Currajong 15 Jul 1845 14 weeks Native of the Colony Thos Slattery
262 Collins Patrick Wollombi 31 Jul 1845 5 Native of the Colony John Kenny
263 Pendergast John Windsor 30 Nov 1845 37 Native of the Colony Mr McGrath
264 Brady Thomas Windsor 17 Jan 1846 58 Native of Ireland Mr McGrath
265 Fitzpatrick James Penrith 4 Apr 1846 7 Mr McGrath
266 Fitzpatrick Mary Windsor 14 Apr 1846 15 weeks Mr McGrath
267 McGoven Peter Wilberforce ? 15 Apr 1846 26 Captain Cook Mr McGrath
268 Gaham or Graham Hugh Freemans Reach 13 May 1846 51 Mr McGrath
269 Darey or Doney Thomas Freemans Reach 14 Jul 1846 41 Mr McGrath
270 Davies Mathew Poor House 28 Jul 1846 70 Mr McGrath
271 Keating G Poor House 14 Aug 1846 67 Mr McGrath
272 Foley Catherine Poor House 19 Aug 1846 35 Mr McGrath
273 O'Donnell Patk Poor House 23 Aug 1846 80 Mr McGrath
274 Perkins ? Windsor 18 Oct 1846 43 Mr McGrath
275 Byrne Patk Windsor 15 Nov 1846 32 Mr McGrath
276 Humphreys Ann Wilberforce 18 Nov 1846 6 Mr McGrath
277 Walsh Ann Windsor 28 Jan 1847 58 Mr McGrath
278 Connor Charles Asylum 10 Feb 1847 50 Mr McGrath
279 Cassidy James Windsor 30 Apr 1847 54 Schoolmaster Mr McGrath
280 Curran Mrs Rebecca Richmond 19 May 1847 19
281 Cusack Patrick Windsor 23 Aug 1847 32 Labourer John Joseph Therry
282 Dormer John Windsor 11 Sep 1847 His body was found in the Hawkesbury River How he came by his death the Coroners Jury could not obtain evidence John Joseph Therry
283 Kennedy Patrick Asylum 17 Sep 1847 63 John Joseph Therry
284 Smith Ann Asylum 13 Oct 1847 48 John Joseph Therry
285 Daley Patrick Richmond 25 Oct 1847 28 John Joseph Therry
286 Riley Mary Ann Richmond 12 Nov 1847 20 months John Joseph Therry
287 O'Brien Michael Windsor 12 Nov 1847 one day John Joseph Therry
288 Power or Poore Mary Ann Clarendon 23 Nov 1847 eleven days John Joseph Therry
289 Collins Thomas Windsor late of Wiseman's establishment at Windsor Hospital 24 Nov 1847 about 46 Herdsman John Joseph Therry
290 Maguire Edward McDonald River, died in Windsor Hospital 21 Dec 1847 66 Labourer John Joseph Therry
291 Riley John Cornwallis 24 Dec 1847 78 Labourer John Joseph Therry
292 Cuffe Farrell Richmond 5 Jan 1848 73 Schoolmaster John Joseph Therry
293 McKeon Hugh Windsor 6 Jan 1848 86 Labourer John Joseph Therry
294 Duffy James Kurrajong 13 Jan 1848 75 Farmer John Joseph Therry
295 Connor Bridget Vinegar Hill 15 Jan 1848 45 John Joseph Therry
296 Donelly Thomas Asylum Windsor 7 Feb 1848 72 Labourer John Joseph Therry
297 McDonogh Patrick North Rocks near Windsor 7 Feb 1848 62 Labourer John Joseph Therry
298 O'Grady Thomas Richmond 8 Mar 1848 22 months John Joseph Therry
299 Peible George Windsor 5 Apr 1848 4 1/2 John Joseph Therry
300 McCormick John Windsor 18 Apr 1848 40 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
301 Murphy Samuel Windsor 19 Apr 1848 41 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
302 Elliott Catherine Windsor 24 Apr 1848 63 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
303 Holmes William Windsor May 1848 46 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
304 Cullen Ellen Caddie Creek 28 May 1848 7 John Joseph Therry
305 Carthy Denis Windsor 29 May 1848 84 Pauper Asylum John Joseph Therry
306 Byrnes Patrick Cornwallis 6 Jun 1848 77 Farmer John Joseph Therry
307 Connelly James Windsor 8 Jun 1848 69 Atlas Shepherd John Joseph Therry
308 Carney Rebecca Eastern Creek 7 Jul 1848 84 Atlas Farmer Rev M Stephens
309 Kean Charles Windsor 22 Jul 1848 82 Pauper Asylum Rev E Luckie
310 Kelly James Lakeville 23 Jul 1848 75 Farmer Rev E Luckie
311 Landres James Richmond Aug 1848 88 Haldo 2nd Farmer Rev E Luckie
312 Gribbon Hugh Windsor 15 Aug 1848 78 Pauper Asylum Rev E Luckie
313 Good Arthur Windsor 2 Sep 1848 57 Pauper Asylum Rev M Stephens
314 Mahan John Windsor Sep 1848 36 Shop Keeper Rev M Stephens
315 Keane Peter Kurrajong Sep 1848 30
316 Spinks John Windsor 12 Oct 1848 42 Lady Melville Bricklayer John Grant
317 Barry Thos 26 Nov 1848 61 Dafiesta 1st Pauper Asylum John Grant
318 Haleroft Mary 5 Dec 1848 35 Pyramus Pauper Asylum John Grant
319 Huston Catherine 10 Dec 1848 43 Hooghley Pauper Asylum John Grant
320 Byrnes Walter 12 Dec 1848 38 Lady Harwood John Grant
321 Lynch ? 26 Dec 1848 48 Charles Forbes John Grant
322 unreadable 10 months John Grant
323 Braywood Henry Windsor 31 Dec 1848 14 months Native child John Grant
324 Turner Anne 14 Jan 1849 51 John Grant
325 Cullen James 4 Feb 1849 40 John Grant
326 C? Maria 12 Feb 1849 40 John Grant
327 Hayward Jane 16 Feb 1849 4 days John Grant
328 Spinks Mary 4 Mar 1849 46 Asylum John Grant
329 Harper ? 22 Mar 1849 53 Unreadable John Grant
330 McKeene Mary Richmond 24 Mar 1849 60 unreadable John Grant
331 Foley John Windsor 14 Apr 1849 54 Elizabeth [3] Asylum John Grant
332 McKibbett Bridget 14 Apr 1849 61 John Grant
333 Trodden Henry 24 Apr 1849 12 days John Grant
334 Costigan William 29 Apr 1849 45 Labourer John Grant
335 Doyle George 3 Jun 1849 70 Asylum John Grant
336 Herring Thos 11 Jun 1849 50 John Grant
337 Brennan John 22 Jun 1849 66 unreadable John Grant
338 Connor Timothy Windsor 24 Jun 1849 76 Unreadable Pauper John Grant
339 Riley Patrick Windsor 1 Jul 1849 59 Unreadable John Grant
340 Clifford Fredk ? Windsor 5 Jul 1849 70 Patra John Grant
341 Coffey Isabel Windsor 10 Jul 1849 38 John Grant
342 Davis Margt Colo 10 Aug 1849 44 Fourth John Grant
343 Donohue Patrick Windsor 19 Aug 1849 49 Andromeda Pauper John Grant
344 McDonald Richd Windsor 21 Aug 1849 10 months John Grant
345 Sullivan Mary Windsor 14 Sep 1849 44 John Grant
346 Baker Margaret Richmond 15 Sep 1849 31 Isabella John Grant
347 Woods James Richmond 6 Oct 1849 8 months John Grant
348 Savage Patrick Richmond 16 Oct 1849 57 Labourer John Grant
349 Pendergast Thos Richard Pitt Town 4 Nov 1849 4 months Native of the Colony John Grant
350 Byrne Maryanne Windsor 11 Nov 1849 5 Native John Grant
351 Maguire Joseph Windsor 12 Nov 1849 2 months Native John Grant
352 *bridge or Petherbridge unreadable Windsor 18 Nov 1849 4 months Native John Grant
353 Carney Edwd Prospect 11 Dec 1849 75 Farmer John Grant
354 Connors Charlotte 14 Dec 1849 60 Maria 2nd Pauper Asylum John Grant
355 Murray Mary Kurrajong 20 Dec 1849 12 months Native of the Colony John Grant
356 Henright Jane Windsor 7 Mar 1850 6 months Native of the Colony John Grant
357 Davis William Tumbledon Barn District of Windsor 7 Mar 1850 14 days Native of the Colony John Grant
358 Colrenny Bridget Windsor 20 Mar 1850 15 Anglia John Grant
359 Rafter Catherine Windsor 7 May 1850 14 months Native of the Colony John Grant
360 Mills Mathew Richmond 17 May 1850 16 months Native of the Colony John Grant
361 Heany Mary Windsor 1 Jun 1850 40 Elizabeth House Servant John Grant
362 Keenan William Windsor 12 Jun 1850 85 Martha Pauper Asylum John Grant
363 Hefferan Patrick Wilberforce 21 Jun 1850 60 Labourer John Grant
364 McAlpin Ellen Richmond 1 Aug 1850 69 Farmer John Grant
365 Timmins Michael Yellowmanday 20 Sep 1850 42 Native of the Colony John Grant
366 Mullens James Windsor 6 Oct 1850 40 Labourer John Grant
367 Ives Mary Richmond 28 Oct 1850 50 Henry Walsh John Grant
368 Reily Francis Richmond 2 Nov 1850 63 Edward Farmer John Grant
369 Smith Henry North Rocks 16 Dec 1850 25 John Grant
370 Gardoll Anton Richmond 21 Dec 1850 12 Weeks John Grant
371 Ahearn James Windsor 25 Dec 1850 8 ? John Grant
372 Brants Mary Windsor 19 Jan 1851 7 days John Grant
373 Wright Johanna Richmond 6 Mar 1851 33 Farmer John Grant
374 Clynes John Windsor 19 Mar 1851 28 Labourer John Grant
375 Pigeon Bridget South Creek 12 Apr 1851 8
376 Mason Mary Buried at Kurrajong 4 May 1851 68
377 Ray David Richmond 10 May 1851 1
378 Redman Martin Windsor 11 May 1851 30 Ogley Pauper Rev N J Coffey
379 Neil Patrick Richmond 1 Jun 1851 37 Farmer Rev N J Coffey
380 Cormack Patrick Cornwallis 10 Jun 1851 47 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
381 Doyle William Windsor 25 Jun 1851 55 Henry Porcher Pauper Rev N J Coffey
382 Egan Michl Windsor 30 Aug 1851 34 Inn Keeper Rev N J Coffey
383 Guthrie John Wilberforce 7 Sep 1851 70 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
384 Kelly Michael Richmond 11 Sep 1851 3 Rev N J Coffey
385 Connor Roger Nepean 1 Oct 1851 77 Neptune Farmer ?
386 Lynch Thomas Windsor 8 Oct 1851 91 Farmer Rev N J Coffey
387 Doyle Bridget Windsor 9 Oct 1851 55 Elizabeth 4th Pauper Rev N J Coffey
388 Collins Thomas Windsor 18 Oct 1851 88 Ann Pauper Rev N J Coffey
389 Ray Alexander Windsor 20 Oct 1851 50 Isabella Pauper Rev N J Coffey
390 Moloney Sarah Buried at Kurrajong 13 Nov 1851 52 Rev N J Coffey
391 Callum James Pitt Town 1 Dec 1851 5 months Rev N J Coffey
392 Smith Patrick Pitt Town 8 Dec 1851 2 months Rev N J Coffey
393 Glasgow Henry Pitt Town 8 Jan 1852 9 Rev N J Coffey
394 Molloy Mary Pitt Town 21 Jan 1852 7 months Rev N J Coffey
394 Mangin Martin Windsor 30 Jan 1852 40 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
395 Fair Richard Calai Creek 1 Feb 1852 2 Rev N J Coffey
396 Heaney Thomas Windsor 4 Feb 1852 61 Pauper Rev N J Coffey
397 McCabe Catherine Buried at Kurrajong 10 Feb 1852 64 Rev N J Coffey
398 Costello Jeremiah Windsor 8 Feb 1852 67 Black Smith Rev N J Coffey
399 Harper Patrick South Creek 16 Feb 1852 72 Farmer Rev N J Coffey
400 Bullok Catherine Windsor 19 Feb 1852 32 Inn Keeper Rev N J Coffey
401 Pendergast Thomas Pitt Town 25 Feb 1852 6 months Rev N J Coffey
402 Higgens Michael Sydney 3 Mar 1852 35 Rev N J Coffey Buried at Kurrajong
403 Dunn Ellen Windsor 4 Mar 1852 72 Labourer's wife Rev N J Coffey
404 Hadden John Kurrajong 11 Mar1852 86 Labourer Rev N J Coffey
405 Sullivan Ellen Windsor 4 Apr 1852 14 months Rev N J Coffey
406 Harris Mary unreadable 22 Apr 1852
407 Maguire Thomas Cornwallis 19 May 1852 62 Farmer Rev P Hallinan
408 Ring John Windsor 20 May 1852 70 Meadicant Rev P Hallinan
409 Broderick Daniel Windsor 31 May 1852 55 Pauper Rev P Hallinan
410 Connely Patrick Cliften 21 Jun 1852 60 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
411 unreadable unreadable Vinegar Hill 13 Jul 1852 58 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
412 unreadable John Michael Windsor 16 Jul 1852 1 day Rev P Hallinan
413 O'Brien Agnes Josephine Windsor 22 Jul 1852 3 weeks Rev P Hallinan
414 Mulhern William McGraths Hill 6 Sep 1852 78 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
415 Davis Margaret South Creek Windsor 15 Sep 1852 70 Rev P Hallinan
416 Kempster James Nepean District 19 Sep 1852 2 yrs 8 mths Rev P Hallinan
417 Day Bridget Cornwallis 29 Sep 1852 55 Widow Rev P Hallinan
418 Leary Mary Windsor 6 Oct 1852 44 Pauper Rev P Hallinan
419 Davies Richd Richmond 14 Oct 1852 34 Labourer Rev P Hallinan
420 Bourke Ellen Windsor 26 Oct 1852 29 Labourer's wife Rev P Hallinan
421 Keogh Walter Windsor 28 Oct 1852 56 John Bayer? Pauper Rev P Hallinan
422 Hamilton John Windsor 12 Nov 1852 75 Rev P Hallinan
423 Sullivan Cornelius Windsor 19 Nov 1852 - Atlas Pauper Rev P Hallinan
424 Cunningham Mary Windsor 20 Nov 1852 Farmer Rev P Hallinan
425 Woods Robert Richmond 21 Nov 1852 18 months Rev P Hallinan
426 Reedy Bridget Windsor 21 Nov 1852 2 Rev P Hallinan
427 Beans Mary unreadable 26 Nov 1852 74 unreadable Rev P Hallinan
428 Hynds Charles Box Hill 1 Dec 1852 18 Farmer Rev P Hallinan
429 McCarthy Thomas Windsor 4 Dec 1852 58 Rev P Hallinan
430 Whelan John Windsor 15 Dec 1852 73 Portland Rev P Hallinan
431 Doyle Patrick Windsor 17 Dec 1852 81 Hodbro? Rev P Hallinan
432 Carthy Mary Windsor 12 Dec 1852 60 Rev P Hallinan
433 Gabon Patrick Windsor 19 Dec 1852 72 Earl of St Vincent Rev P Hallinan
434 Brennan John Windsor 1 Jan 1853 60 Atlas [3] Pauper Rev P Hallinan
435 Cunningham Robert Windsor 6 Jan 1853 30 Royal Saxon Rev P Hallinan
436 King Patrick Windsor 3 Feb 1853 74 Rev P Hallinan
437 Egan Edward Windsor 18 Feb 1853 55 Rev P Hallinan
438 Gaunt Michael Kurrajong 1 Jan 1853 2 months Rev P Hallinan
439 Finley John Windsor 14 Apr 1853 64 Pauper Rev P Hallinan
440 Moffitt Mary Windsor 16 Apr 1853 30 Rev P Hallinan
441 Murray Anne Sally's Bottoms 13 May 1853 33 Rev P Hallinan
442 Goodwin Mary Freemans Reach 15 May 1853 75 Rev P Hallinan
443 McCabe Owen Kurrajong 22 May 1853 27 Rev P Hallinan
444 Norris Mary Ann Cornwallis 27 May 1853 40 Rev P Hallinan
445 Connors Michael Windsor 22 May 1853 80 Rev P Hallinan
446 Harrison Catherine Windsor 24 May 1853 67 Rev P Hallinan
447 Hayes Mary Jane Freemans Reach 2 Jun 1853 37 Rev P Hallinan
448 Barton Stephen Cliften 2 Jun 1853 5 Rev P Hallinan
449 Byrns Peter Windsor 9 Jun 1853 10 Rev P Hallinan
450 Eather Mrs Mary Kurrajong 11 Jun 1853 50 Rev P Hallinan
451 Hanly Jane Richmond 14 Jun 1853 4 months Rev P Hallinan
452 Wayburn Bridget Pitt Town 19 Jun 1853 52 Rev P Hallinan
453 Moore William Pitt Town 21 Jun 1853 50 Rev P Hallinan
454 Read Laurence Windsor 15 Jul 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
455 Mahon Patrick Windsor 15 Jul 1853 77 Rev P Hallinan
456 Murphy John Hospital Windsor 17 Jul 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
457 unreadable Mrs Richmond 5 Aug 1853 26 Rev P Hallinan
458 Parkland Mary Windsor 3 Aug 1853 61 Rev P Hallinan
459 Moran Michael Pitt Town 13 Aug 1853 62 Rev P Hallinan
460 Norris Elizabeth Richmond Bottoms 21 Aug 1853 23 Rev P Hallinan
461 Kelly Daniel Pitt Town 3 Sep 1853 79 Rev P Hallinan
462 Gunan Michael Richmond 13 Sep 1853 55 Rev P Hallinan
463 Mellish Maria Sydney 13 Sep 1853 36 Rev P Hallinan
464 Hill Elizabeth Windsor 18 Sep 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
465 Clarke Thomas Pitt Town 22 Sep 1853 3 Rev P Hallinan
466 Gatton Thomas Windsor 2 Oct 1853 77 Rev P Hallinan
467 Riely John Penrith District 8 Oct 1853 45 Rev P Hallinan
468 Murray Thomas Sally's Bottoms 31 Oct 1853 7 Rev P Hallinan
469 Waddle Thomas Richmond 16 Nov 1853 60 Rev P Hallinan
470 Jones unreadable Windsor 17 Nov 1853 63 Rev P Hallinan
471 Slater unreadable Fairfield 22 Nov 1853 54 Rev P Hallinan
472 Sharry Mary Windsor 23 Nov 1853 19 Rev P Hallinan
473 Dockin John Richmond Bottoms 26 Nov 1853 7 Rev P Hallinan
474 Crawley John Windsor 1 Dec 1853 67 Rev P Hallinan
475 Connors Charles Box Hill 11 Dec 1853 74 Rev P Hallinan
476 Sharry Mary Ann Windsor 12 Dec 1853 1 month Rev P Hallinan
477 nil Rev P Hallinan
478 Buttersworth Bridget Pitt Town Bottoms 2 Jan 1854 26 Rev P Hallinan
479 Buttersworth Bridget Pitt Town Bottoms 12 Jan 1854 17 days Rev P Hallinan
480 Mellish Mary Sydney 26 Jan 1854 6 months Rev P Hallinan Age crossed out
481 Kilduf John Pitt Town 8 Feb 1854 60 Rev P Hallinan
482 Walsh John Windsor 7 Feb 1854 48 Rev P Hallinan
483 Brennan John Windsor 8 Feb 1854 70 Rev P Hallinan
484 Whitford Mary Windsor 18 Feb 1854 60 Rev P Hallinan
485 Power Michael Wilberforce 24 Mar 1854 63 Rev P Hallinan
486 Davies Henry Wilberforce 27 Mar 1854 53 Rev P Hallinan
487 Cavanagh Michael Windsor 10 Apr 1854 78 Rev P Hallinan
488 Pender [gast] Thomas Pitt Town 29 Apr 1854 14 months Rev P Hallinan
489 McQuade Charles Hale Windsor 29 Jun 1854 1 month Rev H Johnson
490 Kenny Anne Richmond 9 Jul 1854 77 Rev P Hallinan
491 Dempsey Denis Richmond 7 Aug 1854 62 Rev P Hallinan
492 Doyle Peter Wilberforce 12 Aug 1854 70 Rev P Hallinan
493 Riley Elizabeth Windsor 17 Sep 1854 63 Rev P Hallinan
494 Norris Michael Cornwallis 28 Sep 1854 30 Rev P Hallinan
495 Doyle Timothy Windsor 17 Oct 1854 80 Rev P Hallinan
496 Hewson Henry North Richmond 24 Oct 1854 11 Rev P Hallinan
497 Tierney Mary Windsor 5 Nov 1854 4 Rev P Hallinan
498 O'Keefe Mary Jane Windsor 13 Nov 1854 7 weeks Rev P Hallinan
499 Tait John Pitt Town 26 Nov 1854 3 Rev P Hallinan
500 Kelly John Richmond Bottoms 28 Dec 1854 2 Rev P Hallinan
501 Gahan Hugh Freemans Reach 31 Dec 1854 1yr 9 months Rev P Hallinan
502 unreadable Thomas Windsor 27 Dec 1854 80 Rev P Hallinan



Credits: Transcriptions by Kristine Wood - October 2003.

Hawkesbury Settlers Welcome Governor Macquarie 1810

There is no doubt, that the establishment of the township of Windsor, was, certainly, a notable event in the early history of New South Wales. The following article, refers to some of the circumstances relative to the foundation of that town.



The Hawkesbury River was discovered during the governorship of Captain Phillip, and the first settlement was made on its banks, in the year 1794. Up to the year 1810, the spot now occupied by the town of Windsor, was known as The Green Hills. From the time of the first settlement on the Hawkesbury, down to the arrival of Governor Macquarie in the colony, frequent floods had devastated the homes, farms, and crops of the colonists settled there. Shortly after Governor Macquarie entered upon his Government, he recognized the importance of the Hawkesbury district as "the granary of the colony," and decided, that some effort should be immediately made to protect, as far as possible, the homes, farms, and crops, of the settlers. Accordingly "in order to guard as far as human foresight could against such calamities," he decided to fix upon several sites where townships could be erected, which would be high and dry during flood time. He chose, among other places, the site upon which the town of Windsor now stands, and granted allotments of land in the newly-formed township to those settlers whose farms were so situated as to come within the influence of the waters of the Hawkesbury during an inundation.
These grants of land within the town were made an 'inseparable part' of those farms with out the town which were esposed to the ravages of the floods. Therefore, those town grants could not be disposed of or sold as separate properties.
The allotment of land given to each settler was proportioned to the size of his farm, and was given to him as a place of refuge for his family, his crops, and his stock; and he was expected to erect thereon a house, a corn yard, and a stockyard. It was decreed that those persons who thus obtained land under the foregoing provisions should build their houses either of brick or weatherboard ; and it was also necessary that every house so built should have a brick chimney and a shingle roof. No house was to be built lower than nine feet high, and each settler had to lodge a plan of his building with the district constable. To give the settlers in the vicinity some place of refuge during flood time, therefore, was the direct cause of the establishment of the town of Windsor
The Hawkesbury settlers from time immemorial have always been loyal subjects.
Even so far back as Governor Bligh's time, when the military deposed Bligh, the Hawkesbury settlers, almost to a man, remained loyal to him.
Bligh stated at the trial of Major Johnston, in England, that had he been able to escape from Sydney to the Hawkesbury, he would have been safe from the attacks of his enemies.
It was natural that after the appointment of a new Governor (Macquarie), the Hawkesbury settlers should exhibit the same loyalty to Bligh's successor, and this feeling was warmly continued throughout the long period of Macquarie's governorship,

The following is from the records, and whilst exhibiting loyalty, at the same time shows
the high opinion the settlers had of William Cox, the founder of the well-known family of that name, and, what is still more interesting, gives the names of the pioneer Hawkesbury settlers who helped to develop the resources, not only of this grand district, but of the then unknown interior.
Many, of their names are familiar to us, and descendents of some are still with us.
Quite an interesting chapter could be written of these old identities would time and space permit.
However, it is interesting to keep a record of the names of these pioneers who first, with axe and fire, prepared the way for agriculture, making the Hawkesbury the first granary of the colony, from which all its food supplies came.

It should. be remembered that only 16 years prior to the address being handed Macquarie,
Governor Phillip had placed the first Hawkesbury settlers - 22 in number on the banks of the Hawkesbury and at the mouth of South Creek.

Strange to say, none of the first settlers' names appear on the address.

HAWKESBURY SETTLERS' ADDRESS.

The following address from the settlers of the Hawkesbnry was presented on the
1st instant (Dec. 1810) to His Excellency the Governor Macquarie at Windsor (formerly the Green Hills),
by Thomas Arndell, Esq.

"1st December, 1810.
We, the undersigned settlers, residents of the Hawkesbuiy and its. vicinity, beg
leave respectfully to congratulate your Excellency on your arrival at this settlement,
and earnestly hope your Excellency will be pleased with the agricultural improvements and
industry that prevails here, and trust that the continuance of our exertions
Will ever merit your Excellency's approbation. We also beg leave to return our unfeigned thanks
for your Excellency's recent appointment of William Cox, Esq., as a magistrate at this
place-a gentleman who for many years has resided among us, possessing our esteem and confidence,
who, from his local knowledge of this settlement, combined with his many other good qualities,
will, we are convinced, promote your Excellency's benign intention of distributing justice and
happiness to all.

-Thomas Arndell,Thomas Hobby, Benjamin Carver, George Hall, Lawrence May, Robert Masters,
James Richards, Henry Baldwin, Paul Bushell, Robert Farlow, William Baker, John Yoel,
Thos. Matcham Pitt, James Blackman, John Merritt, John Cobcroft, John Gregory, Richard Norris,
William Heydon, Thomas Hampson, Daniel McKay, Daniel Fane, John Lyoner, Henry Murray,
John Jones, James Milaman, R. Fitzgerald, John Stevenson, Robert Wilson, Jonathan Griffiths,
Elizabeth Earl, G. Evans, John Bowman, Hugh Devlin, John Watts, William Eaton, David Bell,
James Welsh, Patrick Closhel, William Carlisle, Thomas Gordon, Caleb Wilson, Thomas Markwell,
Thomas Winston, William Baxter, Thomas Hagger, John Baylis, Donald Kennedy, Patrick Murphy,
Owen Tierney, William Shaw, John Dight, Roger Connor, Matthew Lock, Edward Pugh, William Small,
James Wall, William Faithful, William Simpson, Thomas Arkell, Charles Palmer, Thomas Weyham,
Elias Bishop, Thomas Spencer, Joseph McCoulding, Benjamin Baits, John Ryan. Robert Smith,
Paul Randall, John Wild, Benjamin South, William Etrel, Henry Lamb, Martin Mentz, Robert Guy,
John Harris, Thomas Cheshire, Stephen Smith, Thomas Lambley, Edward Field, Rowland Edwards,
George Collis, James Portsmouth, Pierce Collett, Jacob Russell, Thomas Appledore, William Dye,
R. Carr, John Leese, Thomas Cowling, John Embrey, John Benson, John Boulton, William Ezzy.


To which His Excellency, in a letter, on 5th December, 1810, was pleased to make the following answer.

Sir,-I beg you will make known to those respectable settlers of the Hawkesbury who signed the
address presented by you to me that I am much pleased with the sentiments it conveys,
and to assure them that it will always be an object of the greatest interest to me to promote
their prosperity by every means in my power. With this view I have fixed on ground for your
different townships (Windsor, Richmond, Wilberforce, Pitt Town) for the accommodation of
the settlers who have suffered so severely by the floods of the river; and by a
speedy removal to those situations of security, I hope they will enjoy the fruits
of that labor which, I am happy to observe, promises this season to be rewarded;
with one of the finest crops I ever beheld in any country.
I hope on my return to this part of the colony to find the new habitations built on an
improved and enlarged plan to those hitherto erected on the banks of the Hawkesbury.
I am very glad to find that my appointment of Mr.Cox has met with the satisfaction of
the settlers, and I have every reason to believe that he will fulfil the duties of his
office so as to gain the goodwill of all.
-I have, etc.,
LACHLAN MACQUARIE.

Macquarie foresaw shortly after his arrival in the colony, that it was immediately necessary to assist the settlers to ensure regular supplies of food; it was a fortunate thing for Australia that they were assisted and encouraged by him at that period, for as the Hawkesbury district was the ' granary of the colony,' it is morally certain, that the destruction, by floods, of homes and farms, stocks and crops, would have precipitated famines, similar in nature, to that experienced at Port Jackson in 1792. The recurrence, of these famines must have impeded the progress of the colony. If, then, the progress of the colony had, at that time, been retarded, the opening up of Australia would never have proceeded so rapidly as it did. Therefore, in referring to the first days of Windsor, it will be seen, that the circumstances surrounding its foundation, not only proves Macquarie a prudent man, but also shows us that the Hawkesbury settlers, by supplying the colony with the means of its existence food helped very materially to promote the rapid growth of English colonization in Australia.




NOTE:
William Cox was appointed Magistrate after the death of Andrew Thompson.

Sources:
Yeldap
Frank J. Brewer,1905
Windsor and Richmond Gazette
Windsor, NSW :1902-1945)
Friday 16 October 1903 Page 9
Transcription, Janilye, 2012


Henry Charles Eather 1849-1942

Henry Charles, the eldest son of Charles EATHER 1827-1891 and his first wife Eliza nee HOUGH 1825-1870 was born at Richmond on 8 June 1849 and spent his childhood there. According to his obituary, he went to the Narrabri district when he was 16, about 1865, however, his younger brother, my great grandfather Alfred McAlpin was born at 'Henriendi', Narrabri in 1863, so, it is more likely that he went to Narrabri about 1862 when he was thirteen and the family moved from Richmond to the Liverpool Plains. He spent his teenage years on 'Henriendi' and learnt the skills of a stockman. After his father's bankruptcy in 1871, he was placed in charge of 'Henriendi', as well as neighbouring 'Pinegolba' and 'Gumanally'.

In 1876, the year that 'Henriendi' passed into the hands of John Kerr CLARK, Henry Charles and his brother Edwin were leasing 'Norfolk', a property of 40,000 acres (16,000 hectares)to the south of Narrabri on Jock's Creek.

On 23 May 1877 at Narrabri, Henry Charles married Lucina Sarah RIDGE 1857-1936, a younger sister of his stepmother. Martha May RIDGE 1843-1920

In 1878 Henry Charles was listed in the electoral roll as being a leaseholder of 'Norfolk' and a resident of 'Henriendi'. It appears that he was working either full time or part time for John Kerr CLARK, who, at that time was living in Tasmania.

In the early 1880s Henry Charles had a butcher shop at Tullamulla near Boggabri. By the year 1883 he was in financial difficulties (not necessarily related to the butcher shop). The insolvency index in the New South Wales Archives lists him as being in Insolvency Court on 2 April 1883.

Henry Charles and his wife Lucina had a family of five sons and two daughters. One son died in infancy.

By 1925 Henry Charles and his wife Lucina were separated and Henry Charles was living with his son Leslie Gordon 1884-1969 and his wife Ivy Josephine nee Kelly 1889-1971, who owned a large poultry farm at Wetherill Park near Smithfield in New South Wales.

Lucina spent her later years in Sydney and died there in 1936.

Henry Charles died on 2 September 1942 at the age of 93. His eldest and youngest sons had both pre-deceased him.


Eather Family History - Thomas Eather 1764-1827

The Voyage
When the first HEATHER's had settled at Chislehurst, the civil war had been raging in England, with Charles I and the Royalists battling against Cromwell and the Roundheads. By the time the fourth Robert Heather died in 1780, a hundred and forty years had passed. The Commonwealth had come and gone. The restoration which followed had seen the return of the Stuarts who in turn gave way to the House of Hanover. Wars had been fought in Europe and America and the American war of independence was currently in progress. Times had changed and people tended to travel more.

Thomas HEATHER reached adulthood and found employment as a labourer at Chilsehurst, the birthplace of three of his forefathers.

We do not know when or where Robert & Thomas's mother Elizabeth died, but if she was alive in 1787 she must have been appalled by the events which overtook the family. Younger son Thomas, then twenty three years of age and working at Chislehurst, was arrested in October 1787 & held in goal to answer a charge of having robbed a man of money and possessions. Five months later, on 17 March 1788, when the home circuit held it's next sitting at Maidstone, Thomas HEATHER appeared before the judge & jury. He defended himself as well as he was able without the assistance of any legal adviser, but was found guilty of the charges of having robbed one George COTTON of a silver watch and fifty shillings in a field near the Kings highway. He was sentenced to be hanged. On 18 April 1788 the Justices of the Assizes at Whitehall in London reviewed the sentences of the Home Circuit, and Thomas HEATHER was one of those who had their death sentences commuted to fourteen years transportation to a penal settlement beyond the seas.

Thomas spent the first two years of his sentence in goals in England. The first 14 months were probably spent in goal at Maidstone, where most Kent convicts were confined.

In May 1789, Thomas was moved from Maidstone goal to one of the hulks on the Thames river near Gravesend. These hulks were derelict ships tied up in the river to house prisoners who toiled in the nearby dockyards. About mid November, he was transferred to the ship NEPTUNE , the transport ship aboard which he was to make the voyage to New South Wales.

The ship "Neptune" was a vessel of 792 tons which had been built on the Thames in 1779. It was a three-masted, square rigged wooden ship, and was twice as large as any previous convict transport. On 14 November 1789, it left it's anchorage at Longreach and moved down the Thames to Gravesend. Three days later, with it's consignment of convicts on board it sailed for The Downs, the roadstead about five miles North-East of Dover. The part of the ship set up as the Convict's prison was the Orlop deck, the lowest on the vessel, well below waterline, so they had no portholes, no view of the outside world, and very poor ventilation.

There were four rows of one-storey high cabins, each about four feet square, two rows being on each side of the ship from the mainmast forwards, and two shorter rows amidships. Into these cabins no fewer than 424 male and 78 female convicts were crowded.

The appalling conditions under which these convicts were forced to live can be better appreciated when it is remembered that, immediately they had come on board, all convicts had been placed in leg-irons and these were not removed throughout the entire voyage. Into each of these tiny cabins were crowded four to six persons, chained in pairs.

Chained below, Thomas HEATHER would not have been able to take in the scenery as the ship "Neptune" had moved out of the Thames and come to anchor at The Downs, there to spend four days while stores and equipment were taken of board. Then anchors were weighed and the vessel left for Plymouth, a slow voyage which took six days after the ship overshot that port and the error wasn't detected until she was off The Lizard, from where a retreat was made back up The Channel. At Plymouth a series of disputes arose, involving the military, the contractors and the captain of the ship "Neptune". Amongst the military was Captain John MACARTHUR who was on his way out to the Colony for duty there. Accompanying him was his wife, Elizabeth, who kept a diary of events during the voyage. A feature of the dispute was a formal duel between MACARTHUR and Captain GILBERT of the ship "Neptune". As a result of the duel Captain GILBERT was replaced by Captain TRAILL, of whom Mrs MACARTHUR wrote prophetically that "His character was of a much blacker dye than was even in Mr GILBERT's nature to exhibit".

The ship "Neptune" stayed at Plymouth until 10 December and then sailed back along the coast to Portsmouth where it anchored in Stoke's Bay on the 13th. There she met up with two other vessels of the Second Fleet, the "Surprize" and the "Scarborough". The convicts endured the cold weather for twenty-four days before the West winds abated and allowed her to sail on 5 January 1790. She anchored at Spithead until the 8th, but then the winds proved "Faithless" and the vessel arrived back at Mother Bank on the 15th.

At last, on Sunday 17 January 1790, more than two months after leaving The Thames, the ship "Neptune" left Portsmouth and moved down the English Channel. In chains below, Thomas HEATHER would not have had the opportunity to gaze for one last time upon the land of his birth. The voyage was really under way and the convicts became well aware of this fact two days later when they crossed the Bay of Biscay. The sea was so rough that Mrs MACARTHUR recorded in her diary, "It could not be persuaded that the ship could possibly long resist the violence of the sea which was mountain high".

After a month or so the MACARTHUR's succeeded in being transferred to the ship "Scarborough" after they had had a series of disputes withe John's superior, Captain NEPEAN. Captain TRAILL might have been relieved to see them go. The voyage was nothing new to Donald TRAILL. He had been First Mate on the ship "Lady Penrhyn", one of the transports of the First Fleet. Apparently he had learned a few tricks from his earlier experiences.

Historical records indicate clearly that he deliberately starved the convicts on the ship "Neptune" so that he could draw extra rations for himself, and in addition, enrich himself by disposing of surplus rations on the foreign market at ports of call. One convict wrote later to his parents, "we were chained two and two together and confined in the hold during the whole course of our long voyage, without as much as one refreshing breeze to fan our langous cheeks. In this melancholy situation we were scarcely allowed a sufficient quantity of victuals to keep us alive, and scarcely any water".

Sickness was prevalent right from the beginning of the voyage. Heavily ironed and without adequate access to fresh air and sunlight; inadequately fed and without sufficient bedding for warmth at night, the convicts soon began to succumb to the ordeal of their conditions. By the time the ordeal of the cold weather was over they found that they were faced with another which was just as trying - the heat and humidity of the tropics as the ship "Neptune" crossed the Equator and continued south down the coast of Africa. By the time The Cape of Good Hope was reached after 87 days, no fewer than 46 of the convicts had died. Anchoring in False Bay at Capetown on 14 April, the ship "Neptune" stayed for fifteen days, taking on board food, water, a large number of cattle, sheep and pigs, and also twelve convicts from the ill-fated ship "Guardian".

The HMS "Guardian" had been dispatched with supplies for the infant colony of New South Wales in response to an urgent plea sent home by Governor PHILIP with the last returning vessel of the First Fleet. Unfortunately, after the ship "Guardian" had left Capetown on its voyage eastwards, the skipper, Lieutenant RIOU, had taken it too far to the south in his quest for the Roaring Forties, and the ship had run into an iceberg. Two months later RIOU had brought his crippled vessel back into the port at Capetown. The mishap had played a large part in the food shortages which Sydney Town suffered in 1790.

After its stay at Capetown, the ship "Neptune" departed on 29 April to commence its run across to Van Diemen's Land. The existence of the strait we now know as Bass Strait was unknown at that time, so all vessels heading out to Sydney Town via Cape of Good Hope sailed around the south of Van Diemen's Land. More deaths occurred amongst the convicts on board during this leg of the voyage, and while the ship "Neptune" beat its way up the east coast of New South Wales. By the time the ship made its way up Sydney Harbour and dropped anchor in Sydney Cove on 28 June 1790, it had built up the worst record of all convict ships of all time. In all it had lost 147 male and 11 female convicts, and upon its arrival landed 269 others who were sick.

Into Sydney Cove on the same day as the ship "Neptune" arrived, came also the ship "Scarborough". The ship "Surprize" had arrived two days previously. Fortunately the convicts on those ships had fared much better than had the unfortunate souls on the ship "Neptune". The arrival of the Second Fleet was a source of interest for those already in the colony, and many were attracted to the shore to take in the scene. What they observed as the prisoners disembarked was a shocking spectacle. Great numbers of those who came off the ship "Neptune" were not able to walk, or even move a hand of foot. These were slung over the ship's side in the same manner as a box would be slung over. Some fainted as soon as they came out into the open air. Some dropped dead on the deck, while others died in the boat before they reached the shore. Once on the shore some could not stand or walk, or even stir themselves. Some were lead by others and some crept upon hands and knees. All were shockingly filthy, with their heads, bodies, clothes and blankets full of filth and lice.

Somewhere amongst those who came ashore was Thomas HEATHER. It was a scene which he undoubtedly remembered for the remainder of his life. Whether he was one of the sick we do not know, but if he was he soon recovered. He had arrived in a settlement which was so short of food that the hours of public work had recently been shortened, and even the soldiers had pleaded loss of strength. Amongst those who witnessed the shocking spectacle down at the shore that day was Governor PHILIP himself. Not surprisingly, he ordered that an inquiry be held into the conditions on the ship "Neptune".

Thomas HEATHER arrived in the colony when the settlement at Sydney was 2 years old. A second settlement was also being developed on a tract of land at the head of the harbour, and ground prepared for sowing corn. The farm so established became known as Rose Hill. By June 1790 Rose Hill had a population of 200, and in the following month a town was laid out there under the Governors instructions. During that first year that Thomas spent in the colony, many convicts were transferred from Sydney to Rose Hill. It is most likely that Thomas was one of those at the new town before 1790 was out.

The following, is a letter published in the London Morning Chronicle on the 4 August 1791 from a female convict at Sydney Cove, dated 24 July 1790.

"Oh! If you had but seen the shocking sight of the poor creatures that came out in the three ships it would make your heart bleed.
They were almost dead, very few could stand, and they were obliged to fling them as you would goods, and hoist them out of the ships, they were so feeble; and they died ten or twelve a day when they first landed.
The Governor was very angry, and scolded the captains a great deal, and, I heard, intended to write to London about it, for I heard him say it was murdering them. It, to be sure, was a melancholy sight.."



Convict Women on the Neptune
Ships of the Second Fleet

Souces;
A History of THE EATHER FAMILY:
Thomas EATHER and Elizabeth LEE
by John St PIERRE
for the EATHER Family history committee.
The Women of Botany Bay, by Portia Robinson
Australia's Second Fleet - 1790 by Jenny French
janilye

The children of Thomas and Elizabeth LEE :-

1. Ann EATHER 1793 1865
2. Robert EATHER 1795 1881
3. Charlotte EATHER 1797 1862
4. Charles EATHER 1800 1891
5' Thomas EATHER 1800 1886
6. John EATHER 1804 1888
7. Rachel EATHER 1807 1875
8. James EATHER 1811 1899


1 comment(s), latest 4 years, 6 months ago

John Eaton 1811-1904

John Eaton 1811-1904 Son of
William Eaton 1769-1858 and Jane Ison LLoyd 1770-1823
Mary Ann Onus 1813-1897 daughter of Joseph Onus 1782-1835 and Ann Elizabeth Eather 1793-1865

Not long after John Eaton married Mary Ann at St.Matthews, Windsor on the 17th of January 1831, they too moved to the Hunter River district as a prelude to more distant interests. John Eaton and his brother Daniel, rode in 1836 to the vicinity of the present town of Inverell and in the same area, closer to the modern town of Moree, Daniel Eaton established at that time his "Binniguy" run on the Gwydir river. John was spending little time at home in his restless search for land. Mary Ann had only one child between 1833 and 1837.

In 1844 the family moved to the Roseberry Run on the Richmond River and ten years later there was yet another wholesale removal, this time to "Teebar", a consolidated property of 58,000 acres, near Maryborough in Queensland. John leased Teebar from Henry Cox Corfield in 1849 and later in 1854 Corfield transfered the property to John Eaton. Henry Cox Corfield's wife Jessie, nee MURRAY 1824-1853 had died in 1853 and he was so affected he felt he could not live on the property again.

John was keen to send the family by ship to Queensland, along with the furniture and personal possessions. However, Mary Ann insisted that the family go overland with him, and family records indicate that it was just as well she did, as the vessel carrying their possessions to Wide Bay was wrecked and all their belongings lost. Life at Teebar was made very difficult by the frequent and determined onslaughts of the aborigines but the area was gradually pacified and the station extended.

John became Mayor of Maryborough in his time there while holding a position on many projects and public establishments.
In 1869 with his son-in-law, the husband of Mary Ann Elizabeth, Walter HAY, John bought a paddle Steamer named "Sir John Young". This vessel was used on the Mary River as a tug, towing loads of sugar cane to the mills.


On one of the later acquisitions, Eatonvale, in 1859, John Eaton built a palatial residence, set overlooking the Mary river. Built from home-made clay bricks and fitted with beautiful rich cedar from James Eather's farm at Dorrigo. He named the home 'Rosehill' and it came complete with ballroom, and on one occasion the Governor of Queensland stayed there when visiting Maryborough.

You can visit Rosehill and tour this beautiful homestead, and still, today in the grounds is the original well, the washouse complete with it's copper. And attached to the washhouse are 'his' and 'her' thunderboxes.

John Eaton owned many properties in the Wide Bay area, he died on 19 June 1904, at Brooweena, Queensland,Australia at age 93
His grave is close to the Teebar homestead at Brooweena in Queensland, Australia

The Brisbane Courier, Tuesday 21 June 1904
DEATH OF AN OLD RESIDENT.

Mr. John Eaton, proprietor of Teebar and other stations in this district, died at the residence of his son-in-law. Mr. R Maitland, of Westwood, on Sunday. The deceased was the oldest pioneer in the district, and was 94 years of age. He was born at Richmond Bottoms, Maitland district, New South Wales. in the year 1810, and leaves some hundreds of descendants, down to tho fifth generation.


Obituary of John Eaton

The Maryborough Chronicle - Tuesday 21st June, 1904


The duty has at last fallen upon us to record with deep regret the death of that splendid old pioneer settler of the Wide Bay district Mr. John Eaton the Squire of Teebar Station at the grand old age of 94 years. The venerable gentleman had only been ailing for a short time and died quietly and peacefully at Westwood the residence of his Son-in-law Mr. Richard Maitland on Sunday night June 19th. Mr. Eaton was in every sense of the word a splendid colonist and one that not merely the district but all Australia might well be proud of. Born at Richmond Bottoms in the Maitland district it is questionable whether any older born Australian colonists were alive at his death. As a boy he worked in Sydney and afterwards had a hard life up country, farming and cattle breeding. About 44 years ago he took up Teebar run and arrived there overland with his wife and family from New South Wales. He had resided there ever since with the exception of some time spent in Maryborough in the early sixties. During his long occupation of Teebar Mr. Eaton carried on grazing pursuits most successfully. He also invested largely in Maryborough property, and was one of the founders of the once famous Eatonvale sugar plantation and factory. In the earlier days Mr. Eaton took a most active interest in the public affairs of Maryborough. He was one of our first aldermen and was the second Mayor of the town succeeding Mr. Henry Palmer our first Mayor, who is still happily with us, in 1861 and holding office to the end of term in 1862. Our esteemed old citizen Mr. C. E. S. Booker was also a member of that first council, and now that Mr. Eaton has gone, he and Mr Palmer alone remain of the original body of aldermen who laid the municipal foundations of the town. I he present council induced Mr. Eaton a year or so ago to have his photograph taken and his portrait now adorns the gallery of past Mayors in the Municipal chamber. Mr. Eaton was a man of fine physique in his prime and enjoyed an iron constitution, hardened by a very rough bush life in his early days. For many years past he had been famed for his wonderfully sustained vitality and energy. At 90 he could go out on his horse all day and muster stock with the best of them; and even up to two years ago it was his habit to ride about and look after his affairs very keenly. His was a green and vigorous old age almost to the last. He had a family of one son and eight daughters, and at the time of his death he was the head of several hundred descendants down to Great-Great- Grand children. Of his family, Mrs. Eaton died about eleven years ago and the only son William at the same time, Two daughters, Mrs. George Walker and Mrs. Hayes also predeceased him by some years. The surviving daughters are Mrs. Thompson, Mrs. G. Thomas (Clifton), Mrs. Gordon, Mrs R. G. Gilbert, Mrs Maitland and Mrs. Ezzy most of who reside in the district and in the neighbourhood of Teebar with their children and their children's children to the fifth generation, an excellent group of settlers on the land, and primary wealth producers. We have lost from our midst a grand old man upright in all his dealings and generous to a fault. His honoured name which strangely enough is not borne by his host of descendants who are the children of his daughters, will ever be indelibly impressed upon the history of the early pioneering days and development of Maryborough and the Wide Bay District. It has been arranged that the funeral shall take place at Teebar on Wednesday afternoon - when the remains of the deceased will be laid beside those of his wife. Mr. Ammenhauser, Undertaker, is proceeding by train to Teebar tomorrow morning, taking the hearse and horses with him.

The Western Champion and General Advertiser for the Central-Western Districts, Monday 19 September 1904

THE will of the late John Eaton, of Westwood, Bompa, grazier, has been
proved at 29,998,

The Brisbane Courier, Tuesday 15 November 1904
SALE OF LAND

One of the largest attendances of people that his ever attended a public auction sale in Maryborough was witnessed on Saturday morning last at Bryant and Co's auction mart, when a number of properties in the estate of the late John Eaton of Teebar were ofiered for sale, and also some of the personal effects of the de
ceased Bidding was not spirited. Half an acre of land it the corner of Richmond
and Ellena streets opposite the Sydney Hotel on which is erected a small but cher shnop was passed in at 230. Half an acre facing Adelaide, Alice and Lennox streets was passed in at 250. The Bid well paddock at Tinana, containing over 600 acres occupied by Mycock and Son which is considered to be one of the best dairying properties in the district had 2. 5s per acre offered but the owners re quired more. A 300 acre paddock at the Two- mile in the Tinana district was bought by Mycock and Son at 14s. per acre. A 74 acre paddock at the junction of the Tinana Creek and the Mary River was bought by Mr. L. Steindl at 4 10s. per acre. Seventeen allotments in the original township of Tiaro were bought by Mr. Waracker at 20 per allotment An area of 1 acre in Owanyilla township was bought by Mr.Geo Pitt foi 1. A 112 acre paddock fronting the Mary River near Etchell's Falls was bought by Mr. Sorrensen at 18s per acre. The deceased's undivided share in selections at Calgoa sold for 25


There are no descendants named 'EATON' from John and Mary Ann EATON as his only son, William, died without issue.




The children of John and Mary Ann
Mary M Eaton 1831 1831
Ann Eaton 1833 1924 m. Richard GILES 1812-1876 2. William THOMPSON 1842-1909
Mary Ann Elizabeth Eaton 1835 1870 m. Walter HAY 1833-1907
Jane Eaton 1837 1872 m. John George WALKER 1819-1914
Elizabeth Mary Eaton 1839 1933 m. Boyce James NICHOLS 1832-1879
Susannah Eaton 1842 1937 m. Thomas CORNWELL 1837-1916
Charlotta Eaton 1844 1923 m. William Isaac INMAN 1840-1869 2. Henry GORDON 1840-1923
Infant Eaton 1846 1846
William Eaton 1847 1887 m. Julia CORNWELL 1849-1942 died without issue
Caroline Eaton 1850 1850
Martha Mary Richmond Eaton 1851 1931 m. Richard MAITLAND 1846-1923
Veronica Eaton 1854 1942 m Abraham John EZZY 1851-1921
Euphemia Eaton 1854-1939 m. Robert Grant GILBERT 1842-1900


The photograph below is Rosehill
which was taken on the occasion of the Governor's visit in the 1860s and was donated to the Maryborough Wide Bay & Burnett Historical Society by Kay Gassan


Joseph Onus 1782-1835

Joseph Onus was born in 1782 to Thomas Honess and Sarah (nee Field) at Sheerness on the Isle of Sheppey (Thames Estuary), Kent and died at Richmond NSW on 22 June1835. He is buried at St Peters, Richmond.

Joseph was a labourer aged 19 and living at Sheerness, when, early in 1801, he was arrested. At the Lent Assizes on 16 March 1801, he was tried before Judge Baron Hotham and jury, on the charge of having stolen naval stores to the value of 5 pounds 17 shillings and 11 pence. He was sentenced to be hanged by the neck until he was dead.

He was obviously granted a reprieve, duly arriving in Sydney on the "Glatton" on 11 March 1803.
On 11 March 1810 he married Ann Eather 1793-1865 and had a family of six children.
He began his farming career with 25 acres on the river flats near Richmond. He rapidly prospered, and in about 1820, he built the fine two-storied house - now called the 'farmhouse - on the north side of Francis St, Richmond.

In the early 1820's his interests spread to the Hunter Valley, and in some of his ventures he worked in partnership with his wife's brother-in-law, Robert Williams. In December 1823, he sought a pass for 40 head of cattle of this partnership to go from the Hawkesbury to Benjamin Singleton's property on the Hunter River and from there selected land on the Woolombi Brook. On 12 August 1825, Joseoph Onus received Grant No. 225 of 1550 acres of riverflat land at Bulga. Williams was also granted 1000 acres adjacent. In 1826 the partners took cattle over the Liverpool Ranges establishing the property Boorambil on Onus Creek, a tributary of the Mooki River.

In 1832, they were forced off Boorambil when the famous Australian Agricultural Company was granted 600,000 acres of prime land. They were forced to move their stock onwards.

He took up several 'runs' particularly at Wollombi and in the Hunter Valley.

Thomas Eather, assisted by Joseph Onus's head stockman, John Bazley, is understood to have taken up three runs on thr Namoi River in 1833, namely, 'Hendriendi" for himself and brothers Charles and Robert; "Boggabri" for his brother-in-law, Robert Williams; and "Theribry" for another brother-in-law, Joseph Onus.


From The Eather Newsletter March 2001 No 152 Editorial. Editor Mildred Reynolds.
The following newspaper snippet reveals that Joseph Onus and the three men he was convicted with, spent about ten weeks in Maidstone Goal, and in Joseph's case, around 15 months on a hulk in Woolwich before being transported to New South Wales.

5th June 1801: "Early on Saturday morning the following convicts were conveyed by Mr Watson from Maidstone Goal under strong guard to Woolwich, and there put on board a hulk to remain till a vessel is prepared for their transportation to New South Wales." (Kentish Gazette)

The newspaper listed 25 convicts. Four of these men were - Joseph Oness, Jacob Inness, Joshua Appleton and Thomas Gibbons. (Joseph's name also appeared in the ship's indent of convicts as Joseph Onness.)

Joseph Onus was tried on the 16th March 1801, was transported to the colony on the "Glatton," which sailed from England on the 23rd September 1802. He arrived at Port Jackson on 11th March 1803.

Maidstone Goal was also the prison, which housed the pioneer, Thomas Heather/Eather.

***
From Eather Family Newsletter dated December 2002. Editor Mildred J Reynolds.
Police District of Wee Waa - Namoi District, 16th November 1854
Cattle brands supposed to have been stolen therefrom, October last.
Mr Joseph Onus - cattle on Murran Creek Station.
JO near rump, 22 near shoulder, top off near ear.
WS near rump, 7 on near shoulder, with a hole in near ear.
TO near shoulder, 22near rump, TO on near rump and 6 near shoulder
70 pounds reward to prosecute to conviction.

The above information obtained from the Victoria Police Gazette by the editor, shows that in 1854, Joseph Onus Junior was at (or also at) Murran Creek Station. The cattle branded WS would have belonged to William Sharp - his mother's second husband and the TO would have belonged to his brother, Thomas Onus, who at that time was married to Elizabeth Eather - a daughter of Thomas Eather Junior and his wife Sarah (nee McAlpin).


Joseph Onus b:1782 in Sheerness, Kent d:22 June 1835 Richmond New South Wales
Son of Thomas Honess b:1750 and Sarah Field b:1756
Married Ann Elizabeth Eather 1793-1865 at Windsor, New South Wales, on the 11 March 1810

Produced 6 children:-

1. Elizabeth Onus b: 1 January 1811 Windsor, NSW d:23 August 1882 Richmond, NSW m. John Gordon TOWN 1806-1883 on the 17 June 1830 at Windsor. The children of this marriage were:-
John Thomas Town 18311889 Elizabeth Jessie Town 18331908
William Barker Town 18361838 William Gordon Town 18381858
Mary Ann Town 1842 1846
---
2. Mary Ann ONUS b:14 August 1813 Windsor, NSW d:19 March 1887 Maryborough, Queensland. m. John EATON 1811-1804 at Windsor on 17 January 1831. The children of this marriage were:-

Mary M Eaton 1831 1831
Charlotta Eaton 1844 1923
Baby Eaton 1846 1846
William Eaton 1847 1887
Caroline Eaton 1850 1850
Euphemia Eaton 1854 1939
Veronica Eaton 1854 1942
---

3. Susannah ONUS b:28 October 1815 Cornwallis, NSW d: 12 August 1882, 'Glen Alpin' Bulga, NSW. m.William Glas MCALPIN 1810-1902 on the 1 February 1833 at Christ Church, Castlereagh, NSW.
The children of this marriage were:-
Elizabeth McAlpin 1833 1835
Ann McAlpin 1836 1838
Peter McAlpin 1838 1838
William McAlpin 1840 1923
Susannah McAlpin 1842 1882
Sarah McAlpin 1845 1922
Joseph McAlpin 1849 1913
Mary McAlpin 1852 1915
---

4. Joseph ONUS b: 2 May 1818 Richmond, NSW and died 3 December 1895 Richmond, NSW. m.(1) Emma POWELL 1819-1865 on the 13 June 1837 at Richmond. The children of this marriage were:-
Mary Ann ONUS 1838 1861
Joseph Edward ONUS 1840 1891
Emma Susannah ONUS 1843 1931
Joseph Tertius ONUS 1844 1928
Laura Australia ONUS 1854 1855
(2) Clara HUNT 1820-?? on the 28 May 1867at Richmond had one child Linda ONUS 1869 1894
Joseph also had a relationship with Margaret SILK 1824-1884 she had one child to ONUS. Maria Emma SILK 1841 1883
---

5. Thomas ONUS b:29 April 1820 Richmond, NSW and died 28 March 1855 at Richmond, NSW. m. Elizabeth EATHER 1825-1884 on 22 August 1842 at St.Andrews Presbyterian, Windsor, NSW. The children of this marriage were:-
Ann Onus 1842 1905
Sarah Onus 1845 1910
Susannah Onus 1847 1935
Thomas Alexander Onus 1849 1934
Matilda J Onus 1852 1853
Elizabeth A Onus 1854 1855

Before his marriage Thomas ONUS had a relationship with Eliza JAMES 1819-1862 which produced a daughter Ann ONUS in 1841 hence his marriage in the Presbyterian Church after Rev. Henry STILES of the Church of England refused to marry him.
---

6. William ONUS b: 3 September 1822, Richmond, NSW and died on 8 May 1855 at Richmond, NSW. m. Ann HOUGH 1822-1889 the daughter of Peter HOUGH 1776-1833 on 1 March 1882 at Richmond, NSW.
The children of this marriage were:-
Joseph Onus 1844 1928
Elizabeth Onus 1848 1892
Emily A. Onus 1851 1907
Andrew Onus 1853 ??
---


Credit for some of the above belongs to the Eather Family Newsletter of January 1976 and September 1998.

Looking for ALFRED SANDFORD HUTCHISON MCKEE

Born 1837 Tasmania.
The second husband of Emma STAMP (nee RIDDLE)b:1837 d:1899
Married 1872 at Canterbury, Sydney, NSW
Died 16 February 1883, Burwood, Sydney

Produced 1 child Laura Jessie MCKEE b:1873 in Albury
Laura Jessie MCKEE 1873-1936. married George Thomas EATON son of William EATON 1828-1906 and Sarah EATHER 1834-1926. in 1893 at Hurstville, Sydney, NSW, Australia and lived in North Sydney until her death in 1936.